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Will Diabetes Cause Diarrhea

Constipation And Diarrhea From Diabetes

Constipation And Diarrhea From Diabetes

Many people know diabetes can raise their odds of having heart disease and stroke. But it can affect your digestive tract, too. Digestion begins the minute you take a bite of food and ends a day or two later with a trip to the bathroom. The whole process is handled by the same part of your nervous system that controls other body functions that happen automatically, like your heartbeat and breathing. But over time, high blood sugar can damage the tiny blood vessels and nerves in your body, including your digestive system. A speed-up or slow-down of the process in your intestines could result in diarrhea or constipation. Diabetes medications, certain foods, and related illnesses can cause diarrhea, too. Nerve Damage About 60% to 70% of people with diabetes have some form of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy. It can develop at any time, but the longer you have diabetes, the more likely it is. When diabetes damages the nerves in your stomach and intestines, they may not be able to move food through normally. Most often, this causes constipation, but you can also get alternating bouts of constipation and diarrhea, especially at night. Misfiring nerves may not contract the muscles that mix and move the stuff in your intestines, so everything slows down. Your colon absorbs more moisture from the waste, which makes your poop harder -- and harder to pass. Constipation that lasts a long time can cause other health problems, such as fecal impaction, a hard lump of poop that blocks your rectum so nothing can get out. Fluid that lingers in your small intestine too long can allow too much bacteria to grow. This could lead to bloating, belly pain, and diarrhea. Nerve damage in your large intestine may let fluids move through too fast, or cause problems with absorbing and releasing Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Constipation Or Diarrhea

Diabetes And Constipation Or Diarrhea

Diabetes is a disease in which the body either does not produce or is unable to use the hormone insulin properly. The pancreas produces insulin, which helps the body use sugar (glucose) from foods. If the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin, or if the body cannot use the insulin properly, blood sugar levels rise and the body cannot use foods effectively. High blood sugar levels are harmful to many body tissues. Constipation is the most common gastrointestinal problem of people with diabetes. Diarrhea that occurs at night is also common. The nerves of the intestines control how long solid food waste remains in the intestines. If these nerves have been damaged by high blood sugar levels, food and waste products may move through the intestines too slowly, causing constipation or too quickly, causing diarrhea. Damage to the intestinal nerves usually does not occur unless you have had type 1 diabetes that requires treatment with insulin for many years. If you have diabetes, discuss any problems that you are having with either constipation or diarrhea with your doctor. Both conditions can be easily treated with medicine. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) happens when your blood sugar is high and your insulin level is low. This imbalance in the body causes a build-up of ketones. Ketones are toxic. If DKA isn’t treated, it can lead to diabetic coma and even death. DKA mainly affects people who have type 1 diabetes. But it can also happen with other types of diabetes, including type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (during pregnancy). DKA is a very serious condition. If you have diabetes and think you may have DKA, contact your doctor or get to a hospital right away. The first symptoms to appear are usually: frequent urination. The next stage of DKA symptoms include: vomiting (usually more than once) confusion or trouble concentrating a fruity odor on the breath. The main cause of DKA is not enough insulin. A lack of insulin means sugar can’t get into your cells. Your cells need sugar for energy. This causes your body’s glucose levels to rise. To get energy, the body starts to burn fat. This process causes ketones to build up. Ketones can poison the body. High blood glucose levels can also cause you to urinate often. This leads to a lack of fluids in the body (dehydration). DKA can be caused by missing an insulin dose, eating poorly, or feeling stressed. An infection or other illness (such as pneumonia or a urinary tract infection) can also lead to DKA. If you have signs of infection (fever, cough, or sore throat), contact your doctor. You will want to make sure you are getting the right treatment. For some people, DKA may be the first sign that they have diabetes. When you are sick, you need to watch your blood sugar level very closely so that it doesn’t get too high or too low. Ask your doctor what your critical blood sugar level is. Most patients should watch their glucose levels c Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diarrhea - Causes, Symptoms And Management

Diabetic Diarrhea - Causes, Symptoms And Management

Diabetic diarrhea is a type of diarrhea caused by nerve damage which disrupts the functioning of the bowel. People suffering from diabetes are also more prone to diarrhea caused by other things. Coping with diabetes is hard on its own but is made even more difficult with this complication. People don't always know that diabetes and diarrhea can go together. Read on to find out about this distressing symptom, the causes, its symptoms and management. Diabetic Diarrhea Caused by Nerve Damage Autonomic neuropathy is the medical term for damage to the nerves that carry information from your brain to your glands and organs. These nerves normally work to control organs like your bowel, bladder, heart and sexual organs without you being aware of it. When diabetic diarrhea strikes it is because the nerves controlling your bowel have been damaged. During the night our nervous system normally ensures that our bowels are quiet so that we can sleep but if the nerves are damaged then this does not happen and night time diarrhea can be the result. Nerves which control the sphincters allowing the passage of feces can also be damaged leading to incontinence. This type of nerve damage is usually associated with type 1 diabetes and is more common if the diabetes is long standing and has been poorly controlled. It is very rare in type 2 diabetes but it can happen especially if the person is an insulin dependent diabetic. The incidence of this type of diarrhea is difficult to estimate as it is often confused with other types of diarrhea. Figures of 4-22% for people with type 1 diabetes but only 0.4% for type 2 have been given. Diabetic Diarrhea Symptoms Watery painless diarrhea Night time diarrhea (nocturnal diarrhea) Episodes of diarrhea along with periods of normal bowel movements or even Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

What's The Connection Between Diabetes And Diarrhea?

What's The Connection Between Diabetes And Diarrhea?

No one wants to talk about diarrhea. More so, no one wants to experience it. Unfortunately, diarrhea is often the body's natural way of expelling waste in liquid form when a bacterial or viral infection, or parasite is present. However, there are other things that can cause diarrhea for everyone, and some things that can cause diarrhea specifically in those with diabetes. Diabetes and diarrhea There are various things that can cause diarrhea. These include: Large amounts of sugar alcohols, such as sorbitol, that are often used in sugar-free products Some medications, such as metformin, a common medication used to treat diabetes In some cases, such as with illness or the use of sugar alcohols, diarrhea does not last for long. It tends to stop once the illness is over or the person stops using sugar alcohols. With metformin, the symptoms can go away with time. Some people in whom the diarrhea does not resolve may need to stop taking the medication, however. Bowel diseases may cause lasting problems for people with these conditions. Diarrhea and other symptoms can be managed or controlled with lifestyle changes such as stress reduction, and medications as needed. People with type 1 diabetes are at higher risk of celiac disease, and should check for this if long-term diarrhea is a problem for them. A long-term complication associated with diabetes that can lead to long-term diarrhea (and constipation) is called autonomic neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy occurs when there is damage to the nerves that control how the body works. Autonomic neuropathy can affect the nerves that control all automatic bodily functions such as heart rate, sweating, and bowel function. Since diabetes is the most common cause of autonomic neuropathy, people with long-term diabetes complications stru Continue reading >>

Is Diarrhea A Symptom Of Diabetes?

Is Diarrhea A Symptom Of Diabetes?

Diabetes occurs when your body is unable to produce or use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that your pancreas releases when you eat. It allows your cells to absorb sugar. Your cells use this sugar to make energy. If your body isn’t able to use or absorb this sugar, it builds up in your blood. This causes your blood sugar levels to increase. The two types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. People with either form of diabetes experience many of the same symptoms and complications. One such complication is diarrhea. About 22 percent of people with diabetes experience frequent diarrhea. Researchers are unsure whether this is related to issues in the small bowel or the colon. It’s unclear what causes persistent diarrhea in people who have diabetes. Most people have experienced diarrhea at one point in their lives. People with diabetes may often need to pass a significant amount of loose stool at night. Being unable to control a bowel movement, or having incontinence, is also common in people who have diabetes. Diarrhea may be regular, or it may alternate with periods of regular bowel movements. It may also alternate with constipation. Learn more: Diabetes and constipation: What’s the connection? » The cause for the connection between diabetes and diarrhea isn’t clear, but research suggests that neuropathy may be a factor. Neuropathy refers to numbness or pain resulting from nerve damage. If you have diabetes, high blood sugar levels can damage your nerve fibers. This generally occurs in the hands or feet. Issues with neuropathy are common causes for many of the complications that accompany diabetes. Another possible cause is sorbitol. People often use this sweetener in diabetic foods. Sorbitol has proven to be a potent laxative in amounts as small as 10 grams. An imba Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms

High Blood Sugar Symptoms

If you’ve had diabetes for any length of time at all, you’ve probably seen lists of the signs and symptoms of high blood glucose dozens of times. Doctors and diabetes educators hand them out. Hundreds of websites reprint them. Most diabetes books list them. You likely know some of the items on the list by heart: thirst, frequent urination, blurry vision, slow healing of cuts, and more. But have you ever stopped to wonder why these symptoms occur? How does high blood glucose cause frequent urination, make your vision go blurry, or cause all of those other things to happen? Here are some answers to explain what’s going on in your body when you have high blood glucose. Setting the stage for high blood glucose High blood glucose (called hyperglycemia by medical professionals) is the defining characteristic of all types of diabetes. It happens when the body can no longer maintain a normal blood glucose level, either because the pancreas is no longer making enough insulin, or because the body’s cells have become so resistant to insulin that the pancreas cannot keep up, and glucose is accumulating in the bloodstream rather than being moved into the cells. What is high blood sugar? Blood glucose is commonly considered too high if it is higher than 130 mg/dl before a meal or higher than 180 mg/dl two hours after the first bite of a meal. However, most of the signs and symptoms of high blood glucose don’t appear until the blood glucose level is higher than 250 mg/dl. Some of the symptoms have a rapid onset, while others require a long period of high blood glucose to set in. It’s important to note that individuals differ in their sensitivity to the effects of high blood glucose: Some people feel symptoms more quickly or more strongly than others. But each sign or sympt Continue reading >>

Gastroparesis: A Complication Of Diabetes

Gastroparesis: A Complication Of Diabetes

"Gastro" means stomach and "paresis" means impairment or paralysis. Diabetic gastropathy is a term for the spectrum of neuromuscular abnormalities of the stomach caused by diabetes. The abnormalities include gastric-dysrhythmias, antral hypomotility, incoordination of antroduodenal contractions and gastroparesis. Quick Stomach Anatomy Lesson The stomach is a neuromusclar organ that receives the food we ingest, mixes the food with acid and pepsin, and empties the nutriment suspension into the small intestine for absorption. The proximal stomach or fundus relaxes in order to receive the swallowed food (that's called receptive relaxation). The body and antrum mix and empty the food via recurrent gastric peristalic waves. The peristaltic contractions are paced by neoelectrical events called pacesetter potentials or slow waves. When gastric motility is normal, the postprandial (after eating) period is associated with pleasant epigastric sensations. Gastric motility disorders or gastroparesis presents with unpleasant, but non-specific postprandial symptoms: upper abdominal bloating, distention, discomfort, early satiety, nausea, and vomiting. If the vomitus contains undigested food, then gastroparesis is very likely to be present. Fluctuating, difficult-to-predict glucose levels may also reflect the presence of gastroparesis. Diabetes and the GI Tract The motility of your GI tract, which we were just speaking of, is controlled by an outer sleeve of muscles that surrounds your GI tract. They are controlled by a complex nervous system. Diabetes can damage these nerves, and it is this neurological long-term complication of diabetes that can lead to gastrointestinal disorders. How do we know this is the case? First, many of the people with gastroparesis have long-standing diabete Continue reading >>

What’s Bugging Your Gut? Diabetes, Ibs Or Both?

What’s Bugging Your Gut? Diabetes, Ibs Or Both?

If you have “gut issues” – meaning diarrhea, constipation, cramping, abdominal pain or nausea – and you have diabetes, you are not alone. In fact, this relationship is more common than you – or your doctor – may realize. Up to 75% of people with diabetes have at least one gastrointestinal symptom. These GI problems can include diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, and vomiting. The most common GI problem that results in diarrhea is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and the links between gut problems, namely IBS and blood sugars are tightly woven and interconnected. Even the severity of symptoms is closely linked to the glycemic control of the individual. Meaning the worse the glycemic control, the worse the GI symptoms. High blood sugars make it hard for the stomach and small intestine to work normally. At the same time, IBS itself can make it harder for your body to control post-prandial (or “after meal”) blood sugars. A Missed Diagnosis and Continued Suffering Sadly, people with diabetes suffer from the effect of undiagnosed IBS or other digestive disruption every day. Some people with diabetes are told their abdominal pain and gastrointestinal discomfort is just a complication of their poorly controlled blood sugars—leaving Irritable Bowel Syndrome (or other digestive disorders) undiagnosed and, therefore, untreated. To complicate matters further, symptoms of both diabetes and IBS are greatly impacted by diet, stress, and general health. In diabetes, GI problems are often related to what’s referred to as autonomic gastrointestinal neuropathy resulting in abnormal motility. “Motility” refers to your body’s ability to move through the digestive system – including your stomach, small and large intestine at the right speed: not too fast, not to Continue reading >>

Diarrhea

Diarrhea

Diarrhea in cats and dogs can be a symptom of many different conditions, and if it persists, should be diagnosed by a vet. Home remedies are not recommended until a vet has definitively diagnosed the problem. Some possibilities include Food sensitivity and Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Diabetic cats tend toward gastrointestinal problems, most commonly vomiting and diarrhea. This study shows 30% of cats with diabetes also have some GI problems along with it. In 50% of the GI-troubled cats, the problem was vomiting[1]. When diarrhea is a problem, the possibilities for both dehydration and hypoglycemia increase[2]. The insulin dose you give depends partly on the meal being digested at a normal rate. When the food passing through the system speeds up in this manner, the insulin is still being absorbed at its usual rate[3]. It could mean that there's not enough food to match the insulin dose and a hypo could occur. You and your vet may want to temporarily decrease the insulin dose until you are both satisfied the diarrhea is under control. See also Constipation. Continue reading >>

How To Treat Diabetic Diarrhea?

How To Treat Diabetic Diarrhea?

I have a problem that I never see addressed. I've had type 1 diabetes for 36 years and been diagnosed as having diabetic diarrhea. Numerous tests have ruled out all other gastrointestinal problems. Is there any treatment for this problem? Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Exocrine Pancreatic Cancer

Signs And Symptoms Of Exocrine Pancreatic Cancer

The symptoms of exocrine pancreatic cancers and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are often different, so they are described separately. Having one or more of the symptoms below does not mean you have pancreatic cancer. In fact, many of these symptoms are more likely to be caused by other conditions. Still, if you have any of these symptoms, it’s important to have them checked by a doctor so that the cause can be found and treated, if needed. Early pancreatic cancers often do not cause any signs or symptoms. By the time they do cause symptoms, they have often already spread outside the pancreas. Jaundice and related symptoms Jaundice is yellowing of the eyes and skin. Most people with pancreatic cancer (and nearly all people with ampullary cancer) will have jaundice as one of their first symptoms. Jaundice is caused by the buildup of bilirubin, a dark yellow-brown substance made in the liver. Normally, the liver excretes bilirubin as part of a liquid called bile. Bile goes through the common bile duct into the intestines, where it helps break down fats. It eventually leaves the body in the stool. When the common bile duct becomes blocked, bile can’t reach the intestines, and the level of bilirubin in the body builds up. Cancers that start in the head of the pancreas are near the common bile duct. These cancers can press on the duct and cause jaundice while they are still fairly small, which can sometimes lead to these tumors being found at an early stage. But cancers that start in the body or tail of the pancreas don’t press on the duct until they have spread through the pancreas. By this time, the cancer has often spread beyond the pancreas as well. When pancreatic cancer spreads, it often goes to the liver. This can also lead to jaundice. Dark urine: Somet Continue reading >>

Diarrhoea

Diarrhoea

Tweet Diarrhoea is commonly experienced as a result of gastroenteritis but may also be caused by specific medication including statins and metformin. Diarrhoea is defined as passing loose, watery stools more than three times a day. Diarrhoea may also result from conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, coeliac disease and autonomic neuropathy. Common causes of diarrhoea The NHS lists gastroenteritis, bowel infection, as the most common cause of diarrhoea. Gastroenteritis can be caused by a bacterial or viral infection. Other relatively common causes of diarrhoea include: Food intolerances - such as lactose or gluten intolerance Irritable Bowel Syndrome Drinking too much coffee or alcohol Read further below for causes more specifically related to diabetes. Diagnosing diarrhoea In most cases diarrhoea will clear within a week. If diarrhoea persists longer is accompanied by other symptoms such as: Fever Blood in your stools Vomiting Unexplained weight loss If you have recently been treated in hospital or have recently been put onto antibiotics see your GP. To diagnose the cause of persistent diarrhoea, your GP will review the medications you are on and will likely ask questions about your bowel movements and other questions which may help to isolate a possible cause. Your GP may need to take a stool sample or a blood test or perform a rectal examination if further information is needed. Treating diarrhoea Depending on the cause of diarrhoea, treatment may vary. See further below for more about specific causes related to diabetes. Whilst you have diarrhoea, it is important to take regular drinks of fluid, ideally water, as you will lose more water than usual through diarrhoea. High blood glucose, which can also commonly result from viral infections, can also increase th Continue reading >>

Causes And Treatment Of Diarrhea During Pregnancy

Causes And Treatment Of Diarrhea During Pregnancy

Maternity can be a gratifying duration for a new mommy. However, the difficulties as well as problems that feature it could place a damper on one’s joy. One such complication that arises while pregnant and also could come to be quite troublesome otherwise treated quickly is diarrhea. Almost 1 in every 5 females struggles with diarrhea throughout the very first and last weeks of her pregnancy. Although there is no should bother with the condition originally, one would need to maintain an examine the very same and take added actions to make certain it does not influence the pregnancy. Common Sources of Looseness of the bowels Throughout Pregnancy A expectant female could suffer from diarrhea because of numerous reasons. Given below are some of the even more typical ones. Hormonal Changes Every woman would go through a sea of physical as well as psychological modifications throughout pregnancy. These adjustments can be attributed to the unexpected rise in the hormonal degrees throughout this period. The huge quantities of pregnancy hormones produced throughout maternity can reduce the digestion procedure in expectant women. And also though this is done to enable the fetus to take in even more nutrients effectively, it might create negative effects like abdominal cramps, stomach gas, bowel irregularity as well as looseness of the bowels etc. in the mother. Lactose Intolerance In some cases, a lady might endure from diarrhea during pregnancy if she takes place to be lactose intolerant. In the case of lactose intolerance, the individual in inquiry would not have the ability to absorb the sugars present in milk as well as some people dairy items. This can create problems like stomach aches, gas or looseness of the bowels etc. Diet Considerations Pregnant females would normal Continue reading >>

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