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Will Diabetes Cause Diarrhea

Vomiting, Nausea, And Diarrhea – Adjusting Your Diabetes Medication

Vomiting, Nausea, And Diarrhea – Adjusting Your Diabetes Medication

Vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea are most commonly caused by bacterial or viral infections sometimes associated with flu-like illness. An essential part of treatment is to stop eating. Since you can certainly survive a few days without eating, this should pose no problem. But if you’re not eating, it makes sense to ask what dose of insulin or ISA you should take. Adjusting Your Diabetes Medication If you’re on one of the medication regimens described in this book, the answer is simple: you take the amount and type of medication that you’d normally take to cover the basal, or fasting, state and skip any doses that are intended to cover meals. If, for example, you ordinarily take detemir or glargine as basal insulin upon arising and at bedtime, and regular or lispro (or aspart or glulisine) insulin before meals, you’d continue the basal insulin and skip the preprandial regular or lispro for those meals you won’t be eating. Similarly, if you take an ISA on arising and/or at bedtime for the fasting state, and again to cover meals, you skip the doses for those meals that you do not plan to eat. In both of the above cases, it’s essential that the medications used for the fasting state continue at their full doses. This is in direct contradiction to traditional “sick day” treatment, but it’s a major reason why patients who carefully follow our regimens should not develop DKA or hyperosmolar coma when they are ill. Of course, if you’re vomiting, you won’t be able to keep down oral medication and this poses yet another problem. Remember, because infection and dehydration may each cause blood sugar to increase, you may need additional coverage for any blood sugar elevation. Such additional coverage should usually take the form of lispro insulin. This is one of Continue reading >>

Serotonin 5-ht3 Receptor Antagonist For Treatment Of Severe Diabetic Diarrhea

Serotonin 5-ht3 Receptor Antagonist For Treatment Of Severe Diabetic Diarrhea

Diabetic diarrhea is a troublesome gastrointestinal complication of diabetes. This condition persists for several weeks to months, and it frequently accompanies fecal incontinence. The cause of diabetic diarrhea is not fully understood, but autonomic neuropathy is thought to be an underlying mechanism (1). Parenteral somatostatin analog octreotide has been shown to be useful in the treatment of severe long-standing diabetic diarrhea (1). Selective serotonin 5-hydroxy tryptamine type 3 (HT3) receptor antagonist, which was developed as an antiemetic in cancer chemotherapy, prolongs colonic transit, inhibits small bowel secretion, and decreases colonic compliance (2). Here, we report the underlying mechanism of ramosetron (2), a selective serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, for the treatment of severe diabetic diarrhea. A 37-year-old man, who developed type 2 diabetes at 30 years of age, presented with watery diarrhea in late February 2009. Diarrhea occurred at a frequency of >15 bowel movements in 24 h, with a high nocturnal frequency and fecal incontinence. After 2–3 days with diarrhea, the patient developed constipation for 4–5 days. His A1C level had remained at ∼10% for the previous 4 years. He had simple diabetic retinopathy, numbness, and dull pain in the lower limbs but no microalbuminuria. The coefficient of variation of the R-R interval was reduced to 1.24%. He also presented with retrograde ejaculation. Steatorrhea was absent, and the bacterial culture of his stool revealed normal flora. Abdominal computed tomography revealed no abnormal lesions in the liver or the pancreas. The patient did not report abdominal pain or any other abdominal symptoms and had no signs of infectious disease. His body weight did not change after the development of diarrhea. He Continue reading >>

How To Treat Diabetic Diarrhea?

How To Treat Diabetic Diarrhea?

I have a problem that I never see addressed. I've had type 1 diabetes for 36 years and been diagnosed as having diabetic diarrhea. Numerous tests have ruled out all other gastrointestinal problems. Is there any treatment for this problem? Continue reading >>

What's The Connection Between Diabetes And Diarrhea?

What's The Connection Between Diabetes And Diarrhea?

No one wants to talk about diarrhea. More so, no one wants to experience it. Unfortunately, diarrhea is often the body's natural way of expelling waste in liquid form when a bacterial or viral infection, or parasite is present. However, there are other things that can cause diarrhea for everyone, and some things that can cause diarrhea specifically in those with diabetes. Diabetes and diarrhea There are various things that can cause diarrhea. These include: Large amounts of sugar alcohols, such as sorbitol, that are often used in sugar-free products Some medications, such as metformin, a common medication used to treat diabetes In some cases, such as with illness or the use of sugar alcohols, diarrhea does not last for long. It tends to stop once the illness is over or the person stops using sugar alcohols. With metformin, the symptoms can go away with time. Some people in whom the diarrhea does not resolve may need to stop taking the medication, however. Bowel diseases may cause lasting problems for people with these conditions. Diarrhea and other symptoms can be managed or controlled with lifestyle changes such as stress reduction, and medications as needed. People with type 1 diabetes are at higher risk of celiac disease, and should check for this if long-term diarrhea is a problem for them. A long-term complication associated with diabetes that can lead to long-term diarrhea (and constipation) is called autonomic neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy occurs when there is damage to the nerves that control how the body works. Autonomic neuropathy can affect the nerves that control all automatic bodily functions such as heart rate, sweating, and bowel function. Since diabetes is the most common cause of autonomic neuropathy, people with long-term diabetes complications stru Continue reading >>

Causes And Treatment Of Diarrhea During Pregnancy

Causes And Treatment Of Diarrhea During Pregnancy

Maternity can be a gratifying duration for a new mommy. However, the difficulties as well as problems that feature it could place a damper on one’s joy. One such complication that arises while pregnant and also could come to be quite troublesome otherwise treated quickly is diarrhea. Almost 1 in every 5 females struggles with diarrhea throughout the very first and last weeks of her pregnancy. Although there is no should bother with the condition originally, one would need to maintain an examine the very same and take added actions to make certain it does not influence the pregnancy. Common Sources of Looseness of the bowels Throughout Pregnancy A expectant female could suffer from diarrhea because of numerous reasons. Given below are some of the even more typical ones. Hormonal Changes Every woman would go through a sea of physical as well as psychological modifications throughout pregnancy. These adjustments can be attributed to the unexpected rise in the hormonal degrees throughout this period. The huge quantities of pregnancy hormones produced throughout maternity can reduce the digestion procedure in expectant women. And also though this is done to enable the fetus to take in even more nutrients effectively, it might create negative effects like abdominal cramps, stomach gas, bowel irregularity as well as looseness of the bowels etc. in the mother. Lactose Intolerance In some cases, a lady might endure from diarrhea during pregnancy if she takes place to be lactose intolerant. In the case of lactose intolerance, the individual in inquiry would not have the ability to absorb the sugars present in milk as well as some people dairy items. This can create problems like stomach aches, gas or looseness of the bowels etc. Diet Considerations Pregnant females would normal Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cat With Loose Stool

Diabetic Cat With Loose Stool

Cats are genetically predisposed to consuming high protein and low carbohydrates, but if they eat processed cat foods high in carbohydrates, they may become diabetic, which means they are unable to produce enough insulin to balance blood sugar and glucose levels. High glucose levels can contribute to dehydration, frequent urination and loose stools. Diabetes can be easily managed in felines, but it is important to know the right way to maintain your cat's health. Loose stool (diarrhea) in your cat can result from poor diabetic treatment and monitoring. According to Cornell University, "Diabetes will shorten a cat's lifespan. A dangerous, sometimes fatal condition called ketoacidosis may develop, indicated by loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, weakness, dehydration, and breathing abnormalities." Along with excessive urination, loose stool in diabetic cats develops from hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar levels, which will begin to turn excess sugar into glucosuria. When glucosuria builds up in the blood stream, the cat's body responds by flushing it out in urine and runny stool. Feline diabetes can be controlled and treated with a well-monitored diet plan. Cats need a diet high in fiber and low in sugar (carbohydrates) to maintain proper insulin levels and to decrease digestion problems associated with diabetes. Insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas, is responsible for regulating sugar levels. When insulin is deficient, the cat's body starts breaking down fat and protein and, instead of storing it, uses it for an alternative energy source. As a result, a feline can develop a ravenous appetite and have frequent urination and loose stool. To correct poor insulin levels, diabetic cats require insulin injections. Dosage is determined by the veterinarian ba Continue reading >>

What’s Bugging Your Gut? Diabetes, Ibs Or Both?

What’s Bugging Your Gut? Diabetes, Ibs Or Both?

If you have “gut issues” – meaning diarrhea, constipation, cramping, abdominal pain or nausea – and you have diabetes, you are not alone. In fact, this relationship is more common than you – or your doctor – may realize. Up to 75% of people with diabetes have at least one gastrointestinal symptom. These GI problems can include diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, and vomiting. The most common GI problem that results in diarrhea is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and the links between gut problems, namely IBS and blood sugars are tightly woven and interconnected. Even the severity of symptoms is closely linked to the glycemic control of the individual. Meaning the worse the glycemic control, the worse the GI symptoms. High blood sugars make it hard for the stomach and small intestine to work normally. At the same time, IBS itself can make it harder for your body to control post-prandial (or “after meal”) blood sugars. A Missed Diagnosis and Continued Suffering Sadly, people with diabetes suffer from the effect of undiagnosed IBS or other digestive disruption every day. Some people with diabetes are told their abdominal pain and gastrointestinal discomfort is just a complication of their poorly controlled blood sugars—leaving Irritable Bowel Syndrome (or other digestive disorders) undiagnosed and, therefore, untreated. To complicate matters further, symptoms of both diabetes and IBS are greatly impacted by diet, stress, and general health. In diabetes, GI problems are often related to what’s referred to as autonomic gastrointestinal neuropathy resulting in abnormal motility. “Motility” refers to your body’s ability to move through the digestive system – including your stomach, small and large intestine at the right speed: not too fast, not to Continue reading >>

What To Do If You Get Gastroenteritis:

What To Do If You Get Gastroenteritis:

Gastroenteritis causes diarrhea and vomiting, which can lead to dehydration and the loss of sodium and potassium (electrolytes). The disease puts a stress on your body and often causes an increase in blood glucose (sugar) levels. The two main culprits are stress hormones (cortisol, adrenaline) and lack of physical activity when you are ill. In rare cases, blood glucose (sugar) levels will fall. Measure your blood glucose (sugar) frequently; Continue to take your medication or insulin as usual (or as adjusted by your doctor while you are sick), even if your food intake is reduced because you’ve lost your appetite or are vomiting; Modify your diet: if you find it difficult to eat solid foods, try to eat the usual amount of carbohydrates in liquid form or, at the very least, satisfy your body’s minimum carbohydrate requirements of 150 g per day while you are ill. What are the signs of dehydration? Mild to Moderate Dehydration Severe Dehydration Dry, sticky mouth Extreme thirst Unusual sleepiness or tiredness Irritability and confusion Dry and cool skin Sunken eyes Headache Dry skin that doesn't bounce back when you pinch it Dizziness and lightheadedness Low blood pressure Rapid heartbeat and breathing Dark urine in smaller quantity Call a doctor or go to Emergency if: Signs of severe dehydration; Your blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than 25 mmol / L accompanied by excessive drowsiness (type 2 diabetes), or 20 mmol / L with a moderate to high ketone level in your urine or blood (type 1 diabetes); You are vomiting continuously and unable to keep liquids down; Your fever stays above 38.5 ºC (101.3 ºF) for more than 48 hours; Diarrhea lasts more than 24 hours or occurs more than 5 times per day. How to avoid becoming dehydrated Here are some ways to avoid dehydra Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Severe Diarrhea?

Can Metformin Cause Severe Diarrhea?

Question Originally asked by Community Member Tracey Can Metformin Cause Severe Diarrhea? My mother has Type 2 diabetes and is suffering with severe diarrhea. This is now making her avoid going out because she’s afraid of needing a bathroom all the time. Can anything be done about this? Answer Yes, metformin can cause severe diarrhea, which is needless, because we can easily avoid it. The problem is that our doctors far too often start us with a dose that is far too high and/or increase the dosage far to soon. Metformin is one of the safest drugs that we have for type 2 diabetes as well as having few side effects. It is one of our most powerful drugs and is one of the least expensive too. Please see my article about it and about how to increase the dosage at Metformin Forever. You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diarrhea - Causes, Symptoms And Management

Diabetic Diarrhea - Causes, Symptoms And Management

Diabetic diarrhea is a type of diarrhea caused by nerve damage which disrupts the functioning of the bowel. People suffering from diabetes are also more prone to diarrhea caused by other things. Coping with diabetes is hard on its own but is made even more difficult with this complication. People don't always know that diabetes and diarrhea can go together. Read on to find out about this distressing symptom, the causes, its symptoms and management. Diabetic Diarrhea Caused by Nerve Damage Autonomic neuropathy is the medical term for damage to the nerves that carry information from your brain to your glands and organs. These nerves normally work to control organs like your bowel, bladder, heart and sexual organs without you being aware of it. When diabetic diarrhea strikes it is because the nerves controlling your bowel have been damaged. During the night our nervous system normally ensures that our bowels are quiet so that we can sleep but if the nerves are damaged then this does not happen and night time diarrhea can be the result. Nerves which control the sphincters allowing the passage of feces can also be damaged leading to incontinence. This type of nerve damage is usually associated with type 1 diabetes and is more common if the diabetes is long standing and has been poorly controlled. It is very rare in type 2 diabetes but it can happen especially if the person is an insulin dependent diabetic. The incidence of this type of diarrhea is difficult to estimate as it is often confused with other types of diarrhea. Figures of 4-22% for people with type 1 diabetes but only 0.4% for type 2 have been given. Diabetic Diarrhea Symptoms Watery painless diarrhea Night time diarrhea (nocturnal diarrhea) Episodes of diarrhea along with periods of normal bowel movements or even Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Ibs

Diabetes And Ibs

Many people who are diabetic also experience gastrointestinal symptoms similar to IBS, so it’s not surprising that they are connected! I’m so happy to have today’s guest dietitian write about a topic that I know some of you may be struggling with – managing co-existing conditions on top of your IBS. Today we are lucky to have April Saunders, RD share her expertise on managing diabetes alongside your IBS. Take it away, April! If you have “gut issues”, meaning diarrhea, constipation, cramping, abdominal pain or nausea, and you have diabetes, you are not alone. In fact, this relationship is more common than you – or your doctor – may realize. Incredibly, 10-20% of adults worldwide suffer from functional gastrointestinal (GI) problems. For people with diabetes, this problem is even more common, and a large proportion of people with diabetes (type 1 or 2) suffer from a poorly functioning gut. Up to 75% of people with diabetes have at least one gastrointestinal symptom. A connection between people with IBS and higher rates of prediabetes has been found too, suggesting that this relationship starts early on in the pathway to type 2 diabetes. IBS and Glycemic Control IBS and other gut disorders are closely linked to diabetes. In fact, even the severity of symptoms is closely linked to the glycemic control of the individual, meaning the worse the glycemic control, the worse the GI symptoms. These GI problems can include diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, and vomiting. The most common GI problem that can be responsible for causing diarrhea is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), and many complex links have been identified between gut problems and blood sugars. Why do diabetes and IBS often co-exist? High blood sugars make it hard for the stomach and small intestin Continue reading >>

What Foods To Eat For A Diabetic With Diarrhea

What Foods To Eat For A Diabetic With Diarrhea

The typical diarrhea diet flies in the face of most dietary recommendations for diabetics. While most diabetic diets are rich in fibrous fruits, vegetables and beans, foods that help to ease diarrhea symptoms tend to be the exact opposite. However, that doesn't mean that you must suffer through diarrhea just to stick to your diabetic meal plan. There are a number of diabetic friendly foods that also help you bounce back faster from diarrhea. If you have diarrhea that lasts longer than five days or is combined with a fever, the University of Maryland Medical Center advises that you contact your doctor. Video of the Day After suffering from a bout of diarrhea, your number one priority is rehydration. You've lost significant amounts of fluid and the best way to get it back is through water, Health Castle reports. Electrolyte containing beverages such as Pedialyte and Gatorade may help in your hydration efforts. However, they tend to be high in simple sugars and should be avoided or limited if you have diabetes. That's why pure water -- which is calorie and sugar free -- is your best bet. Health Castle recommends that you drink at least eight glasses of fluid per day to replenish fluid lost during your diarrhea spell. In addition to water, you can also rehydrate with diabetic friendly beverages such as caffeine-free tea or diet soda. Vegetables and other fiber-rich legumes should be avoided while suffering from diarrhea, Health Castle reports. Fibrous foods can worsen diarrhea. However, this doesn't mean that you need to get your carbohydrates from starchy veggies such as white bread and crackers. By boiling your vegetables extensively so that they're soft, you can still eat the vegetables included on your diet without making your diarrhea worse. You may also want to consid Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy (nerve Damage) - An Update

Diabetic Neuropathy (nerve Damage) - An Update

Nerve damage or diabetic neuropathy resulting from chronically high blood glucose can be one of the most frustrating and debilitating complications of diabetes because of the pain, discomfort and disability it can cause, and because available treatments are not uniformly successful. Some patients find some relief from this nerve damage or neuropathy by keeping blood sugars as closely controlled as possible, getting regular exercise and keeping their weight under control. Using non-narcotic pain relievers consistently throughout the day—rather than waiting until nighttime when symptoms can become more severe—also seems to help if pain is the major symptom. Surprisingly, clinicians have also found that certain antidepressants may be helpful and can take the edge off the pain of neuropathy. Although pain or numbness in the legs or feet may be the most common complaint from people diagnosed with neuropathy, it is not the only symptom of this complication. Neuropathy can cause a host of different types of symptoms, depending on whether nerves in the legs, gastrointestinal tract, or elsewhere in the body are affected. If you have any of these symptoms, neuropathy may be the culprit: inability to adequately empty the bladder of its contents, resulting in frequent infections; nausea, vomiting, abdominal fullness or bloating, diarrhea, or constipation; low blood pressure upon standing that causes fainting or dizziness; inability to lift the foot or new deformities of the foot, or foot ulcers; trouble achieving or maintaining an erection. Although physicians have found some medications and other treatments that help ease these symptoms in some people, prevention continues to be the key. "Hemoglobin A1C readings should ideally be at 7.0% or lower. Those that are consistently n Continue reading >>

Diarrhea

Diarrhea

Diarrhea in cats and dogs can be a symptom of many different conditions, and if it persists, should be diagnosed by a vet. Home remedies are not recommended until a vet has definitively diagnosed the problem. Some possibilities include Food sensitivity and Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Diabetic cats tend toward gastrointestinal problems, most commonly vomiting and diarrhea. This study shows 30% of cats with diabetes also have some GI problems along with it. In 50% of the GI-troubled cats, the problem was vomiting[1]. When diarrhea is a problem, the possibilities for both dehydration and hypoglycemia increase[2]. The insulin dose you give depends partly on the meal being digested at a normal rate. When the food passing through the system speeds up in this manner, the insulin is still being absorbed at its usual rate[3]. It could mean that there's not enough food to match the insulin dose and a hypo could occur. You and your vet may want to temporarily decrease the insulin dose until you are both satisfied the diarrhea is under control. See also Constipation. Continue reading >>

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