diabetestalk.net

Zoloft Diabetes Side Effects

The Effects Of Sertraline On Blood Lipids, Glucose, Insulin And Hba1c Levels: A Prospective Clinical Trial On Depressive Patients

The Effects Of Sertraline On Blood Lipids, Glucose, Insulin And Hba1c Levels: A Prospective Clinical Trial On Depressive Patients

Go to: Abstract In this study, we aimed to investigate the possible effects of sertraline on blood glucose and lipid levels as risk factors for cardiovascular disease in depressive patients. METHODS: Eight male and twelve female depressive patients, diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, were included in this study. The subjects aged 19-50 years, did not smoke, and had normal body mass index (BMI), homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) values, blood pressure, blood glucose, insulin and lipid levels. Sertraline therapy (50 mg/day) was started. Patients with diabetes mellitus, heart disease, pregnancy, and those taking other drugs were excluded from the study. Blood glucose, insulin, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglyceride values were measured in patients before, and at the 4th, 8th and 12th weeks after treatment with sertraline. Moreover, HbA1C levels were measured at the beginning and at the end of the treatment (at 12th weeks). There were no significant differences in physical examination (blood pressure, BMI, body weight, height, waist circumference) and laboratory findings (glucose, HDL-C, LDL-C, HOMA-IR and HbA1C levels) at the 12th week after of treatment with sertraline compared to pretreatment values. However, insulin levels at the 4th, 8th and 12th weeks significantly increased compared with pretreatment values. Likewise, triglyceride levels at the 8th and 12th weeks significantly increased compared with pretreatment values. Sertraline-treated patients have to be followed up for blood insulin and triglyceride levels. In addition, their treatment plan needs to be adjusted as necessary to prevent possible metabolic changes. KEYWORDS: Sertraline, Insulin, Glucose, Lip Continue reading >>

Depression And Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Depression And Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Diabetes is a serious condition, and living with it can be a challenge. It can take a toll on your emotions. People with the disease are twice as likely to get depressed as people who don’t have it. Depression is a problem on its own, and it can also keep you from taking good care of yourself. That can lead to high blood sugar levels and diabetes complications. So if you think you might be depressed, tell your doctor. You can take some steps to feel better. The Link Between Diabetes and Depression Depression is a complex disease. Its root causes can be tied to genes, your environment, and emotions. Managing diabetes can be stressful and time-consuming. The lifestyle and diet-related limits can make life seem less fun. Depression Symptoms There are several warning signs, including: Sadness Irritability Lack of interest in things you once enjoyed Pulling away from your social life Can't concentrate Insomnia (trouble falling and staying asleep) Lots of guilt or feeling worthless Loss of energy, or fatigue Changes in appetite Observable mental and physical sluggishness If you (or someone you love) has diabetes and show signs of depression, tell your doctor right away. How Is It Diagnosed? Your doctor will make the call based on the symptoms you tell him about. Lab tests aren't used to diagnose depression. How Is It Treated? Your doctor will work with you to control your depression. If he suggests you try medication, he can prescribe one or more of these antidepressants: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect the way your brain uses a chemical called serotonin. Changing the balance of this chemical may help your brain cells receive messages better and boost your mood. Examples of this type of antidepressant include citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro Continue reading >>

Sertraline-induced Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Sertraline-induced Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes Patients

1From the Section of Endocrinology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2Division of Endocrinology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC, and George Washington University, Washington, DC. Objective: To report the clinical outcomes of 2 type 2 diabetes patients admitted for severe and precipitous hypoglycemia after initiation of sertraline and subsequent resolution after discontinuation of the medication. Methods: Case reports with literature review. Results: Case 1: A 58-year-old African American man with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes was admitted for unresponsiveness due to severe hypoglycemia. Twelve days prior to admission, he was started on sertraline and observed declining fasting blood sugar levels, with 2 episodes of symptomatic hypoglycemia. Despite discontinuation of insulin for 48 hours during admission, resolution of hypoglycemia only occurred after discontinuation of the sertraline. Despite titration of insulin to pre-admission dosage following discharge, he was re-admitted shortly for hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. Case 2: An 85-year-old Caucasian man with well-controlled type 2 diabetes was admitted for 3 episodes of hypoglycemia in 1 day. At home, he was on metformin and pioglitazone for his diabetes. He was started on sertraline 2 months prior, with progressively decreasing fasting glucose levels. After discontinuation of the sertraline on the second day of his admission, there were no further recurrences of hypoglycemia. Conclusion: These cases demonstrate through temporal correlation that sertraline may be associated with hypoglycemia in conjunction with antidiabetic agents. Although this potential side effect is rarely reported and not mechanistically defined, sertraline and other selective serotonin re-u Continue reading >>

Happy Pills Are Linked To A Higher Risk Of Diabetes: Antidepressants Can Cause Weight Gain, Leading To Condition

Happy Pills Are Linked To A Higher Risk Of Diabetes: Antidepressants Can Cause Weight Gain, Leading To Condition

Researchers say the risk is for all antidepressants, not just some types The increased risk could be because people on antidepressants are more likely to be overweight and this is a risk factor for diabetes Scientists think the pills may also be an independent risk factor Antidepressants taken by hundreds of thousands of people may increase the chances of developing diabetes, researchers warn. A major study involving more than a million patients has shown that those taking all antidepressant pills are at far higher risk from the condition. Academics from Southampton University think this may be because antidepressants cause weight gain which in turn leads to type 2 diabetes. But despite the strong link, they cannot be sure that the pills are definitely causing the condition. Patients on antidepressants are more likely to be overweight so have a higher risk of developing diabetes in the first place than healthy individuals. The numbers of Britons taking antidepressants has soared in the last decade and more than 50 million prescriptions were handed out by GPs last year compared to just 20 million in 1999. But experts say doctors are handing out the pills too freely without considering the possible long-term side effects. In one of the largest studies of its kind, academics from Southampton University looked at 25 research papers that involved just over a million patients. The study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, found many patients were developing type 2 diabetes - the commonest form - after they had been prescribed antidepressants, which suggests the pills cause the illness. Antidepressants can cause weight gain and obesity which in turn worsens the body’s ability to regulate blood sugar -which triggers diabetes. Lead researcher Dr Katharine Barnard, a healt Continue reading >>

More in diabetes