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Worst Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Diabetes is a metabolism disorder and thus diet plays a significant role in the management of the disease. While some foods can help lower the risk of diabetes and help with blood sugar management, other foods can exacerbate the symptoms and medical complications. Some of the worst foods for diabetics are heavily processed fast foods that are high in sodium, sugar, and fat. According to the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report, 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes and some 8.1 million of them are undiagnosed. At least one-third of diagnosed diabetes cases occur in people over the age of 65. However, diabetes is also one of the most common chronic diseases among children in the United States. Urgent: Discover Your Risk for Heart Disease, Take the Test Now! These menu items commonly top the worst foods lists for diabetes: 1. Candy, cookies, syrup, and other sugary food items: According to nutrition and health expert Joy Bauer from NBC, these food choices lack nutritional value. In addition, they "also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications." 2. White flour and processed grains like white rice: White flour and processed grains have been so refined that they have been stripped of their fiber and nutrients. These "bad carbs" are empty calories, are absorbed quickly by the body, and trigger a release of insulin, which affects blood sugar. 3. Higher-fat cuts of meat, hotdogs, and bacon: Diabetics need a low-fat diet that is also low in sodium. Processed meats contain a high level of both fat and sodium, which can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, reports Everyday Health. 4. Canned fruit, fruit drinks, jam, jelly, and preserves: These food choices make the Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Following a type 2 diabetes diet doesn’t mean you have to give up all the things you love — you can still enjoy a wide range of foods and, in some cases, even help reverse type 2 diabetes. Indeed, creating a diet for diabetes is a balancing act: It includes a variety of healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The trick is ultimately choosing the right combination of foods that will help keep your blood sugar level in your target range and avoid big swings that can cause diabetes symptoms — from the frequent urination and thirst of high blood sugar to the fatigue, dizziness, headaches, and mood changes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The Basics of the Type 2 Diabetes Diet: What Should You Eat? To follow a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, you must first understand how different foods affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates, which are found to the largest degree in grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables, are broken down into glucose in the blood faster than other types of food, which raises blood sugar, potentially leading to hyperglycemia. Protein and fats do not directly impact blood sugar, but both should be consumed in moderation to keep calories down and weight in a healthy range. To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says. How Many Carbs Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Most of us take it for granted that we can eat whatever we like, although it may have an unwanted effect on our waistline. But diabetics have to be much more careful with what they consume, as their inability to produce any, or enough, insulin, means their blood sugar levels can become dangerously high if they eat whatever they fancy. [Read more: 6 surprising cholesterol-busting foods] [Revealed: Why am I always hungry? 6 reasons you’re feeling starving] However, as World Diabetes Day is marked on November 14, Diabetes UK points out that no foods are totally off-limits for diabetics – they just need to eat carefully. Libby Dowling, senior clinical advisor at Diabetes UK, explains: “If you have diabetes – whatever the type – no food is out of bounds, but you should aim for a healthy, balanced diet, just as everyone should. This is a diet which is low in sugar, salt and saturated fats and includes plenty of fruit and vegetables. “It’s fine to have a treat now and again, but maintaining a healthy diet most of the time can help you to manage your diabetes, and is good for your general health too.” Here are some suggestions for the best and worst foods to eat when you're diabetic: Frozen grapes Instead of sweets, try these fruity little gems, which turn into a creamy sorbet-style healthy snack when frozen. Although there are fruit sugars in them, there's less sugar than there is in sweets, and fruit's packed with vitamins, minerals and fibre. Sweet potatoes Sweet potatoes have been shown to stabilise blood sugar levels in diabetics by lowering insulin resistance. They also contain high amounts of fibre, which helps reduce levels of 'bad' LDL cholesterol, which is linked to cardiovascular disease. Almonds Eating almonds can help people with type 2 diabetes to Continue reading >>

9 Of The Worst Eating Habits For Diabetes

9 Of The Worst Eating Habits For Diabetes

You’re a breakfast skipper istock/ShotShare We always hear that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but this may be particularly true for individuals with diabetes, says Alison Massey, RD, a registered dietitian and director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Waiting too long to eat in the morning might result in hypoglycemia or blood glucose that is too low. Here are tricks to treat hypoglycemia every diabetic should know. “Even when my clients aren’t typical ‘breakfast eaters,’ I encourage them to incorporate a small snack into their morning routine, like a Greek yogurt with some berries or a hard-boiled egg and slice of whole grain toast,” she says. It doesn’t have to be a sit-down meal, but make sure you have something healthy in your body so you don’t crash. Follow these healthy breakfast rules for diabetics. istock/GMVozd Research suggests that excessive fat intake (more than 30 percent of total calories) may worsen insulin resistance. Stay away from meals that tend to contain high amounts of saturated fat, like those from fast food restaurants. While the mechanism isn’t clearly understood, some research has found a modest benefit in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) on insulin resistance, as well as decreasing liver fat. MUFAs are good-for-you fats found in avocados, olive oil, nut butters, and seeds, to name a few. A diet that is high in MUFAs and lower in saturated fats is also associated with improvements in cardiovascular health, lower LDL cholesterol, and reduced triglycerides and blood pressure, says Massey. Here are clear signs you aren't eating enough healthy fats. From Merrill Lynch istock/alle12 Overindulging in protein could impact your blood glucose levels, especially if that protein Continue reading >>

The 11 Worst Foods For Diabetics

The 11 Worst Foods For Diabetics

Diabetes, put simply, is the presence of too much glucose in your blood. Glucose is an important source of energy for cells and the brain’s main source of fuel, but too much of it can lead to major health problems. A hormone called insulin is responsible for allowing glucose into the cells, but with type 1 diabetes the immune system attacks the insulin; with type 2 diabetes the cells become resistant to insulin. In both cases, sugar is left to build up in the bloodstream. To control diabetes, it’s best to avoid foods that can raise your blood sugar too much or too fast. Obviously, foods that are high in sugar—both processed and natural—can cause blood sugar to spike, but plenty of foods that aren’t sweet, like those high in refined carbohydrates, can still have a high glycemic index and add too much sugar too quickly to your bloodstream (refined starches act a lot like sugar once they’re digested). The glycemic index is a measurement of how fast a carbohydrate raises your blood sugar; it’s suggested that when a diabetic eats one of the foods on our list (which have high glycemic indexes), it be balanced out with a low-glycemic index food, like steel-cut oatmeal or non-starchy vegetables. The Mayo Clinic suggests that diabetics center their diet on fruits, vegetables, and whole grains instead of simple carbs, animal products, and sweets. There’s no specific diabetes diet, but some foods should certainly be avoided, or at least consumed in strict moderation. Foods that are high in cholesterol, fat, sodium, carbohydrates, and calories are unhealthy in general, but are even more dangerous for diabetics because their health is already compromised, and their body is working overtime to keep them healthy. Each case of diabetes is unique, so diabetics should wor Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

The Best—and Worst—foods For Diabetics

The Best—and Worst—foods For Diabetics

If you have type 2 diabetes or are at high risk for the disease, you know that soda, candy, and doughnuts won't exactly do you any favors. That's because eating too many of these sugar-loaded refined carbs over time can lead to consistently elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance—which spells serious damage for your kidneys, eyes, nerves, and heart. But avoiding long-term complications of this disease is about more than forgoing blood sugar–spiking foods, says Amy Hess Fischl, RDN, a registered dietitian and diabetes educator at the University of Chicago Diabetes Center. In addition to carb control, people with diabetes should be eating foods that lower high blood pressure and high cholesterol and reduce excess weight—some of the triggers that likely contributed to diabetes in the first place. So, which foods can you feel good about? As a general guide, those rich in potassium, calcium, fiber, magnesium, fiber, and vitamins A, C, and E are good choices, says Fischl. Even fats can be good, as long as they're healthy fats and portion size is in check. Here are some of Fischl's top picks—and what you're better off skipping. Whole Grains—Eat! When it comes to diabetes, not all carbs are created equal. Whole grains—whole grain bread, quinoa, and bran, among others—unlike their non-whole counterparts, are fiber-rich, which actually slows digestion and slows how quickly carbs get turned into glucose, helping prevent blood sugar spikes. Plus, the fiber from whole grains will help keep you full longer, and some whole grains—pearled barley and oatmeal—also deliver potassium. The bottom line: Whole grains (in appropriate portions) don't affect blood sugars as drastically as other carbs. (Try one of these 3 healthy grains you should be eating.) Salmon Continue reading >>

5 Worst Foods You Can Eat—and What To Have Instead

5 Worst Foods You Can Eat—and What To Have Instead

When it comes to poor food choices for people with diabetes—and everyone else for that matter—sugary sweets top the list. But other choices, like fat-laden meats, breads and other baked goods made with refined white flour, and starchy, low-fiber snacks like potato chips and pretzels, can be just as harmful to your health in the long run if you eat them in excess. Never fear. We have tasty substitutes for some of the worst offenders. Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

Here Are The Best And Worst Foods For A Diabetic | Miami Herald

Here Are The Best And Worst Foods For A Diabetic | Miami Herald

We all tend to overeat sugary and fattening foods during the holiday season. But for many, particularly those with dietary challenges like diabetes, it’s an everyday struggle. The prevalence of diabetes in the U.S. climbed to a new high of 11.6 percent of Americans in 2016, up from 10.6 percent in 2008, according to a new report by Gallup and Sharecare, titled “The Face of Diabetes in the United States.” About 1.5 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year, estimates the American Diabetes Association. Roughly 95 percent have Type 2, the result of the nation’s obesity epidemic, a by-product of too little exercise and too much bad food. Never miss a local story. Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access. SUBSCRIBE NOW In Type 2, the pancreas produces insulin, but the body doesn’t use it properly, which can wreck havoc with blood-sugar levels. “Researchers have found over 60 different causes for Type 2 diabetes,” said Natalia Torres-Negron, a registered dietitian in Cleveland Clinic’s endocrinology department and patient educator at the Weston hospital. But lifestyle does “play a huge role” in preventing or improving the disease, she added. Diet, weight and sedentary behavior are “part of the whole package,” added Randy Kaplan, clinical dietitian at Memorial Hospital Pembroke. “It’s important to look at the big picture.” One strategy is to ask patients about their current typical diet and “together we choose one thing to change,” Torres-Negron said. “One patient had juice or soda with every single meal. He switched to water and didn’t make any other change in his diet. He was able to lose 10 pounds in a month just by doing that.” “Patients often think that certain foods are their enemy,” Continue reading >>

50 Worst Foods For Diabetes

50 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Controlling your diabetes requires a careful balance of lifestyle habits, including eating right, exercising, and taking your proper medication. But it can be tricky to navigate proper nutrition, especially with foods that sound healthy but can actually wreak havoc on your blood sugar and overall health. In fact, diabetics are two to four times more likely than people without diabetes to die of heart disease or experience a life-threatening stroke, according to the American Heart Association. It’s even more dangerous for those who don’t control their diabetes; it can lead to heart disease, nerve damage, and kidney disease. To stay on track, be sure to avoid these 50 foods that will spike your blood sugar and lead to chronic inflammation. Luckily, life with diabetes doesn’t have to be flavor free. “After working with thousands of diabetic individuals over the years, I noticed that many asked me the same question at their first appointment. ‘Can I still eat my favorite foods?’” says Lori Zanini, RD, CDE, author of Eat What You Love Diabetes Cookbook. “And the answer from me was always ‘Yes!’ It’s the portion sizes and frequency that makes the most difference, in addition to how the food is prepared.” As always, be sure to consult with your doctor, registered dietitian, or certified diabetes educator before making any drastic changes to your diet. Some of these recommendations may change if you are suffering from low blood sugar. If you’re looking for what you can enjoy, be sure to stock up on the 50 Best Foods for Diabetes. Sure, it seems healthy, but a pulverized, low-fiber smoothie made primarily of fruit isn’t the best bet for those with diabetes. “Smoothies can be large whacks of carbs and sugar, especially if there’s no protein or heal Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Candy Not only do high-sugar foods like candy, cookies, syrup, and soda lack nutritional value, but these low-quality carbohydrates also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications. Learn to satisfy your sweet tooth by snacking on high-quality carbohydrates such as fresh fruit. Apples, berries, pears, grapes, and oranges all have sweet, juicy flavors and are packed with fiber to help slow the absorption of glucose, making them a much better choice for blood sugar control. When snacking on fruit, pair it with a protein food, such as a string cheese, nonfat yogurt, or handful of nuts, to further reduce the impact on your blood sugar. (For more sweet ideas, see my list of 20 Low-Sugar Snack ideas). Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetics – Best And Worst Foods

Type Ii Diabetics – Best And Worst Foods

Having diabetes can make dining out a nightmare, but knowing what the best and worst foods for type II diabetics can help you manage and even cure it! There is a sort of balancing act that has to happen to keep the body’s blood sugar levels in the right range without getting too hungry. That’s why it’s just as important to know what NOT to eat as it is to know what to eat. Why is this so important? Because having blood sugar too low or too high can cause big swings in a diabetic’s symptoms, including: Dizziness Headaches Cravings Frequent Urination Unusually High Thirst Fatigue Tingling in the Hands And many other side effects happen when a type II diabetic’s blood sugar is out of whack. So the goal is to be eating the kinds of food that make you feel full and happy, WITHOUT the crazy blood sugar spikes. P.S. If you’re into healthy eating tools, check out our awesome Healthy Salad Dressing Recipes Magnet and Gluten-Free and Dairy Free Conversion Magnets at the end of this article! The Basics Chances are that you don’t have a nutrition degree and probably started with a very vague understanding of what type II diabetes is. In order to follow a healthy diet, understanding how certain foods affect blood sugar is key. The good news: Keep in mind that type II diabetes is curable in most cases. With the right plan of action and program, many people see their type II diabetes reversed. The following foods are a big part of curing and managing diabetes. The Best and Worst Foods for Type II Diabetics Proteins Proteins are the building blocks of lean muscle tissue and a healthy, happy body. It will also have virtually no effect on blood sugar levels. So you should be eating a large amount of protein in a diabetic diet. Best sources: Lean protein sources like organic Continue reading >>

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions among adults and children worldwide (1). Uncontrolled diabetes has many serious consequences, including heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and other complications. Prediabetes has also been linked to these conditions (2). Importantly, eating the wrong foods can raise your blood sugar and insulin levels and promote inflammation, which may increase your risk of disease. This article lists 11 foods that people with diabetes or prediabetes should avoid. Carbs, protein and fat are the macronutrients that provide your body with energy. Of thesen three, carbs have the greatest effect on your blood sugar by far. This is because they are broken down into sugar, or glucose, and absorbed into your bloodstream. Carbs include starches, sugar and fiber. However, fiber isn't digested and absorbed by your body in the same way other carbs are, so it doesn't raise your blood sugar. Subtracting fiber from the total carbs in a food will give you its digestible or "net" carb content. For instance, if a cup of mixed vegetables contains 10 grams of carbs and 4 grams of fiber, its net carb count is 6 grams. When people with diabetes consume too many carbs at a time, their blood sugar levels can rise to dangerously high levels. Over time, high levels can damage your body's nerves and blood vessels, which may set the stage for heart disease, kidney disease and other serious health conditions. Maintaining a low carb intake can help prevent blood sugar spikes and greatly reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Therefore, it's important to avoid the foods listed below. Sugary beverages are the worst drink choice for someone with diabetes. To begin with, they are very high in carbs, with a 12-ounce (354-ml) can of soda prov Continue reading >>

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

Despite conventional wisdom, a diabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you have to commit to a bland and boring diet. There are loads of delicious foods that are safe and healthy to eat—you may just not know what they are yet. But that’s okay, because we’re here to help! Read on to discover the best and worst drinks, grains, proteins, and produce picks for your diet, according to top nutritionists. Once you’ve read through the list and added some things to your shopping list, click over to these 15 Cooking and Eating Tips If You Have Diabetes to find out how to transform the Eat This picks into delicious, satisfying meals. According to the American Diabetes Association, it’s important to choose the most nutritious whole grains possible. Although grains help to maintain steady blood-sugar levels and provide heart-healthy fiber, white flour-based products can’t claim the same. Because the bran, germ, and endosperm have been compromised, these foods elevate blood-sugar levels and should only be consumed on occasion. “Oats contain a type of fiber called beta-glucan, which seems to have an anti-diabetic effect,” explains Jackie Newgent, RDN, CDN, author of The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook., adding,* “I advise people with diabetes to steer clear of added sugars by enjoying savory rather than sweet oatmeal.” For some tips on whipping up a delectable bowl of oats, dig into these 20 Savory Oatmeal Recipes for a Flat Belly. Though you likely assumed sugary donuts and muffins weren’t the best way to kick off your day, we bet you didn’t realize just how awful certain pastries can be. “Cinnamon rolls, for example, can contain more saturated fat and added sugars than people with diabetes should have in an entire day,” cautions Newgent. Yikes! Always turn down t Continue reading >>

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