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Will Diabetes Cause Hot Flashes

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

Drinking Excessive Fluids, Excessive Sweating, Fatigue And Hot Flashes

Drinking Excessive Fluids, Excessive Sweating, Fatigue And Hot Flashes

WebMD Symptom Checker helps you find the most common medical conditions indicated by the symptoms drinking excessive fluids, excessive sweating, fatigue and hot flashes including Diabetes, type 2, Panic attack, and Generalized anxiety disorder. There are 89 conditions associated with drinking excessive fluids, excessive sweating, fatigue and hot flashes. The links below will provide you with more detailed information on these medical conditions from the WebMD Symptom Checker and help provide a better understanding of causes and treatment of these related conditions. Diabetes, type 2 Diabetes can make you feel hungry, tired, or thirsty; you may urinate more than normal and have blurry vision. Panic attack When someone has a panic attack, that person feels a sudden, intense fear that can't be controlled. Generalized anxiety disorder Generalized anxiety disorder is a condition in which a person has nearly constant anxiety. Dehydration (Children) Dehydration, or not getting enough fluid, causes dry and sticky mouth, tearless crying, and more in children. Medication reaction or side-effect Medication side effects include nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, weakness, dizziness, seizures, and more. Mononucleosis Mononucleosis is a viral infection causing extreme fatigue, sore throat, fever, rash, muscle aches, and more. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Low blood sugar, or low glucose levels, causes shakiness, anxiety, clammy skin, irritability, hunger, and more. Multiple sclerosis Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the nervous system causing difficulties with balance, speech, and movement. Diabetes, type 1 Diabetes can make you feel hungry, tired, or thirsty; you may urinate more than normal and have blurry vision. Supraventricular tachycardia Supraventricular tachycardia is fast h Continue reading >>

Don’t Sugar Coat It…diabetes Effects Menopause Symptoms

Don’t Sugar Coat It…diabetes Effects Menopause Symptoms

The Effects of Menopause and Diabetes Hormonal changes The menopause, and the years leading up to it, is when women’s bodies gradually produce less estrogen and progesterone. These hormonal changes can affect blood sugar levels differently for each individual. Many women notice their blood sugar levels fluctuate more,. The hormonal changes as well as swings in blood sugar levels can contribute to mood changes, fatigue and hot flushes. Weight gain often occurs at menopause. Any weight gain will increase insulin resistance which may cause the development of diabetes. And, in women who have diabetes, menopause itself, can wreak havoc on their diabetes control and they may have to adjust their diabetes medication. Menopause means end of menstruation. It is defined as not having a menstrual period for 12 consecutive months in a row. The menopause may be natural or it may occur after a hysterectomy, the surgical removal of the uterus, with the removal of the ovaries (oophorectomy). The usual age for women to stop menstruating naturally is between 45 -55 years. Signs and Symptoms of Menopause include: Mood changes Disturbed sleep Depression and headaches Irregular periods Hot flashes Night sweats Other symptoms includes: vaginal dryness, loss of sex drive and bladder problems. These problems will be made worse by high blood sugar levels. Does Menopause Increase Diabetes? This question is difficult to answer, but it does look like estrogen and progesterone may have something to do with it. Also, of course, our age, weight and lifestyle plays an important part. As women start to go into menopause, changes in hormone levels can lead to swings in blood glucose levels. That is why it is so important for women to have their blood sugar checked regularly. It’s important for women Continue reading >>

What Your Hot Flashes Could Be Telling You

What Your Hot Flashes Could Be Telling You

Women with diabetes tend to experience hot flashes that aren't just a sudden rush of feeling too warm. Instead, you may have noticed your hot flashes come with flushing, sweating or shakiness, as well as confusion and weakness. This might be because these aren't hot flashes like those associated with menopause. The issue here is with your blood sugar. Does diabetes cause hot flashes? Diabetes itself does not directly cause hot flashes. Instead, hot flashes and sweating can come from low blood sugar. In fact, a sudden hot flash can be a sign of hypoglycemia. If you get hot flashes after eating, check how much insulin you're giving yourself. If you take more insulin than the amount of food you just ate requires, your blood sugar can dip too low, causing hot flashes. You might also find yourself with low blood sugar if you don't eat after you take your insulin or you overdo it at the gym. What can you do about hot flashes? The solution to diabetic hot flashes lies in managing your blood glucose levels. If you frequently get hot flashes and have diabetes, you should discuss this with your doctor to see whether your treatment regimen needs adjustment. When you're having a hot flash, the first thing you should do is check your blood sugar. Low blood sugar is very serious and can have severe consequences if you don't address it, so treat your hot flashes as a warning sign from your body and take action. How to treat low blood sugar The first thing you need to do is consume 15 to 20 grams of glucose or simple carbohydrates, according to the American Diabetes Association. This can be in the form of glucose tablets or gel, four ounces of juice, hard candies, or a couple of tablespoons of raisins. Once you've done this, check your blood sugar again in 15 minutes and consume more g Continue reading >>

Night Sweats In Men: Causes, Treatments And Remedies

Night Sweats In Men: Causes, Treatments And Remedies

Are you a man in your 20s, 30s, above 40, 50, 60 or 70 years old who occasionally or constantly suffer from severe and heavy night sweats? We have all the possible reasons or causes including hot flashes such as cancer, alcoholism, stress (anxiety), surgery, diabetes, infections, among others. We also have ways to treat or stop them and much more. Overview Night sweats or nocturnal hyperhidrosis in men, women or even children refers to the excessive sweating while someone is sleeping at night. Some texts often refer them to as ‘sweating in bed’ or ‘sleep sweat.’ This definition might not include it happening because they sleeping in very warm rooms, have very warm bedding or you wear many bedclothes since they will be expected to sweat and this is very normal. Actual night sweats can be described as ‘very severe hot flushes’ or ‘drenching ’ where victims have ‘heavy sweating while sleeping’ and they wake up with their clothes and bed sheets drenched. The cause of this severe or excessive sweating is not influenced by their environment. Whereas some people might have this problem occasionally, others will suffer from excessive, heavy or severe night sweats constantly until the underlying cause is correctly diagnosed and cured or prevented. In terms of their effects, although very unpleasant, they are harmless in most cases. They only serve to indicate or are symptoms of something totally wrong with your body. Due to their similarity to hot flushes (feverish heat that comes all over a sudden), it is not easy to say if they are just hot flashes or they could be night sweats. Cold sweat including those at night This is “the body's reaction to stress as part of the "fight or flight" response that helps us to react in a dangerous situation.” It happens Continue reading >>

News Flash: Hot Flashes And Sugar Control Are Linked

News Flash: Hot Flashes And Sugar Control Are Linked

As a rite of passage, menopause impacts every woman as she enters the later years of life. While menopause offers a bridge to an improved sense of self and peace of mind, this life transition holds the reputation as one of misery. In other words, the beauty of this relatively short season is sometimes overshadowed by the negative. Yes, menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes, raise dread in those approaching the 50-year mark and complaints from those already there. However, lifestyle changes, particularly diet adjustments, decrease these symptoms. In particular and to the point, sugar control begets hot flash control. Ongoing Body Changes in Women In looking at the link between blood sugar levels and hot flash occurrences, the perspective is important. For women, the body changes continually from childhood growth through puberty, possibly pregnancy, and nursing, through to aging and into menopause. Adapting to these bodily changes can become wearisome if you don’t take care of yourself. Keeping a positive perspective as to the miracle of the female body and adjusting as necessary brings you to menopause in a healthy state of mind. This outlook combats the negative impact of many of the menopausal symptoms you may experience. It may help to keep in mind that the one constant in life is change. Understanding Menopause Simply put, menopause is the cessation of a woman’s menstrual cycle and the closure of her reproductive years. This natural, biological process happens when the ovaries stop releasing eggs. An end to fertility, menopause does not signal an end to sexuality, vitality or health. When and How It Happens Typically, this change of life occurs after age 40 with the average age of around 51 years in the United States. However, hysterectomies, chemotherapy trea Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Many people with diabetes will experience times when they sweat too much, too little, or at odd times. Diabetes-related nervous system damage and low blood sugars cause these commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Sweating complications can be a sign of poor diabetes management. Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is crucial to both prevention and treatment. Contents of this article: Diabetes and sweating problems People sweat for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are normal and some are not. Sweating is a natural response to physical and emotional stress. But excessive sweating, when the reason is unclear, is often a sign that something is not right. Some people with sweating conditions will sweat even on a cold day or during minimal activity. Low blood sugar levels and diabetes-related nervous system damage cause the most commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Extremely low blood sugars cause a fight-or-flight response, triggering the release of hormones that increase sweating. When blood sugar levels are too high for too long, a loss of nerve function can occur. This condition is known as diabetic neuropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) claim that around half of people with diabetes experience some form of neuropathy. If the nerves that control the sweat glands are damaged, they may send the wrong message to sweat glands, or none at all. In most cases, neuropathies cause either excessive sweating or an inability to sweat. Sweating caused by hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a term to describe abnormally low blood sugar levels. For most adults, blood glucose levels below 70 milligrams per deciliter are considered hypoglycemic. Individual targets can vary, however. Many diabetes management medica Continue reading >>

Study Suggests Hot Flashes Could Be Precursor To Diabetes

Study Suggests Hot Flashes Could Be Precursor To Diabetes

Hot flashes, undoubtedly the most common symptom of menopause, are not just uncomfortable and inconvenient, but numerous studies demonstrate they may increase the risk of serious health problems, including heart disease. A new study suggests that hot flashes (especially when accompanied by night sweats) also may increase the risk of developing diabetes. Results are being published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). As reported in "Vasomotor symptom characteristics: are they risk factors for incident diabetes?" data was analyzed from the more than 150,000 postmenopausal women who participated in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) to confirm that the occurrence of hot flashes was associated with an elevated diabetes risk. Of the total population studied, 33% of the women had experienced hot flashes. Any incidence of hot flashes was associated with an 18% increased diabetes risk, and this risk continued to climb on the basis of the severity and duration of the hot flashes. Moreover, diabetes risk was the most pronounced for women reporting any type of night sweats but only if the onset of hot flashes occurred late in the menopause transition. Diabetes is a serious health risk currently affecting 15% of women aged 55 years and older. Its incidence is expected to more than double by 2050. Compared with men with diabetes, women with diabetes have a higher risk of being hospitalized for or dying from diabetes and its complications, which makes the timely identification and management of diabetes through lifestyle intervention or medical management critical. "This study showed that, after adjustment for obesity and race, women with more severe night sweats, with or without hot flashes, still had a higher risk of diabetes," sa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms In Women

Diabetes Symptoms In Women

Diabetes symptoms in women are a common condition. According to NHS statistics diabetes affects 2.8 million people, both men and women, in the U.K. It is believed that a further 1 million have the condition but remain undiagnosed. 90% of all adults in the U.K. with diabetes have type 2. Managing diabetes whilst going through menopause can feel like a double challenge for many women due to the combined effects that each condition can have on the body. What Are The Different Types of Diabetes? Type 1 – A total lack of insulin Formerly called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes. The body’s immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, which results in the elimination of insulin production from the body. If you don’t have insulin in your body, cells cannot absorb sugar (glucose) which they need to produce energy. Type 2 – Too little insulin or cannot use insulin effectively Previously called adult-onset or non-insulin dependent diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can develop at any age but is most commonly known for developing during adulthood. The main characteristic of type 2 diabetes is insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the body’s inability to respond to insulin. Resistance develops because of many factors:- Genetics Obesity Increasing age High blood sugar over a long period of time Gestational – Like type 2 but occurs in the later stages of pregnancy Normally disappears after the baby is born. You are more likely to develop gestational diabetes in future pregnancies. You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes as some stage. The Differences Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Signs and symptoms are usually very obvious and develop quickly. People seek medical help because they are seriously ill from symptoms of high blood su Continue reading >>

Diabetes-prevention Drug Metformin Can Cause Night Sweats

Diabetes-prevention Drug Metformin Can Cause Night Sweats

DEAR DR. ROACH: As a preventive measure for prediabetes, my doctor recommended I take 500 mg of metformin twice a day (morning and evening). I have been following this regimen for two months. The same day I started the medication, my night sweats started up again, with a vengeance. On the metformin, my quality of sleep was negatively affected by four to five episodes of bad hot flashes every night. Since hot flashes/night sweats were not mentioned as a side effect either by my doctor or on the information pamphlet, I notified my doctor. He suggested stopping the metformin for two to four weeks to see if the night sweats subsided. I had IMMEDIATE relief with the night sweats being eliminated the first day I stopped the medication. I am a 58-year-old female, and other than needing to lose about 20 pounds, am in good health, exercise every day and eat a healthy diet. Some research indicates that metformin causes hypoglycemia, which then causes the night sweats. A sometimes-mentioned desirable side effect is weight loss. What is your take on metformin and whether it is a help or a hindrance to good health? -- R.M.T. ANSWER: Metformin was tested in a large trial to see whether it could help prevent people at high risk for diabetes from developing overt diabetes, and it was successful at doing so. It wasn't quite as successful as a good diet and regular exercise, but many experts do use metformin, especially in overweight people, to help them lose weight and reduce their diabetes risk. In my opinion, it works best when combined with a healthy diet and regular exercise. However, it does have side effects. Gastrointestinal side effects, especially diarrhea but also nausea, are the most common. Hot flashes are listed as occurring in up to 10 percent of people taking the medicati Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes And Menopause

Managing Diabetes And Menopause

In 2010, business owner Deena Pierott, 53, of Vancouver, WA, began to notice her menopausal symptoms—mood swings, hot flashes and fatigue—were intensifying. “I was in the early stages of type 2 diabetes,” says Pierott. “[The combination] was the perfect storm.” “Together, diabetes and menopause are even more challenging,” confirms endocrinologist Asha Thomas, MD, a director with the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore. Fluctuating levels of estrogen and progesterone can cause blood sugar levels to seesaw. The hormonal changes can also increase the risk of vaginal and urinary-tract infections, already higher in women with diabetes. And night sweats and hot flashes wreak havoc with slumber—a problem because “not sleeping can also disrupt hormones like cortisol, resulting in more uneven blood sugars,” says Dr. Thomas. Bone thinning can also escalate after menopause, a particular concern for women with diabetes as they are more prone to bone and joint problems. Finally, menopause also brings metabolic changes that can cause pounds to pile on, exacerbating a woman with diabetes’ already high risk of heart disease. But anticipating menopausal changes can help you keep your diabetes under control. Follow these tips: Know the landscape. “Have a conversation with your endocrinologist and your gynecologist before menopause about possible changes,” says Dr. Thomas. “And begin to check your blood sugar more frequently to [monitor] changes.” How frequently you check depends on your symptoms and how well your glucose has been controlled. Ask your endocrinologist to review other health factors that menopause can affect, such as blood pressure and blood lipids (fats), important for controlling heart disease risk. Overh Continue reading >>

7 Causes Of Excessive Perspiration In People With Diabetes

7 Causes Of Excessive Perspiration In People With Diabetes

Unless the weather is sweltering or you’re having hot flashes, excessive sweating is most likely an indication of a greater health issue. Ask yourself: Do you have a fever or other signs of an infection? Are you in any pain when you sweat? Is the sweating mainly on one side? Does it involve your palms, soles, and/or armpits? Do you sweat while you sleep? Is your blood glucose level high (or low) during these sweating episodes? Could sweating be a reaction to your diabetes medication? If the answer is yes to any of these questions, talk to your healthcare provider. What are the possible causes of excessive sweating? For people with diabetes, certain complications can affect the sweat glands, making it difficult for the body to cool down in hot weather, triggering heavy sweating even during light activities, or causing sweating in cool temperatures. 1. Autonomic neuropathy. This is a condition in which hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) interferes with the nerves that control involuntary functions. The autonomic nervous system manages several systems automatically, including bladder control, heart rate, the ability to detect hypoglycemia, and the ability to sweat appropriately. Dry feet are a common symptom of nerve disease, so it is important to inspect your feet daily to be sure there are no cracks from excessive dryness, a condition that tends to occur along with sweating. 2. Low blood glucose levels. A low blood glucose level is called hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia triggers a fight-or-flight response in the body. As a result, the body produces additional norepinephrine and adrenaline, which can lead to heavy sweating as well as shakiness and anxiety. Good diabetes management can help keep your blood glucose levels in check. 3. Heart problems. People with diabetes have Continue reading >>

The Strange Link Between Hot Flashes & Diabetes

The Strange Link Between Hot Flashes & Diabetes

By Joy Stephenson-Laws, JD, Founder Menopause is inevitable for every female. It marks the end of fertility for women. The transition to this phase of a woman’s life involves many hormonal changes and can come with some pretty unpleasant symptoms like hair loss, weight gain, depression, mood swings, insomnia, vaginal dryness and night sweats and hot flashes. And if you are a woman going through the transition to menopause and experiencing night sweats and hot flashes it is very important to do everything you can to reduce and better manage these symptoms, because they may lead to some very serious health issues. A study published in Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) suggests that hot flashes, probably one of the most common symptoms of menopause, may be a precursor to diabetes. Researchers pulled data from more than 150,000 postmenopausal women. They found that 33% of them had experienced hot flashes during menopause. And incidence of hot flashes was linked to an 18% increased risk for diabetes. Furthermore, the risk for diabetes appeared to increase in women who experienced more severe and longer hot flashes. Women who experienced hot flashes accompanied by night sweats also appeared to have an increased risk, but only if this occurred in the late stages of the menopause transition. “Diabetes hits women hard, especially at midlife. In the United States, it’s the number 6 killer of women ages 45 to 54 and the number 4 killer of women ages 55 to 64,” according to the North American Menopause Society (NAMS). In the U.S., the average age for menopause is 51-years-old. The perimenopause or menopause transition may begin 8-10 years before a woman actually enters menopause. “This study showed that, after adjustment for obesity and Continue reading >>

Hot Flashes: Symptoms & Signs

Hot Flashes: Symptoms & Signs

A hot flash is a feeling of warmth spreading over the body that is often most strongly felt in the head and neck regions. Hot flashes may be accompanied by perspiration or flushing and usually last from 30 seconds to several minutes. Although hot flashes are a characteristic symptom of perimenopause, rare tumors, and other medical conditions may sometimes also cause hot flashes. Taking certain medications, eating spicy foods, and the consumption of alcohol have also been associated with the occurrence of hot flashes. Although the exact cause of hot flashes is not fully understood, hot flashes that occur in the perimenopause are thought to be due to a combination of hormonal and biochemical fluctuations brought on by declining estrogen levels. Hot flashes can often begin before the menstrual irregularities characteristic of menopause are even noticed. Up to 40% of regularly menstruating women in their 40s report having hot flashes. About 80% of women will be finished having hot flashes after five years, but sometimes they may persist for a longer time period. Hot flashes can sometimes be accompanied by night sweats (episodes of drenching sweats occurring at nighttime). Hot flashes can also occur in men. Most commonly, they arise as a result of a dramatic drop in testosterone levels in men who have their testes surgically removed (as part of the treatment for prostate cancer) or who are taking medications that counteract the effects of testosterone. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Continue reading >>

Is It Menopause Or Low Blood Sugars Causing Your Night Sweats?

Is It Menopause Or Low Blood Sugars Causing Your Night Sweats?

Do you wake up at night and throw off your covers because you are feeling hot and damp? Do you have a family history of Type 2 diabetes? Did you eat a lot of crackers, ice cream, pretzels or chips in the evening and wake up with soaked sheets? There are many causes of night sweats but often times people who have not been diagnosed with diabetes or prediabetes do not consider the possibility that they might be having low blood sugars in the middle of the night and not just hot flashes from menopause. Low Blood Sugars Could Be Causing Your Night Sweats If you have a family history of diabetes, you are “overwaist” with a waist circumference greater than 35 for a woman, you do not exercise regularly and you eat refined carbohydrates in excessive amounts, you might have prediabetes. Eating a large amount of sugary foods or white flour products can cause a rapid rise in blood sugar which then tells your pancreas to release extra amounts of insulin. This extra insulin can bring your blood sugar down rapidly and actually cause a low blood sugar. Have you ever felt shaky mid morning after eating cold cereal or pancakes with lots of syrup for breakfast. Have you munched on a whole bag of pretzels commending yourself for them being low fat but noticed you had night sweats that woke you in the middle of the night? Have you noticed on the days you eat more whole grains, lean protein, Greek yogurt, nuts, lots of veggies with a small night snack of fruit that you do not wake up with night sweats? To get a better understanding let me explain what happens with Type 2 diabetes. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a completely different disease process than Type 1 diabetes. Type 1 is an autoimmune disorder that results in complete loss of insulin production by the pancreas. Th Continue reading >>

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