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Weak Legs And Balance Problems

Weak Legs And Balance Problems

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi. I was wondering if anyone else has or is experiencing the same complications that I am. My sugars have been very high for some time now as I suffer with Diabulimia. For the last several months I have foung that I am unable to climb a flight of stairs. The only wsy I can do it is to pull myself up using the banister or go up the stairs on all fours. Its as if I have no strength in my legs. I slso find that I am unable to wear heels anymore and can only walk short distances before I need to take a rest...not because im tired but because my legs feel like they're going to give way. They always feel as if ive walked fifty miles already when I've just started and dont improve with more walking. The other thing that is affecting me is my balance. I didnt even know this could be affected...my dsn confirmed my balance has been affected by nerve damage. It feels like I'm drunk when I'm stood up or walking...not as in having a fuzzy head but in the respect that i have to really concentrate on standing and walking my feet and legs wont always do what I want them too. I know this is all down to my Diabulimia which I am trying to get help with.iam only 37 but honestly feel like a 90 year old. I was wandering if anybody else suffers with these complications as id love to hear from you. There's a number of possibilities with these symptoms , most but not all of them related to diabetes, so best to ask to have them checked out. Postural hypotension (auto nerve damage) can cause dizziness due to blood pressure not responding quickly enough when you first stand up from sitting etc. Trick is to take your time when first standing. Peripheral neuropathy can cause diff Continue reading >>

Bone And Joint Problems Associated With Diabetes

Bone And Joint Problems Associated With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you're at increased risk of various bone and joint disorders. Certain factors, such as nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), arterial disease and obesity, may contribute to these problems — but often the cause isn't clear. Learn more about various bone and joint disorders, including symptoms and treatment options. Charcot joint What is it? Charcot (shahr-KOH) joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, occurs when a joint deteriorates because of nerve damage — a common complication of diabetes. Charcot joint primarily affects the feet. What are the symptoms? You might have numbness and tingling or loss of sensation in the affected joints. They may become warm, red and swollen and become unstable or deformed. The involved joint may not be very painful despite its appearance. How is it treated? If detected early, progression of the disease can be slowed. Limiting weight-bearing activities and use of orthotic supports to the affected joint and surrounding structures can help. Diabetic hand syndrome What is it? Diabetic hand syndrome, also called diabetic cheiroarthropathy, is a disorder in which the skin on the hands becomes waxy and thickened. Eventually finger movement is limited. What causes diabetic hand syndrome isn't known. It's most common in people who've had diabetes for a long time. What are the symptoms? You may be unable to fully extend your fingers or press your palms together flat. How is it treated? Better management of blood glucose levels and physical therapy can slow the progress of this condition, but the limited mobility may not be reversible. Osteoporosis What is it? Osteoporosis is a disorder that causes bones to become weak and prone to fracture. People who have type 1 diabetes have an increased risk of osteoporosis. What are Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Symptoms

Hypoglycemia Symptoms

Why a Short List Is Not Enough Hypoglycemia is a common side effect of using insulin, and it can also occur in people who take pills that cause the pancreas to release more insulin. Pills that have this effect include the oral drugs chlorpropamide (brand name Diabinese), tolazamide (Tolinase), tolbutamide (Orinase), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, and Micronase), glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL), glimepiride (Amaryl), combination drugs that contain glyburide, glipizide, or glimepiride (such as Glucovance, Metaglip, Avandaryl, and Duetact), repaglinide (Prandin), combination drugs that contain repaglinide (Prandimet), and nateglinide (Starlix). It is therefore important that anyone who uses one of these drugs know what causes hypoglycemia, how to prevent it, how to recognize it, and how to treat it. Often, however, the most education a person receives on the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia is a handout listing its 10 most common symptoms. This is particularly true for adults. But, as any longtime user of insulin will tell you, such a list does not go far enough in describing how those common symptoms can feel, and it misses some important, albeit not-so-common, symptoms of hypoglycemia. This article attempts to fill in some of the blanks by describing what those common symptoms really feel like — in a variety of situations, including driving and sleeping — and by describing some less common symptoms. Once you (and your friends, coworkers, and family members) are better equipped to recognize hypoglycemia, you will be able treat low blood glucose faster and avert more severe hypoglycemia and its sometimes serious consequences. What is hypoglycemia Low blood glucose, or hypoglycemia, is a condition in which the brain does not have enough glucose to carry out its many Continue reading >>

Muscle Fatigue And Leg Weakness In Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetic Patients

Muscle Fatigue And Leg Weakness In Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetic Patients

Muscle fatigue is a feeling of tiredness, exhaustion or lack of energy in legs or arms that makes you get tired even after a few steps. It can greatly impact your quality of life, making you fell like not doing ANYTHING except resting to regain your strength - only to find that you still feel weak afterward. One viewer wrote, "Just wondering, does anyone else deal with constant fatigue in their legs? My appetite and numbers are both fine, and I feel pretty good otherwise, but when it comes to walking around I can only take a few steps and then I feel exhausted. I really need a solution." Recommended Reading: A Review of Treatments to Relieve Muscle Cramps in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease on Dialysis If you have Chronic Kidney Disease, you are more prone for muscle fatigue and leg weakness because your damaged or already failed kidneys cannot circulate oxygen or filter waste out of your blood. Also, High Blood Sugar has been linked to leg tiredness in those with Diabetes. Recommended Reading: CKD Patients improve Muscle Power, Leg Strength and less Fatigued by Exercising During Dialysis In either case, tiredness in the legs when walking or climbing stairs as well as cramping and pain may not sound like the symptoms of a serious condition, and in fact many people believe that they are normal signs of aging. However they can actually be signs of Peripheral Arterial Disease, a severe condition that can lead to Gangrene (bacterial infection that produces gas within tissues) and amputation if left untreated. This disease affects between 8 to 12 million Americans and those with Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease are at an elevated risk. So if you have these symptoms, be sure to tell your Specialists. Recommended Reading: Foods That Stop Chronic Inflammation, Reduce Hea Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy In Dogs

Diabetic Neuropathy In Dogs

Diabetic neuropathy is an uncommon, but potentially life-changing side effect of diabetes. Dog owners need to know more about this rare condition that can cause paralysis, nerve damage or even death. Let’s look at how diabetes affects your dog, what the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy look like, how your veterinarian can treat the condition and what you can do to prevent it in your dog. What Diabetes Does to Your Dog Diabetes is the most common hormonal disorder of dogs, and it mainly affects female dogs between the ages of 5 and 7 years of age. Under normal conditions, your dog’s endocrine system keeps his metabolism functioning correctly so he can maintain his health. If your dog has diabetes, his body cannot produce a high enough level of the hormone insulin, which helps his body gain quick energy from glucose. Because he cannot properly process glucose, your dog’s blood sugar level remains high. Dogs with diabetes present with a particular set of symptoms, including: excessive thirst frequent urination higher-than-normal water consumption lethargy sleepiness urinating in the house or in other inappropriate places weight loss If you notice that your dog has developed any of these symptoms, make an appointment to have your veterinarian test him for diabetes. What Canine Diabetic Neuropathy Looks Like Diabetic neuropathy, which is more common in cats than in dogs, can develop at any time following a dog’s initial diagnosis of diabetes. Its main symptom is progressive weakness or paralysis in a dog’s hind legs, which is caused by excessive levels of glucose in the dog’s blood. The high glucose levels damage the sheaths, or coverings, on the nerves in your dog’s body, and the nerves in his hind legs are particularly vulnerable to damage. Both legs are affec Continue reading >>

Proximal Diabetic Neuropathy

Proximal Diabetic Neuropathy

Proximal diabetic neuropathy, more commonly known as diabetic amyotrophy, is a nerve disorder that results as a complication of diabetes mellitus. It can affect the thighs, hips, buttocks or lower legs. Proximal diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disease (diabetic neuropathy) characterized by muscle wasting or weakness, pain, or changes in sensation/numbness of the leg.[1] Diabetic neuropathy is an uncommon complication of diabetes. It is a type of lumbosacral plexopathy, or adverse condition affecting the lumbosacral plexus. There are a number of ways that diabetes damages the nerves, all of which seem to be related to increased blood sugar levels over a long period of time. Proximal diabetic neuropathy is one of four types of diabetic neuropathy.[2] Proximal diabetic neuropathy can occur in type 2 and type 1 diabetes mellitus patients however, it is most commonly found in type 2 diabetics.[3] Proximal neuropathy is the second most common type of diabetic neuropathy and can be resolved with time and treatment.[4] Signs & symptoms[edit] Signs and symptoms of proximal diabetic neuropathy depend on the region of the plexus which is affected. The first symptom is usually pain in the buttocks, hips, thighs or legs. This pain most commonly affects one side of the body and can either start gradually or come on suddenly. This is often followed by variable weakness in the proximal muscles of the lower limbs. These symptoms, although often beginning on one side, can also spread to both sides.[1] Weakness in proximal diabetic neuropathy is caused by denervation of the specific muscles innervated by regions of the plexus affected and can thus these muscles may start exhibiting fasciculations. Note that diabetic amyotrophy is a condition caused by diabetes mellitus, but sepa Continue reading >>

Weak Legs | Diabetic Connect

Weak Legs | Diabetic Connect

I am a type II since 1989. I have been "in control" from the beginning; but it didn't seem to stop the neuropathy from progressing to the point that I use a cane most of the time. I am retired; but work a little part time at our local school as a custodian and at work, where I always have an "aid" in my hands (broom, mop, floor scrubber etc) I don't have much of a problem; but unaided i couldn't walk to the end of my street. I also ride a motorcycle; but that may stop soon as I do not feel I can hold it up at stops or back it in and out of my garage. Not at all satisfied with any of these problems or the suggestions I have heard to help relieve it. Hey Randy, My legs are not the best in the world. Would not win any contest of any sort. But they are mine. My legs I have notice that from the mid calf down, they are slightly discollored. They are darker then the rest of my leg. I dont think I have that good of circulation going on there. My calfs themselves are well deleloped. I do get tingling in my feet from time to time and muscle spams in my feet. hope its not connected. Good luck with your legs. i have poly neuropathy i have all the problems you described and more. it is all over my body now and there is never any relief. have you had a test to see if you have nerve damage? you would have to see a neurologist for this test. This last winter I was having a hard time sleeping at night with my legs twitching and tingling, my feet were cold all the time and could not hardly get them warm even with the inserts. I would get these sharp pains like someone was sticking a needle through me at different times, made me jump. The funny thing is that once I started taking metamucil it stopped, I was taking liquid tylenol as it seemed to help and have not had a dose since then. Th Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Symptoms Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a condition caused by long-term high blood sugar levels, which causes nerve damage. Some people will not have any symptoms. But for others symptoms may be debilitating. Between 60 and 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Peripheral neuropathy, the most common form of diabetic neuropathy, affects the legs, feet, toes, hands, and arms. Many people do not know that they have diabetes. People unaware of their diabetes may not know what’s causing some of the unusual sensations they’re experiencing. Nerve damage is the result of high levels of blood glucose over long periods of time. It isn’t entirely clear why high glucose levels damage nerves. A number of factors may play a role in nerve fiber damage. One possible component is the intricate interplay between the blood vessels and nerves, according to the Mayo Clinic. Other factors include high blood pressure and cholesterol levels and nerve inflammation. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy usually first appears in the feet and legs, and may occur in the hands and arms later. A common symptom of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is numbness. Sometimes you may be unable to feel your feet while walking. Other times, your hands or feet will tingle or burn. Or it may feel like you’re wearing a sock or glove when you’re not. Sometimes you may experience sudden, sharp pains that feel like an electrical current. Other times, you may feel cramping, like when you’re grasping something like a piece of silverware. You also may sometimes unintentionally drop items you’re holding as a result of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Walking with a wobbly motion or even losing your balance can res Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes can cause serious health complications. That's why it is very important to know how to spot type 2 diabetes symptoms. Even prediabetes can increase the chance of heart disease, just like type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor about preventive measures you can take now to reduce the chance of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes due to high blood sugar may include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Loss of consciousness (rare) Contact your health care provider if you have any type 2 diabetes symptoms or if you have further questions about type 2 diabetes. It's important to get diabetes testing and start a treatment plan early to prevent serious diabetes complications. Type 2 diabetes is usually not diagnosed until health complications have occurred. Most often, there are no diabetes symptoms or a very gradual development of the above symptoms of type 2 diabetes. In fact, about one out of every four people with type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. Other symptoms of type 2 diabetes may include: Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching of the skin (usually around the vaginal or groin area) Recent weight gain or unexplained weight loss Velvety dark skin changes of the neck, armpit, and groin, called acanthosis nigricans Numbness and tingling of the hands and feet Erectile dysfunction (impotency) Continue reading >>

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

Across the board, a low blood sugar seems to be considered as anything under 70 mg/dL. Revisiting the American Diabetes Association’s website this morning offers up a list of symptoms of low blood sugar, like: Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills and clamminess Irritability or impatience Confusion, including delirium Rapid/fast heartbeat Lightheadedness or dizziness Hunger and nausea Sleepiness Blurred/impaired vision Tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue Headaches Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness Lack of coordination Nightmares or crying out during sleep Seizures Unconsciousness (As with most diabetes-related lists on the Internet, the further down the list you read, the worse shit seems to get.) The “what happens if a low blood sugar goes untreated” answer is short, and to the point: “If left untreated, hypoglycemia may lead to a seizure or unconsciousness (passing out, a coma). In this case, someone else must take over.” When my daughter hears my Dexcom beeping, she understands the difference between the alert signaling a high blood sugar and the alert signaling a low. If the high alarm goes off, she doesn’t react, but if the low alarm goes off, she perks up immediately and asks me if I need a “glupose tab.” The immediacy and seriousness of low blood sugars is noticed by my three year old because she’s seen me go from normal, functional Mom to confused, sweaty, and tangled-in-my-own-words Mom in a matter of minutes. The symptoms of low blood sugars don’t just vary from PWD to PWD, but often vary within the PWD’s own lifetime. When I was very small, my low blood sugar “tell” was when my mouth would go numb and my face felt like I’d had Novocaine hours earlier and it was just starting to wear off, with th Continue reading >>

Managing Complications In Diabetic Cats

Managing Complications In Diabetic Cats

Serious—even life-threatening—complications are possible if felines' blood glucose concentrations are not well-controlled. Diabetes mellitus results from the dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells or from insulin resistance. Compared with diabetic people, diabetic cats seem to develop fewer long-term complications. The most common complication is simply an inability to keep good control of blood glucose concentrations. Hypoglycemia is the clinical term for blood glucose concentrations below the accepted reference range, and hyperglycemia is the term for blood glucose concentrations above the reference range. Serious complications can result from either condition if not remedied in a timely fashion. Unregulated or fluctuating blood glucose concentrations can contribute to long-term complications such as renal disease (diabetic nephropathy) or neuropathies and increase the acute risk of diabetic ketoacidosis or cataracts. Maintaining well-regulated control of blood glucose concentrations helps to prevent these complications. Here are the signs and common treatments for the chronic and acute complications that may develop so you can help catch them early in your feline patients. CHRONIC COMPLICATIONS Diabetic neuropathy The most common complication in cats that are chronically hyperglycemic is diabetic neuropathy—about 10 percent of cats are affected. The progression to this condition may take several months, and, if properly treated, it can resolve within six to 12 months. The femoral nerve is most commonly affected. An affected femoral nerve can lead to a plantigrade gait, which is walking on the whole sole of the foot (e.g., like rabbits, bears, and people). In cats, this gait takes the shape of walking on hocks (heels), and the tarsal joints and nerves of the hind Continue reading >>

The Neuropathy In My Legs Is Causing Severe Muscle Weakness, Loss Of Balance And Coordination?

The Neuropathy In My Legs Is Causing Severe Muscle Weakness, Loss Of Balance And Coordination?

Home Q & A Questions The neuropathy in my legs is... The neuropathy in my legs is causing severe muscle weakness, loss of balance and coordination? depression , peripheral neuropathy , vertigo , back pain , fatigue , muscle This is steadily getting worse. I called my neurologist and could not even get an appointment to discuss anything. She said there is nothing that can be done for me. I asked about special shoes or anything to help with the balance and lack of coordination. I walk like a drunk all the time and have fallen a lot. I am very discouraged as I feel like the medical world has given up on me. My pain doctor will only discuss a pain stimulator. Has anyone else gotten to this point or know of something I can try? I am desperate, I feel like there is no hope Have you asked about physical therapy? You should be using a walker to help you ambulate if you are weak and unbalanced to the point of falling. Sometimes neuropathy does get to a point where nothing much can be done. Physical therapy should be able to help you strengthen to your maximum ability and a walker will help keep you balanced so that you dont fall. I have done therapy, insurance says I have had enough and cant pay out of pocket as it is very expensive. I use a cane most days and I do have a walker I use when I have to but I have also fallen using the walker. My legs just give out and I fall. I try to do some light stretching every day I cant do anything strenuous I have back issues also. Its very frustrating. Thanks, I appreciate your feedback Have you spoken to a podiatrist? They are "foot and ankle" specialists and may be able to fit you for orthotics. Keep hollering and complaining. A squeaky wheel gets greased! Sometimes you just have to keep after some Drs. Get second opinions and third opin Continue reading >>

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2)

A A A Are There Home Remedies (Diet, Exercise, and Glucose Monitoring) for Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition characterized by the body's inability to regulate glucose (sugar) levels in blood. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin. People with type 2 diabetes can produce insulin, but the body is not able to use the insulin effectively. The cause of type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune reaction. Combinations of genetic risk factors and unhealthy lifestyle choices cause type 2 diabetes. The main diagnostic test for diabetes is measurement of the blood glucose level. Changes in lifestyle and diet may be adequate to control some cases of type 2 diabetes. Others with type 2 diabetes require medications. Insulin is essential treatment for type 1 diabetes. No effective approach yet exists to prevent type 1 diabetes. Prevention of type 2 diabetes can be accomplished in some cases by maintaining a healthy weight, exercising, sustaining a healthy lifestyle. Prediabetes is a condition that can occur before development of type 2 diabetes. Complications of any type of diabetes include damage to blood vessels, leading to heart disease or kidney disease. Damage to blood vessels in the eye can result in vision problems including blindness. Nerve damage can occur, leading to diabetic neuropathy. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a set of related diseases in which the body cannot regulate the amount of sugar (specifically, glucose) in the blood. The blood delivers glucose to provide the body with energy to perform all daily activities. The liver converts the food a person eats into glucose. The glucose is then released into the bloodstream from the liver between meals. In a healthy person, several hormones tightly regulate the blood glucose level, primarily insulin. Insulin is Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

Signs You May Have Hypoglycemia | Healthcentral

Signs You May Have Hypoglycemia | Healthcentral

Many people - even those without diabetes - exhibit signs of low blood sugar. Read on for 5 subtle signs of hypoglycemia. Feeling suddenly weak or shaky is one of the better known signs of low blood sugar, but that doesnt mean its always easy to notice. Weakness, particularly in the arms or legs, or a feeling of being jittery or trembling could also mean its time to eat. Physical symptoms arent the only signs of low blood sugar; emotional instability can also occur. In fact, if you suspect you have fluctuating blood sugar, your symptoms might include things such as feeling suddenly overwhelmed, frustrated, angry, irritated, or like you could burst into tears. Find yourself breaking into a cold sweat for no reason? Low blood sugar may be to blame. The stress on your body means that it has to work harder, and a cold sweat is a classic sign that your body is having to work too hard to function. Other symptoms might be a rapid or irregular heartbeat, or even blurred vision. Hypoglycemia can bring on feelings of nausea or extreme hunger. Traditionally, eating sugar helps raise blood sugar levels, but try to eat a balanced snack or meal soon afterward, to avoid a repeat sugar crash. When blood sugar is low , it can make you a little spacey. You may find yourself rambling, or others may have a tough time following your conversation. But slurred speech or confusion are more serious signs of dangerously low blood sugar, and should not be taken lightly. Continue reading >>

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