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World Diabetes Day 2016 Slogan

14th November - World Diabetes Day

14th November - World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day (WDD) is celebrated annually on November 14. Led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by IDF and the World Health Organization in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threat posed by diabetes. The World Diabetes Day 2014 campaign marks the first of a three-year (2014-16) focus on healthy living and diabetes. This year's activities and materials will specifically address the topic of healthy eating and its importance both in the prevention of type 2 diabetes and the effective management of diabetes to avoid complications. The latest estimates from the IDF Diabetes Atlas indicate that there are 382 million people living with diabetes worldwide. By 2035, 592 million people or one person in ten will have the disease. A further 316 million people are currently at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, with the number expected to increase to almost 500 million within a generation. What makes the pandemic particularly menacing is that throughout much of the world, it remains hidden. Up to half of all people with diabetes globally remain undiagnosed. Off to the Right Start This year’s activities on World Diabetes Day focus on the importance of starting the day with a healthy breakfast. Eating a healthy breakfast decreases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Skipping breakfast is associated with weight gain, one of the main risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Overweight and obesity account for up to 80% of new cases of type 2 diabetes. Know what to eat and not to eat in breakfast to reduce the risk of getting diabetes. Unhealthy breakfast options are: Fruit juice, fruit smoothies, sugar-sweetened yoghurt, white bread, pastries, croissants, most breakfast cereals, jam, honey, chocolate Continue reading >>

Women And Diabetes Theme For This Years World Diabetes Day

Women And Diabetes Theme For This Years World Diabetes Day

Women and diabetes theme for this years World Diabetes Day Accessible and equal care focus of this years global diabetes awareness event. The annual World Diabetes Day, led by International Diabetes Federation, has announced the theme for this years event Women and Diabetes. The event , held each year on 14th November, will this year promote the importance of affordable and equitable access for all women at risk of developing, or living with diabetes to essential diabetes medicines and technologies, self-management education and information. The event will also focus on meeting the best outcomes for people with diabetes, while also looking to prevent future cases of type 2 diabetes . The slogan for this years World Diabetes Day is Our right to a healthy future. There are currently more than 199 million women living with diabetes worldwide and this total is estimated to increase to 313 million by 2040. Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women globally, with 2.1 million deaths each year. The campaign will highlight a number of issues that can affect women with diabetes around the world. In many developing countries, as a result of socioeconomic conditions, girls and women with diabetes experience barriers in accessing cost-effective diabetes prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment and care. Two out of every five women with diabetes are of reproductive age, accounting for more than 60 million women worldwide. Women with diabetes have more difficulty conceiving and may have an increased chance of having complications during their pregnancy. Approximately one in seven births is affected by gestational diabetes, a severe and neglected threat to maternal and child health. A significant number of women with gestational diabetes also go on to develop type Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017 Theme Announced: Woman & Diabetes

World Diabetes Day 2017 Theme Announced: Woman & Diabetes

The theme of World Diabetes Day (WDD) 2017 - 14 November - is Women and Diabetes, with the slogan "Our right to a healthy future". Led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the campaign will promote the importance of affordable and equitable access for all women at risk for or living with diabetes to the essential diabetes medicines and technologies, self-management education and information they require to achieve optimal diabetes outcomes and strengthen their capacity to prevent type 2 diabetes. There are currently over 199 million women living with diabetes and this total is projected to increase to 313 million by 2040. Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women globally, causing 2.1 million deaths each year. As a result of socioeconomic conditions, girls and women with diabetes experience barriers in accessing cost-effective diabetes prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment and care, particularly in developing countries. Two out of every five women with diabetes are of reproductive age, accounting for over 60 million women worldwide. Women with diabetes have more difficulty conceiving and may have poor pregnancy outcomes. Approximately one in seven births is affected by gestational diabetes (GDM), a severe and neglected threat to maternal and child health. A significant number of women with GDM also go on to develop type 2 diabetes resulting in further healthcare complications and costs. Women and girls must be empowered with equitable access to knowledge and resources that will strengthen their capacity to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, and influence the adoption of healthy lifestyles to improve the health and well-being of those around them and future generations. The first set of promotional materials promoting the ke Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

Logo for World Diabetes Day World Diabetes Day is the primary global awareness campaign focusing on diabetes mellitus and is held on November 14 each year. Led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), each World Diabetes Day focuses on a theme related to diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes is largely preventable and treatable non-communicable disease that is rapidly increasing in numbers worldwide. Type 1 Diabetes is not preventable but can be managed with insulin injections. [1] Topics covered have included diabetes and human rights, diabetes and lifestyle, diabetes and obesity, diabetes in the disadvantaged and the vulnerable, and diabetes in children and adolescents. While the campaigns last the whole year, the day itself marks the birthday of Frederick Banting who, along with Charles Best and John James Rickard Macleod, first conceived the idea which led to the discovery of insulin in 1922.[2] History[edit] World Diabetes Day was launched in 1991 by the IDF and the World Health Organization (WHO) in response to the rapid rise of diabetes around the world.[1][3] By 2016, World Diabetes Day was being commemorated by over 230 IDF member associations in more than 160 countries and territories, as well as by other organizations, companies, healthcare professionals, politicians, celebrities, and people living with diabetes and their families.[4] Activities include diabetes screening programmes, radio and television campaigns, sports events and others. Themes[edit] Themes of previous World Diabetes Day campaigns have focused on different factors that influence the risk of diabetes and its complications:[5] 2013: Protect our Future: Diabetes Education and Prevention. 2014: Go Blue for Breakfast. 2015: Healthy Eating. 2016: Eyes on Diabetes. 2017: Women and diabetes – our rig Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day was first introduced in 1991, and founded by both the International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organization. In reaction to the rise in cases of Diabetes worldwide, it was decided to choose a day of the year to raise awareness of Diabetes and related causes. The day chosen was the birthday of Sir Frederick Banting, a medical scientist who co-discovered Insulin and was the first person to use it on humans. The theme of World Diabetes Day regularly changes. For example, the theme for the day between 2009 and 2013 was education and prevention, and in the past such themes have been used such as human rights, lifestyle, obesity, the disadvantaged and vulnerable, and children/teenagers. Various events around the world mark the day including raising awareness in the media, lectures and conferences, sporting events, and leaflet/poster campaigning. “Going blue” is another global event to mark the day, where people wear blue and landmark buildings and monuments around the world are lit up in blue, to help spread awareness of the day. Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

Tweet every year. It has grown from humble beginnings to become a globally-celebrated event which increases awareness about diabetes. Comprising hundreds of campaigns, activities, screenings, lecture, meetings and more, World Diabetes Day is proving internationally effective in spreading the message about diabetes and raising awareness for the condition. World Diabetes Day is internationally recognised and is an official United Nations Day. World Diabetes Day Each year, World Diabetes Day, which is co-ordinated by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), carries a particular theme. Between 2014-2016 it was healthy living and eating, and between 2009-2013 it was ‘education and prevention’. To learn more about World Diabetes Day, visit worlddiabetesday.org Countdown to World Diabetes Day 2017: World Diabetes Day 2017 The theme for World Diabetes Day 2017 is ‘Women and diabetes - our right to a healthy future.’ It is reported than one in 10 women live with diabetes, but not all women have the same access to education, treatment and care. This year’s campaign is designed to improve the affordability and accessibility for diabetes care worldwide to help women with diabetes better manage their diabetes and improve their health outcomes. Who introduced World Diabetes Day? World Diabetes Day was jointly introduced by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). The global diabetes awareness campaign was introduced amidst concern over an escalating diabetes epidemic. Why is November 14th World Diabetes Day? November 14th is a significant date in the diabetes calendar because it marks the birthday of the man who co-discovered insulin, Frederick Banting. Banting discovered insulin in 1922, alongside Charles Best. World Diabetes Continue reading >>

About The Campaign

About The Campaign

Why take steps? Because diabetes is a pandemic Today, more than 415 million people have diabetes. By 2040, that could rise to 642 million. And 75% of people with diabetes live in low- and middle- income countries. Yet there's something we all can do, no matter where we live. Regular exercise helps keep blood sugar levels stable, reduces the risk of developing chronic diseases, and improves well-being. Since 2004, more than 3 million people have joined our effort to raise awareness and encourage more people to take steps to prevent this devastating disease. Join us, as we take steps to prevent diabetes! Common questions When did the The Global Diabetes Walk begin? The first Global Diabetes Walk was held in 2004. Why 14 November? November 14 is World Diabetes Day (WDD). Each year, the International Diabetes Federation marks the day with a global campaign promoting diabetes awareness and advocacy. The Global Diabetes Walk is the WDF's contribution to this important campaign. Can walks take place on other days? Yes. It is fine to organise a walk in the days before or after 14 November, if this suits your local needs. Who can organise and participate? All are welcome to organise and participate in Global Diabetes Walks. The WDF particularly encourages its partners in developing countries to do so. What if I'm planning other WDD events? That's great. Consider adding a Walk to your campaign - the Global Diabetes Walk supports and complements most World Diabetes Day activities. Learn more about the IDF's 2017 campaign. How can WDF support my Walk? We can provide you with new banners, posters and t-shirt designs for 2017. These are available in three languages (English, Spanish, French), with space for your local information. What you need to do:Download the designs, customise a Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2016

World Diabetes Day 2016

14 November 2016 marks World Diabetes Day. This year's theme, "Eyes on Diabetes", is a reminder that diabetes is among the leading causes of blindness and visual impairment. It is estimated that 422 million adults live with diabetes - 1 in every 11 people. The prevalence has almost doubled since 1980, with the steepest rise in low- and middle-income countries, largely due to population ageing, unhealthy diet and lack of physical activity. Diabetes impacts on health and economies, particularly through its deadly, debilitating and costly complications - blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks and strokes, and lower limb amputations. Of the three main types of diabetes, Type 1 requires insulin for survival and its causes are unknown, while Type 2 is associated with excess body weight and physical inactivity. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is often transitory, but can lead to undesirable pregnancy outcomes. About 7% of people with diabetes are at risk of blindness. The risk is highest in people with type 1 diabetes and those who have lived longer with the disease. Changes in the eyes are often insidious, and are noticed only at an advanced stage when treatment can do little to restore vision. Like other complications of diabetes, vision loss is preventable through good management of the disease. Most importantly, blood glucose and blood pressure should be controlled and eyes should be regularly examined, and laser or other treatment administered as needed. Unfortunately, in many low- and middle-income countries, health professionals do not always have the training needed to know the signs and care for patients with diabetes who are at risk of complications, and only 1 in 3 low-income countries have basic technologies for diagnosis and management of the diseas Continue reading >>

The Theme Of World Diabetes Day (wdd) 2017 - 14 November - Is Women And Diabetes

The Theme Of World Diabetes Day (wdd) 2017 - 14 November - Is Women And Diabetes

Led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the campaign will promote the importance of affordable and equitable access for all women at risk for or living with diabetes to the essential diabetes medicines and technologies, self-management education and information they require to achieve optimal diabetes outcomes and strengthen their capacity to prevent type 2 diabetes. There are currently over 199 million women living with diabetes, and this total is projected to increase to 313 million by 2040. Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women globally, causing 2.1 million deaths each year. As a result of socioeconomic conditions, girls and women with diabetes experience barriers in accessing cost-effective diabetes prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment and care, particularly in developing countries. Two out of every five women with diabetes are of reproductive age, accounting for over 60 million women worldwide. Women with diabetes have more difficulty conceiving and may have poor pregnancy outcomes. Approximately one in seven births is affected by gestational diabetes (GDM), a severe and neglected threat to maternal and child health. A significant number of women with GDM also go on to develop type 2 diabetes resulting in further healthcare complications and costs. Women and girls must be empowered with equitable access to knowledge and resources that will strengthen their capacity to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes and influence the adoption of healthy lifestyles to improve the health and well-being of those around them and future generations. Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2016

World Diabetes Day 2016

The fourteenth of November is World Diabetes Day, an observance day led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and recognized by the World Health Organization and the United Nations. The day aims to raise awareness of the condition globally. The theme of the 2016 campaign is “Eyes on diabetes” and focuses around screening, diagnosis, and treatment to reduce the complications of type 2 diabetes. In support of World Diabetes Day, we have collated a selection of content including journal articles and blog posts that explore a range of sub-topics such as diabetes in old age, improving diabetes care, and health service barriers in the management of diabetes. Flickr. Continue reading >>

Eyes On Diabetes – World Diabetes Day 2016

Eyes On Diabetes – World Diabetes Day 2016

World Diabetes Day (WDD) is celebrated by million s of people around the world on November 14th each year. [1] Led by the IDF, WDD is a global campaign that aims to raise awareness of diabetes and promote efforts to tackle the condition as a global health priority. [2] The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimate that 415 million adults were living with diabetes in 2015, with this number set to rise to around 642 million by 2040. [3] This is equivalent to one in 10 adults. [3] Diabetes is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease, blindness and kidney failure in many countries around the world, but some of these complications, such as blindness, can be prevented with early detection and treatment. [3] This year, the theme of WDD is “eyes on diabetes.” [2] Key messages of the campaign are: Screening for type 2 diabetes is essential for managing the condition and reducing the risk of complications. Screening for diabetes complications is a vital for the management of both types of diabetes. [2] Highlighted articles from BMJ Open for World Diabetes Day 2016 include: Social inequalities in prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and impaired glucose regulation in participants in the Health Surveys for England series Investigation of the relationship between patient empowerment and glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional analysis. Is self-monitoring of blood glucose effective in improving glycaemic control in type 2 diabeteswithout insulin treatment: A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials Sources World diabetes day 2016. Diabetes UK. accessed 8 November 2016 World diabetes day. IDF. accessed 31 October 2016 World diabetes day 2016. IDF. accessed, 31 October 2016 Continue reading >>

103 Rallies Raise Awareness On World Diabetes Day In Bangladesh

103 Rallies Raise Awareness On World Diabetes Day In Bangladesh

103 rallies raise awareness on World Diabetes Day in Bangladesh Published: 2016-11-15 01:56:14.0 BdSTUpdated: 2016-11-15 01:56:14.0 BdST Danish pharma Novo Nordisk has joined forces with the Diabetic Association of Bangladesh to raise awareness of the lifestyle disease on the World Diabetes Day 2016. The day was observed on Monday with the slogan eyes on diabetes. With 7.1 million people living with diabetes in Bangladesh in 2015, International Diabetes Federation has put the country among the top ten diabetes-burdened countries. The worlds largest insulin maker, Novo Nordisk in a statement said it participated in 103 rallies organised across Bangladesh with different associations affiliated with the Diabetic Association to celebrate the day. The biggest one was taken out in Dhaka from in front of National Museum. Healthcare professionals, people living with diabetes and all employees of Novo Nordisk have participated at the rally. They also organised a motivational programme for the children living with diabetes at Birdem hospital. Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017

World Diabetes Day 2017

Women and diabetes: Our right to a healthy future On World Diabetes Day 2017, WHO joins partners around the world to highlight women’s right to a healthy future. Around 8% of women – or 205 million women – live with diabetes worldwide, over half in South-East Asia and the Western Pacific. During pregnancy high blood glucose substantially increases the risk to health for both mother and child as well as the risk of diabetes for the child in the future. Almost half of women who die in low-income countries due to high blood glucose die prematurely, before the age of 70 years. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attack, stroke and lower limb amputation. Healthy diet, physical activity and avoiding tobacco use can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. In addition diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with medication, regular screening and treatment for complications. Ensuring such actions form part of the recommendations of WHO’s Global report on diabetes launched in 2016. Established in 1991 by the International Diabetes Federation with support from WHO in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threat posed by diabetes, World Diabetes Day became an official UN day in 2006. The World Diabetes Day 2017 campaign promotes affordable and equitable access for all women with diabetes or at risk of diabetes to the essential medicines and technologies, self-management education and information they require to achieve optimal diabetes outcomes and strengthen their capacity to prevent type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

What's Happening For World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month 2015

What's Happening For World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month 2015

November is upon us -- that time of year when "all eyes are on diabetes," with it being national Diabetes Awareness Month and World Diabetes Day on Nov. 14. That day was chosen in honor of Dr. Frederick Banting, the co-discoverer of insulin back in 1921, who would be 124 years old were he still alive to celebrate this birthday! This month of diabetes awareness has been going on for much longer than many realize. National Diabetes Month was actually established 40 years ago in 1975, though Congress and the U.S. presidents didn't start passing proclamations recognizing November as "diabetes month" until the mid 1980s. The American Diabetes Association trademarked "American Diabetes Month" in 1997. Meanwhile, World Diabetes Day was launched by the International Diabetes Federation in 1991 to call attention to this worldwide epidemic, and it got a big boost when the United Nations issued a resolution on it in 2006. The first-ever WDD was recognized in 2007. All of these November observances exploded about a decade ago with the debut of the Diabetes Online Community (DOC), where people can easily create and promote new campaigns and initiatives. Some of these repeat annually, while others are specific to the particular year they’re launched. Here's a quick look at what’s being organized in November 2015 by some prominent organizations (in alphabetical order). Of course, if you know of any other activities, please let us know in a comment below! American Diabetes Association (ADA) This year is the ADA’s 75th anniversary and it has a “timeless message” for D-Awareness Month: eating well is one of life’s greatest pleasures, and enjoying delicious, healthy food helps with diabetes management. With its Eat Well, America! campaign, the ADA wants to show how easy and jo Continue reading >>

World Health Day 2016: History, Facts And Why Diabetes Is This Yearstheme

World Health Day 2016: History, Facts And Why Diabetes Is This Yearstheme

So its World Health Day today (Thursday, April 7). Well, its an annual awareness-raising day organised by The World Health Organisation (WHO). Theres a different theme each year this time its diabetes. Heres everything you need to know about World Health Day 2016. MORE: World Health Day 2016: This is how it feels to be a type 1 diabetic When the UN was formed in 1945, it was decided a global health organisation should be set up. The World Health Organisation was born on April 7, 1948. It was decided this anniversary should be marked with a day educating people on an important global health issue. The first World Health Day was in 1950 and, since then, it has spread awareness on everything from food safety to blood pressure. The day is also a celebration of theWorld Health Organisation itself. Because diabetes is on the rise dramatically. More than one in 16 people in the UK have the disease. It can lead to aheart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and lower limb amputation, andcaused 1.5million deaths globally in 2012. High blood glucose also caused 2.2million deaths. Its alifelong condition that causes someones blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. Theres Type 1, Type 2,Gestational, Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT) and Impaired Fasting Glycaemia (IFG). World Health Day: 9 things youre doing that could give you diabetes and how to avoid getting it Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. Type 1 is where the pancreas doesnt produce any insulin. People with it need to have insulin every day. Scientists dont know what causes Type 1. Type 2 is where the pancreas doesnt produce enough insulin or the bodys cells dont react to insulin. It is usually caused byexcess body weight and physical ina Continue reading >>

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