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Healthy Eating Begins With Breakfast :: World Diabetes Day Observed

Healthy Eating Begins With Breakfast :: World Diabetes Day Observed

World Diabetes Day was observed on 14 November 2014 all over the world including Bangladesh. The theme of the year is ‘Healthy Eating Begins with Breakfast’. It is celebrated as United Nations Day since 2007, the year UN Revolution was adopted. Awareness meeting with slogans for prevention and control of Diabetes, posters, leaflets, health magazine "KANTI" were published and banners, festoons were installed at BIRDEM complex and at different part of the city to signify the day. To mark the day Diabetic Association of Bangladesh hold a Grand Rally in front of the National Museum at 8am inaugurated by Prof. A.K. Azad Khan, President of Diabetic Association of Bangladesh. After the rally a colorful Bicycle procession played through Shabagh to Mirpur, Darusalam. Free diabetes screening was also organized by BADAS at different city points including in front of the National Press Club, Dhanmondi Rabindra Sorobor and the National Museum. NHN and HCDP also organized free diabetic checkup camp at their different centers on this occasion. A mammoth Discussion Meeting highlighting the significance of the day was held at BIRDEM auditorium. Mr. Zahid Maleque, MP, State Minister, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of the People's Republic of Bangladesh graced the function as chief guest and Mr. M. Mustafa Zaman, NCD Co-coordinator, WHO and Dr. Mohammad Shanewaj, Additional DG, Health were the special guest . President of Diabetic Association of Bangladesh Prof. A.K. Azad Khan presided while Mr. Md Sayef Uddin , Major General (Rtd.) Prof. A R Khan and Prof. Nazmun Nahar spoke in the meeting. Prof. Nazma Shahin, Institute of Nutrition and Food Science, Dhaka University presented the key note paper on the theme subject of WDD 2014 . Ibrahim Cardiac Hospital organized Continue reading >>

Health Tips For World Diabetes Day

Health Tips For World Diabetes Day

Each year on November 14 the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) seek to promote the theme of ‘education and prevention’ on World Diabetes Day. A huge concern for the modern generation, the campaign slogan for 2012 is ‘Diabetes: protect our future’ and focuses on supporting those with type 1 diabetes and preventing our current generation of children from developing type 2 diabetes. The date is significant in the diabetes calendar because it marks the birthday of the man who co-discovered insulin, Frederick Banting. But whilst insulin has provided those suffering with a way to lead a regular and full life there are many other helpful tips and tricks that can help to prevent the effects of diabetes... • Look on the bright side Stress can get in the way of taking care of yourself and managing your diabetes. So find out what's causing stress in your life and find small ways to reduce or cope with the things that irritate you. A great way of doing this is simply to schedule something fun for yourself on a regular basis. • Exercise makes everything better Exercise is good for everybody. It gives you more energy, reduces stress, helps you relax, and makes it easier to fall asleep. Work towards doing at least 30 minutes every day but remember to choose an activity that you'll find fun rather than a chore. • Get regular checkups Keeping regular appointments with your doctor and getting tests will keep you up to date with your risks. Write down any questions that you have ahead of time and let your doctor know at the beginning of each visit what specific things you want to talk about. • Don't diet, just make healthier food choices Find a healthier way of eating that you can stick with for life by introducing a variety of foods packed full of vitamins and miner Continue reading >>

14th November - World Diabetes Day

14th November - World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day (WDD) is celebrated annually on November 14. Led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by IDF and the World Health Organization in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threat posed by diabetes. The World Diabetes Day 2014 campaign marks the first of a three-year (2014-16) focus on healthy living and diabetes. This year's activities and materials will specifically address the topic of healthy eating and its importance both in the prevention of type 2 diabetes and the effective management of diabetes to avoid complications. The latest estimates from the IDF Diabetes Atlas indicate that there are 382 million people living with diabetes worldwide. By 2035, 592 million people or one person in ten will have the disease. A further 316 million people are currently at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, with the number expected to increase to almost 500 million within a generation. What makes the pandemic particularly menacing is that throughout much of the world, it remains hidden. Up to half of all people with diabetes globally remain undiagnosed. Off to the Right Start This year’s activities on World Diabetes Day focus on the importance of starting the day with a healthy breakfast. Eating a healthy breakfast decreases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Skipping breakfast is associated with weight gain, one of the main risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Overweight and obesity account for up to 80% of new cases of type 2 diabetes. Know what to eat and not to eat in breakfast to reduce the risk of getting diabetes. Unhealthy breakfast options are: Fruit juice, fruit smoothies, sugar-sweetened yoghurt, white bread, pastries, croissants, most breakfast cereals, jam, honey, chocolate Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2016

World Diabetes Day 2016

Type 2 diabetes is the most frequent type of diabetes affecting adults in Hong Kong. Primary care is the first point of contact in the healthcare system. By applying the principle of family medicine and working in partnership with other healthcare professionals such as dietitians, nurses, optometrists and physiotherapists, primary care doctors are in a prime position to provide patient-centered, continuing and comprehensive care to diabetes patients taking into account individual patients’ needs and values. It is of paramount importance for primary care doctors to provide ongoing care to reduce risk factors, diagnose disease early, assess patients’ needs, offer suitable treatment, monitor treatment responses and adherence, and identify treatment barriers such as patients’ concerns and misperceptions, as well as empowering patients for self care. To sustain efforts of “Let’s beat diabetes” in around World Health Day 2016, the Primary Care Office would like to emphasize the essential role of primary care doctors in managing diabetes. Our new slogan is 「醫吾 醫好 家庭醫生幫到你」 “My Family Doctor walks with me” 醫吾 醫好 means "My family doctor offers me treatment and I am living well." In Cantonese, the words 醫唔醫好 may also be interpreted as the doubts of patients who fear to consult their family doctors despite presence of risk factors, which in turn may lead to delayed diagnosis and management. The English slogan actually echoes the true meaning of the Chinese slogan. We should trust our family doctors in providing quality health care according to our needs. This website includes a variety of useful resources, ranging from principles of diabetes management, to diabetic friendly recipes and myths on diabetes, as well as other ref Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day: Eyes In Focus

World Diabetes Day: Eyes In Focus

An early detection and treatment of retinopathy can prevent most cases of severe vision loss and blindness in people. Unfortunately poor and lower middle class people end up with the problems than the rich who can afford regular care It's been almost a year since Los Angeles residen... At a time when banks are facing challenges related... Diabetes is fast becoming one of the most challenging and major public health problems worldwide. Unfortunately, very few are aware of complications created in the eyes. It is presumed that this disease would affect a total of 4.4% by the end of 2030. Moreover, 183 million people (50%) are undiagnosed and 4.6 million deaths were caused by diabetes in 2011. It is the fifth leading cause of death in most high-income countries and there is substantial evidence that it is epidemic in many economically developing and newly industrialized countries. In Nepal, one out of three people aged 40 years or more are found to be suffering from pre-diabetes, a silent killer disease. In a survey in Kathmandu, one out of four people aged 60 years (25.99%) were found to be suffering from the disease. Reports till date show that there are 900,000 diabetic people in Nepal. Diabetes patients are found more in urban areas than in the rural and two-thirds of the diabetes patients are diagnosed during health camps, while the life expectancy of people suffering from diabetes is 13 years less than the normal life expectancy rate of the country. Diabetes affects different parts of the body leading to complications including heart disease, stroke, loss of limbs, kidney problems, and in pregnancy causing fatality. This disease can gradually disturb people’s vision, finally resulting in blindness due to diabetic retinopathy. It is one of the leading causes of visu Continue reading >>

Homelessness And World Diabetes Day

Homelessness And World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day falls this year on Tuesday, November 14 — right in the middle of Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week. In recognition of this day, the National Coalition for the Homeless would like to start a conversation among healthcare providers, community members, and homeless advocates about how to help individuals who are facing illness and homelessness at the same time. Consider the difficulty of managing a chronic illness like diabetes without the security of a home. The National Health Care for the Homeless Council (NHCHC) points out that, “[h]igh stress, unhealthy and dangerous environments, and an inability to control food intake often result in visits to emergency rooms and hospitalization which worsens overall health.” Simply having a home decreases the likelihood that an individual will be exposed to extreme weather or unsanitary conditions. Housing provides greater security, improving both mental and physical health. If you’ve ever wondered why we promote slogans like “Housing is Healthcare,” this is why. The NHCHC report goes on to point out that treatment is also more challenging without a home. In the case of diabetes, a report released by the Health Care for the Homeless Clinician’s Network noted that, “[h]ealthy meals can be hard to find, refrigerating insulin may be impossible, and medications for other illnesses may have a negative impact on metabolism.” The report suggests several strategies physicians can use to help their homeless patients with diabetes to manage symptoms and maintain health as much as possible. However, these patients are already facing such disadvantages that the self-care strategies recommended in the report are less than ideal. So what is there to do? Here are a few suggestions: 1) Encourage empathy am Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

Logo for World Diabetes Day World Diabetes Day is the primary global awareness campaign focusing on diabetes mellitus and is held on November 14 each year. Led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), each World Diabetes Day focuses on a theme related to diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes is largely preventable and treatable non-communicable disease that is rapidly increasing in numbers worldwide. Type 1 Diabetes is not preventable but can be managed with insulin injections. [1] Topics covered have included diabetes and human rights, diabetes and lifestyle, diabetes and obesity, diabetes in the disadvantaged and the vulnerable, and diabetes in children and adolescents. While the campaigns last the whole year, the day itself marks the birthday of Frederick Banting who, along with Charles Best and John James Rickard Macleod, first conceived the idea which led to the discovery of insulin in 1922.[2] History[edit] World Diabetes Day was launched in 1991 by the IDF and the World Health Organization (WHO) in response to the rapid rise of diabetes around the world.[1][3] By 2016, World Diabetes Day was being commemorated by over 230 IDF member associations in more than 160 countries and territories, as well as by other organizations, companies, healthcare professionals, politicians, celebrities, and people living with diabetes and their families.[4] Activities include diabetes screening programmes, radio and television campaigns, sports events and others. Themes[edit] Themes of previous World Diabetes Day campaigns have focused on different factors that influence the risk of diabetes and its complications:[5] 2013: Protect our Future: Diabetes Education and Prevention. 2014: Go Blue for Breakfast. 2015: Healthy Eating. 2016: Eyes on Diabetes. 2017: Women and diabetes – our rig Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017: Significance And When Is The Day Celebrated

World Diabetes Day 2017: Significance And When Is The Day Celebrated

Every year on November 14, different countries observe World Diabetes Day. Started by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 1991 as a reactionary measure against the rise of diabetes around the world, the day seeks to create awareness about the way diabetes affects people on a global scale. It focuses on diabetes mellitus. The day became an official United Nations Day in 2006 when the United Nation Resolution 61/225 was passed. The day also marks the birth anniversary of scientist and Nobel Laureate Frederick Banting, the co-discoverer of insulin. World Diabetes Day serves as a platform to promote the efforts of IDF and also brings to the fore the importance of taking actions to combat diabetes as a glaring global health problem. Each year, the day focuses on a particular theme pertaining to diabetes. In 2016, the theme was ‘Eyes on Diabetes’ whereas this year, the day concentrates on the effects of diabetes on women. The organisation, this year, seeks to make people aware about ‘Women and Diabetes’, especially those who are pregnant. It also intends to throw light on how their newborn might be affected by the condition. Nine countries in the South-East Asia (SEA) Region, including India has been shortlisted by IDF as the most affected by diabetes. A study conducted the Federation in India revealed that out of the 79.8 million adults living in India, a staggering 69.1 million adults suffer from diabetes. A blue circle logo, adopted in 2007 represents the campaign. It serves as the global symbol for diabetes and signifies the unity of the global diabetes community in response to the rising diabetes epidemic. Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day (WDD) is celebrated annually on November 14. Led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by IDF and the World Health Organization in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threat posed by diabetes. World Diabetes Day became an official United Nations Day in 2006 with the passage of United Nation Resolution 61/225. Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Campaign

World Diabetes Campaign

One of the most awaited campaigns our school looks forward to is World Diabetes Day. On November 14, WDD campaign intended to ignite the deep anticipation of the volunteers of the school as they whole heartedly attempted to aware everyone about the types and myths of diabetes, ways of preventing it or how to adapt healthy regime to maintain a steady diabetic lifestyle. Thus, the slogan of our campaign this year was “Be Sensible…Don’t Be Deprived” beside the international slogan of WDD “Our Right to a Healthy Future” and it was evident in our activities. Through the informative and entertaining activities, volunteers hoped to create a positive atmosphere for the victims. Their hardwork was visible in the tangible items such as key chains, bookmarks, and white balloons…etc. they created and gave away during their campaigns inside and outside of the school. The target audiences for the campaign were women and children. On November 30, NIS student volunteers actively engaged in a plethora of selfless acts, with hope to achieve their aim of a widespread awareness to the visitors of Friends of Jeddah Parks (the Amira Tarabulsii Branch for Women and Children). Our agenda apart from distributing giveaways and activating our corner through exciting activities and puppet show, was to promote the relation between diabetes and physical activities, and that was done through our jogging Marathon which took place in the park for 2-3 laps. The school later thanked all the participants of the Marathon and distributed appreciating medals. Other organizations present there were the Ministry of Health of Saudi Arabia and International Diabetes Care Center Every year, we aim to train our students to reach out a large scale of audience for their awareness and prevention from di Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2016 Quiz

World Diabetes Day 2016 Quiz

How much do you know about diabetes? Diabetes is a widespread disease and it’s on the rise in populations all over the world. It occurs when the pancreas is no longer able to make insulin, or the body is unable to make use of the insulin it produces. Insulin is vital for ensuring the glucose we eat reaches the cells in our body to produce energy. Without it, the build-up of unused glucose can cause damage to the body and failure of various organs and tissues. Take this quiz to see how much you know and to learn more about diabetes. Good luck! Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day is the world’s largest diabetes awareness campaign reaching a global audience of over 1 billion people in more than 160 countries. The campaign draws attention to issues of paramount importance to the diabetes world and keeps diabetes firmly in the public and political spotlight. World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by IDF and the World Health Organization in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threat posed by diabetes. World Diabetes Day became an official United Nations Day in 2006 with the passage of United Nation Resolution 61/225. The World Diabetes Day campaign aims to: Be the platform to promote IDF advocacy efforts throughout the year. Be the global driver to promote the importance of taking coordinated and concerted actions to confront diabetes as a critical global health issue. The campaign is represented by a blue circle logo that was adopted in 2007 after the passage of the UN Resolution on diabetes. The blue circle is the global symbol for diabetes awareness. It signifies the unity of the global diabetes community in response to the diabetes epidemic. Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017

World Diabetes Day 2017

The theme of World Diabetes Day 2017 is Women and diabetes - our right to a healthy future. The campaign will promote the importance of affordable and equitable access for all women at risk for or living with diabetes to the essential diabetes medicines and technologies, self-management education and information they require to achieve optimal diabetes outcomes and strengthen their capacity to prevent type 2 diabetes. IDF will release campaign materials from May through to September to help the diabetes and wider WDD stakeholder community to prepare for World Diabetes Day on 14 November. Key messages All women with diabetes require affordable and equitable access to care and education to better manage their diabetes and improve their health outcomes. Supporting facts There are currently over 199 million women living with diabetes. This total is projected to increase to 313 million by 2040. Two out of every five women with diabetes are of reproductive age, accounting for over 60 million women worldwide. Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women globally, causing 2.1 million deaths per year. Women with type 2 diabetes are almost 10 times more likely to have coronary heart disease than women without the condition. Women with type 1 diabetes have an increased risk of early miscarriage or having a baby with malformations. What needs to be done Health systems must pay adequate attention to the specific needs and priorities of women. All women with diabetes should have access to the essential diabetes medicines and technologies, self-management education and information they need to achieve optimal diabetes outcomes. All women with diabetes should have access to pre-conception planning services to reduce risk during pregnancy. All women and girls should have access Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

Tweet every year. It has grown from humble beginnings to become a globally-celebrated event which increases awareness about diabetes. Comprising hundreds of campaigns, activities, screenings, lecture, meetings and more, World Diabetes Day is proving internationally effective in spreading the message about diabetes and raising awareness for the condition. World Diabetes Day is internationally recognised and is an official United Nations Day. World Diabetes Day Each year, World Diabetes Day, which is co-ordinated by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), carries a particular theme. Between 2014-2016 it was healthy living and eating, and between 2009-2013 it was ‘education and prevention’. To learn more about World Diabetes Day, visit worlddiabetesday.org Countdown to World Diabetes Day 2017: World Diabetes Day 2017 The theme for World Diabetes Day 2017 is ‘Women and diabetes - our right to a healthy future.’ It is reported than one in 10 women live with diabetes, but not all women have the same access to education, treatment and care. This year’s campaign is designed to improve the affordability and accessibility for diabetes care worldwide to help women with diabetes better manage their diabetes and improve their health outcomes. Who introduced World Diabetes Day? World Diabetes Day was jointly introduced by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). The global diabetes awareness campaign was introduced amidst concern over an escalating diabetes epidemic. Why is November 14th World Diabetes Day? November 14th is a significant date in the diabetes calendar because it marks the birthday of the man who co-discovered insulin, Frederick Banting. Banting discovered insulin in 1922, alongside Charles Best. World Diabetes Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

On November 14 each year, World Diabetes Day aims to increase an awareness of the effects of diabetes and the complications caused by the disease. What Do People Do? The World Diabetes Day campaign is led by the International Diabetes Federation and its member associations around the world, including the American Diabetes Association, Diabetes UK, Diabetes Australia, the Canadian Diabetes Association, Diabetes South Africa, Diabetes New Zealand and the Diabetic Association of India. These organizations arrange events at international, national and local levels. Events include: Conferences, workshops and seminars for health and public policy professionals. The distribution of information to encourage at risk individuals to be screened for diabetes. Events to highlight diabetes in local and national media, including television, newspapers and Internet publications The World Diabetes Day bike races to increase awareness of diabetes. The distribution of geocoins for use in geocaching (a game for global positioning systems users). Civil leaders around the world issue proclamations on World Diabetes Day to raise awareness of diabetes in their communities. Many events aim to raise money for research into treatments for diabetes. Public Life World Diabetes Day is a global observance and not a public holiday. Background Diabetes is the common name for a range of conditions including diabetes mellitus type one and diabetes mellitus type two, diabetes insipidus and gestational diabetes. These are all conditions, which affect how the pancreas (an organ in the digestive system) secretes insulin or how the body reacts to this hormone. Depending on the type and severity, diabetes is controlled by dietary measures, weight loss, oral medication or injected or inhaled insulin. There is a Continue reading >>

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