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Yukon Gold Potatoes Diabetes

Nutritional Difference Between Red & Yellow Potatoes

Nutritional Difference Between Red & Yellow Potatoes

Red and yellow potatoes for sale at a market.Photo Credit: dabldy/iStock/Getty Images Nutritional Difference Between Red & Yellow Potatoes Jill Corleone is a registered dietitian and health coach who has been writing and lecturing on diet and health for more than 15 years. Her work has been featured on the Huffington Post, Diabetes Self-Management and in the book "Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation," edited by John R. Bach, M.D. Corleone holds a Bachelor of Science in nutrition. To improve health and maximize vitamin and mineral intake, you should eat a rainbow of fruits and vegetables each day, according to food and nutrition specialist Julie Garden-Robinson. While this statement might conjure up images of red strawberries and purple cabbage, you might want to take a look at the rainbow of colors potatoes come in. Eating a colored potato every now and again can certainly help vary your nutrient intake. While the nutritional profile of the red and yellow potato are similar, there are some differences that may make you decide to eat one over the other. If you're looking for a lower-calorie potato, the red potato slightly hedges out the yellow potato. An 85-gram portion of a red potato, which is about 1/2 cup, contains 70 calories, while the same size serving of a yellow potato contains 77 calories. Seven calories may not sound like much of a difference, but saving a few calories here and there can add up over the course of a day, which is especially important given that most Americans eat more calories than they need, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. When it comes to protein, fat and carbs, a red potato is lower in carbs and a better source of protein than a yellow, and both are fat-free. An 85-gram serving of a red potato contains 2 grams of prot Continue reading >>

The Mediterranean Pantry For Diabetics

The Mediterranean Pantry For Diabetics

Written by Frances Towner Giedt and Bonnie Sanders Polin, PhD You've likely already heard about the Mediterranean Diet, considered by many physicians and nutritionists as the healthiest diet in the world. Not surprisingly it's quite similar to a diabetic diet: it features fresh fruits and vegetables, grains and legumes, breads, fish, and small amount of very lean meats. This is the way that we both cook, and we've done so since the early 1990s when Nancy Harmon Jenkins wrote her best selling cook, The Mediterranean Diet Cookbook. She also wrote The Essential Mediterranean. Unfortunately the second book does not have nutritional information, but the first one does and you can easily figure out the exchanges or just count the carbohydrates. To follow the Mediterranean Diet, it helps to have a few staples in your pantry. Actually, everything on here is good to have in a "diabetic pantry." If you keep these staples on hand, it'll be easier to cook well and make delicious diabetic recipes. Here's what you'll find in a Mediterranean Diet pantry: fat-free no-salt-added chicken and vegetable broth Continue reading >>

Potatoes - 10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar - Purple Clover

Potatoes - 10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar - Purple Clover

Many sugar saboteurs seem perfectly innocuous, but don't let them fool you Certain foods can send your blood sugar level on a roller coaster, with insulin rushing to keep up. The good news is, while there are some surprises, most of these foods fall under the same category: processed food, such as white flour and sugar. "Refined flours and sugar cause huge spikes in insulin and get absorbed quickly, which causes problems," says Mark Hyman, author of The Blood Sugar Solution (Little, Brown and Company). Look at the whole meal instead of just individual ingredients, adds Jackie Mills, MS, RD. Pairing carbohydrates with protein, fat, or fiber helps slow down the absorption process. Watch out for these 10 blood-sugar saboteurs. White rice is a whole rice grain that has been polished until just the endospermessentially an easily digestible starch bombis left. Not surprisingly, recent studies have shown that eating white rice can raise blood glucose significantly, especially if eaten often or in large quantities. One study showed an 11% increase in diabetes risk with each daily serving of white rice. If you love rice with your stir-fries, switch to brown rice. Your blood sugar will thank you. Potatoes may be a whole, natural root veggie, but theyre also notorious for causing blood sugar to spike because they're digested into the bloodstream quickly. To mitigate this negative effect, cook potatoes with a healthy fat, such as olive oil, and bump up the fiber by adding hearty leafy greens or another vegetable to the mix. Or, make potato salad with plenty of lemon juice and chill it in the fridge. The acid and cold alter the starch molecules in the spuds to slow digestion. We tend to think of ketchup as a salty condiment, but many brands list some sort of sweetener as the second Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes?

Can people with diabetes eat potatoes? The answer is yes, and even more resounding when you have some info in your back pocket. Potatoes come in every form imaginable—from chips to potato salad, from fries to baked potatoes with butter and sour cream. Some forms are obviously more nutritious than others. And all can have varying effects on blood sugar. Here are some recommendations: Sweet potatoes and yams are good choices on the potato spectrum as they have a lower glycemic index and glycemic load than a regular baked russet potato, therefore affecting blood glucose less. Small red potatoes with the skin can also be a good choice. The skin provides fiber, which slows digestion and absorption. And small, whole potatoes may be easier to portion control. Serve a few on your plate as opposed to a whole baked potato or scoop of mashed potatoes. Try to limit fried potatoes and potato chips, choosing roasted, baked or broiled instead. Be aware of portion size. The plate method is an easy way to manage this: about ¼ of your plate should come from starchy foods and only the depth of a deck of cards. It might not be the potato itself wreaking havoc on blood sugar, but instead the portion of potatoes if it is more than about ¾ to 1 cup. Many, many years ago, nurses, dietitians, and diabetes educators were instructed to teach their patients with diabetes to eat certain foods and not eat others. But in more modern times, the belief and teaching method is based on making healthy food choices, understanding portion sizes, and learning the best times to eat in order to manage diabetes. This method of not having to eliminate foods from the diet is supported by the American Diabetes Association and the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Blood glucose control and food choice Continue reading >>

When It Comes To Diabetes, Is Ignorance Really Bliss?

When It Comes To Diabetes, Is Ignorance Really Bliss?

I come from a long line of type two diabetics -- my father, my brother and my sister. Still, when I was diagnosed I didnt understand the way a diabetic should eat. The sad thing is they were ignorant of this, too! When my brother came to visit us, his only instruction to me was no sugar. He made no mention of any other foods high in carbohydrates, just sugar in any of its forms. It is important to note that my brother was a medical scientist. So, I made him and his family a dinner of roasted salmon. On the side was a huge bowl of rice. Our dessert was fresh fruits with a yogurt sauce sweetened with a sugar substitute. He ate every bit of it. If he knew that carbohydrates were a problem, he did not tell me. We went to brunch that Sunday and he ate anything he wanted, including French toast, but not a dessert. He did not die at my table that night or the next day, nor did he go into a coma. His death came a few years later after having a toe removed. It never healed and he died from an infection in his blood. Robert was not yet 70 years old. My sisters choice was pretty much to ignore what she ate. Or worse yet, eating non-sugared foods, only when somebody was looking. Upon my diagnosis, I was gung ho on showing her all that I had learned when she came to visit. I may have just as well been speaking with her in another language. She claimed that she had never been told to limit her intake of carbohydrates. Martha was diagnosed in the late 1980s. In the twenty plus years that she was diabetic, she claimed that no doctor, no dietician, no nutritionist, had ever explained to her about carbohydrates. Her attitude was if she had a medication, or she put magic cinnamon on something, she could do and eat anything she wanted. Was she lying to me? Was she lying to herself? The da Continue reading >>

Don't Drop The Potato

Don't Drop The Potato

Don't Drop the Potato by Berkeley Wellness Many people fear that potatoes will make them fat or cause other health problems. Are potatoes really such villains? Are they any better or worse than bread, rice, or other starchy grains? A half-baked myth Potatoes have a bad reputation, in part, because they have a high glycemic index (GI), meaning that their carbohydrates are quickly broken down into sugar, causing blood sugar and insulin levels to rise rapidly. This, in turn, increases fat storage and the risk of obesity and diabetes—at least in theory. A few studies have implicated potatoes in weight gain and diabetes. For instance, a 2009 study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found a link between potato consumption and waist circumference in women (but not men). Earlier data from the Nurses’ Health Study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2006, linked potato intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes in obese women—especially when potatoes were eaten in place of whole grains. But there are plenty of caveats to consider before you drop the potato. For one, not all studies support the idea that high-GI diets—let alone potatoes, in particular—have such adverse effects. Several have found no relationship between high-GI diets and body fat or diabetes. In any case, the GI of potatoes and other foods depends on many factors, including how they’re cooked and what they’re eaten with. And not all varieties have such a high GI. Russet potatoes do, for example, but red potatoes rank moderately. Moreover, it’s hard to separate the effects of potatoes from those of other foods in a typical Western diet. That is, the undesirable associations seen in some studies could be due to the meat, refined grains, sugars and trans Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Yukon Gold Potatoes

Benefits Of Yukon Gold Potatoes

Yukon gold potatoes make a good mashed potato. If you're looking to add a new food to your menu but you have picky eaters in your house, try a different variety of potato. Yukon gold potatoes were developed at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada and they are a cross between the North American white potato and a wild yellow potato from South America. As far as potatoes go, the Yukon gold is very versatile. You can boil it, fry it and even mash it. In addition, like other potatoes, it is a good source of important nutrients. One medium Yukon gold potato meets one half of your daily vitamin C needs, and contains nearly twice the amount of vitamin C as a regular baking potato. Vitamin C is an important antioxidant, as it protects your cells from free-radical damage. It also plays a role in the regeneration of other antioxidants such as vitamin E. Vitamin C is used for synthesis of collagen, which helps your body heal wounds. One medium Yukon gold potato contains 120 calories, and the majority of those calories come from its 26 grams of carbohydrates. According to the McKinley Health Center, 45 to 65 percent of the calories in your diet should come from carbohydrates because they are your body's preferred source of energy. Carbs are used to fuel your brain and your muscles. Nearly one-third of adults in the U.S. have high blood pressure, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. High blood pressure increases your risk of heart and kidney disease. The Yukon gold potato is a good source of potassium, which may help lower your blood pressure, by decreasing the effects of sodium. In fact, the American Heart Association recommends that you aim for 4,700 milligrams of potassium per day. Iron deficiency is a serious health concern, and is considered "the Continue reading >>

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

Getty Images What to Eat to Beat Type 2 Diabetes What makes a food “super”? When it comes to type 2 diabetes, it’s not just about foods that pack lots of nutrients. For a diabetes-friendly diet, you also need foods that will help keep your blood sugar levels in check. “Look for items that contain healthy fats and are high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, a certified diabetes educator at Burgess Health Center in Onawa, Iowa. It’s also crucial to eat a wide variety of foods to make sure you’re getting a healthy mix of phytochemicals and essential fatty acids. Add these 11 superfoods to your grocery cart to keep your diet diabetes-friendly. Continue reading >>

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Eat Potatoes?

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Eat Potatoes?

Despite being the most popular vegetable in the United States, potatoes have fallen out of favour somewhat with nutritionists over the last few decades due to a relatively low nutrient density and high levels of quickly absorbed carbohydrates. Many diabetics avoid potatoes altogether for fear of exacerbating their condition. Fortunately the news is not all bad when it comes to diabetes and potatoes and most diabetics can include a modest level of potatoes in their diet. The main reason diabetics are cautious when it comes to potatoes is their very high glycemic index (GI) value. The glycemic index is important for diabetics because it is a measure of the impact a particular food has on blood glucose levels once it has been digested. Eating large amounts of foods with high GI values results in a large increase in blood sugar levels which would normally result in a corresponding rise in insulin to bring blood sugar levels back to a normal level within a few hours. Because diabetics have an impaired insulin response, blood sugar levels can remain very high for quite some time leading to the typical symptoms of diabetes such as excessive thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, and nerve problems. Potatoes have a GI value that ranges from 65 to 80 which is considered high. By comparison table sugar (sucrose) has a GI of 63, white bread has a GI of 71, wholemeal bread a GI of 60, and brown rice a GI of 55. Interestingly the method of cooking and variety of potato can affect the GI value of potatoes greatly. Newer potatoes tend to have lower GI values than older potatoes. Waxy potato varieties such as Red Norland, Yellow Finn, and Red Pontiac have lower GI values than floury potato varieties such as Russet Burbank and Norgold Russet. A 2005 study published in The Journal of the Continue reading >>

Potatoes And Spuds Are So Paleo

Potatoes And Spuds Are So Paleo

Ancient man ate a lot of baked potatoes. Strict Paleo diets exclude potatoes, claiming that the saponins they contain make them unfit for human consumption. Given the scientific evidence, this is complete nonsense. Potatoes and tubers have provided an important source of energy for many millennia. Ive been avoiding potatoes for years because of the low-carb craze and misguided Paleo advice! Research shows that starches like potatoes and tubers were a staple in the diet of Paleolithic man and they should be a staple in your diet, too. Today, most people tolerate potatoes quite well and I see no reason to exclude them from the diet. Rediscover and relish potatoes. Research on the diets of early man proves to us that they were eating tubers, roots, rhizomes and corms foods similar to our modern potatoes and tubers. Researchers not only found evidence to prove this by testing bones and observing the structure of their teeth, but they have found digging sticks to dig up those tasty little tubers. ( 6 ) Today the evidence for our prehistoric potato feast lies in the fact that humans most plentiful saliva enzyme, amylase, breaks down starch. Chimps have two copies of the gene for amylase. Most humans around the world have seven. This means we ate enough starch to evolve more genetic copies of this gene. ( 11 ) We are adapted to eat potatoes, okay?! Loren Cordain, one of the original founders of Paleo, suggests in his landmark The Paleo Diet that potatoes should not be on the Paleo diet for three reasons ( 1 ): Have a high glycemic index (they rapidly raise your blood sugar) Consumed in highly processed forms (uh, just eat whole potatoes) Saponins, also known as glycoalkaloids,are toxins present in various plants includingspinach, oats, chick peas, beans, asparagus, onions, ya Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of A Low Glycemic Diet For Diabetics

The Benefits Of A Low Glycemic Diet For Diabetics

The Benefits of a Low Glycemic Diet for Diabetics The Benefits of a Low Glycemic Diet for Diabetics Diabetes is one of those conditions thats equivalent to a full-time job. A diabetic person has to constantly check blood sugar levels and maintain a normal level with diet and exercise. Those suffering from diabetes struggle containing their blood sugar levels and often find themselves suffering from hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. The first is too low blood sugar and the latter is too high of blood sugar levels. Glucose, otherwise known as blood sugar, is the main source of energy for our bodys cells. When food is taken in, its processed into carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Carbohydrates affect blood sugar levels because once consumed, they convert into sugars. One of the easiest ways for a diabetic to regulate blood sugar levels (glucose) is by monitoring the number of carbohydrates taken in. This is done by following a low glycemic diet. A low glycemic diet consists of foods that help to manage blood sugar level. The glycemic index is broken down as such: Foods with a GI of 70 or more is too high Foods with a GI of 56 to 69 is medium Foods with a GI of less than 55 is low Basically, the more foods you eat with a glycemic index of 70 or more is going to spike your blood sugar level, which can lead to fatigue, headaches, difficulty concentrating, blurred vision, damage to your eyes, blood vessels or kidneys and much more. (Information courtesy of diabetes.webmd.com) The glycemic diet is not necessarily one where you specifically count carbs or eliminate them all together. This diet teaches a diabetic which foods to avoid, which ones to eat in moderation and which ones are okay to consume. With the glycemic index, diabetics can base food GI numbers on how balanced thei Continue reading >>

Potatoes: Good Or Bad?

Potatoes: Good Or Bad?

Potatoes have long been considered the most basic of basic foods, a no-frills staple for the everyman or everywoman. One reason potatoes have earned this distinction is, no doubt, their low cost, but another may be their basic nutritional qualities: They are fat-, sodium-, and cholesterol-free, and a medium-size potato contains just 110 calories. Nevertheless, the reputation of potatoes has taken a hit lately due to their relatively high glycemic index, which means that the carbohydrate in them is quickly converted to glucose when digested. Many people with diabetes take glycemic index into account when deciding what foods to incorporate into their diet. So how good or bad are potatoes when it comes to weight control and glucose tolerance? A study examining these topics was published earlier this month by the Journal of the American College of Nutrition. According to an article on the study in the Daily Mail, the effect of potatoes on weight control may be modestly positive. Researchers assigned 90 overweight participants to one of three groups. Two of these groups were taught how to reduce their daily caloric intake by 500 calories, but one group was taught how to do this by eating mostly high-glycemic-index foods, and the other by eating mostly low-glycemic-index foods. The third group was not told to change anything about the caloric or glycemic-index composition of their diet. All three groups were told, however, to consume 5–7 servings of potatoes per week. After 12 weeks of following their prescribed diets, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of weight loss or body composition changes. All three groups, however, experienced modest weight loss and improvements in body composition. Since the only dietary change that all three groups h Continue reading >>

Nutrition For A Russet Vs. Yukon Gold Potato

Nutrition For A Russet Vs. Yukon Gold Potato

Russet and Yukon Gold are two common varieties of potato. Nutrition for a Russet vs. Yukon Gold Potato Brian Willett began writing in 2005. He has been published in the "Buffalo News," the "Daytona Times" and "Natural Muscle Magazine." Willett also writes for Bloginity.com and Bodybuilding.com. He is an American Council on Exercise-certified personal trainer and earned a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the University of North Carolina. All potatoes are carbohydrate-rich, but not all potatoes are exactly the same. You can find a number of different varieties just by taking a trip to your local grocery store. Among the most common are Russet and Yukon Gold potatoes. While these potatoes have some differences in physical appearance and the regions in which they can be cultivated, Russet and Yukon Gold potatoes have the same nutritional profile. Each 5.3 oz. Russet or Yukon Gold potato provides 110 calories, which makes the potatoes moderately low in calories. This amount of calories comprises just 5.5 percent of the daily recommended intake of 2,000, so you may find Russet and Yukon Gold potatoes appropriate for dieting. If you're trying to lose weight, burn the 110 calories from either potato by 11 minutes of jogging or 23 minutes of playing volleyball. As with many other vegetables, the majority of the calories in Russet and Yukon Gold potatoes come from carbohydrates. Each 5.3 oz. serving of either potato variety provides 26 g of carbohydrates, which is just 1 g less than 1/2 cup serving of oatmeal provides. Carbohydrates are your body's primary source of fuel, so carbohydrate-rich foods such as Russet or Yukon Gold potatoes can be beneficial for athletes. While Russet and Yukon Gold potatoes are rich in carbohydrates, they only provide low levels of an important c Continue reading >>

Researchers Find Spuds That Could Foil Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers Find Spuds That Could Foil Type 2 Diabetes

The Huckleberry Gold is a low-GI potato released by the Tri-State Potato Commission. Photo: Prairie Star. Researchers Find Spuds that Could Foil Type 2 Diabetes Montana State University researchers have found several varieties of potatoes that could foil one of the scourges of the modern world: type 2 diabetes. Researchers in the Sands Research Lab at MSUs Plant Science Department have found low glycemic index potatoes that do not cause the rapid spike in blood sugar that comes with eating starchy foods. Sugar spikes can be dangerous for diabetics who lack the insulin to handle it and have been linked to cancer, heart disease and other conditions. Although potatoes provide valuable carbohydrates and vitamins with minimal fat, most varieties have a high glycemic index, which means they are rapidly digested and boost blood sugar dangerously fast. MSU currently has six varieties that have a lower glycemic index than Russet Burbank or Yukon Gold potatoes, which are rated high on the glycemic index. That means diabetics and others watching their carbohydrate intake can have their potatoes and eat them, too. We want to let people know that if they have to watch their GI there are potatoes out there they can eat, said Alice Pilgeram, an assistant research professor. We are hoping that this will create more demand for these potatoes, and seed producers will grow more, turning it into a nice specialty market for the Montana seed producers. According to the American Diabetes Association, 23.6 million adults and children, or 7.8 per cent of the population of the United States, have diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in three adults may develop diabetes by 2050 if current trends continue. Varieties of potato with low GI are commercially ava Continue reading >>

Why Do Potatoes Raise Blood Glucose More Than Sugar?

Why Do Potatoes Raise Blood Glucose More Than Sugar?

It can be surprising to find out that potatoes are generally high on the glycemic index (GI), which rates how much certain foods raise your blood glucose. After all, it's a staple in diets throughout the world because potatoes are an affordable and nutritious vegetable. Plus, most people associate blood sugar with foods that contain sugar. How is it that a potato has a higher GI than white sugar? It's all about the starch and how it converts to glucose in your body. However, not all potatoes are created equal and there are ways to lower their impact on your blood glucose. You may still be able to enjoy a few potatoes here and there, you'll just want to keep your servings in check. Too often, glucose is associated with sweetness and regular white potatoes are not a food that's generally considered sweet. Potatoes are almost all starch, though, and that starch is made up of long strings of glucose. Since the starch in potatoes is rapidly digested, the glycemic index of potatoes can be almost as high as that of glucose alone. The glycemic index of glucose is 100 points where potatoes are usually listed as being in the high 80s or low 90s. Sucrose (table sugar), on the other hand, has a GI of 59 and is a disaccharide (two sugar) molecule. It is made up of one glucose molecule and one fructose molecule joined together. Fructose is processed differently in your body than glucose, and it doesn't affect your blood sugar as much. However, fructose causes problems of its own when you eat too much of it. With that, it's fair to say that an ounce of carbohydrate from potatoes has twice the glucose as sugar. When you think of it that way, it's only logical that potatoes would raise blood glucose more. There are many varieties of potatoes and it would not be accurate to say that eve Continue reading >>

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