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The Diabetes Diet | Tips And Advice | Living With Diabetes

The Diabetes Diet | Tips And Advice | Living With Diabetes

Living with diabetes means developing a lifestyle that allows you to control the disease while staying active. To learn more Tips and advice Food and nutrition At the grocery store Eating properly helps keep your blood glucose (sugar) levels within target values.The dietary recommendations for people with diabetes are similar to those for the general public. Eat three balanced meals per day, plus snacks if needed. Avoid skipping meals. Stick to regular mealtimes. Meals should be spaced about 4 to 6 hours apart. Have a snack, if required, 2 to 3 hours after a meal. Eat a variety of foods from the different food groups: vegetables, fruits, starches, dairy and alternatives, meat and alternatives. Construct your meals based on the Balanced Plate model. Choose foods rich in dietary fibre : vegetables, fruits, whole-grain products, legumes, nuts and seeds, etc. Limit your consumption of sweets and foods with little nutrition (cakes, pastries, candies, chocolate, cookies, brown sugar, honey, molasses, syrups, jams, etc.). These should be eaten only occasionally and in tiny quantities. Choose water for hydration rather than fruit juice or sweetened drinks. If you eat sugar substitutes (aspartame, sucralose, cyclamates, saccharine, stevia, etc.) or products that contain them, do so in moderation. If you drink alcohol, do so preferably with food and respect the recommended quantities . Pay particular attention to serving size and distribution of foods containing carbohydrates fruit, starches, milk and alternatives, legumes, certain vegetables and foods with added sugar. Limit your consumption of foods high in fat, particularly saturated and trans fat. Limit your consumption of foods high in salt: chips, cured meats, prepared or frozen foods, marinades, commercially prepared sauc Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Foods You Eat

Diabetes And The Foods You Eat

The foods you eat are made of 3 basic nutrients: carbohydrates, fat, and protein. All of these nutrients provide calories (energy) that allow your body cells to function properly. Why do I need a meal plan? A balanced meal plan is important for everyone. If you have diabetes, eating properly balanced meals and snacks is even more important. Food is an important tool that you can use to control diabetes and stay healthy. Carbohydrate counting adds variety to your meals and still allows you to control your blood glucose. Ask a registered dietitian how carbohydrate counting can be incorporated into your lifestyle. Eating a balanced meal plan can help you: Control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Control blood pressure. Maintain a healthy weight or reduce your weight, if you are overweight. Prevent low blood glucose reactions. Reduce the risk of health problems caused by diabetes. How do I get a meal plan? To plan the amount of foods that you eat, you should meet with a registered dietitian who will help you develop a meal plan that is right for you. This plan will be based on your individual health goals. Do I have to count every bite? No. But you will need to be aware of what and how much you are eating and the right portions of foods. The number one goal of the meal plan is to control blood glucose levels with an even distribution of carbohydrates at meals and snacks. Here are some basic guidelines: Follow the meal plan set with your dietitian. Eat a variety of foods every day to get all the nutrients you need. Eat only the amount of food in your meal plan. Eat about the same amount of food each day. Be aware of portion sizes. Do not skip meals. Eat meals and snacks at regular times every day. Distribute meals 4 to 5 hours apart, with snacks in between. If you are taking a Continue reading >>

Eat Well!

Eat Well!

When you have diabetes, deciding what, when, and how much to eat may seem challenging. So, what can you eat, and how can you fit the foods you love into your meal plan? Eating healthy food at home and choosing healthy food when eating out are important in managing your diabetes. The first step is to work with your doctor or dietitian to make a meal plan just for you. As soon as you find out you have diabetes, ask for a meeting with your doctor or dietitian to discuss how to make and follow a meal plan. During this meeting, you will learn how to choose healthier foods—a variety of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods, lean meats, and other proteins. You will also learn to watch your portion sizes and what to drink while staying within your calorie, fat, and carbohydrate (carbs) limits. You can still enjoy food while eating healthy. But how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you when eating at home and away from home. Eating Healthy Portions An easy way to know portion sizes is to use the “plate method.” Looking at your basic 9-inch dinner plate[PDF – 14 MB], draw an imaginary line down the middle of the plate, and divide one side in half. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables, like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and carrots. In one of the smaller sections, put a grain or starchy food such as bread, noodles, rice, corn or potatoes. In the other smaller section, put your protein, like fish, chicken, lean beef, tofu, or cooked dried beans. Learn more at Create Your Plate, an interactive resource from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that shows how a healthy plate should look. This tool allows you to select different foods and see the portion sizes you should use in planning your meal Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

How To Eat To Manage Diabetes - Top 10 Tips

How To Eat To Manage Diabetes - Top 10 Tips

Moderation is key when it comes to managing diabetes. Douglas Twenefour, clinical advisor at Diabetes UK, explains what to eat when and shares his top 10 tips for managing your diabetes... There is not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ eating pattern for people with diabetes, but Douglas Twenefour suggests tips that can be incorporated into individual healthy eating goals for people who have the condition... 1. Eat regular meals Spacing meals evenly throughout the day will help control your appetite and blood glucose levels – especially if you are on twice-daily insulin. 2. Opt for slowly absorbed carbohydrates All carbohydrates (carbs) affect blood glucose levels, so be conscious of how much you eat and opt for carbs that are more gradually absorbed. Try wholewheat pasta, basmati rice; granary, pumpernickel or rye bread; new potatoes in their skins, sweet potatoes and yams; oat-based cereals, such as porridge or natural (unsweetened) muesli. For more information, take a look at our Spotlight on... low-GI foods. 3. Cut the fat Eat less fat – particularly saturated fat. Try unsaturated fats and oils, especially monounsaturated fats like extra virgin olive oil and rapeseed oil, as these types of fat are better for your heart. Use lower fat dairy products including skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. Grill, steam or bake foods rather than frying. Remember that all fats contribute similar amounts of calories, so limit your overall intake if you are aiming to lose weight. 4. Five a day Aim for at least five portions of fruit and vegetables every day to give your body the vitamins, minerals and fibre it needs. A portion is: 1 medium-sized piece of fruit, like a banana or apple, 1 handful of grapes, 1 tablespoon (30g) dried fruit, 1 small glass (150ml) of unsweetened 100% fruit juice or Continue reading >>

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Figuring out the best foods to eat when you have diabetes can be tough. The main goal is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled. However, it's also important to eat foods that help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease. Here are the 16 best foods for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Fatty fish is one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies and mackerel are great sources of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which have major benefits for heart health. Getting enough of these fats on a regular basis is especially important for diabetics, who have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke (1). DHA and EPA protect the cells that line your blood vessels, reduce markers of inflammation and improve the way your arteries function after eating (2, 3, 4, 5). A number of observational studies suggest that people who eat fatty fish regularly have a lower risk of heart failure and are less likely to die from heart disease (6, 7). In studies, older men and women who consumed fatty fish 5–7 days per week for 8 weeks had significant reductions in triglycerides and inflammatory markers (8, 9). Fish is also a great source of high-quality protein, which helps you feel full and increases your metabolic rate (10). Fatty fish contain omega-3 fats that reduce inflammation and other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Leafy green vegetables are extremely nutritious and low in calories. They're also very low in digestible carbs, which raise your blood sugar levels. Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are good sources of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C. In one study, increasing vitamin C intake reduced inflammatory markers and fasting blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

There is no single diabetes diet, meal plan, or diet that is diabetes-friendly that can serve as a correct meal plan for all patients with diabetes (type 2, gestational, or type 1 diabetes). Glycemic index, carbohydrate counting, the MyPlate method, and the TLC diet plan are all methods for determining healthy eating habits for diabetes management. The exact type and times of meals on a diabetic meal plan depend upon a person's age and gender, how much exercise you get and your activity level, and the need to gain, lose, or maintain optimal weight. Most diabetic meal plans allow the person with diabetes to eat the same foods as the rest of the family, with attention to portion size and timing of meals and snacks. Eating a high-fiber diet can help improve blood cholesterol and blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Glycemic index is a way to classify carbohydrates in terms of the amount that they raise blood sugar. High glycemic index foods raise blood sugar more than lower index foods. Some patients with type 2 use supplements as complementary medicine to treat their disease. However, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of supplements in treating the disease. A diabetes meal plan (diabetes diet) is a nutritional guide for people with diabetes that helps them decide when to consume meals and snacks as well as what type of foods to eat. There is no one predetermined diabetes diet that works for all people with diabetes. The goal of any diabetic meal plan is to achieve and maintain good control over the disease, including control of blood glucose and blood lipid levels as well as to maintaining a healthy weight and good nutrition. Health care professionals and nutritionists can offer advice to help you create the best meal plan to manage your diabe Continue reading >>

12 Diabetes Food Tips To Avoid

12 Diabetes Food Tips To Avoid

CONTRAVE® (naltrexone HCI/bupropion HCl) is a prescription weight-loss medicine that may help adults with obesity (BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2), or who are overweight (BMI greater than or equal to 27 kg/m2) with at least one weight-related medical condition, lose weight and keep the weight off. CONTRAVE should be used along with diet and exercise. One of the ingredients in CONTRAVE, bupropion, may increase the risk of suicidal thinking in children, adolescents, and young adults. CONTRAVE patients should be monitored for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. In patients taking bupropion for smoking cessation, serious neuropsychiatric adverse events have been reported. CONTRAVE is not approved for use in children under the age of 18. Stop taking CONTRAVE and call a healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you: thoughts about suicide or dying; attempts to commit suicide; depression; anxiety; feeling agitated or restless; panic attacks; trouble sleeping (insomnia); irritability; aggression, anger, or violence; acting on dangerous impulses; an extreme increase in activity and talking (mania); other unusual changes in behavior or mood. Do not take CONTRAVE if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure; have or have had seizures; use other medicines that contain bupropion such as WELLBUTRIN, APLENZIN or ZYBAN; have or have had an eating disorder; are dependent on opioid pain medicines or use medicines to help stop taking opioids such as methadone or buprenorphine, or are in opiate withdrawal; drink a lot of alcohol and abruptly stop drinking; are allergic to any of the ingredients in CONTRAVE; or are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Before taking CONTRAVE, tell your healthcare provider ab Continue reading >>

Grocery Lists For Type 2 Diabetes: What To Buy And What To Avoid

Grocery Lists For Type 2 Diabetes: What To Buy And What To Avoid

Diabetes is best managed by being mindful of carbohydrate intake, eating smaller meals regularly, and choosing nutrient dense, healthful options. Knowing what food to eat can make a huge difference to controlling, and, potentially, reversing type 2 diabetes. Making informed food choices can be helped by writing out a grocery list of foods that improve overall health, and benefit someone who has type 2 diabetes. Contents of this article: Lists of good foods A person who has type 2 diabetes can make it easier to avoid buying unhealthful foods by going to the grocery store armed with a list. Choosing healthful, satisfying foods that meet individual nutrition requirements can help people with type 2 diabetes manage their condition. By making smart food choices and buying the right foods, a person can ensure they have enough diabetic-friendly ingredients on hand to take them from breakfast through to the last meal, or snack, of the day. Vegetables Vegetables are the base of a healthy diet. Not only do they offer excellent sources of vitamins and minerals, but they are fibrous, too, and help the body feel full and satisfied. This in turn can deter overeating, which may cause blood sugar issues. Some vegetables to add to the shopping list include: salad greens broccoli cauliflower squash green beans asparagus Brussel sprouts red, green, orange, or yellow peppers Beans and legumes Beans are an excellent source of dietary fiber and protein. They can often be used in place of a portion of the protein that is needed in a diet. Here are some examples of what beans to pick up in either their canned or dried forms: black beans lentils white beans chickpeas kidney beans pinto beans Fruits Despite their high sugar content, fresh or frozen fruits pack a powerful nutritional punch with t Continue reading >>

3 Food Strategies Guide You To Doable Diabetes Diet - Three Diet Strategies To Help Anyone Diagnosed With Prediabetes Or Type 2 Diabetes Become Wiser About Controlling Your Blood Sugar, Reduce Common Complications, And Achieve A Healthy Weight.

3 Food Strategies Guide You To Doable Diabetes Diet - Three Diet Strategies To Help Anyone Diagnosed With Prediabetes Or Type 2 Diabetes Become Wiser About Controlling Your Blood Sugar, Reduce Common Complications, And Achieve A Healthy Weight.

Diabetes Diet: The Best Way to Eat for Type 2 Diabetes Three diet strategies to help anyone diagnosed with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes become wiser about controlling your blood sugar, reduce common complications, and achieve a healthy weight. Written by Susan McQuillan MS, RDN, CDN | Reviewed by Caroline Apovian MD, FACP, FACN A diagnosis of type 2 diabetesor even prediabetesusually means the doctor has suggested that you make some changes to your diet or the diet of someone you care for. This is a good time to become wiser about how you are eating on a regular basis. Fortunately, following a diabetes diet doesnt mean giving up the joy of eating or avoiding your favorite foods and special family meals. You can still enjoy pizza night, celebrate birthdays and anniversaries, and partake in holiday meals and vacation dining. This is more about your routine daily food choices and meal planning. Use the four sections of a plate as a guide when planning healthy meals for someone with diabetes. Photo: 123RF Eating to beat diabetes is much more about making wise food adjustments than it is about denial and deprivation. A better way to look at a diet when you have diabetes is one that helps you establish a new normal when it comes to your eating habits and food choices.1 What Should You Eat If You Have Diabetes? In truth, a diet aimed at reducing the risks of diabetes is really nothing more than a nutritionally-balanced meal plan aimed at supporting maintaining blood sugar levels within range and supporting a healthy weight. For those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, the main focus of a diabetes-focused diet is being attentive to your weight.2 That said, a diabetic diet is simply an eating approach that works to keep you healthy, and so is not reserved only for people wi Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Following a type 2 diabetes diet doesn’t mean you have to give up all the things you love — you can still enjoy a wide range of foods and, in some cases, even help reverse type 2 diabetes. Indeed, creating a diet for diabetes is a balancing act: It includes a variety of healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The trick is ultimately choosing the right combination of foods that will help keep your blood sugar level in your target range and avoid big swings that can cause diabetes symptoms — from the frequent urination and thirst of high blood sugar to the fatigue, dizziness, headaches, and mood changes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The Basics of the Type 2 Diabetes Diet: What Should You Eat? To follow a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, you must first understand how different foods affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates, which are found to the largest degree in grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables, are broken down into glucose in the blood faster than other types of food, which raises blood sugar, potentially leading to hyperglycemia. Protein and fats do not directly impact blood sugar, but both should be consumed in moderation to keep calories down and weight in a healthy range. To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says. How Many Carbs Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Eating Tips For Diabetes

5 Healthy Eating Tips For Diabetes

Diabetic Living / Food to Eat / Nutrition While taking control of eating is just one aspect of managing diabetes, it's a big and important piece of the puzzle. Here are five tips for healthy eating. Eating with Diabetes: How to Better Control Blood Sugar & Weight Loss Gone are the days of strict diets, forbidden foods, and trips down the sugar-free food aisle. According to American Diabetes Association nutrition recommendations: To eat well with diabetes simply means applying the basic principles of healthful eating. "Thank goodness I don't need to follow a rigid 'diabetic diet,' limit carbs, and eat every two hours," says Cathy Rogers, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes three years ago. "I'm encouraged I can manage my eating without stressing out." The way people with diabetes should eat is in line with the way every American should eat. "The Dietary Guidelines for Americans dovetail perfectly with the American Diabetes Association's nutrition guidelines," says Angela Ginn, R.D., CDE, education coordinator at the University of Maryland Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology and spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. Shed a few pounds if you need to. Get and keep your blood sugar, cholesterol, and blood pressure in the healthy target zones. As it turns out, your list of healthy eating dos and don'ts isn't really all that long after all. Start by putting these top five dos -- the ones that give you the biggest bang for your effort -- into action. Take a good hard look at your plates -- the foods you choose and the portions you eat. Rate your plates to see if they measure up. For lunch and dinner, do you fill half your plate with vegetables, a quarter with starch or grain, and the remaining quarter with a lean protein source? Is there a serving of fruit a Continue reading >>

The Best Prediabetes Diet For 2020

The Best Prediabetes Diet For 2020

2020s Best Prediabetic Diet + Prediabetes Diet Plans and Recipes What is the best prediabetes diet? That may be a burning question on your mind if you have been recently diagnosed with prediabetes (also known as borderline diabetes), or if you have known about your prediabetes for a while now. Even if you have not been told that you have prediabetes, you could be worried about it, since 90% of the people are unaware that they have it. You are at higher risk if you are over 45 years old, do not get much exercise, have a family history of diabetes , or are African American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino, or Pacific Islander. Whats more is that you are at risk if you are overweight, have high bad LDL cholesterol or high triglycerides, or low good HDL cholesterol. What these have in common is that you can improve them with diet . Most people with prediabetes eventually get diabetes, but heres a secret: it doesnt always have to happen, prediabetes is reversible. You can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in large part by following a healthy diet for prediabetes no gimmicks necessary. Awareness of prediabetes could be the best thing that ever happened to you. It gives you the chance to find a good diet for prediabetes that works for your health and for your lifestyle. Once you decide to make those healthy changes, you are more likely to succeed with a support system that works for you, and a health app could be what you need for information and accountability. Prediabetes is a condition with higher-than-normal blood sugar (blood glucose) levels, but levels that are lower than in diabetes . As the National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) explains, it results from a disruption in how your body regulates glucose (sugar) in your blood. The sugar Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Diet | American Heart Association

The Diabetic Diet | American Heart Association

If youre a person with diabetes, you may juggle a lot of concerns. Eating a healthy diet is a big part of the balancing act. Unmanaged diabetes can increase your risk of developing heart disease . Diabetic patients are also at risk for blindness, amputation and kidney failure. Find out more about why treating diabetes matters . It's critical that people with diabetes pay attention to their heart health, said registered dietitian Kathy McManus, director of nutrition at Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston. They should combine a healthy complex carbohydrate with some protein and a littlebit of healthy fat for meals and snacks. They should also avoid trans fats and limit saturated fats. Know your fats . When grocery shopping, plan ahead for the week and always bring a list and a full stomach. Stay on the perimeter of the store, and stock up on seasonal produce thats on sale, McManus said. Not everything has to be fresh.Plain, frozen vegetables and fruits can beeasy and convenient substitutes. Look for whole-grain, high-fiber foods and limit your time on the aisles where there are boxed foods that may not be healthy. Take a close look at serving size and salt and sugar content. We all need to be sensitive to the added sodium and added sugar in packaged, processed, take-out foods and the Salty Six, McManus said. Avoid products with too much sugar and look for its other names in the ingredient list such assucrose, honey and high fructose corn syrup. Be wary of buy-one get-one free deals, because if theyre not healthy, youre getting more than you bargained for. Ready for dinner? Your best bet is to start with a small plate. Fill half of it with vegetables such as roasted squash, grilled asparagus or a salad. For the next quarter, consider a healthy carb like a small, plain s Continue reading >>

Simple Tips For Your Diabetes Diet

Simple Tips For Your Diabetes Diet

A healthy diet is an important part of managing type 2 diabetes. Try these healthy-eating tips to help keep your diabetes under control. Medically Reviewed by Rosalyn Carson-DeWitt, MD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . A diagnosis of type 2 diabetes often comes with recommendation from your doctor to improve your diet. While eating a healthy diet is important for everyone, when you have type 2 diabetes , eating smart is essential to managing your condition. A healthy diabetes diet can help you: Lose weight and maintain a healthy weight Prevent related health complications , like heart disease and high blood pressure But if youve never paid much attention to nutrition, you might find it hard to balance eating healthy meals with the rest of your diabetes management plan. The answer is to follow some simple healthy-eating tips that can get you on track in no time. Start with these steps: Focus on five food groups.When you have diabetes, its important to make sure youre getting enough of the right types of foods in your diet. While there isnt one perfect food that can provide all the nutrients your body needs, the key is to incorporate a variety of healthy foods into your diabetes diet. Focus on eating plenty of: Lean protein sources such as chicken, fish, and lean beef Although you can indulge in other foods on occasion, these five food groups are the building blocks of a healthy diabetes diet. Create a meal plan.Taking the time to draw up a meal plan can save you time and stress in the long run. Jan Elsten, RD, CDE, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Indiana University Health-Ball Memorial Hospital in Muncie, says is the main thing to focus on is spacing your meals and snacks evenly Continue reading >>

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