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Diabetes Program Home

Diabetes Program Home

To achieve these goals, the program supports the following activities: Prevention of type 2 diabetes and its complications. Quality Improvement for better diabetes care. Quality Diabetes Education Initiative to increase access to quality diabetes self-management education and support. Epidemiology and Surveillance of diabetes, its complications and risk factors. Evaluation to improve program performance, account for our public health actions, and share lessons learned. Partnerships and Coordination to share resources, and increase the scope and effectiveness of interventions. The Montana Diabetes Program Fact Sheet summarizes our program activities, key statistics, and contact information. To see how we are working with schools, worksites, healthcare systems, communities, and the environment, and with other public health programs in Montana,go to the Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion Bureau page. The State Public Health Actions (1305) and the Four Domains of Chronic Disease Prevention Infographic shows howwe are part of a national effort for chronic disease prevention and health promotion. From 2013 to 2018, the Montana Diabetes Program is implementing a work plan underthe State Public Health Actions to Prevent and Control Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and Associated Risk Factors and Promote School Health (1305) grant funded by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention .The objectives of this work plan can only be accomplished through the joint efforts of healthcare leaders, insurers, public health agencies, policy makers, and healthcare organizations serving Montanans, and the engagement of the people of Montana. Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes

Types Of Diabetes

Today, there are 11 million Canadians living with diabetes or prediabetes. Every three minutes, another Canadian is diagnosed. Chances are that diabetes affects you or someone you know. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic, often debilitating and sometimes fatal disease, in which the body either cannot produce insulin or cannot properly use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that controls the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Diabetes leads to high blood sugar levels, which can damage organs, blood vessels and nerves. The body needs insulin to use sugar as an energy source. What is the pancreas and what does it do? The pancreas is an organ that sits behind the stomach and releases hormones into the digestive system. In the healthy body, when blood sugar levels get too high, special cells in the pancreas (called beta cells) release insulin. Insulin is a hormone and it causes cells to take in sugar to use as energy or to store as fat. This causes blood sugar levels to go back down. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks and kills the beta cells of the pancreas. No, or very little, insulin is released into the body. As a result, sugar builds up in the blood instead of being used as energy. About five to 10 per cent of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes generally develops in childhood or adolescence, but can develop in adulthood. Type 1 diabetes is always treated with insulin. Meal planning also helps with keeping blood sugar at the right levels. Type 1 diabetes also includes latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), the term used to describe the small number of people with apparent type 2 diabetes who appear to have immune-mediated loss of pancreatic beta cells. What is type 2 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Training Camp Foundation Scholarship Program

Diabetes Training Camp Foundation Scholarship Program

Our 1st week-long camp will be June 25 30 at Millersville University in Lancaster, PA. Millersville was the first PA state school founded 150 years ago and has a beautiful sprawling 250 acre campus nestled in scenic Lancaster. Well cycle through Lancasters rolling farmlands, takes runs and walks on beautiful trails and enjoy the picturesque campus as we stay in the dorm and eat at the dining hall. Our camp at Millersville will have a collegial and community feel. Our 2nd week-long camp will be August 13 18 at Spooky Nook Sports in Lancaster, PA. Spooky Nook is the largest indoor sports complex in North America with first-class courts, fields, climbing areas and even a ninja warrior course. We will cycle, walk and run through the beautiful Lancaster countryside, but also utilize The Nook facilities throughout camp. We will stay in the adjacent Warehouse hotel, a 4.5 star hotel, with luxurious rooms and modern amenities. Meals will be catered and served in the conference center where we hold our lectures. At both camps, our campers will be matched with a roommate unless they choose to upgrade to a single room. More information about registration price and timing will be coming very soon! And, we plan to open our scholarship application process in early February for these 2 week long camps. Other exciting services coming from DTC in 2018! We are actively working on planning more DTC experiences in 2018 powered by the Diabetes Training Camp Foundation: 3-day TEEN/PARENT Boot Camp we piloted this program last December and had a tremendous experience. We are looking forward to offering another program in 2018. 3-day TYPE 2 DIABETES Boot Camp we are currently working on the possibility of offering a 3 day program geared solely to Type 2 and pre-diabetic campers. 3-day ALUMNI Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

Diabetes Home Page

Diabetes Home Page

Idaho Diabetes Prevention and Control Program Thank you for your interest in the Idaho Diabetes Prevention and Control Program. This website was developed to help people with prediabetes and diabetes manage their conditions by connecting them to free and reduced-cost resources within their communities. It also provides a central location for healthcare professionals who treat and educate Idaho adults with prediabetes and diabetes to access resources. The Idaho Diabetes Prevention and Control Program works with partners throughout the state to reduce disability and death due to diabetes and its complications. It is the goal of the Diabetes Program to: Improve the public's access to affordable, high-quality diabetes care and services, especially for people at high-risk. Educate the public and health professionals on how to prevent and manage diabetes. Develop programs and projects with partners that prevent diabetes and reduce the health complications related to diabetes. Facilitate the statewide Diabetes Alliance of Idaho (DAI), which is made up of health professionals, diabetes educators, local public health districts, health plan representatives, pharmaceutical companies and other partners invested in diabetes care. Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Nerve Pain?

What Is Diabetic Nerve Pain?

If you have diabetes and shooting, burning, pins and needles pain in your feet or hands, you could have painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy—also known as diabetic nerve pain. It is a common complication of diabetes. The most common cause is poorly controlled blood sugar over time. Diabetic nerve pain can take years to develop. In the early stages, you may have no signs at all, and then only start to feel a tingling or numbness in your feet. As it progresses, you may also feel the pain in your hands and it is often worse at night. This means that your nerves may be damaged for a long time before you experience painful symptoms. Nerve damage can’t be reversed, but controlling your blood sugar can help prevent further damage. Talk to your doctor if you experience any symptoms of diabetic nerve pain. Symptoms of diabetic nerve pain These are some of the most common symptoms of diabetic nerve pain: Shooting Burning Pins and needles Numbness Electric shock-like Throbbing Tingling Stinging Stabbing Radiating Sensitivity to touch How is diabetic nerve pain different from other pain? There are two types of pain—muscle pain or nerve pain. Both types of pain are your body’s way of telling you that something is wrong but each has its own cause, symptoms, and management. Muscle pain is a "protective" form of pain. It is caused by something specific like an injury or inflammation. The nerves in the injured muscle or joint send electric signals to the brain as a warning that damage has occurred and the activity you’re doing is causing harm. If you limit or stop the harmful activity, muscle pain can get better over time. Nerve pain is a "non-protective" form of pain. It occurs when your nerves are damaged by an injury or disease, such as diabetes. Your nerves send extra el Continue reading >>

Tips For Using The Diabetes Food Hub Meal Planner And Grocery List By The Diabetes Food Hub Team

Tips For Using The Diabetes Food Hub Meal Planner And Grocery List By The Diabetes Food Hub Team

Tips for Using the Diabetes Food Hub Meal Planner and Grocery List by The Diabetes Food Hub Team The all-new interactive Meal Planner and Grocery List features on Diabetes Food Hub make planning meals, tracking nutrition, and shopping for groceries a breeze. To make sure youre getting the most out of these features, try these easy-to-follow tips. First things firstif you have not done so already, create your free account with Diabetes Food Hub. Not only will creating an account let you save recipes, create a profile, and enjoy a more personalized experience on the site, but access to the Meal Planner and Grocery List features requires an account. If you have ever donated to the ADA or volunteered for Step Out or Tour de Cure, you probably have an account with the ADA already and can use that user name and password. Simply log in to the site! If you do not have a username and password, setting up an account is easy. Click on the Menu button in the upper right corner and select Log In from the listed options. When the Log In box appears, click on register here at the bottom of the box. Follow the instructions and fill out the necessary informationyoure all set! The Meal Planner uses recipes youve saved to your Recipe Box for building and planning meals. So be sure to save plenty of recipes in order to have a good selection in the Meal Planner . You can save recipes by clicking the star icon on recipes. You can then view these recipes in your Recipe Box . Be sure to save different types of recipes, such as sides, breakfasts, lunches, and main dishes, so you can build complete meals that meet your nutrition needs. Now that youve saved some recipes, its time to start building! Your saved recipes will show up to the right of the interactive Meal Planner . (If want to use rec Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes?

What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes can strike anyone, from any walk of life. And it does – in numbers that are dramatically increasing. In the last decade, the cases of people living with diabetes jumped almost 50 percent – to more than 30 million Americans. Worldwide, it afflicts more than 422 million people. And the World Health Organization estimates that by 2030, that number of people living with diabetes will more than double. Today, diabetes takes more lives than AIDS and breast cancer combined -- claiming the life of 1 American every 3 minutes. It is a leading cause of blindness, kidney failure, amputations, heart failure and stroke. Living with diabetes places an enormous emotional, physical and financial burden on the entire family. Annually, diabetes costs the American public more than $245 billion. Just what is diabetes? To answer that, you first need to understand the role of insulin in your body. When you eat, your body turns food into sugars, or glucose. At that point, your pancreas is supposed to release insulin. Insulin serves as a “key” to open your cells, to allow the glucose to enter -- and allow you to use the glucose for energy. But with diabetes, this system does not work. Several major things can go wrong – causing the onset of diabetes. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are the most common forms of the disease, but there are also other kinds, such as gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy, as well as other forms. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 2 diabetes? Do you want to learn more about a cure for diabetes? We're developing a DRI BioHub mini organ to restore natural insulin production in those living with diabetes. Watch the BioHub video>> Keep up with the latest updates on the DRI BioHub. Be a DRInsider today. It's free and easy to sign up. Join no Continue reading >>

Diabetes Food Hub - Articles

Diabetes Food Hub - Articles

Donta Hightower, Brendon Ayanbadejo, and brothers Reid and Blake Ferguson share something in common beyond footballamazing mothers on the sidelines. As part of the American Diabetes Associations Team Tackle , these players raise awareness of diabetes and offer support to the many families affected by this condition in the United States. This Mothers Day, Hightower, Ayanbedejo, and the Ferguson brothers tell us how diabetes impacts their families. They also divulge their favorite recipes, teaming up with a dietitian at Diabetes Food Hub to make the ingredients even more nutritious. Linebacker Donta Hightower, who has two Super Bowl rings with New England, grew up celebrating food in Tennessee. We loved to have family cookouts, big holiday meals, grilling, barbequeall of it. He adds that his mother taught him pretty much everything he knows about cooking. Four years ago, his mother was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, changing the foods they eat together and at family gatherings. We all had to take a step back and think about what were putting into our bodies and how it could affect us. Knowing that our family has a higher likelihood of developing diabetes has definitely changed the way we eat. "I usually like to start my day off with some fruit, protein of some type, or some eggs. I try to let the first thing I eat be really nutritious and full of fuel.Our days at the facility can be long during the season, so I try to eat healthy snacks throughout the day to keep my energy level up instead of waiting for each meal. Eating healthy doesnt have to be boring, there are many options for healthy recipes that can still be flavorful and taste good, and many ingredients you can sub out for something healthyyou wont even be able to taste a difference." "My mom is my everything, s Continue reading >>

Causes Of Diabetes

Causes Of Diabetes

Tweet Diabetes causes vary depending on your genetic makeup, family history, ethnicity, health and environmental factors. There is no common diabetes cause that fits every type of diabetes. The reason there is no defined diabetes cause is because the causes of diabetes vary depending on the individual and the type. For instance; the causes of type 1 diabetes vary considerably from the causes of gestational diabetes. Similarly, the causes of type 2 diabetes are distinct from the causes of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes causes Type 1 diabetes is caused by the immune system destroying the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. This causes diabetes by leaving the body without enough insulin to function normally. This is called an autoimmune reaction, or autoimmune cause, because the body is attacking itself. There is no specific diabetes causes, but the following triggers may be involved: Viral or bacterial infection Chemical toxins within food Unidentified component causing autoimmune reaction Underlying genetic disposition may also be a type 1 diabetes cause. Type 2 diabetes causes Type 2 diabetes causes are usually multifactorial - more than one diabetes cause is involved. Often, the most overwhelming factor is a family history of type 2 diabetes. This is the most likely type 2 diabetes cause. There are a variety of risk factors for type 2 diabetes, any or all of which increase the chances of developing the condition. These include: Living a sedentary lifestyle Increasing age Bad diet Other type 2 diabetes causes such as pregnancy or illness can be type 2 diabetes risk factors. Gestational diabetes causes The causes of diabetes in pregnancy also known as gestational diabetes remain unknown. However, there are a number of risk factors that increase the chances of deve Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes And Treatments

Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes And Treatments

Diabetes, often referred to by doctors as diabetes mellitus, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body's cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Patients with high blood sugar will typically experience polyuria (frequent urination), they will become increasingly thirsty (polydipsia) and hungry (polyphagia). Here are some key points about diabetes. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Diabetes is a long-term condition that causes high blood sugar levels. In 2013 it was estimated that over 382 million people throughout the world had diabetes (Williams textbook of endocrinology). Type 1 Diabetes - the body does not produce insulin. Approximately 10% of all diabetes cases are type 1. Type 2 Diabetes - the body does not produce enough insulin for proper function. Approximately 90% of all cases of diabetes worldwide are of this type. Gestational Diabetes - this type affects females during pregnancy. The most common diabetes symptoms include frequent urination, intense thirst and hunger, weight gain, unusual weight loss, fatigue, cuts and bruises that do not heal, male sexual dysfunction, numbness and tingling in hands and feet. If you have Type 1 and follow a healthy eating plan, do adequate exercise, and take insulin, you can lead a normal life. Type 2 patients need to eat healthily, be physically active, and test their blood glucose. They may also need to take oral medication, and/or insulin to control blood glucose levels. As the risk of cardiovascular disease is much higher for a diabetic, it is crucial that blood pressure and cholesterol levels are monitored regularly. As smoking might have a serious effect on c Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 definition and facts Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Insulin produced by the pancreas lowers blood glucose. Absence or insufficient production of insulin, or an inability of the body to properly use insulin causes diabetes. The two types of diabetes are referred to as type 1 and type 2. Former names for these conditions were insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes, or juvenile onset and adult onset diabetes. Symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes include increased urine output, excessive thirst, weight loss, hunger, fatigue, skin problems slow healing wounds, yeast infections, and tingling or numbness in the feet or toes. Some of the risk factors for getting diabetes include being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle, a family history of diabetes, hypertension (high blood pressure), and low levels of the "good" cholesterol (HDL) and elevated levels of triglycerides in the blood. If you think you may have prediabetes or diabetes contact a health-care professional. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that result from defects in insulin secretion, or its action, or both. Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes (as it will be in this article) was first identified as a disease associated with "sweet urine," and excessive muscle loss in the ancient world. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine, hence the term sweet urine. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers the blood glucose level. When the blood glucose elevates (for example, after eating food Continue reading >>

Communication, Careful Planning Ensure Students With Diabetes Can Succeed At School

Communication, Careful Planning Ensure Students With Diabetes Can Succeed At School

Communication, careful planning ensure students with diabetes can succeed at school Type 1 diabetes remains one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. According to the ongoing SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study, about 200,000 U.S. children and adolescents have type 1 diabetes. By 2050, that number is expected to rise to 600,000, according to JDRF. The numbers mean more students with the disease will be attending more schools, where proper management is critical but confusion about the law and what children are entitled to has led to situations that sometimes result in discrimination or put children with diabetes at risk, experts told Endocrine Today. When a child and his or her family are coping with a new type 1 diagnosis, members of the care team ranging from pediatric endocrinologists to certified diabetes educators and primary care providers often find themselves preparing families for battles on several fronts. In the school setting, to manage type 1 diabetes well and prevent acute and long-term complications, planning, training and ongoing communication are required, Anastasia Albanese- ONeill, PhD, ARNP, CDE, assistant clinical professor in the division of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Florida, told Endocrine Today. Youre monitoring glucose levels, taking insulin as prescribed, counting carbohydrates, learning to recognize low blood glucose. There are a lot of elements. The broader challenge is that, often if a kid is diagnosed in the middle of the school year, its an abrupt change in that childs life. They may be the only child in their school with diabetes, they have to learn a new routine and, in some cases, the school nurse hasnt cared for a child with diabetes for many years, if at all. There are a whole series of challenges that m Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes

Living With Diabetes

Diabetes and Diabetics Diabetes has become a growing concern for both adults and children. While the awareness of diabetes is widespread, many people don’t realize that diabetes is actually a group of conditions that impair the way the body uses blood glucose. Types of diabetes include: Gestational diabetes Pre-diabetes Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes. Our bodies need glucose, which is the main energy source for the cells in our muscles and tissues. Most of the food that we eat eventually breaks down to glucose, which is absorbed into the bloodstream. Glucose is also stored and manufactured in the liver, where it is released into the blood to maintain healthy glucose levels if you haven’t eaten for a while. The pancreas then secretes insulin into the blood, which acts as a key that allows that sugar to enter and fuel our cells. In all types of diabetes, however, insulin is lacking or its function impaired, so too much glucose is present in the blood. Left untreated, high levels of blood glucose can lead to many severe health issues. Some complications with diabetes may include: Bone and joint problems Cardiovascular disease Eye damage Foot damage Hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia Ketoacidosis Nephropathy (kidney damage) Neuropathy (nerve damage) Skin and mouth conditions. Symptoms of Diabetes Depending on which type you have, symptoms of diabetes may vary. If you have pre-diabetes or gestational diabetes, you might not experience any symptoms at all. Here are some classic symptoms of diabetes, both Type 1 and Type 2: Blurred vision Extreme hunger Fatigue Frequent or reoccurring infections including bladder, gum, skin or vaginal infections Intense thirst Sores that heal slowly Unexplained weight loss. Your doctor can perform blood tests to diagnose diabetes. Even if you are Continue reading >>

Take Back Control Of Your Life!

Take Back Control Of Your Life!

Diabetes:M is an award-winning diabetes logbook app that was first published in Google Play in April 2013. It was developed by diabetics to meet the needs of people who want to manage all aspects of their condition. Users can track, analyze, review and export data in great detail. Today Diabetes:M is an established tool with nearly 350 000 installations and over 50 000 active users. The application is well known to medical professionals, with many diabetes specialists recommending it to their patients. Designed for smartphones and tablets this application is intended to help diabetics to manage better their diabetes and keep it under control. Users can log their values in the logbook and keep the records with them all the time. The application tracks almost all aspects of the diabetes treatment and provides detailed reports, charts and statistics to share via email with the supervising specialists. It provides various tools to the diabetics, so they can find the trends in blood glucose levels and allows them to calculate normal and prolonged insulin boluses using its highly effective, top-notch bolus calculator. Diabetes:M can analyze the values from the imported data from various glucometers and insulin pumps via the exported files from their respective diabetes management software systems. Diabetes:M is one of the first diabetes management apps which started to support Android Wear smart watches when they were first introduced on the market. Continue reading >>

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