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Yogurt And Diabetes

What's In Your Pot?

What's In Your Pot?

According to consumer research, the UK population spends a staggering 1.7 billion a year on yogurt and fromage frais. With an ever-increasing range of yogurt varieties on offer, it can be difficult to work out why one variety may be more or less healthy than another. Here at Enjoy Food, we thought it was about time we took a closer look at this popular product and find out what exactly is in those pots… The good news Yogurt provides many health benefits. Made with milk, it contains protein and calcium needed for healthy bones and teeth. Some yogurts also have added vitamin D, which helps our body to absorb calcium. It’s also good to know that low-fat yogurts have just as much calcium as the full-fat versions. Some research even suggests that eating yogurt can help you to feel fuller, which may make it easier to manage your weight. As well as a useful portable snack, or instant pudding when you fancy a sweet fix, plain, natural, or greek yogurt can be used as a topping on fruit and desserts instead of cream, in smoothies, or in cooking. Spotlight on sugar As with most manufactured food products, you need to take a step back from the marketing hype and take a closer look at the food label, to check whether that innocent looking pot is as healthy as it seems. Many yogurts, particularly the ones aimed at children, are crammed full of the ‘free sugars’ we all need to cut back on. Looking at the label, the carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ provides useful information. An amount in grams (g) will be given. Spotting 'free sugars' This figure includes sugars which come naturally from the milk used to make the yogurt, known as ‘lactose’, as well as any sugar added to the yogurt, ie ‘free sugars’, and sugar that comes naturally from any fruit or fruit puree that h Continue reading >>

Yogurt And Diabetes: Overview Of Recent Observational Studies.

Yogurt And Diabetes: Overview Of Recent Observational Studies.

Abstract The effects of dairy consumption on the prevention of type 2 diabetes remain controversial and depend on the dairy subtype. Yogurt intake has received special attention because its association with health benefits is more consistent than that of other types of dairy products. In the present article, we review those observational studies that evaluated the association between yogurt consumption and type 2 diabetes. We also discuss the possible mechanisms involved in these associations. We found that 13 prospective studies evaluated the association between yogurt intake and type 2 diabetes, most of which showed an inverse association between the frequency of yogurt consumption and the risk of diabetes. In addition to the scientific evidence accumulated from individual prospective studies, several meta-analyses have shown that yogurt consumption has a potential role in diabetes prevention. The most recent analysis shows a 14% lower risk of type 2 diabetes when yogurt consumption was 80-125 g/d compared with no yogurt consumption. The intake of fermented dairy products, especially yogurt, has been inversely associated with variables of glucose metabolism. Yogurt may have probiotic effects that could modulate glucose metabolism. We conclude that yogurt consumption, in the context of a healthy dietary pattern, may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in healthy and older adults at high cardiovascular risk. Large-scale intervention studies and randomized clinical trials are warranted to determine if yogurt consumption has beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes. KEYWORDS: dairy; fermented dairy products; insulin sensitivity; type 2 diabetes; yogurt Continue reading >>

Diabetes: One More Reason To Love Yogurt!

Diabetes: One More Reason To Love Yogurt!

Many of us have been touched by diabetes. Maybe it’s a friend or family member who lives with diabetes or perhaps you battle the condition yourself. Fortunately, there is some good news: more and more studies indicate there may be a beneficial association between yogurt and Type 2 diabetes. Yogurt could be an excellent choice no matter who you are. And you can also feel confident choosing yogurt, if you have type 2 diabetes or if you want to prevent it. Why yogurt can be a nutritious choice in that context was introduced by Sharon Donovan (University of Illinois, Urbana) and Jordi Salas-Salvado (University Hospital of Sant Joan de Reus, Madrid, Spain) during the Fourth Global Summit on the Health Effects of Yogurt dedicated to yogurt and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). The proceedings are now published in The Journal of Nutrition. Here are the key stories from San Diego, USA. Should I be concerned about fat and sugar in yogurt? No, yogurt reduces the risk whatever its fat or sugar content! In fact, the epidemiologic evidences, reviewed by Prof Salas-Salvado (University Rovira I Virgili, Tarragona) showed that the consumption of any type of yogurt and other fermented dairy products is associated with a lower risk of diabetes. When evaluating your diet to face diabetes, calories or nutrients aren’t the only factor to consider. Also worth noting is the glycemic index of your food, which indicates the influence of different foods on your blood sugar level. High-glycemic foods cause a rapid spike in your blood sugar, while those with a low glycemic index (GI) cause a slower increase. Enjoying a bowl of yogurt won’t cause a rapid blood sugar response. Do you know why? Thomas Wolever (University of Toronto) analysis showed that the GI values of plain and sweetened yogurt are lowe Continue reading >>

At The Grocery Store

At The Grocery Store

Greek yogurt has taken a huge chunk of the Québec yogurt market and now comes in a wide variety of brands and flavours. Creamy and high in protein Greek yogurt differs from "regular" yogurt by its creamy texture. The difference is due to the manufacturing process, which removes a portion of the liquid from the yogurt, leaving a solid, high-protein residue. For the same portion size, Greek yogurt has twice the protein of regular yogurt. This process also gives the yogurt a creamy taste even though it is made from skim milk. A premium price Because liquid is removed, the production of Greek yogurt requires three to four times the amount of milk as traditional yogurt, which justifies its higher price. High nutrient value The technique Greek-yogurt manufacturers use to remove water from the milk before producing the yogurt has an effect on its nutritional value. For example, the traditional drip technique results in the loss of some of the calcium and lactose contained in the milk, whereas a different technique preserves these two nutrients. The table below compares various plain Greek yogurt brands on the market. The table uses the "fat free" variety when available, or the lowest-fat version if a company does not produce a “fat free” product. Nutritional Value of Plain, Fat-free Greek Yogurt Compared to Regular Yogurt Per 175 g (175 ml or 3/4 cup) Protein (g) Carbohydrates (g) Calcium (% DV*) Vitamin D (% DV*) Plain, regular yogurt2 8 12 30% 0 to 35% Astro Original, plain, fat free 18 7 49% 0% President’s Choice 18 12 50% 0% Damafro1 14 6 40% 0% Iögo Greko1 (Ultima Foods) 17 7 45% 30% Liberty 20 6 15% 0% Oikos (Danone) 18 7 20% 0% Skotidakis 18 12 50% 0% * percentage Daily Value; that is, the percentage of the amount you need daily 1 fat-free not available: the ana Continue reading >>

Yogurt May Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Yogurt May Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

A new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers found that higher consumption of yogurt was associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Other forms of dairy were not found to offer similar protection. Drawing on health data from more than a 100,000 participants in three long-running studies —the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986 to 2010), Nurses’ Health Study (1980 to 2010), and Nurses’ Health Study II (1991 to 2009) — the researchers found that a daily serving of yogurt was linked to an 18% lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Senior author Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology, told Forbes that the mechanisms behind this finding “are not well understood at this point. One hypothesis is that the probiotics in yogurt may help to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation, but this hypothesis needs to be tested in randomized clinical trials.” The study’s lead author was doctoral student Mu Chen. Dairy consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes: 3 cohorts of US adults and an updated meta-analysis (BMC Medicine) Yogurt may cut type 2 diabetes risk (Forbes) Continue reading >>

What's The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes?

Yogurt, typically made from cow's milk (however, nowadays there are many alternatives), is a source of carbohydrate which is also full of good bacteria, calcium, and protein. If you have diabetes, yogurt can be a smart food choice; however, the trick is to know which kind of yogurt to choose and which to skip out on. What to Look for in a Yogurt In the best kinds of yogurt, you get a good balance of protein and carbohydrate, along with calcium and healthy probiotics. You also don't get a lot of added sugar, additives, food coloring, or saturated fat. Choosing a low-fat or non-fat yogurt version can help you to reduce your total calorie intake as well as keep your saturated fat (the type of fat that increase bad LDL cholesterol) low. In addition, since yogurt is a source of carbohydrate, you'll want to choose a yogurt that is low in added sugars such as fruited yogurts or those yogurts with added granola, or other toppings that are rich in sugar. Therefore, it's best to choose plain, low-fat yogurt. If you need to add sweetness, top your yogurt with some berries or peaches. Frozen varieties can make your yogurt seem "syrup-y", too, for more fiber and less added sugar. Greek Yogurt vs. Regular Yogurt Greek yogurt is regular yogurt that's been strained, removing some of the whey and leaving behind a thicker, more protein-rich yogurt. Greek yogurt is readily available in regular grocery stores; find it in the refrigerated dairy section. Regular yogurt provides 5 grams of protein per 6-ounce serving, while Greek yogurt provides up to 20 grams, depending on the brand. Because it has more protein, Greek yogurt has about 1/3 the carbohydrate of regular yogurt. And, because lactose is a source of carbohydrate in dairy products, this means that many people find Greek yogurt easie Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Yogurt?

Can Diabetics Eat Yogurt?

Diabetes, a metabolic disorder that disrupts insulin production, affected 23.6 million Americans in 2007, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes requires dietary adjustments to keep blood sugar levels within an acceptable range. High blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels, including those in the eyes and kidneys. Diabetics can eat any food, as long as they incorporate it into their daily carbohydrate allowance. Video of the Day Diabetic Food Plan Every diabetic should follow a food plan designed specifically for them. Overweight diabetics will follow a reduced-calorie eating plan which also limits daily carbohydrates. Diabetic diets generally restrict carbohydrate intake to a certain number of carbohydrates per meal or per day. Although complex carbohydrates such as whole grains add more nutritional value than simple sugars found in sweets, you can eat sweets in moderation, as long as your carbohydrate count remains within limits. People on a 1,600- to 2,000-per-day calorie level, for example, can eat eight starches per day, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders. The nutritional value of yogurt depends on the type you eat. Full-fat Fage plain Greek yogurt contains 20 grams of fat, 31 percent of your daily fat intake, and 16 g of saturated fat, 80 percent of your daily intake, while its 2 percent contains 4 g of fat, 3 g from saturated fats. Fage fat-free brand has no fat at all. Fage plain 2 percent yogurt has 8 g of carbohydrate compared to 19 g, all from sugar, for the strawberry flavor. Dannon’s Fruit on the Bottom strawberry contains even more sugar, 28 g. A serving also contains approximately 6 to 17 g of protein, depending on the type of yogurt and container size. Yogurt supplies an excellent so Continue reading >>

Eating Yogurt May Reduce Risk Of Diabetes

Eating Yogurt May Reduce Risk Of Diabetes

Eating yogurt four or five times a week may lower the risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, a new study has found. Researchers in the United Kingdom looked at the diets of 4,000 people and followed them for 11 years. They found that people with the highest yogurt consumption had a 24 percent lower risk of developing diabetes, compared with people who didn't eat yogurt. This risk reduction was seen in study participants who consumed an average of four and a half 4-ounce servings of low-fat yogurt per week, according to the study published today (Feb. 5) in the journal Diabetologia. The study found an association, not a cause-and-effect relationship between eating yogurt and lowered risk of diabetes. And at least part of the positive effect of eating yogurt seems to stem from the fact that people who eat yogurt also eat fewer unhealthy desserts and snacks, the researchers said. They found that replacing a serving of chips with a serving of yogurt reduced the risk of diabetes by 47 percent. [9 Snack Foods: Healthy or Not?] Still, there is reason to think yogurt may lower the risk, the researchers said. Yogurt is a fermented dairy product, and contains a specific type of vitamin K, as well as probiotics, both of which have been suggested to protect against diabetes, the researchers said. The researchers didn't find a link between total dairy consumption and the risk for diabetes, suggesting that only some dairy products may be beneficial in reducing the risk for this condition. Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal, because the body cannot get the glucose into the cells to be used for energy. Risk factors for developing diabetes include obesity and physical inactivity. About 26 million people in the United States (8.3 percent of the population) Continue reading >>

The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes

The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes

Yogurt can be one of the best foods for people with diabetes to eat. Or one of the worst. It is the probiotic food that we eat the most. These foods have friendly bacteria that help us to drive out the bad ones. This can be good for our health, the U.S. Government’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine says. But to get this benefit from yogurt or other probiotic foods, we have to avoid any of them that say on the label that they were heat treated after culturing. That kills the active cultures. Even worse is when we eat the usual yogurt preparations that are loaded with added sugars. This includes not only frozen yogurts but also what most of us think of as regular yogurt. For example, a little 6-ounce container of "Yoplait Original Blackberry Harvest" sounds great. But its 13 ingredients include so much sugar that it packs 33 grams of carbohydrate, according to the Nutrition Facts label on the company’s website. When we want to eat a healthy yogurt, we have to start by limiting our selection to plain ones. Then, if we like, we can add a little fresh fruit and perhaps some non-caloric sweetener. I often add a few organic blueberries and a small sprinkling of stevia. Somebody asked me a few months ago if I could find any organic, Greek style, full fat, plain yogurt. I can’t. But we can come close. I recommend full fat yogurt, particularly for those of us who follow a low-carb diet, because non-fat or 2 percent yogurts always have added bulking agents that increase the carbs. They don’t taste as good either. I also recommend organic yogurt, but perhaps out of an excess of caution. I do eat organic fruit and vegetables whenever I have a choice, because I want to avoid consuming all the insecticides and herbicides conventional farmers spray on Continue reading >>

Great Food Swaps For Diabetes—yogurt

Great Food Swaps For Diabetes—yogurt

If you like it, you probably already have your favorite yogurt varieties and know that it makes for a great snack or dessert if you watch the carb content. Soy yogurt is especially good for you, not only because it’s full of antioxidants, but because it appears to help regulate enzymes that affect blood sugar and may help lower blood pressure, according to recent research. But don’t forget that plain (non-soy) yogurt or Greek yogurt can stand in for mayonnaise or sour cream in virtually any recipe. Yogurt also makes a good ingredient in marinades, because the active cultures tenderize meat in the same way acids do. Yogurt can even be used in place of milk: Just add one-half teaspoon of baking powder to each cup of yogurt. Consider using creamy, full-fat yogurt. The low-fat and fat-free varieties often contain more sugar and other carbohydrates. Greek yogurt is even higher in protein and lower in carbs and sugar than plain yogurt. Here are tips for getting the most out of yogurt: Make sure the yogurt you buy contains “live, active cultures” and lists the Latin names of these beneficial bacteria. Many of the health promoting properties of yogurt come from these bacteria. To preserve the benefits of the active cultures, don’t heat yogurt above 120 degrees F. Check the “sell by” dates on the yogurt tubs, and buy those that are most fresh. (Yogurt lasts for about ten days beyond the “sell by” date, but the sooner you eat it, the better, in terms of reaping the health benefits.) Stirring yogurt makes it lose its consistency and become runny. Continue reading >>

What’s The Effect Of Yogurt On Blood Glucose?

What’s The Effect Of Yogurt On Blood Glucose?

Yogurt has a much lower impact on glucose levels than people think. Therefore, it gets the green light to be included in a diabetes-friendly diet. In fact, research has shown that diets including yogurt may even help to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). One explanation is associated to glycemic index of yogurt, which was the aim of the presentation of Thomas Wolever (University of Toronto, Canada) at the Fourth Global Summit on the Health Effects of Yogurt. Most yogurts have a minimal effect on blood sugar The differences between carbohydrate foods can be described in relation to their glycemic index. Simply put this index, which goes from 100 to 0, indicates how quickly a food raises blood glucose levels. Glucose is rated at 100, and the closer to 100 a food is rated, the more it increases blood sugar levels. Generally, GI values of foods are classified as low GI(GI≤55), medium GI (55Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Yogurt can be a great nutrient-dense breakfast option or an easy snack. It is low in carbohydrates, meaning it won’t cause blood sugar spikes in people with diabetes. There may even be additional benefits for people with diabetes. What Research Shows Fermented foods, such as yogurt, contain good bacteria called probiotics. Probiotics have been shown to improve gut health. Research on gut health is ongoing, but gut bacteria and overall health could play a factor in a number of health conditions, including obesity and diabetes. What Do I Need to Know About Probiotics? Recent research shows that yogurt consumption might be associated with lower levels of glucose and insulin resistance, and lower systolic blood pressure. Another study found a potential link between regular yogurt consumption and a reduced risk for type 2 diabetes. These studies are encouraging, but more research is needed to determine what link, if any, exists between yogurt and type 2 diabetes. What Makes Yogurt Great Most dairy products are low on the glycemic index. This makes them ideal for people with diabetes. To get the most out of your yogurt, check the labels before you purchase. If you want the gut benefits from the probiotics, choose a yogurt that contains live and active cultures. Also pay attention to the nutrition facts. Many yogurts have added sugars. Look for yogurts with high protein content and low carbohydrates, such as unflavored Greek yogurt. Sugar content among brands, and even among flavors within the same brand, can vary drastically, so check labels closely. Carbohydrates By Yogurt Type Yogurt Type (6 ounces) Carbohydrates Sugar plain Greek yogurt 6-8 grams 4-8 grams flavored Greek yogurt 16-22 grams 12-18 grams plain yogurt 11-15 grams 10-12 grams vanilla yogurt 22-33 grams 21-28 Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Prevent dangerous blood sugar spikes with the help of these foods. Yogurt Low-fat yogurt naturally contains both high-quality carbohydrates and protein, making it an excellent food for slowing or preventing an unhealthy rise in blood sugar. Studies also show that a diet high in calcium from yogurt and other calcium-rich foods is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Be sure to stick to low-fat or nonfat brands; fat-free Greek yogurt is my top pick because it has twice as much protein as regular nonfat yogurt. Previous Next More Photos Almonds Fish Continue reading >>

Why Greek Yogurt Should Be Part Of Your Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Why Greek Yogurt Should Be Part Of Your Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Smooth, creamy, thick — Greek yogurt is one of the hottest foods around, and its popularity shows no signs of abating. With a pudding-like texture and a slightly tart flavor, Greek yogurt also has more protein and fewer carbs and fewer sugars than traditional yogurt. This means that Greek yogurt can be even better for people with type 2 diabetes, says Tami Ross, RD, CDE, a diabetes educator in Lexington, Kentucky. "My patients love the consistency of it," Ross explains. "Even the patients who are not big on yogurt or milk products overwhelmingly seem to like Greek yogurt." Greek yogurt's thick consistency comes from straining it to remove liquid whey. This process increases the amount of protein per serving and removes some of the carbohydrates, which people with diabetes must watch carefully. "For folks with diabetes, the lower carbs are a plus," Ross notes. "You can work in the yogurt for a snack without having to account for so many carbohydrates." The increased protein can also help you feel that you've had a more substantial snack, so you'll feel more satisfied and won't be hungry for something else quite so quickly. "In terms of promoting satiety and helping people feel full, it's great," Ross says. And starting your day with Greek yogurt may even help you manage your blood sugar throughout the day. Eating low-GI foods for breakfast helps prevent blood-sugar spikes later on, one recent study found. How to Find the Right Greek Yogurt Of course, not all Greek yogurts are created equal. With many brands and flavors on the market, it's important to read nutrition labels carefully to find one that will work with a diabetes-friendly diet. Carbohydrate content is the most important item to look for on the nutrition label of Greek yogurt, since it accounts for the sugar Continue reading >>

Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a serving a day of yogurt may lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. "The data we have gathered show that yogurt consumption can have significant benefit in reducing the risk of diabetes," said senior study author Dr. Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, in Boston. "It's not a huge effect, about an 18 percent reduction [in risk]." "Yogurt is not magic for curing or preventing diabetes," Hu said. "That's the bottom line and the message we want to convey to our consumers, that we have to pay attention to our diet pattern. There is no replacement for an overall healthy diet and maintaining [a healthy] body weight." The study is published online Nov. 24 in the journal BMC Medicine. It was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. In type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells develop a resistance to insulin, and blood sugar levels then get too high. For the study, Hu and his team pooled the result of three large studies that tracked the medical histories and lifestyle habits of health professionals: the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study of more than 51,000 male health professionals; the Nurses' Health Study, which included more than 121,000 women nurses; and the Nurses' Health Study II, which followed nearly 117,000 women nurses. During the study follow-up, there were about 15,000 cases of type 2 diabetes. When they looked at total dairy intake, they saw no effect on the risk of diabetes. However, when they zeroed in on yogurt, they found one serving a day was linked with about a 17 percent reduced risk. The researchers next pooled their result with other published studies that lo Continue reading >>

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