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Worse Type Of Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes – type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2. There are 3.9 million people living with diabetes in the UK. That's more than one in 16 people in the UK who has diabetes (diagnosed or undiagnosed). This figure has nearly trebled since 1996, when there were 1.4 million. By 2025, it is estimated that 5 million people will have diabetes in the UK. Pre-diabetes Many more people have blood sugar levels above the normal range, but not high enough to be diagnosed as having diabetes. This is sometimes known as prediabetes. If your blood sugar level is above the normal range, your risk of developing full-blown diabetes is increased. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. When to see a doctor You should therefore visit your GP as soon as possible if you have symptoms, such as feeling thirsty, passing urine more often than usual, and feeling tired all the time. Symptoms of diabetes The main symptoms of diabetes are: feeling very thirsty urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk itching around the penis or vagina, or frequent episodes of thrush cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision Type 1 diabetes can develop quickly over weeks or even days. Many people have type 2 diabetes for years without realising because the early symptoms tend to be general. What causes diabetes? The amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancr Continue reading >>

That Pizza May Be Worse For You If You Have Diabetes

That Pizza May Be Worse For You If You Have Diabetes

DIABETES: Fast food contains a lot of sugar and fat. But even worse, it causes blood sugar and fat levels (glucose and triglycerides) to skyrocket. Previous studies have shown that vascular function is impaired in the period right after you eat unhealthy foods, but there have been fewer studies of how the heart reacts. Now a study by NTNU’s Cardiac Exercise Research Group suggests that a single meal of fast food stresses the heart, and that the negative effect is greater for patients with type 2 diabetes than in healthy individuals. “Both the healthy and diabetic participants experienced changes in their diastolic heart function within half an hour after they had eaten. The heart needed to work harder to fill with blood in the relaxed diastole phase. While this effect was reversed after four hours in healthy participants, the effect lasted the longer for diabetics,” says the study’s first author Siri Marte Hollekim-Strand. Study method Ten individuals with type 2 diabetes and ten healthy individuals participated in the study. They were all the same age and had similar BMIs. A single meal of fast food stresses the heart, and the negative effect may be greater in patients with type 2 diabetes. Photo: Thinkstock All 20 participants ate a whole Dr. Oetker mozzarella pizza on three different occasions: 16-18 hours after they had completed either a workout with intensive 4 × 4 intervals, or a workout of moderate intensity or no training. The researchers measured participants’ heart function with ultrasound both before the workouts and before the meal, and then again 30 minutes, two hours and four hours after the meal. “The heart rate also increased after ingesting fast food, but here no significant differences between groups resulted. The pre-exercise workout (or Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes – where the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin type 2 diabetes – where the body doesn't produce enough insulin, or the body's cells don't react to insulin Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2. During pregnancy, some women have such high levels of blood glucose that their body is unable to produce enough insulin to absorb it all. This is known as gestational diabetes. Pre-diabetes Many more people have blood sugar levels above the normal range, but not high enough to be diagnosed as having diabetes. This is sometimes known as pre-diabetes. If your blood sugar level is above the normal range, your risk of developing full-blown diabetes is increased. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. When to see a doctor Visit your GP as soon as possible if you experience the main symptoms of diabetes, which include: urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision Type 1 diabetes can develop quickly over weeks or even days. Many people have type 2 diabetes for years without realising because the early symptoms tend to be general. Causes of diabetes The amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). When food is digested and enters your bloodstream, insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it's broken down to produce ene Continue reading >>

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

A fellow caregiver asked... How serious is type 2 diabetes, and is it less or more serious than type 1 diabetes? My mom, just diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, keeps it under control without taking insulin. So is type 2 diabetes less of a problem than insulin-dependent type 1? Expert Answers No, definitely not. In fact, in some ways type 2 diabetes is a more serious disorder because your mom may have had it for years before she was diagnosed. So she may well have developed some of the long-term, debilitating complications linked to the condition without knowing it. In addition, since type 2 diabetes is a progressive disorder without a cure, over time her body may not be able to produce insulin or use it as well as it does now, and she may wind up needing insulin injections or pills. A person with type1 diabetes ignores it for a day at his own peril. He'll likely end up in the emergency room because his body can't absorb glucose without a continuous supply of insulin via injection or an insulin pump. People with type 1 diabetes typically develop such severe symptoms over a short time in childhood or early adulthood that they're forced to deal with it. Type 2 diabetes is a sneakier condition: Its harmful health effects can slowly build for years until full-blown complications, such as vision loss, heart disease, or foot problems, make it impossible to ignore. Plus it often comes with its own set of problems. For instance, people with type 2 diabetes are frequently diagnosed with high blood pressure and cholesterol along with high blood sugar. This damaging threesome can lead to progressive thickening of the arteries and reduced blood flow, putting your mom at greater risk for a slew of complications including heart disease, stroke, and nerve damage. If your mom is overweigh Continue reading >>

The Good, The Bad And The Worst Of Type 1 Diabetes

The Good, The Bad And The Worst Of Type 1 Diabetes

It is common in a diabetic’s life to face questions like “do you have the good type of diabetes or the bad one?” To be really honest, these are the types of questions that I really don’t know how to answer. What does “good” and “bad” diabetes even mean? Recently, I changed jobs in my office, so now I’m facing a lot of these types of questions again, and because of this, I thought that maybe it would be interesting to write a bit about the basic features of diabetes — the good, the bad and the worst. The Good Let’s start with the “goods” of diabetes. Because Diabetes is associated with the lack of capability of your body to naturally regulate the levels of glucose in your bloodstream, as a type 1 diabetic, you always have to help your body do that. In addition to self-injecting insulin, you can also do simple things like pay special attention to what you eat and how often you exercise. In this way, diabetes gives you an extra-healthy motivation to exercise every day and to eat healthier. This is clearly a good thing — you become more aware of your own fitness levels and more conscious about these kinds of topics. When my personal trainer discovered that I was diabetic, right away he understood why did I knew all the information about the “recommended amount of carbs” — the type of carbs and digestion times — that we had discussed during our first session. Review my blog posts on exercising and nutrition for more information on this. The Bad Looking at the bad things, the first that comes to my mind is definitely the danger that a diabetic faces every time we don’t eat enough, or when we inject too many units of insulin. All these situations can have repercussions in terms of losing consciousness and doing things that you end up not r Continue reading >>

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Tweet Whilst both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterised by having higher than normal blood sugar levels, the cause and development of the conditions are different. Confused over which type of diabetes you have? It's not always clear what type of diabetes someone has, despite what many people think. For instance, the typical assumption is that people with type 2 diabetes will be overweight and not inject insulin, while people with type 1 diabetes will be, if anything, underweight. But these perceptions just aren't always true. Around 20% of people with type 2 diabetes are of a healthy weight when diagnosed, and many of them are dependent on insulin. Similarly, people with type 1 diabetes will in some cases be overweight. Because both types of diabetes can be so varied and unpredictable, it's often difficult to know which type of diabetes someone has. It's not safe to assume that an overweight person with high blood glucose levels has type 2 diabetes, because the cause of their condition might in fact be attributable to type 1. In some cases, when the type of diabetes is in doubt, your health team may need to carry out specialised tests to work out which type of diabetes you have. This way, they can recommend the most appropriate treatment for your diabetes. Common differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Despite the uncertainty that often surrounds a diagnosis of diabetes, there are a few common characteristics of each diabetes type. Please note that these differences are based on generalisations - exceptions are common. For instance, the perception of type 1 diabetes isn't strictly true: many cases are diagnosed in adulthood. This table should be seen as a rough guide to the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, rather than hard and fast rules. Co Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

It's Worse Than We Thought: 3 New Revelations In Sleep Health

It's Worse Than We Thought: 3 New Revelations In Sleep Health

It's Worse Than We Thought: 3 New Revelations in Sleep Health Not getting enough sleep is tied to everything from lack of productivity to Alzheimer's and type 2 diabetes. Draw a line between professional time and personal time, and make sleep a higher priority. It's healthy. Shutterstock Oct. 31, 2017, 11:59 AM UTC/UpdatedOct. 31, 2017, 11:59 AM UTC You undoubtedly realize that sleep is important, if for no other reason than youve experienced the grogginess and detrimental productivity effects firsthand after a night of little to no sleep. You probably also realize that a chronic lack of sleep is bad for your health , making you vulnerable to other illnesses and conditions. However, theres still much that scientists dont fully understand about sleep, and were constantly uncovering new information about how sleep-related habits affect our health. The more we learn about sleep, the more important we understand it to be and the latest findings confirm that a chronic lack of sleep is even worse than you thought. Here are three new eye-opening studies on subject of sleep: Alzheimers disease is a complex form of dementia, which develops with age and grows progressively worse, limiting your cognitive functions, impairing your memory, and even interfering with your sense of identity. Its a frightening disease we still dont fully understand, but researchers at the Alzheimers Association International Conference in London recently revealed they discovered correlation between lack of sleep and Alzheimers disease. Their study focused on sleep-disordered breathing, like sleep apnea, but may apply to a broader population struggling with getting adequate sleep. This site is protected by recaptcha Privacy Policy | Terms of Service In one study focusing on children, losing just one hou Continue reading >>

Which Is More Worse Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is More Worse Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes is a complicated condition and is mainly categorized into two different types: Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. There are a lot of differences as well as similarities between the two-condition due to which people often argue as to which type of diabetes is worse than the other. The following article deals with this question as we try to understand the differences and similarities between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. So, read on “Which is More Worse Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes?” Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Let us first start by understanding the differences between the two types of diabetes. Following are the major differences: Definition Type 1 is the type of diabetes that is caused when the beta cells of the pancreas responsible for the production of the hormone insulin are destroyed completely. Thus, the body lacks insulin. Type 2 is the condition where the pancreas of the body is able to produce the hormone. However, the body is unable to utilize the hormone appropriately for several reasons. Causes The main causes of type 1 are genetic disorders, exposure to varied types of viral infections such as mumps and other viruses, exposure to the toxins in the environment, amongst others. Insulin resistance is the most important cause of type 2 diabetes. The condition is also associated with the increase in the body weight of the individual as well as with high levels of blood pressure and bad cholesterol levels. Genes can also be a factor here too. Onset The onset in case of type 1 is often very rapid, while the onset of type 2 is often really slow. The type 1 is mostly diagnosed during the childhood while type 2 is said to be diagnosed in adults who are usually over 30 years of age. Symptoms In either type of diabetes, the symptoms are slow to appea Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - This Item Of Clothing Could Be Making Condition Worse

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - This Item Of Clothing Could Be Making Condition Worse

People with diabetes have a much greater risk of developing problems with their feet, due to the damage raised blood sugars can cause to sensation and circulation. By 2025 experts believe more than 5 million people in the UK will have diabetes. This can lead to amputation as a result of incurable foot ulcers. However, now experts have said wearing socks could make symptoms worse and exacerbate symptoms - resulting in amputation in the most serious cases. Innovators at Gentle Grip IOMO Footnurse Socks have designed socks which could help diabetics. The producers said the design eradicates the elastic that can create unnecessary complications for the adult population with diabetes. The company said: “Gentle Grip IOMI Footnurse Socks have done away with elastic completely, thanks to the non-restrictive Honeycomb Top that holds secure, moulds to the natural contours of the ankle and calf and are made a soft-touch, breathable cotton that creates a healthy environment. “The finished product has been a sensation, with the Sockshop brand including the Gentle Grip IOMI Footnurse socks boasting worldwide with sales totalling over 30 million, helping diabetics put their best foot forward all day, every day.” Raised blood sugar levels caused by diabetes can affect sensation and circulation, which can be made worse by the tight elastic in ordinary socks. This means that small injuries such as cuts or blisters from shoes rubbing can go undetected, risking infection and ulcers. Guidance by health watchdog NICE said: “Foot complications are common in people with diabetes. “It is estimated that 10 per cent of people with diabetes will have a diabetic foot ulcer at some point in their lives. “A foot ulcer can be defined as a localised injury to the skin and/or underlying tiss Continue reading >>

Flu And People With Diabetes

Flu And People With Diabetes

People with diabetes (type 1 or type 2), even when well-managed, are at high risk of serious flu complications, often resulting in hospitalization and sometimes even death. Pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections and ear infections are examples of flu-related complications. The flu also can make chronic health problems, like diabetes, worse. This is because diabetes can make the immune system less able to fight infections. In addition, illness can make it harder to control your blood sugar. The illness might raise your sugar but sometimes people don’t feel like eating when they are sick, and this can cause blood sugar levels to fall. So it is important to follow the sick day guidelines for people with diabetes. Vaccination is the Best Protection against Flu CDC recommends that all people who are 6 months and older get a flu vaccine. It is especially important for people with diabetes to get a flu vaccine. Flu shots are approved for use in people with diabetes and other health conditions. The flu shot has a long, established safety record in people with diabetes. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of developing pneumococcal pneumonia because of the flu, so being up to date with pneumococcal vaccination is also recommended. Pneumococcal vaccination should be part of a diabetes management plan. Talk to your doctor to find out which pneumococcal vaccines are recommended for you. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing and throw the tissue away after using it; Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after coughing or sneezing; Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth (germs are spread that way); and Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care. If you are sick with flu-like symptoms you should sta Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Kidney Disease (stages 1-4)

Diabetes And Kidney Disease (stages 1-4)

What is diabetes? Diabetes happens when your body does not make enough insulin or cannot use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone. It controls how much sugar is in your blood. A high level of sugar in your blood can cause problems in many parts of your body, including your heart, kidneys, eyes, and brain. Over time, this can lead to kidney disease and kidney failure. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes generally begins when people are young. In this case, the body does not make enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes is usually found in adults over 40, but is becoming more common in younger people. It is usually associated with being overweight and tends to run in families. In type 2 diabetes, the body makes insulin, but cannot use it well. What is chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Your kidneys are important because they keep the rest of your body in balance. They: Remove waste products from the body Balance the body’s fluids Help keep blood pressure under control Keep bones healthy Help make red blood cells. When you have kidney disease, it means that the kidneys have been damaged. Kidneys can get damaged from a disease like diabetes. Once your kidneys are damaged, they cannot filter your blood nor do other jobs as well as they should. When diabetes is not well controlled, the sugar level in your blood goes up. This is called hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) can cause damage to many parts of your body, especially the kidneys, heart, blood vessels, eyes, feet, nerves. Diabetes can harm the kidneys by causing damage to: Blood vessels inside your kidneys. The filtering units of the kidney are filled with tiny blood vessels. Over time, high sugar levels in the blood can cause these vessels to become narrow and clogged. Without enough blood, the kid Continue reading >>

Why Diabetes Is Worse Than Cancer

Why Diabetes Is Worse Than Cancer

I have said to many as well as writing here that diabetes is more difficult to deal with than either bout with cancer ever was. For some this is difficult to believe so I am going to explain myself. After the initial shock of the news of cancer I was told of the survival rate. Then I knew cancer would be just a bump in the road. While there is no cure it goes into remission which is my current state. Diabetes is forever until someone makes a magical elixir that will cure it. Diabetes is a finicky disease, and even with the best control, you can have bad days. That extra piece of pizza or that fun night out can throw you for a loop. Yes, in most cases it does not take long to get back to normal but not being able to eat or drink on a whim can be frustrating. I have always been a fighter. Most do not understand my flippant attitude about it all. It is not that I am carefree but one thing cancer taught me was to enjoy every sandwich. Yes if you are keeping count that is the second reference in this blog’s history to the Warren Zevon quote. I am going to start taking more leaps, not foolishly and blind but take more chances. I am going to say yes more. I am going to respect my time here. Every single second is precious, every day this is one thing I know for sure. I Survived Thankgiving It used to be that the holidays were a time of gluttony. I would get more excited about food at holiday parties more than anything. I would eat until my belly was an actual bowl of jelly. There was no such thing as enough. Unless it was “not enough”. This time around is different. I... Read more » The Winey Diabetic I remember in my younger years as a irresponsible diabetic I would party like a rock star. It was a given that at least once a weekend I would drink the night away with so Continue reading >>

Why Prescribing Insulin Makes Type 2 Diabetes Even Worse (and How To Naturally Reverse It)

Why Prescribing Insulin Makes Type 2 Diabetes Even Worse (and How To Naturally Reverse It)

The United States has seen a rapid rise in pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes over the last decade. Nearly 80 million people—about one in four—now has diabetes or pre-diabetes. Diabetes among children and teens is also growing at a rapid rate. The most recent data1,2 reveals that, between 2001 and 2009, type 2 diabetes among children aged 10-19 rose by 30 percent. Overwhelmingly, the evidence points to a faulty diet—indeed the entire culture of inappropriate, health-harming food—which is the topic of the fast-paced documentary, Carb-Loaded: A Culture Dying to Eat,3 produced by Lathe Poland and Eric Carlsen. Poland was himself diagnosed with diabetes in 2010, which led to the creation of this revealing film. In a press release, Poland notes: “I wasn’t overweight… To be honest, I was completely blown away when my doctor gave me the diagnosis. Why would a seemingly healthy 30 something man like myself get a disease like this? My misconception like most people was that there were two scenarios where you get diabetes…Either it’s hereditary and it’s not your fault, or you eat junk food like it’s going out of style and end up diabetic.” His doctor wanted him to take three different medications, and what alarmed Poland was what he calls “the rubber stamp approach.” So he decided to look deeper, to find out what really causes diabetes, and whether the drug approach was really the only remedy. Processed Carbs Fuel the Diabetes Epidemic For the last 50 years, Americans have been told to eat a high complex carbohydrate, low saturated fat diet. Even diabetics have been told to eat 50-60 percent of their daily calories in the form of processed carbs. As the filmmakers note, “refined and processed foods, especially processed carbohydrates have become a stap Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2

Type 1 And Type 2

Differences Between Understanding diabetes starts with knowing the different types of diabetes and their key differences. The two most common types are type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the body makes little or no insulin due to an overactive immune system. So people with type 1 diabetes must take insulin every day. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children and young adults but can also appear in older adults. Type 2 diabetes In type 2 diabetes, your body prevents the insulin it does make from working right. Your body may make some insulin but not enough. Most people with diabetes—about 90% to 95%—have type 2. This kind of diabetes usually happens in people who are older, although even younger adults may be diagnosed with it. Type 2 diabetes also usually occurs in people who are overweight. In fact, about 8 out of 10 people with type 2 diabetes are overweight. Diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes) Some women may develop diabetes during pregnancy, which is called gestational diabetes. Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes doesn't mean a woman had diabetes before or would continue to have diabetes after giving birth. A woman should follow her health care provider's advice closely during pregnancy. Continue reading >>

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