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Will Diabetes Shorten My Life

Life Expectancy Of People With Type 1 Diabetes Increasing

Life Expectancy Of People With Type 1 Diabetes Increasing

What was the day you were diagnosed with diabetes, or your child was diagnosed like? Do you remember it and what was it like for you? I remember being very sick for many weeks on a family holiday and not knowing what was wrong with me. My mother suspected diabetes, and a trip to the doctor confirmed her fears. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1979. Life following that day was a whirlwind of tests and needles and learning. It was also a whirlwind of fear, hate, anxiety and sadness. This was experienced by my family too and many people talk about a period of grief following a diagnosis of diabetes. That is a normal reaction to a very abnormal situation – being told you have a disease that will never go away and may cause all sorts of awful complications and shorten your life by at least 15 – 20 yrs. It messes with your head. Yet most of us get on with life, I mean what else are you going to do? You could stay in the corner and spend the rest of your days sad, or you could come through the other side. It does not mean you won’t have bad and sad days, and in fact we know people with diabetes experience more of these days than those who don’t have diabetes. It’s a thing. But most of us live full and productive lives. I have 3 boys, 3 businesses and have just been awarded a finalist position in the Telstra Business Women’s Awards. I have crap days. I have gastroparesis and complicated health needs, but these do not stop me LIVING, and in fact probably living MORE than some people who have no health conditions to manage. And I think that is the key to survival with diabetes – living. You can not let it drive the car, you can not let it be the only thing you think about, or talk about, or care about. You must expand your life so diabetes is a small bit, whi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Middle Age 'can Reduce Your Life By Six Years'

Type 2 Diabetes In Middle Age 'can Reduce Your Life By Six Years'

Having diabetes in middle age will cut your life short by an average of six years, say researchers. For the first time, a study has calculated the reduction in life expectancy from having type 2 diabetes, the kind linked to being overweight in middle age. Diabetes is known to double the risk of heart attacks and strokes, but the new findings show people with type 2 diabetes are also at greater risk of dying from cancer, infection and mental disorders. More than 2.5million Britons have diabetes, with 800,000 being unaware of the condition. Scientists from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration – co-ordinated by the University of Cambridge – analysed data on 820,900 people, each of whom was monitored for about a decade. Even after accounting for other risk factors such as age, sex, obesity and smoking, the researchers found people with diabetes were at increased risk of death from several common cancers, infections, mental disorders, and liver, digestive, kidney and lung diseases. About 60 per cent of the reduced life expectancy in people with diabetes is attributable to blood vessel diseases – such as heart attacks and strokes. Only a small part of these associations are explained by obesity, blood pressure, or high levels of fat in the blood – conditions which often co-exist with diabetes. The study, involving more than 250 scientists from 25 countries, also suggests people with diabetes may be at increased risk of death from intentional self-harm – a finding which the scientists say requires further study, including investigation of a possible link between diabetes and depression. It was funded by the Medical Research Council, British Heart Foundation and Pfizer, and is published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Researcher Naveed Sattar, of the Univer Continue reading >>

Will Crohn’s Disease Affect My Life Span?

Will Crohn’s Disease Affect My Life Span?

It can be scary to learn that you have any kind of chronic disease. But if you’ve been diagnosed with Crohn’s, know this: With the right treatment and medication, you can expect to live a long, full life. Thanks to “better treatment, surgery, and use of medications,” says Ashwin Ananthakrishnan, MPH, a gastroenterologist with the Massachusetts General Hospital Digestive Healthcare Center’s Crohn’s and Colitis Center in Boston, “it’s very rare for people to die of Crohn’s today.” While there’s still no cure for Crohn’s disease, you can manage your symptoms by taking medication. What’s more, the current treatments for Crohn’s disease are less likely to cause side effects than the ones used in the past. For example: Doctors don’t use steroids over the long term as much as they once did, says Ananthakrishnan. These medications can trigger serious side effects like bone loss and cataracts over time, according to the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation (CCFA). Here’s what you can expect instead. Preventing Complications of Crohn’s Disease Managing your Crohn’s and preventing serious complications are possible if you take the right steps. This includes sticking to your treatment plan and making healthy lifestyle choices, like quitting smoking. The people who are most at risk for serious complications are those who smoke and those who are not getting proper treatment for inflammation, says Ananthakrishnan. “People with poorly controlled Crohn’s wind up with a lot of bowel damage and repeated, resistant, or undertreated inflammation,” he says. Plus, letting your Crohn’s disease go untreated can also cause nutritional deficiencies, he says. It’s also worth noting that people with inflammatory bowel disease can be three times more likely Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy For Type 1 Diabetes

Life Expectancy For Type 1 Diabetes

New study shows recent improvement in years of life lost. With minimal studies to evaluate the impact of type 1 diabetes on life expectancy, studies have been developed to retrospectively look at the effects of diabetes on mortality. Diabetes was also compared to other disease states and causes that had an influence on years of life lost (YLL). The YLL of patients with type 1 diabetes and patients with other disease states were compared to those of the general healthy population. This autoimmune disorder accounts for 10% of all Americans diagnosed with diabetes, and the ability to prevent the development of type 1 diabetes is minimal. Causes have been linked to genetics, and viral infections such as mumps, rubella, cytomegalovirus, measles, influenza, encephalitis, polio, or Epstein-Barr virus. In a study conducted on Australians with type 1 diabetes between the years of 1997 and 2010, researchers looked at the estimated YLL of the type 1 diabetic patients compared to the general public. Researchers used the Chiang method to estimate life expectancy and Arriaga’s method to estimate the impact of age-specific and cause-specific mortalities. Results showed no disparity in terms of YLL from type 1 diabetes in women vs. men. When the YLL was organized into two groups, 1997-2003 and 2004-2010, the 2004-2010 groups showed improvement in life expectancies of 1.9 years in men and 1.5 years in women. Overall, over the time period of the study, patients with type 1 diabetes had a life expectancy of 12.2 years less than the general population. The majority of the YLL was attributed to endocrine and metabolic diseases that occurred between the ages of 10-39, and circulatory diseases that occurred after the age of 40. Medical advances over the years may account for the YLL improve Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

Diabetes is recognized as one of the leading causes of disability and death worldwide. There was a time when Type 2 diabetes was common in people in their late forties and fifties. However, thanks to the easy availability of processed foods, sedentary lifestyles, poor sleep and a host of other unfavorable factors, type 2 diabetes affects millions of young adults throughout the globe today. A report was commissioned in 2010 by the National Academy on an Aging Society. It showed that diabetes cut off an average of 8.5 years from the lifespan of a regular, diabetic 50-year-old as compared to a 50-year-old without the disease. This data was provided by the Health and Retirement Study, a survey of more than 20,000 Americans over the age of 50, done every two years by the University of Michigan. Characterized by high blood glucose levels, T2D can be the result of a combination of genes, obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle. If left untreated, diabetes can be life-threatening. Complications of this disease can take a serious toll on a patient’s health and well-being. So, how long do diabetics live, you ask? Does having diabetes shorten one’s life? Let’s address these questions, one by one. MORE: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) How Long Do Diabetics Live? Diabetes is a system-wide disorder which is categorized by elevated blood glucose levels. This blood travels throughout the human body and when it is laden with sugar, it damages multiple systems. When the condition is left unchecked or is managed poorly, the lifespan of diabetic patients is reduced due to constant damage. Early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes for preventing its long-term complications is the best coping strategy. So, don’t ignore your doctor’s advice if you’re pre-diabeti Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Life Expectancy

Diabetes And Life Expectancy

What did the study find? Previous research has suggested that diabetes can shorten life expectancy - BUT a big study in Sweden shows that that is not true for everyone. Some people with diabetes over the age of 75 had better life expectancy than people without diabetes. This was probably because the people with diabetes worked closely with their doctors, who paid great attention to their risk factors, like blood pressure and cholesterol. What does the study mean for me? The study showed that in recent years the risk of dying early for all people with diabetes had decreased and the gap with the rest of the population was narrowing. The authors suggest this is down to improved medication and better self-management leading to improved blood glucose control. Although younger people (under 55) with type 2 diabetes covered in the study were at risk of a shorter life expectancy compared to the general population, having good blood glucose control could half this extra risk. Those aged 75 or over people with good blood glucose control were actually likely to live longer than the general population. They were less likely to die from a heart attack, stroke or any other cause. How did they do the research? Despite some earlier research little is really known about the risk of a shorter life expectancy in people with type 2 diabetes compared to the non-diabetic population (controls). The study draws on data collected as part of the Swedish National Diabetes Register, which includes more than 90% of all people in Sweden with type 2 diabetes. Data from over 430,000 patients with type 2 diabetes were included in this study. Each of these were matched with 5 controls (people without diabetes) from the Swedish population, taking account of age, gender, educational level, county of birth Continue reading >>

What Is The Life Expectancy For Someone With Emphysema?

What Is The Life Expectancy For Someone With Emphysema?

The life expectancy for someone with emphysema depends on many factors. That said, emphysema is not typically diagnosed until there is 40 to 50 percent lung damage, which is stage 2 or 3 emphysema. Therefore, the prognosis of emphysema is not favorable. The average life expectancy for someone with emphysema is five years. Your life expectancy drops to two years, however, if you don’t seek treatment and/or you do not quit smoking [source: Health Information Directory]. Intensive intervention is necessary to improve your quality of life and to extend your duration of life. The severity of emphysema is measured in different stages. Put simply, the less severe the condition is, the greater the life expectancy. People with mild, stage 1 emphysema actually have a normal life expectancy, if they quit smoking. People with moderate to severe, stage 2 and 3 emphysema, have a life expectancy of five years or more with intensive treatments. People with end-stage, stage 4 emphysema, have little time to live, even with treatment [source: No More Smokes]. There are also other factors that greatly contribute to the life expectancy of someone with emphysema. First, weight and overall health are important factors. You should maintain a healthy body weight with a proper diet and regular exercise. Second, if you have other chronic conditions, such as HIV or connective tissue disorders in addition to emphysema, your life expectancy will be reduced. Third, emphysema also exacerbates other health concerns, such as diabetes and heart problems. Complications due to diabetes and/or heart problems may eventually cause death. Fourth, you should also avoid exposure to secondhand smoke and other hazardous fumes and dust to improve your life expectancy. Simply inhaling indoor fumes, such as heating Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Person With Age 35 Can Have A Life Span Of 70 And How To Manage It By Not Taking Medication

Can A Diabetic Person With Age 35 Can Have A Life Span Of 70 And How To Manage It By Not Taking Medication

Kapalbhati & anulomvilom are Yoga exercise and if you do some exercise of 30 minutes in the morning & 30 minutes in the evening you can definitely control diabetes & if possible about 15 minutes fast walk. The Yoga book /C.D is available at almost every book shop. Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes, that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. * Overall, the risk for death among people with diabetes is about twice that of people of similar age without diabetes. * Adults with diabetes have heart disease death rates about 2 to 4 times higher than adults without diabetes. * The risk for stroke is 2 to 4 times higher among people with diabetes. Monitoring and controlling the levels of diabetes indicators, including HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), postprandial plasma glucose (PPG), body mass index (BMI), blood pressure and lipids, is an integral component of diabetes care at every stage of the disease. Diabetic patients should conduct the following tests periodically. A: HbA1c. HbA1c is a lab test that shows the average level of blood sugar (glucose) over the previous 3 months. It shows how well you are controlling your diabetes. B: Control your high Blood pressure, if any. Normal blood pressure- <120/80 mmHg. C: Control your blood Cholesterol: Normal cholesterol < 200 mg/dL. LDL <100 mg/dL HDL > 40 mg/dL Triglyceride < 150 mg/dL. D: Diabetic education. Denta Continue reading >>

What Is The Life Expectancy For Someone With Dementia?

What Is The Life Expectancy For Someone With Dementia?

How long will you live after a dementia diagnosis? It's sad but true that people with dementia usually have shorter lives. However, exactly how much shorter their life will be varies enormously from person to person. Here's the key information about life expectancy, but remember, these are only general statistics so think carefully about whether you really want to know, before you read on. In a nutshell Life expectancy is one of the key issues that someone diagnosed with dementia, or their friends and family, want to know, but there is no simple answer. Dementia is often called a 'life limiting' condition although people have been known to live with it for as long as 26 years after they first start showing symptoms. Generally speaking, the life expectancy of a person with dementia depends on the type of dementia they are diagnosed with, their age and health. Most studies seem to show that the average number of years someone will live with dementia after being diagnosed is around ten years. It's important not to take this number – or any other – as fact, but to use it as guidance, and a way to prepare and make every day count. >> SET UP A LASTING POWER OF ATTORNEY WITH OUR DEDICATED SERVICE Facts about the future Studies into the main types of dementia have revealed the following about life expectancy Alzheimer's disease General life expectancy for someone with Alzheimer's is around 8-12 years from diagnosis although this does depend on age and health. If you were relatively fit and healthy on diagnosis you could live considerably longer than this. People who are diagnosed around the age of 60-65 tend to decline more slowly than those who are aged 80 or over. But with the right care and treatment, a fit and healthy 80 year old could still live into their nineties. Di Continue reading >>

What To Know About Diabetes And Life Expectancy

What To Know About Diabetes And Life Expectancy

Twenty-nine million Americans and more than 400 million people worldwide have diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes with different underlying causes. But when either type 1 or type 2 diabetes is not well controlled, they lead to a dangerous buildup of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Over time, the damage this does to blood vessels and nerves can lead to serious complications, such as blindness, limb amputation, heart disease, and kidney failure. Diabetes: a Chronic Disease Diabetes is a chronic condition that requires consistent, daily care, which makes it more difficult to control than some other conditions. When damage from diabetes takes too heavy a toll on the body, it can shorten lifespan. In the United States, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death. Thinking about life expectancy is uncomfortable. But, it’s important to know that advances in diabetes care and in how people are taking care of their health can make living a long life with diabetes a reality. Life Expectancy With Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin—a hormone that helps carry glucose to the body’s cells to use for energy. Five to 10% of people with diabetes have type 1. Type 1 diabetes is most frequently diagnosed in childhood or adolescence. This means that people with type 1 diabetes can spend a large part of their lives with the condition. The average person with type 1 diabetes has a shorter lifespan than a person without it—but the life expectancy gap is shrinking. Research in the 1970s estimated that people with type 1 diabetes could expect to live 27 fewer years, on average, than people without the disease. However, a recent study out of Scotland reports that men with type 1 diabetes lose an estimated 11 years and women 13 years of l Continue reading >>

Heart Disease Plus Diabetes Can Knock More Than A Decade Off Your Life

Heart Disease Plus Diabetes Can Knock More Than A Decade Off Your Life

A combination of heart disease and diabetes can shorten your life by more than a decade, research has shown. Scientists came to the conclusion after analysing data on more than 135,000 deaths among more than a million study participants. They calculated the life expectancy reductions associated with a history of cardiometabolic diseases combining diabetes, strokes and heart attacks. The lead researcher, Dr Emanuele Di Angelantonio, from Cambridge University, said: “We showed that having a combination of diabetes and heart disease is associated with a substantially lower life expectancy. “An individual in their 60s who has both conditions has an average reduction in life expectancy of about 15 years.” Men of 60 with any two of the cardiometabolic conditions studied lost 12 years of life on average. The lifespan of those with all three conditions was reduced by 14 years. For women aged 60, the corresponding estimates were 13 years and 16 years of reduced life expectancy. The effects were even more dramatic at younger ages. Men of 40 with all three conditions could expect to have their life cut short by 23 years and women by 20 years. Prof Jeremy Pearson, associate medical director at the British Heart Foundation, which part-funded the research, said: “The results of this large study emphasise the importance of preventing diabetes, heart attacks and strokes in the first place, through encouraging patients to live a healthier lifestyle and, where necessary, treating them with medication. “Once someone has developed diabetes, or suffered a stroke or heart attack, it is even more essential to address all their risk factors, such as their diet and the amount of physical activity they do, to lower their risk of a subsequent heart attack or stroke and give them the bes Continue reading >>

Extreme Obesity Cuts Average Life Span Extremely

Extreme Obesity Cuts Average Life Span Extremely

Those with a body mass index, or BMI, above 40 are robbed of at least 6 1/2 years, on average, of expected life span, a study has found. And the toll in years lost rises with the degree of obesity, reaching nearly 14 years for the most obese -- those with a BMI above 55, researchers said. The study found that the reduction in life expectancy associated with being extremely obese was similar to that seen in adults who smoke. And as a person's obesity rises to higher levels, his or her expected life span falls below that of smokers. The findings come from a project that aggregated the results of about 20 long-term studies on obesity conducted in the United States, Australia and Sweden. They were published Tuesday in the journal PLoS Medicine, in what is believed to be the largest study to date of the health consequences of severe obesity. Compared with their normal-weight peers, the extremely obese are more likely to succumb early to heart disease, cancer and diabetes. For men with "class III obesity," the rate of death attributable to heart disease and diabetes is especially elevated compared with normal-weight males. For women in the same obesity category, cancer deaths dramatically outstripped those among normal-weight women. But premature deaths attributable to all causes, from injury to chronic lower respiratory infections, were consistently higher in those with severe obesity, the study found. The extremely obese -- those who generally would need to lose 100 lbs. or more to attain a "normal healthy weight" -- are a fast-growing segment of the U.S. population, now representing about 6% of American adults. The ranks of those with a BMI over 40 (for example, a 5-foot-6 person weighing 250 pounds or more) have grown fourfold since the 1980s. The population with a BMI ov Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

A person with type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin themselves, so needs to take insulin to manage their blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes is known as an autoimmune condition, because the body's defences - the immune system - wrongly attacks the cells in the pancreas responsible for making insulin. Although the condition usually appears before the age of 40 and more than half the people with type 1 are diagnosed under the age of 15, type 1 diabetes may occur at any age, according to Diabetes UK. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes and accounts for around 10% of the UK's 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes, according to Diabetes UK. Insulin and type 1 diabetes Normally, the hormone insulin is secreted by the pancreas. When you eat a meal, sugar (glucose) from food stimulates the pancreas to release insulin. The amount that is released is proportional to the amount that is required by the size of that particular meal. Insulin's main role is to help move certain nutrients - especially sugar - into the cells of the body's tissues. Cells use sugars and other nutrients from meals as a source of energy to function. The amount of sugar in the blood decreases once it enters the cells. Normally that signals the beta cells in the pancreas to reduce the amount of insulin secreted so that you don't develop low blood sugar levels ( hypoglycaemia). But the destruction of the beta cells that occurs with type 1 diabetes throws the entire process into disarray. In people with type 1 diabetes, sugar isn't moved into the cells because insulin is not available. When sugar builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, the body's cells are starved of nutrients. This means other systems in the body must provide energy for many important bodily functions. As a re Continue reading >>

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