diabetestalk.net

6 Small Meals A Day For Diabetics

Attention, Diabetics! This Is How Many Meals You Should Eat Every Day (hint: It’s Not 3)

Attention, Diabetics! This Is How Many Meals You Should Eat Every Day (hint: It’s Not 3)

Soloviova Liudmyla/Shutterstock You’ve been told all your life to eat three square meals a day. Well, if you have diabetes, it might be time to rethink your food schedule. (And if you don’t, watch out for these 12 silent signs of diabetes.) For 12 weeks, 47 obese adults with either pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes ate either three or six meals a day (presumably without these 9 worst food mistakes diabetics make). Then they swapped over for another 12 weeks, giving blood samples before starting each routine. Even though participants ate the same number of calories, spreading it out into smaller meals gave big benefits, according to results shared at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual meeting. During the six-meal plan, participants had lower average blood sugar and showed signs that their bodies could use sugar better. Plus, it took longer for blood sugar to spike after eating in prediabetics, and those with severe prediabetes had fewer times with abnormally high insulin. But that’s not all. Neither of the plans helped the volunteers lose weight on average, but they were less likely to feel hungry (or want to eat when they weren’t) when they had more meals. (To boost your six-meal benefits, don’t miss these 10 life-saving things every diabetic should do.) “These results suggest that increased frequency of meals, consumed at regular times, may be a useful tool for doctors treating subjects with obesity and diabetes or prediabetes, especially those who are reluctant or unsuccessful dieters,” the researchers said in a statement. If you aren’t at risk of diabetes, though, you might not want to jump onboard the six-meal plan yet. A past study in the British Journal of Nutrition found that obese adults didn’t lose any more weight when eat Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Not sure if this is the right plan for you? Calculate your calorie level and find the diet meal plan that will work best for you. Day 1 Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 1/2 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (298 calories, 32 grams carbohydrates) • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt • 1/2 cup blueberries • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts • 2 tsp. honey Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case h Continue reading >>

Six Small Meals A Day Diet

Six Small Meals A Day Diet

I am a fast and efficient writer that would love to write articles for your company. Thank you for your consideration! A bowl of yogurt topped with fruit, nuts and cereal on the cushion of a chair.Photo Credit: saquizeta/iStock/Getty Images Whether you are diagnosed with diabetes and your doctor has suggested eating frequent meals, or you are on a restricted-calorie diet and want to prevent hunger throughout the day, eating six small, balanced meals a day is a healthy alternative to the standard three. By eating six small meals, you can curb your hunger and keep your blood sugar at a stable level, provided the food you are eating is nutritious. Eat a protein-rich breakfast that includes fiber as well as fruits and vegetables. Because you will be eating another small meal in the late morning, avoid overeating and keep your first meal of the day as light as possible. Try eating oatmeal with bananas, strawberries and nuts on top, or a breakfast burrito with black beans, egg whites and a variety of fruits and vegetables. Eat a small second breakfast, more like a mid-morning snack, approximately three hours after your first meal. Using a lean protein source like yogurt, add fruits like blueberries and stir in wheat germ or sunflower seeds to create a balanced meal. Provide your body with a nourishing lunch, like sliced, skinless chicken breast on whole-wheat bread with lettuce, tomato and avocado. Avoid eating salty snacks like chips and popcorn, which are high in saturated fat and will raise your calorie count for the day significantly. Snack on a small, high-protein meal that's packed with vegetables about three hours after lunch. Eat a small salad topped with nuts or seeds, or a handful of vegetables like celery, carrots and broccoli dipped in nonfat Italian dressing. Ea Continue reading >>

The Truth About The So-called

The Truth About The So-called "diabetes Diet"

Despite all the publicity surrounding new research and new nutrition guidelines, some people with diabetes still believe that there is something called a "diabetic diet." For some, this so-called diet consists of avoiding sugar, while others believe it to be a strict way of eating that controls glucose. Unfortunately, neither are quite right. The "diabetes diet" is not something that people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes should be following. "That just simply isn't how meal planning works today for patients with diabetes," says Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, a nutritionist at Joslin and co-author of 16 Myths of a Diabetic Diet. "The important message is that with proper education and within the context of healthy eating, a person with diabetes can eat anything a person without diabetes eats," Campbell states. What's the truth about diabetes and diet? We know now that it is okay for people with diabetes to substitute sugar-containing food for other carbohydrates as part of a balanced meal plan. Prevailing beliefs up to the mid-1990s were that people with diabetes should avoid foods that contain so-called "simple" sugars and replace them with "complex" carbohydrates, such as those found in potatoes and cereals. A review of the research at that time revealed that there was relatively little scientific evidence to support the theory that simple sugars are more rapidly digested and absorbed than starches, and therefore more apt to produce high blood glucose levels. Now many patients are being taught to focus on how many total grams of carbohydrate they can eat throughout the day at each meal and snack, and still keep their blood glucose under good control. Well-controlled blood glucose is a top priority because other research studies have concluded that all people with diab Continue reading >>

Ask The Expert: Should I Eat Three Large Meals A Day Or Several Smaller Meals?

Ask The Expert: Should I Eat Three Large Meals A Day Or Several Smaller Meals?

Ask the expert: Should I eat three large meals a day or several smaller meals? Healthy U reader, Joe Connor from Strathpine asked "Isthere any advantage to eating regular small meals during the day(e.g. five to six meals) versusthree main meals per day forweight loss. Even if total kilojoule intake is thesame?" Diabetes Queensland's newest Dietitian Alison Bennettresponds: What a great question Joe! Some health professionals recommendeating several small meals a day to help in weight loss, the ideais that feeding your body regularly keeps your metabolism pumpingand helps to stabilise your blood sugar levels and your hungerlevels. Others recommend three meals a day is a better way tocontrol how much you eat, suggesting that if people are given theopportunity to six meals a day they are more likely to overeat. Unfortunately, despite a lot of research on the subject the juryis still out on which is the best option. A number of studies havecompared the effect of feeding individuals the same amount of foodin three meals or in six meals and have found no significantdifference in weight loss (or weight gain). Interestingly, onestudy showed that people eating six small meals a day were morelikely to feel hungry throughout the day than those who ate threelarge meals. I believe that it comes down to the types of foods you areeating and the amount of kilojoules that you are eating over theentire day rather than how often you are eating. At the end of theday, weight loss will occur if the amount of kilojoules you areeating is less than the amount of kilojoules that you burnthroughout the day. So if you find that you prefer to eat six smallmeals a day, go for it. But if you find that eating lots of smallmeals means that you're more likely to eat more than you reallyneed then maybe Continue reading >>

Diabetics: Two Large Meals Better Than 6 Small Meals With Same Calories For Controlling Weight, Blood Sugar

Diabetics: Two Large Meals Better Than 6 Small Meals With Same Calories For Controlling Weight, Blood Sugar

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Diabetics: Two large meals better than 6 small meals with same calories for controlling weight, blood sugar Two large meals (breakfast and lunch), rather than six small meals with the same total calories, are better for controlling weight and blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, research shows. "Novel therapeutic strategies should incorporate not only the energy and macronutrient content but also the frequency and timing of food. Further larger scale, long-term studies are essential before offering recommendations in terms of meal frequency," the researchers conclude. Research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) suggests that two large meals (breakfast and lunch), rather than six small meals with the same total calories, are better for controlling weight and blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. The research is by Dr Hana Kahleov, Diabetes Centre, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic, and colleagues. The study assessed 54 patients (29 men, 25 women) treated with oral diabetes drugs, aged 30-70 years, BMI 27-50 kg/m2 and HbA1c of 6-11.8% (42-105 mmol/mol). They were asked to follow one of two regimens of a restricted calorie diet, each containing 500 calories less than the recommended daily amount; in one programme the meals were six small meals (A6) and the other 2 large meals, breakfast and lunch (B2). In this cross-over trial, the 54 participants were divided into 2 groups of 27, with each group doing one of the two programmes for 12 weeks, and then after finishing moving on to the other programme, again for 12 weeks. The diet in both regimens had the same macronutrient and calorie con Continue reading >>

A Low-cost Meal Plan

A Low-cost Meal Plan

**The meal prices shown above are based on those found at a large chain grocery store in the DC Metro Area during the month of December. The price per portion of the featured recipes was based on the price published the this month's featured cookbook: Diabetes Meals on $7 a Day or Less. Total cost of this meal plan is less than $7.00 for the entire day. Continue reading >>

How Often Should I Eat?

How Often Should I Eat?

Q: How often should a person with type 2 diabetes eat? A: Everyone needs to eat about every four to six hours during the day to keep energy levels up. People with type 2 diabetes usually have better blood glucose control if their meals and carbohydrates are spaced evenly throughout the day. Too many carbohydrates at any one time can raise blood glucose too high, even if you take diabetes medicine. Many people tend to skip breakfast, eat a light lunch, and then eat too much in the evening. A person with diabetes should attempt to eat about the same amount of carbohydrates at each meal. Breakfast is especially important if you need to control your weight. It helps to jump-start your metabolism and makes you less likely to overeat later. If you are unusually active or on fixed doses of medication, you may need a snack. Monitoring your blood glucose will help you to decide that with your medical team. Sometimes diabetes medication can be adjusted so you do not need snacks if you are concerned about your weight. Connie Crawley, M.S., R.D., L.D., is a nutrition and health specialist for the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service and a registered dietitian Continue reading >>

Grazing Vs Two Large Meals—which Is Better For Insulin Sensitivity?

Grazing Vs Two Large Meals—which Is Better For Insulin Sensitivity?

New study suggests that eating two large meals per day improves insulin sensitivity and promotes weight loss better in patients with type 2 diabetes than grazing Conventional dietary wisdom holds that eating frequent but small meals—“grazing”—helps to maintain steady blood glucose and promotes weight loss. New research from the Czech Republic calls that theory into question. The study suggests that eating two large meals per day improves insulin sensitivity and promotes weight loss better in patients with type 2 diabetes than grazing, even when the total number of daily calories is the same. “The data suggest that eating fewer, larger meals—a hearty breakfast and lunch—can be healthy and beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes,” said Hana Kahleova, MD, PhD, researcher at the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine in Prague. “Our results support the ancient proverb, ‘Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.’” The randomized, crossover study included 54 adults with type 2 diabetes (average age, 59). Patients were assigned eating plans designed to cut their intake by 500 calories per day for 24 weeks. Participants had well-controlled diabetes, with an average A1c of 7.2%, but were overweight, with an average body mass index (BMI) of 32.6. Before beginning their new eating plans, the patients participated in group meetings and received individual counseling, noted Dr. Kahleova, who recently presented the study results at the American Diabetes Association’s 73rd Scientific Sessions in Chicago. For 12 weeks the participants ate 6 meals per day—breakfast, lunch, dinner, and three snacks. For the other 12 weeks they ate only a large breakfast between 6:00 and 10:00 a.m. and a large lunch between 12:00 and Continue reading >>

Is Grazing Good For Diabetes?

Is Grazing Good For Diabetes?

What if you ate frequent, small meals, instead of a few big ones? You wouldn’t need as much insulin at any one time. Maybe postmeal spikes would be much smaller. What does science say about this approach? The question mainly applies to people with Type 2 who still make some insulin. They may have enough insulin to cover a small meal, but not a normal American meal. If you are injecting rapid-acting insulin, more meals would mean more, smaller shots. Eating very frequent, very small meals is sometimes called “grazing.” Some evidence shows that it improves insulin function. In one small study, people were assigned in random order to eat a “nibbling diet,” which consisted of 17 snacks per day, or the usual three meals per day. (Both diets had the same amount of total food and types of food.) The nibblers made less insulin, although their sugars were about the same as the regular eaters. That shows their insulin was used more efficiently. Grazing has been very popular at times for weight loss and diabetes management. It’s not so popular now. A Czech study presented in 2013 found that grazing was less effective for weight loss than eating two main meals a day. No differences were found in glucose levels or insulin function. Some experts still strongly recommend grazing. The Pritikin Longevity Center compares frequent very small meals to weight-loss surgery. Weight-loss surgery is often touted as a diabetes “cure,” or at least a highly effective treatment. But why does it help? Weight-loss surgery leaves a person with a very small stomach, maybe the size of an egg. Pritikin’s website says, “Post- surgery life means very small meals, eaten very slowly and chewed thoroughly, for the rest of one’s life.” That grazing diet may be what appears to be “curi Continue reading >>

Eating Six Times A Day On A Diet To Lower Blood Sugar

Eating Six Times A Day On A Diet To Lower Blood Sugar

Managing blood glucose levels can be a difficult process often leading to less than ideal outcomes for diabetics. According to a “Diabetes Care” study, a little over half of diabetics have been able to reach their average blood glucose goals between 1988 and 2010. Could frequent, small meals be a key to more stable blood glucose control? Diabetics struggle with insulin resistance, which is the condition that causes blood glucose levels to be abnormally high hours after consuming meals, according to Kathleen Mahan and Sylvia Escott-Stump, authors of “Krause’s Food and Nutrition Therapy.” A number of factors, including physical activity, types of foods eaten and overall portion sizes, influence blood glucose levels. The American Diabetes Association advises eating smaller, more frequent meals instead of eating the more traditional two to three meals, citing benefits such as more stable blood glucose and better appetite control, which leads to a lower calorie intake. Frequent Meals and Blood Glucose A study in the “Diabetes Care” compared glucose response in participants receiving two different meal patterns: group A received six small, equal calorie meals while group B received two larger meals. Even though total daily calorie counts were equal for each group, it was observed that group A's average peak glucose value was 84 percent lower than group B's. The researchers from Horsens Hospital in Denmark noted that not only was glucose control much improved in group A, insulin levels of this group were also significantly lower. Sample Menu Consuming six meals daily does require some planning to assure that healthy meals and snacks are available throughout the day; adhering to this regimen means eating something small every two to three hours, as noted by the 20 Continue reading >>

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Diabetes is a condition in which your body cannot properly use and store food for energy. The fuel that your body needs is called glucose, a form of sugar. Glucose comes from foods such as fruit, milk, some vegetables, starchy foods and sugar. To control your blood glucose (sugar), you will need to eat healthy foods, be active and you may need to take pills and/or insulin. In the following table, you will find some tips to help you until you see a registered dietitian. Tips for Healthy Eating, Diabetes Prevention and Management Tips Reasons Eat three meals per day at regular times and space meals no more than six hours apart. You may benefit from a healthy snack. Eating at regular times helps your body control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Limit sugars and sweets such as sugar, regular pop, desserts, candies, jam and honey. The more sugar you eat, the higher your blood glucose will be. Artificial sweeteners can be useful. Limit the amount of high-fat food you eat such as fried foods, chips and pastries. High-fat foods may cause you to gain weight. A healthy weight helps with blood glucose (sugar) control and is healthier for your heart. Eat more high-fibre foods such as whole grain breads and cereals, lentils, dried beans and peas, brown rice, vegetables and fruits. Foods high in fibre may help you feel full and may lower blood glucose (sugar) and cholesterol levels. If you are thirsty, drink water. Drinking regular pop and fruit juice will raise your blood glucose (sugar). Add physical activity to your life. Regular physical activity will improve your blood glucose (sugar) control. Plan for healthy eating Using a standard dinner plate, follow the Plate Method in the image below to control your portion sizes. Alcohol can affect blood glucose (sugar) levels and cause you Continue reading >>

Eating Two Larger Meals A Day (breakfast And Lunch) Is More Effective Than Six Smaller Meals In A Reduced-energy Regimen For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomised Crossover Study

Eating Two Larger Meals A Day (breakfast And Lunch) Is More Effective Than Six Smaller Meals In A Reduced-energy Regimen For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomised Crossover Study

Go to: Abstract The aim of the study was to compare the effect of six (A6 regimen) vs two meals a day, breakfast and lunch (B2 regimen), on body weight, hepatic fat content (HFC), insulin resistance and beta cell function. In a randomised, open, crossover, single-centre study (conducted in Prague, Czech Republic), we assigned 54 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents, both men and women, age 30–70 years, BMI 27–50 kg/m2 and HbA1c 6–11.8% (42–105 mmol/mol), to follow two regimens of a hypoenergetic diet, A6 and B2, each for 12 weeks. Randomisation and allocation to trial groups (n = 27 and n = 27) were carried out by a central computer system. Individual calculations of energy requirements for both regimens were based on the formula: (resting energy expenditure × 1.5) − 2,092 kJ. The diet in both regimens had the same macronutrient and energy content. HFC was measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Insulin sensitivity was measured by isoglycaemic–hyperinsulinaemic clamp and calculated by mathematical modelling as oral glucose insulin sensitivity (OGIS). Beta cell function was assessed during standard meal tests by C-peptide deconvolution and was quantified with a mathematical model. For statistical analysis, 2 × 2 crossover ANOVA was used. The intention-to-treat analysis included all participants (n = 54). Body weight decreased in both regimens (p < 0.001), more for B2 (−2.3 kg; 95% CI −2.7, −2.0 kg for A6 vs −3.7 kg; 95% CI −4.1, −3.4 kg for B2; p < 0.001). HFC decreased in response to both regimens (p < 0.001), more for B2 (−0.03%; 95% CI −0.033%, −0.027% for A6 vs −0.04%; 95% CI −0.041%, −0.035% for B2; p = 0.009). Fasting plasma glucose and C-peptide levels decreased in both regimens (p < Continue reading >>

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

The Outsmart Diabetes Diet is based on new research that found four specific nutrients—fiber, vitamin D, omega-3s, and calcium—work together to help balance blood sugar and encourage weight loss. Build your daily diabetic diet meal plan by choosing one breakfast, one lunch and one dinner, plus two snacks—any combination gets you approximately 1,400 calories a day and a healthy dose of the "Fat-Fighting 4." Remember to eat about every 3 hours and practice portion control. Prevention Premium: What Every Woman Knows About Erectile Dysfunction Follow this mix and match diabetic diet meal plan—adapted from The Outsmart Diabetes Diet—for the next five weeks to help fight fat, maintain healthy blood sugar levels, boost energy, and reduce your diabetes risk. BREAKFAST Fruity bagel breakfast: Spread 1 Tbsp light cream cheese and 1 tsp 100% fruit spread on ½ of a whole grain bagel. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk. Crunchy yogurt: Combine 6 oz fat-free light yogurt, ¼ c granola cereal, 1 Tbsp ground flax seed, and 1 Tbsp chopped nuts. Add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Eggs and English muffin: Scramble 1 egg in a pan coated with 1 tsp canola or olive oil; top with ¼ c chopped tomato, onion, and chile salsa. Serve with toasted 100% whole grain English muffin, spread with 2 Tbsp low-fat (1%) cottage cheese, and 1 c fat-free milk. Instead of scrambled eggs, try poaching an egg: Good Morning Blend: Stir together 6 ounces fat-free yogurt, 2 Tbsp dried mixed fruit, 2 Tbsp ground flax seed and 2 Tbsp chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans. Nutty Oatmeal: Top ½ c cooked oatmeal with ¼ c walnuts or other nuts; add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice beverage. Bagel and cream cheese: Sprea Continue reading >>

Eating Six Meals A Day Better For Stabilising Overweight People's Blood Sugar Levels, Finds Study

Eating Six Meals A Day Better For Stabilising Overweight People's Blood Sugar Levels, Finds Study

Eating six meals a day better for stabilising overweight people's blood sugar levels, finds study Eating little and often may be the key to improving your health When you want to lose weight, many of us are put off by the idea of starving ourselves, spending our days with rumbling stomachs and having to resist giving in to our hunger. But this neednt actually be the case at all. In fact, according to a new study, eating six meals a day rather than three could help you stabilise your blood sugar levels,stick to your healthy eating regime andreduce hunger. Sharing the full story, not just the headlines You'll lose weight easier if you don't eat at this time of day Researchers from the Agricultural University of Athens assessed 47 obese people with pre-diabetes or type two diabetes - they found that those who ate little and often had much better blood sugar control than those consumed three larger meals a day. The participants in the study were asked to follow a special diet for six months. Everyone had the same calorie intake over the course of the day (designed to maintain their weight), but the frequency of eating varied. Half ate three meals a day, half ate six, and the groups switched after three months. The researchers found that the people who ate six times a day saw a decrease in their glycated haemoglobin and glucose levels, which is a sign of improved blood sugar control. For the participants who had pre-diabetes and severely impaired glucose tolerance, eating little and often helped reduce how often they had high insulin levels and also delayed the time taken for blood glucose to peak after eating sugar. You will need: 1 onion, 1 red pepper, 1 stick of celery, 1 cup of mushrooms, 4 to 6 eggs, 1 habanero chilli (optional), 1 tablespoon of oil, 25g of grated low- Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet