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Will Diabetes Cause Hot Flashes

Hot Flashes: Symptoms & Signs

Hot Flashes: Symptoms & Signs

A hot flash is a feeling of warmth spreading over the body that is often most strongly felt in the head and neck regions. Hot flashes may be accompanied by perspiration or flushing and usually last from 30 seconds to several minutes. Although hot flashes are a characteristic symptom of perimenopause, rare tumors, and other medical conditions may sometimes also cause hot flashes. Taking certain medications, eating spicy foods, and the consumption of alcohol have also been associated with the occurrence of hot flashes. Although the exact cause of hot flashes is not fully understood, hot flashes that occur in the perimenopause are thought to be due to a combination of hormonal and biochemical fluctuations brought on by declining estrogen levels. Hot flashes can often begin before the menstrual irregularities characteristic of menopause are even noticed. Up to 40% of regularly menstruating women in their 40s report having hot flashes. About 80% of women will be finished having hot flashes after five years, but sometimes they may persist for a longer time period. Hot flashes can sometimes be accompanied by night sweats (episodes of drenching sweats occurring at nighttime). Hot flashes can also occur in men. Most commonly, they arise as a result of a dramatic drop in testosterone levels in men who have their testes surgically removed (as part of the treatment for prostate cancer) or who are taking medications that counteract the effects of testosterone. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Many people with diabetes will experience times when they sweat too much, too little, or at odd times. Diabetes-related nervous system damage and low blood sugars cause these commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Sweating complications can be a sign of poor diabetes management. Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is crucial to both prevention and treatment. Contents of this article: Diabetes and sweating problems People sweat for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are normal and some are not. Sweating is a natural response to physical and emotional stress. But excessive sweating, when the reason is unclear, is often a sign that something is not right. Some people with sweating conditions will sweat even on a cold day or during minimal activity. Low blood sugar levels and diabetes-related nervous system damage cause the most commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Extremely low blood sugars cause a fight-or-flight response, triggering the release of hormones that increase sweating. When blood sugar levels are too high for too long, a loss of nerve function can occur. This condition is known as diabetic neuropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) claim that around half of people with diabetes experience some form of neuropathy. If the nerves that control the sweat glands are damaged, they may send the wrong message to sweat glands, or none at all. In most cases, neuropathies cause either excessive sweating or an inability to sweat. Sweating caused by hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a term to describe abnormally low blood sugar levels. For most adults, blood glucose levels below 70 milligrams per deciliter are considered hypoglycemic. Individual targets can vary, however. Many diabetes management medica Continue reading >>

Is It Menopause Or Low Blood Sugars Causing Your Night Sweats?

Is It Menopause Or Low Blood Sugars Causing Your Night Sweats?

Do you wake up at night and throw off your covers because you are feeling hot and damp? Do you have a family history of Type 2 diabetes? Did you eat a lot of crackers, ice cream, pretzels or chips in the evening and wake up with soaked sheets? There are many causes of night sweats but often times people who have not been diagnosed with diabetes or prediabetes do not consider the possibility that they might be having low blood sugars in the middle of the night and not just hot flashes from menopause. Low Blood Sugars Could Be Causing Your Night Sweats If you have a family history of diabetes, you are “overwaist” with a waist circumference greater than 35 for a woman, you do not exercise regularly and you eat refined carbohydrates in excessive amounts, you might have prediabetes. Eating a large amount of sugary foods or white flour products can cause a rapid rise in blood sugar which then tells your pancreas to release extra amounts of insulin. This extra insulin can bring your blood sugar down rapidly and actually cause a low blood sugar. Have you ever felt shaky mid morning after eating cold cereal or pancakes with lots of syrup for breakfast. Have you munched on a whole bag of pretzels commending yourself for them being low fat but noticed you had night sweats that woke you in the middle of the night? Have you noticed on the days you eat more whole grains, lean protein, Greek yogurt, nuts, lots of veggies with a small night snack of fruit that you do not wake up with night sweats? To get a better understanding let me explain what happens with Type 2 diabetes. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a completely different disease process than Type 1 diabetes. Type 1 is an autoimmune disorder that results in complete loss of insulin production by the pancreas. Th Continue reading >>

7 Causes Of Excessive Perspiration In People With Diabetes

7 Causes Of Excessive Perspiration In People With Diabetes

Unless the weather is sweltering or you’re having hot flashes, excessive sweating is most likely an indication of a greater health issue. Ask yourself: Do you have a fever or other signs of an infection? Are you in any pain when you sweat? Is the sweating mainly on one side? Does it involve your palms, soles, and/or armpits? Do you sweat while you sleep? Is your blood glucose level high (or low) during these sweating episodes? Could sweating be a reaction to your diabetes medication? If the answer is yes to any of these questions, talk to your healthcare provider. What are the possible causes of excessive sweating? For people with diabetes, certain complications can affect the sweat glands, making it difficult for the body to cool down in hot weather, triggering heavy sweating even during light activities, or causing sweating in cool temperatures. 1. Autonomic neuropathy. This is a condition in which hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) interferes with the nerves that control involuntary functions. The autonomic nervous system manages several systems automatically, including bladder control, heart rate, the ability to detect hypoglycemia, and the ability to sweat appropriately. Dry feet are a common symptom of nerve disease, so it is important to inspect your feet daily to be sure there are no cracks from excessive dryness, a condition that tends to occur along with sweating. 2. Low blood glucose levels. A low blood glucose level is called hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia triggers a fight-or-flight response in the body. As a result, the body produces additional norepinephrine and adrenaline, which can lead to heavy sweating as well as shakiness and anxiety. Good diabetes management can help keep your blood glucose levels in check. 3. Heart problems. People with diabetes have Continue reading >>

Diabetes-prevention Drug Metformin Can Cause Night Sweats

Diabetes-prevention Drug Metformin Can Cause Night Sweats

DEAR DR. ROACH: As a preventive measure for prediabetes, my doctor recommended I take 500 mg of metformin twice a day (morning and evening). I have been following this regimen for two months. The same day I started the medication, my night sweats started up again, with a vengeance. On the metformin, my quality of sleep was negatively affected by four to five episodes of bad hot flashes every night. Since hot flashes/night sweats were not mentioned as a side effect either by my doctor or on the information pamphlet, I notified my doctor. He suggested stopping the metformin for two to four weeks to see if the night sweats subsided. I had IMMEDIATE relief with the night sweats being eliminated the first day I stopped the medication. I am a 58-year-old female, and other than needing to lose about 20 pounds, am in good health, exercise every day and eat a healthy diet. Some research indicates that metformin causes hypoglycemia, which then causes the night sweats. A sometimes-mentioned desirable side effect is weight loss. What is your take on metformin and whether it is a help or a hindrance to good health? -- R.M.T. ANSWER: Metformin was tested in a large trial to see whether it could help prevent people at high risk for diabetes from developing overt diabetes, and it was successful at doing so. It wasn't quite as successful as a good diet and regular exercise, but many experts do use metformin, especially in overweight people, to help them lose weight and reduce their diabetes risk. In my opinion, it works best when combined with a healthy diet and regular exercise. However, it does have side effects. Gastrointestinal side effects, especially diarrhea but also nausea, are the most common. Hot flashes are listed as occurring in up to 10 percent of people taking the medicati Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Menopause: A Twin Challenge

Diabetes And Menopause: A Twin Challenge

Diabetes and menopause may team up for varied effects on your body. Here's what to expect — and how to stay in control. Menopause — and the years leading up to it — may present unique challenges if you have diabetes. But it's not necessarily a one-two punch. First, learn what to expect. Then consider what to do about it. Diabetes and menopause: What to expect Menopause is the phase of life after your periods have stopped and your estrogen levels decline. In some women, menopause can occur as a result of surgery, when the ovaries are removed for other medical reasons. Diabetes and menopause may team up for varied effects on your body, including: Changes in blood sugar level. The hormones estrogen and progesterone affect how your cells respond to insulin. After menopause, changes in your hormone levels can trigger fluctuations in your blood sugar level. You may notice that your blood sugar level is more variable and less predictable than before. If your blood sugar gets out of control, you have a higher risk of diabetes complications. Weight gain. Some women gain weight during the menopausal transition and after menopause. This can increase the need for insulin or oral diabetes medication. Infections. Even before menopause, high blood sugar levels can contribute to urinary tract and vaginal infections. After menopause — when a drop in estrogen makes it easier for bacteria and yeast to thrive in the urinary tract and vagina — the risk is even higher. Sleep problems. After menopause, hot flashes and night sweats may keep you up at night. In turn, the sleep deprivation can make it tougher to manage your blood sugar level. Sexual problems. Diabetes can damage the nerves of the cells that line the vagina. This can interfere with arousal and orgasm. Vaginal dryness, a Continue reading >>

Hot Flash Causes And How To Treat Them

Hot Flash Causes And How To Treat Them

A hot flash is a feeling of intense warmth that’s not caused by an external source. Hot flashes can appear suddenly, or you may feel them coming on over a period of a few minutes. Symptoms of hot flashes include: having skin that suddenly feels warm experiencing redness of the skin on the face, neck, ears, chest, or other areas sweating, especially in the upper body tingling in your fingers experiencing a heartbeat that is faster than usual Many people also feel cold or get chills as the hot flash lets up. Hot flashes are a common symptom of menopause. Women undergoing menopause can experience hot flashes as often as several times a day. Menopause isn’t the only cause of hot flashes, though. Anyone can experience them. How long they last and how often you feel them depend on what triggers them. Hormonal changes in your body are thought to cause hot flashes. This reaction can be triggered by several factors. Potential triggers of hot flashes include: spicy foods hot drinks being in a warm room wearing tight clothing spinal lesions There are many possible causes of hot flashes and this list is not comprehensive. If you experience repeat hot flashes that don’t go away, you should call a doctor. Treating hot flashes depends on what’s causing them. Many people can manage their hot flashes at home with some strategies. In cases of more severe hot flashes, your doctor may prescribe medication to help reduce them. Other people use alternative treatments for hot flashes, although you should talk to your doctor before taking any herbs or supplements. Lifestyle changes and strategies for managing hot flashes To manage your hot flashes, it helps to know what triggers them. One way to figure out what’s triggering your hot flashes is to keep a hot flash diary. Take note of Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

Night Sweats In Men: Causes, Treatments And Remedies

Night Sweats In Men: Causes, Treatments And Remedies

Are you a man in your 20s, 30s, above 40, 50, 60 or 70 years old who occasionally or constantly suffer from severe and heavy night sweats? We have all the possible reasons or causes including hot flashes such as cancer, alcoholism, stress (anxiety), surgery, diabetes, infections, among others. We also have ways to treat or stop them and much more. Overview Night sweats or nocturnal hyperhidrosis in men, women or even children refers to the excessive sweating while someone is sleeping at night. Some texts often refer them to as ‘sweating in bed’ or ‘sleep sweat.’ This definition might not include it happening because they sleeping in very warm rooms, have very warm bedding or you wear many bedclothes since they will be expected to sweat and this is very normal. Actual night sweats can be described as ‘very severe hot flushes’ or ‘drenching ’ where victims have ‘heavy sweating while sleeping’ and they wake up with their clothes and bed sheets drenched. The cause of this severe or excessive sweating is not influenced by their environment. Whereas some people might have this problem occasionally, others will suffer from excessive, heavy or severe night sweats constantly until the underlying cause is correctly diagnosed and cured or prevented. In terms of their effects, although very unpleasant, they are harmless in most cases. They only serve to indicate or are symptoms of something totally wrong with your body. Due to their similarity to hot flushes (feverish heat that comes all over a sudden), it is not easy to say if they are just hot flashes or they could be night sweats. Cold sweat including those at night This is “the body's reaction to stress as part of the "fight or flight" response that helps us to react in a dangerous situation.” It happens Continue reading >>

Feeling Extremely Hot With Intense Sweating Can Be A Bad Sign For Ckd And Diabetics

Feeling Extremely Hot With Intense Sweating Can Be A Bad Sign For Ckd And Diabetics

A KidneyBuzz.com viewer wrote, "Is it just me or do others write in and ask about problems they are suffering with feeling excessively hot?" He continued, "I am in an AC room with my girlfriend and all of a sudden I start feeling flushed, terribly hot, and pouring in sweat while she is freezing! I don't know if it's my thyroid or hormones or what, but is there anything I can do!" Recommended Reading: How Chronic Kidney Disease And Diabetics Can Overcome Feeling "Drained" During Hot Weather While each Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patient is completely different, and it would be impossible for KidneyBuzz.com to suggest what might be causing you to feel extremely hot and sweaty, there are some common but lesser known complications that may cause this issue. As you know, KidneyBuzz.com does not offer medical advice, but the following strategies may assist Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic patients to improve their condition as well as their overall quality of life. Recommended Reading: Fruits and Vegetables can Effectively Hydrate Individuals with CKD better than a Glass of Water If you start to feel sweaty and really hot like a heat wave just hit or as if the room which you are in is locked and the temperature is rising, and/or your energy starts to decrease, then you may be suffering from Low Blood Sugar. Intense perspiration accompanied by decreased energy is a common problem in Diabetic patients, but did you know that the process of Dialysis can also cause Low Blood Sugar even if you DO NOT have Diabetes!? Recommended Reading: The Best Way CKD Patients Can Prevent Weight Gain, Lower Diabetes Risk And Improve Energy Fast When you have Dialysis, the process removes most things from your blood, including sugar. Although your Dialysate Bath (used in dialysis to dra Continue reading >>

Got Hot Flashes? Might Not Be Menopause!

Got Hot Flashes? Might Not Be Menopause!

You’re standing in line at the supermarket, and suddenly feel a whoosh of heat rise to the top of your head, leaving you flushed and sweaty and desperately fanning yourself. Yes—it’s another hot flash. This misery is a cliché of menopause, and these sweat-inducing menopausal heat surges can strike day or night—or both. But what if those temperature spikes aren’t menopause after all? As a gynecologist and menopause expert, I know that I have to check for other causes for these debilitating symptoms in my patients even if they’re already going through menopause. Read on for the some of the other reasons you may be having hot flashes—and what actions to take. THESE DISEASES CAN CAUSE HOT FLASHES… Thyroid Disease The thyroid gland pumps out the hormones that control metabolism and body temperature, among other things. So it’s no surprise that thyroid conditions can produce many of the temperature-related symptoms associated with menopause, including hot flashes, night sweats and a low tolerance for heat. Abnormal thyroid hormone levels can also mimic other common menopausal symptoms including brain fog, insomnia and irritability. What to do: Since women are eight times more likely to develop a thyroid condition than men are, it makes sense to get your thyroid tested if you’re experiencing hot flashes. One key reason: Thyroid conditions require treatment to avoid potentially serious complications. A simple blood test can measure your level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and if the level is abnormal, often the lab automatically will run extra tests to see whether you’ve developed a thyroid condition. Whether the thyroid gland is overactive (hyperthyroidism) or underactive (hypothyroidism), there are medications to correct the imbalance. It takes Continue reading >>

Hot Flushes: How To Cope

Hot Flushes: How To Cope

Most women will experience hot flushes when going through the menopause. They're often described as a sudden feeling of heat that seems to come from nowhere and spreads throughout the body. You might also experience sweating, palpitations, and flushing of the face. Some women only have occasional hot flushes that don't really bother them, while others can have many a day, and find them uncomfortable, disruptive and embarrassing. Hot flushes can start a few months or years before your periods stop (before you start the menopause), and usually continue for several years after your last period. Causes of hot flushes Hot flushes usually affect women who are approaching the menopause and are thought to be caused by changes in your hormone levels affecting your body's temperature control. They can happen without warning throughout the day and night, but can also be triggered by: eating certain foods – such as spicy foods or those containing monosodium glutamate (MSG) drinking alcohol or coffee wearing woolly jumpers – especially polo necks a fever feeling stressed anxiety or a panic disorder treatment for certain types of cancer (this can affect both men and women) certain medications some health conditions – such as an overactive thyroid, diabetes, tuberculosis and certain types of cancer Is a hot flush anything to worry about? Hot flushes are usually harmless. But you should talk to your GP if you're having other symptoms as well, such as feeling generally unwell, fatigue, weakness, weight loss or diarrhoea. What does a hot flush feel like? Women often describe a hot flush as a creeping feeling of intense warmth that quickly spreads across your whole body and face "right up to your brow". It typically lasts for several minutes. Others say the warmth is similar to the Continue reading >>

Are Hot Flushes A Diabetes Warning Sign?

Are Hot Flushes A Diabetes Warning Sign?

Hot flushes, the most common symptom of menopause, increase the risk of serious health problems, including heart disease. A new study suggests that they also may increase the risk of developing diabetes, especially when accompanied by night sweats. During the study, which has been published in Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society, data from more than 150,000 postmenopausal women was analysed. Of the total population studied, 33 per cent of the women had experienced hot flushes. Any incidence was associated with an 18 per cent increased diabetes risk, and this risk continued to climb on the basis of the severity and duration of the hot flashes. Moreover, diabetes risk was the most pronounced for women reporting any type of night sweats but only if the onset of hot flushes occurred late in the menopause transition. Compared with men with diabetes, women with diabetes have a higher risk of being hospitalised for or dying from diabetes and its complications, which makes the timely identification and management of diabetes through lifestyle intervention or medical management critical. Dr. JoAnn Pinkerton, executive director of the North American Menopause Society, said: ‘This study showed that, after adjustment for obesity and race, women with more severe night sweats, with or without hot flashes, still had a higher risk of diabetes.’ ‘Menopause is a perfect time to encourage behaviour changes that reduce menopause symptoms, as well as the risk of diabetes and heart disease. Suggestions include getting regular exercise and adequate sleep, avoiding excess alcohol, stopping smoking, and eating a heart-healthy diet. For symptomatic women, hormone therapy started near menopause improves menopause symptoms and reduces the risk of diabetes.’ Continue reading >>

Will Eating Fruits Cause Diabetes?

Will Eating Fruits Cause Diabetes?

No, eating fruits cannot cause diabetes. - Type 1 diabetes is a genetic disorder marked by severe deficiency or absence of insulin production from the pancreas. Eating fruits cannot lead to this form of diabetes. - Type 2 diabetes is marked by resistance of the body to insulin. No natural fruits can produce insulin resistance on consumption.Hence, diabetes type 2 also cannot be induced by eating any fruits. - However, there are some fruits which are rich in sugars and should be avoided by people who are already diabetic,as eating these fruits increases blood sugar levels and can result in weight gain. - Some of the fruits that should be avoided are banana, custard apple, chikoo, sweet melon, grapes which are known to have very high levels of sugars. - Along with these packed fruit juices, sugar or fruit syrups, jams and jellies must be avoided as they increase blood sugar levels. - Some fruits that are very useful in diabetes are jamun, guava, star fruit, pineapple, papaya, oranges, water melon and pomegranate. These can be consumed in small proportions of 100-200 grams each day. Continue reading >>

Tips About Sugar, Hot Flashes, And Night Sweats

Tips About Sugar, Hot Flashes, And Night Sweats

Hot flashes and night sweats are experienced by 75% of women during perimenopause and 50% of women during postmenopause. Having a healthy and balanced diet is imperative to making hot flashes and night sweats infrequent and less disruptive. Studies have shown that hot flashes occur more often in women who have diets that are high in saturated fats and sugar. Also, some researchers have shown that hot flashes are more likely to occur when blood glucose levels fall in between meals. Why Avoid Excess Fat and Sugar? Hot flashes and night sweats are connected to fluctuations in estrogen production during menopause. The part of the brain that regulates temperature, the hypothalamus, is sensitive to estrogen fluctuations, as are the blood vessels. A woman's diet can change how the body metabolizes, or processes, estrogen, which can lead to different concentrations of estrogen in the body and therefore hot flash and night sweat episodes. Diets high in unhealthy fats and sugars tend to increase the frequency of menopausal hot flashes and night sweats. What Healthy Eating Habits Help Reduce Hot Flashes? Research has found that Mediterranean diets and diets higher in fruits and vegetables reduce hot flashes. The Mediterranean diet includes garlic, peppers, salad greens, whole wheat pasta, olive oil, and fish. It is also low in red meat, processed food, and foods high in simple sugars and unhealthy fats. Mediterranean diets have high amounts of fiber, something most North Americans don't get enough of, as well as healthy fats, which are found in nuts, olive oil, avocados, and fish. Dietary Tips That Impact Hot Flashes Studies have shown that stabilizing blood glucose levels will help diminish hot flashes. A woman can take certain steps to stabilize her glucose levels. The primarily Continue reading >>

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