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Why Should Diabetics Get The Flu Shot?

Flu Shot Is Key For People With Diabetes

Flu Shot Is Key For People With Diabetes

With predictions calling for a potentially bad flu season this year, doctors are urging people — particularly those with diabetes — to get vaccinated. Many people with diabetes don't get a seasonal flu shot each year, according to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). Some people with the blood sugar disease don't realize they're at risk for flu-related complications. Others have misguided fears that the shot will trigger an adverse reaction, the group explained. However, people with diabetes are more likely to develop serious flu-related health problems if they get the virus, the AADE cautioned. The group said the flu shot is a safe and effective way to prevent or reduce the severity of these complications. "Reducing risks is one of the AADE's seven key self-care behaviors for managing diabetes, and getting the flu shot every fall is an excellent way of reducing the risk of getting sick," certified diabetes educator Evan Sisson said in an AADE news release. "It's widely available, it takes just a few minutes and it can make a real difference in your health." Good hand hygiene is another important way to stay healthy and hopefully avoid the flu, the diabetes experts noted. There are several ways a seasonal flu shot can benefit people with diabetes, according to the AADE. They include: ♦ Better disease management. The flu and other infections can raise blood sugar levels and disrupt a healthy diet plan. Avoiding the flu can help people with diabetes stay on track and manage the condition. ♦ Complication prevention. People with diabetes are more likely to be hospitalized for flu-related complications, such as pneumonia. They are also more likely to die from the flu. ♦ Immune system boost. As people age, their immune system weakens. The flu can t Continue reading >>

Why I Get The Flu Shot As A Person With Type 1 Diabetes

Why I Get The Flu Shot As A Person With Type 1 Diabetes

Why I Get the Flu Shot as a Person with Type 1 Diabetes The flu-shot, explains Diabetes Educator Will Dubois from DiabetesMine , is just a vial of the dead flu. I didnt get a flu-shot for several years (because I didnt have health insurance and was paying full-price for insulin and test-strips) and I never got the flu. But I was in college surrounded by germs, so my immune system was on its game. After college, I worked at a gym for 5 years, where I was surrounded by peoples sweat, germsbut thankfully not their blood. Regardless, the point is: my immune system was happy and strong because I was surrounded by germsdaily and therefore less susceptible to small symptoms growing into worse symptoms. Did I ever acquire flu-like germs? Sure, probably, but they never exploded into the full-on flu, which I attribute to being surrounded by all those germs! Then, I left my work as a personal trainer and yoga instructor to pursue my bubbling writing career full-time. This pursuit meant that I was working primarily at home by myself (with dogs, of course), and no longer surrounded by other peoples germs all day. (Sure, I still went to the gym for my own workout, but that handful of hours didnt seem to be the same as training people, touching sweaty people, and touching sweaty equipment all day long.) My boyfriend brought it home from his office. His symptoms were mild and went away within a few days. (He never goes to the doctor and is naturally quite healthy despite his lack of interest in health! LOL.) But my symptoms turned into thereal flu for the first time since I was a kid. I spent the next 3 weeks battling moderate ketones even when my blood sugar was 120 mg/dL, and lying in bed because even the slightest effort of activity left me dizzy, nauseas, rapidly rising fever, and Continue reading >>

Flu Vaccine Has Added Benefits For People With Diabetes

Flu Vaccine Has Added Benefits For People With Diabetes

Well | Flu Vaccine Has Added Benefits for People With Diabetes Flu Vaccine Has Added Benefits for People With Diabetes People with Type 2 diabetes may get an added benefit from the flu vaccine: a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. British researchers studied 124,503 people with Type 2 diabetes over a seven-year period. About two-thirds of them had been vaccinated against flu. After controlling for sex, age, smoking, body mass index, hypertension, medications and other health and behavioral factors, they found that people with Type 2 diabetes who had gotten the flu vaccine had a 30 percent lower risk of stroke, a 22 percent lower risk of heart failure and a 24 percent lower risk of dying from all causes. They also had a slightly lower, but statistically insignificant, risk for heart attack. The lead author, Dr. Eszter P. Vamos, a clinical fellow at Imperial College London, said that people with diabetes are already at high risk for cardiovascular disease, and flu is particularly dangerous for them. The flu vaccine is largely underused among people with chronic illnesses, she said. Its really important that people with diabetes receive their annual flu vaccine. The study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal , had a large sample and a long follow-up time, which give it considerable strength. Still, the authors acknowledge they were unable to account for all of the factors that could make people who get a flu shot different from people who do not. A version of this article appears in print on 08/02/2016, on page D4 of the NewYork edition with the headline: What Else a Flu Shot Can Do. Continue reading >>

Should People With Diabetes Get A Flu Shot?

Should People With Diabetes Get A Flu Shot?

Should People with Diabetes Get a Flu Shot? What is flu anyway? Flu is influenza , an infectious disease that spreads from person to person. Symptoms are chiils and fever, muscle pain, sore throat, headache, coughing, weakness and fatigue and general discomfort. In some children, flu may have nausea and vomiting accompanying, but most often that is not a classic symptom of influenza. Many people confuse the stomach bug, gastroenteritis a 24 hour wipe your insides out kinda bug, which is unrelated to influenza. Historically, one of the most horrific flu epidemics was Spanish flu of 1918. It was a particularly virulent and lethal pandemic, coming in three waves starting in 1918, 1919, ending in 1920, and its spread was amplified through troop movements and global transportation. Spanish flu was estimated to have killed 40 million people in Europe, with some scientists estimating 100 million globally. In the US, Spanish flu affected twenty five percent of the population, but more remarkably, in only one year the average life expectancy in the U.S. dropped by 12%. The flu usually killed the very young and the very old, but this virus strain attacked teens and young adults with robust immune systems. Immune cells were activated by the virus, increasing the number of immune cells circulating in the blood and overwhelming the lungs with fluids. Healthy young adults essentially drowned from within. Patients would turn blue, suffocating from a lack of oxygen as their lungs filled with a frothy, bloody substance. Some patients died only a few hours after their first symptoms appeared; others died in a matter of days. Anyone watching Downton Abbey remembers the episode when the house comes down with Spanish flu. Flu vaccine is always controversial in a complimentary medicine prac Continue reading >>

Flu Shot & Diabetes | Joslin Diabetes Center

Flu Shot & Diabetes | Joslin Diabetes Center

Each year people with diabetes are offered flu vaccinations. Should you get an annual flu shot if you have diabetes? Everyone with diabetes over the age of six months. People who are allergic to eggs (they are used in the production of the vaccine). A yearly flu shot is highly recommended if you have diabetes, according to M. Donna Younger, MD, at Joslin Diabetes Center. Diabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting the flu, particularly if your diabetes is not well controlled. Having the flu also makes it more difficult to manage diabetes. Its important to get a flu shot when you have diabetes, so you can reduce the risk. The flu vaccine is 70-90 percent effective and takes two weeks after the shot for your immunity to build up. Its a triple vaccine against three types of influenza strains that public health officials predict are most likely to strike in a given flu season. The flu shot is effective for about six months. Cases of flu usually peak in January or February, but you can still get infected any time up until May. Although it is recommended you get the vaccine as soon as it is available in the fall, even January is not too late. Should you get the flu when you have diabetesbefore you get thevaccine or despite it, Younger recommends that you contact your primary care provider right away. There are also other treatments for the flu, but they arent as effective as getting the vaccine. Tamiflu, for example, has to be taken in first 48 hours and continued for a week. In order to be prepared, you should also have a sick day plan made with your health care team. We also encourage others in your family over six months years old to get the vaccine as well, so the flu is not passed around the house, Younger says. Prepare yourself for theflu season and get your vaccine Continue reading >>

The Truth About Flu Shots

The Truth About Flu Shots

**Editors Note: This article is based on current recommendations and research from the CDC . We encourage everyone to consult their doctor whenmaking personal health decisions. I got my flu shot in a Target CVS this year. I went in to pick up my insulin from the pharmacy, and when the pharmacist asked if Id like to get a flu shot I agreed. Id been meaning to anyway. Within 2 minutes Id filled out the necessary paperwork and she gave me the injection. Unfortunately, she hit a vein when she took the needle out, blood was dripping down my arm right in the middle of a public area of Target. The pharmacist was embarrassed and worried that Id be upset, but with 15 years as a Type 1 diabetic under my belt, this felt like a pretty average day. I laughed, thanked her, and left with a $5 gift card. A win-win, because I know how important it is to get a flu shot as a T1D. No doubt, your healthcare professional has urged you to get a flu vaccine. In the United States, flu vaccines are recommended for everyone over 6 months old but if you have diabetes, getting vaccinated is especially important ( CDC ). Dr. Marina Basina, an endocrinologist at Stanford explains that If a person with diabetes gets the flu, it becomes much more difficult to manage blood sugars any infection will elevate blood sugars and increase variability in the readings and resistance to insulin. On the other hand, fevers, sweats and poor appetite may lead to low blood sugars, or ketone formation even in the setting of normal blood sugars. Furthermore, DKA is more frequent in the setting of flu even when blood sugars are not significantly elevated. Flu shots are a safe, inexpensive and effective way to lower your risk ofgetting sick. One study found that flu vaccination is associated with a 79% lower rate of hosp Continue reading >>

Flu And People With Diabetes

Flu And People With Diabetes

People with diabetes (type 1 or type 2), even when well-managed, are at high risk of serious flu complications, often resulting in hospitalization and sometimes even death. Pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections and ear infections are examples of flu-related complications. The flu also can make chronic health problems, like diabetes, worse. This is because diabetes can make the immune system less able to fight infections. In addition, illness can make it harder to control your blood sugar. The illness might raise your sugar but sometimes people don’t feel like eating when they are sick, and this can cause blood sugar levels to fall. So it is important to follow the sick day guidelines for people with diabetes. Vaccination is the Best Protection against Flu CDC recommends that all people who are 6 months and older get a flu vaccine. It is especially important for people with diabetes to get a flu vaccine. Flu shots are approved for use in people with diabetes and other health conditions. The flu shot has a long, established safety record in people with diabetes. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of developing pneumococcal pneumonia because of the flu, so being up to date with pneumococcal vaccination is also recommended. Pneumococcal vaccination should be part of a diabetes management plan. Talk to your doctor to find out which pneumococcal vaccines are recommended for you. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing and throw the tissue away after using it; Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after coughing or sneezing; Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth (germs are spread that way); and Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care. If you are sick with flu-like symptoms you should sta Continue reading >>

Flu Shot Key For People With Diabetes

Flu Shot Key For People With Diabetes

(HealthDay)—With predictions calling for a potentially bad flu season this year, doctors are urging people—particularly those with diabetes—to get vaccinated. Many people with diabetes don't get a seasonal flu shot each year, according to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). Some people with the blood sugar disease don't realize they're at risk for flu-related complications. Others have misguided fears that the shot will trigger an adverse reaction, the group explained. However, people with diabetes are more likely to develop serious flu-related health problems if they get the virus, the AADE cautioned. The group said the flu shot is a safe and effective way to prevent or reduce the severity of these complications. "Reducing risks is one of the AADE's seven key self-care behaviors for managing diabetes, and getting the flu shot every fall is an excellent way of reducing the risk of getting sick," certified diabetes educator Evan Sisson said in an AADE news release. "It's widely available, it takes just a few minutes and it can make a real difference in your health." Good hand hygiene is another important way to stay healthy and hopefully avoid the flu, the diabetes experts noted. There are several ways a seasonal flu shot can benefit people with diabetes, according to the AADE. They include: Better disease management. The flu and other infections can raise blood sugar levels and disrupt a healthy diet plan. Avoiding the flu can help people with diabetes stay on track and manage the condition. Complication prevention. People with diabetes are more likely to be hospitalized for flu-related complications, such as pneumonia. They are also more likely to die from the flu. Immune system boost. As people age, their immune system weakens. The flu can tax Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Flu Shot: Ask D'mine Looks At The Potential Link

Diabetes And The Flu Shot: Ask D'mine Looks At The Potential Link

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Yep, we're sticking with our fear theme for the month of October. Who's afraid of a big bad flu shot? You might be surprised! Only way to find out is to brave this edition of our weekly diabetes advice column, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and community educator Wil Dubois. {Need help navigating life with diabetes? Email us at [email protected] } Nancy from Pennsylvania, type 1, writes: I was wondering if any other PWD has had this happen to them. I was diagnosed with Type 1 five years ago at the age of 48. The first two years of my diabetic life I received an annual flu shot. However, 2 years ago I started wearing an insulin pump. I went for my annual flu shot and within two weeks of getting my shot, my basal rate increased two-fold. Not Happy! I discussed this with my endo and she really had no explanation for this increase. This basal increase was permanent. I haven't gotten a flu shot since and my basal hasn't increased. I've had a consistent A1C of 5.8-6.0 so it's not like I don't take care of myself. Afraid to get the Flu shot again... [email protected] D'Mine answers: Yeah, I know: we talked about the flu shot here at Ask D'Mine just the other day . But this was so frickin' bizarre I just had to talk about it (no offense Nancy). First, I gotta say, I've never seen anything like this happen. I've never heard of anything like this happening. I even spent some time with my favorite search engine and couldn't find anyone else reporting anything like this. Well, there was this one guy, but he was also talking about his alien abduction experiences and his past life as Elvis, so I wasn't inclined t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Patients Should Get Flu Shots, Not Nasal Spray

Diabetes Patients Should Get Flu Shots, Not Nasal Spray

Diabetes Patients Should Get Flu Shots, Not Nasal Spray As the flu season approaches in the Northern Hemisphere, medical professionals, government agencies, and others are reminding physicians and patients that those with diabetes should get vaccinated ideally with shots, rather than the nasal-spray flu vaccine, for safety reasons. "Diabetes can weaken your immune system against the flu, and it also puts you at risk of flu-related complications," cautions Fernando Ovalle, MD, at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical School, in a statement from his institution . For physicians, Medscape has a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) expert commentary on the 20132014 influenza season, and WebMD has a page for consumers devoted to diabetes and the flu . Diabetic patients should also constantly track their glucose levels if they become ill, because these can be adversely affected by sickness. The American Diabetes Association, for example, suggests checking glucose levels every 3 to 4 hours and adjusting insulin levels accordingly. Higher blood sugar levels can increase the risk for complications in diabetes, particularly short-term ones such as ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS). And diabetic patients are also at risk for flu-related complications like pneumonia, says Dr. Ovalle, who also recommends that doctors talk to their diabetes patients about pneumococcal vaccines. Recently released estimates show that although more Americans are getting vaccinated against flu than ever, at just over 40%, the rates could be even better. Physicians, at least, set a good example, with more than 90% of doctors getting immunized. Send comments and news tips to [email protected] . Cite this article: Larry Hand.Diabetes Patients Should Get Flu Shots Continue reading >>

Should I Get A Flu Shot If I Have Diabetes?

Should I Get A Flu Shot If I Have Diabetes?

Having type 1 or type 2 diabetes puts you at increased risk of illness because elevated blood sugar weakens the immune system. Getting an annual flu shot is the best way to protect yourself. Fall is here, and that means that along with pumpkins and hay rides, it’s influenza (flu) season—which can last until May. For those with diabetes, flu isn’t just a drag: It can result in hospitalization, and occasionally even death. Fortunately, a vaccine can slash your risk of the illness by an estimated 40-60%, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The flu shot also lowers your chances of hospitalization, which is most common in flu patients with chronic conditions like diabetes. The vaccine can also “prevent major respiratory infections during the flu season,” says Kavita Seetharaman, MD, staff physician at Joslin Diabetes Center, a Boston-based non-profit affiliated with Harvard Medical School. Why Is the Flu So Dangerous for People with Diabetes? “As with any other infection, the flu virus can cause inflammation, congestion, and mucus production in the respiratory tract,” as well as cough, fever, and even breathing difficulties, Dr. Seetharaman says. But for diabetes patients, there’s another risk. “When patients with diabetes are not feeling well,” due to illness, infection, or injury, “they can become more insulin resistant. Blood sugar rises [even if patients aren’t eating], and ketones can develop,” she explains. Ketones are chemicals that are produced when there’s not enough glucose (sugar) to fuel the metabolism; the presence of ketones (which can be detected with over-the-counter test strips) indicate that the body is using fat for energy. Patients with diabetes can accumulate ketones in the blood, which can make Continue reading >>

Why People With Diabetes Need A Flu Shot

Why People With Diabetes Need A Flu Shot

If you have any form of diabetes, even if its well-controlled, I strongly recommend you get the flu vaccine . Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Heres why. Everyone has the chance to get the flu . If you have diabetes , your immune system is already weakened. Taking extra precautions is important because your overall risk for catching the flu is higher than those who dont have it. For the same reason, you are also more likely to have complications from the flu. Even more fundamentally, if you have diabetes, it is so important that you take active steps to keep it under control. This can help protect you from a range of more serious health problems, including those that can all spiral from the flu. A few exceptions apply. You should not get a flu vaccine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to the flu vaccine in the past, if you are allergic to eggs or if you currently have symptoms of flu or common cold. Why inadequately controlled diabetes heightens risk Uncontrolled or less controlled diabetes and flu do not play well together. Heres how this duo can affect your health: The immune system of people with uncontrolled or less controlled diabetes is weakened. For this reason, they are more likely to develop complications of flu even potentially life-threatening conditions, such as bacterial pneumonia. The risk of pneumonia in people with diabetes is even greater if they have other chronic conditions, including chronic kidney disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) . Flu and infections can worsen blood glucose control and exacerbate diabetes symptoms, particularly in people whose diabetes is less controlled. Th Continue reading >>

Why You Should Get A Flu Shot

Why You Should Get A Flu Shot

As fall comes around I hear people debating, “Should I get the flu shot?”, “Should I vaccinate my kids?”. I’m always surprised to hear just how hesitant people are to vaccinate. The flu is a highly infectious and serious viral respiratory infection. Many viruses can give you the sniffles, but allow you to continue working or going to school. The flu, however, actually knocks you out, and flu symptoms can be quite severe and prolonged. In addition, bacterial infections (superinfections) can occur on top of the flu infection– those are situations which can truly overwhelm the lungs. Such a situation is especially dangerous for the elderly and the very young. It can even cause death. People’s main concern with the influenza vaccine tends to be that the injection will actually give them the flu. This is not true. While the vaccine can cause soreness or redness at the site of the shot, pains in the joints, and even mild fever, it is nothing like the flu itself. A good excuse not to get vaccinated is if you have an egg allergy, in which case the vaccine is contraindicated, since the vaccine is developed in eggs. Many people don’t get the flu vaccine, and they are okay. People with diabetes, however, shouldn’t take a chance. Most people with diabetes are not aware that for them, the flu can pose a much bigger threat than it does for people without diabetes. When blood sugar levels are elevated, especially above 200mg/dL, the immune cells do not work as efficiently and therefore patients with diabetes may have abnormalities in immune function. Studies have shown that diabetics are sick longer with the flu, have a higher chance of ending up in the hospital, and even an increased risk of death. This is particularly true for patients who have diabetes complicatio Continue reading >>

Did The Flu Shot Cause My Daughter's Diabetes? | Ask D'mine

Did The Flu Shot Cause My Daughter's Diabetes? | Ask D'mine

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Got questions about life with diabetes? So do we! That's why we offer our weekly diabetes advice column, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1 peep W il Dubois , a diabetes author with many years' experience as an educator in a New Mexico clinic. This week, Wil is taking on one of those questions about whether vaccines -- the flu shot specifically -- might have led to diabetes. Well, we guess in this day and age of anti-vaccine scares, it's worth addressing this particularly long question head-on. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected] } Gerry, D-mom from California, writes: My9-year-old daughter Ruby has been newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Thisdiagnosis has come completely out of the blue to us. We are a healthy family, one that doesnt eat junk food or ready meals, doesn't drink lots of sugary drinks,and there is no family history on either of the parents sides. We dont takeunnecessary medications, preferring a more holistic approach. Our consultant told us that the medicalprofession doesnt really know why T1 can suddenly start in juveniles, exceptto say that they think it is virus-related. I have a suspicion, though, whichis shared by my ex-husband.My daughters school was taking part in aprogram of vaccinating children under 11 against the flu virus toward the endof last year in November, and my daughter was given the fluvaccine via a nose spray. She didnt immediately appear to have a cold ortemperature but then shortly after began to complain of the occasional headacheor tummy ache. In the new year she had an increasedthirst and was weeing a lot more than usual, and saying she had a sore Continue reading >>

Flu Shot Benefits Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Flu Shot Benefits Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Flu Shot Benefits Type 2 Diabetes Patients Risk of dying dropped almost one-quarter over 7 years in those who got the vaccine TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The seasonal flu vaccine may offer people with type 2 diabetes some protection against dying prematurely, a new study suggests. The flu shot also appeared to protect those with type 2 diabetes from hospitalizations for stroke , as well as heart and breathing problems , the study said. British researchers looked at a large group -- more than 124,500 people -- with type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes normally have a higher risk of cardiovascular problems, the researchers noted. During the seven-year study, the researchers found that flu vaccination was associated with a 19 percent reduction in flu -season hospital admissions for heart attack in people with type 2 diabetes . Hospital admissions for stroke were 30 percent lower for those who got a flu vaccination. Admissions were also down 22 percent for heart failure , and 15 percent for pneumonia or influenza in people with type 2 diabetes who got the flu shot. The death rate among those who received a flu shot was 24 percent lower than in those who weren't vaccinated, the research said. The study wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect link between the flu shot and the reduction in death and hospital admissions. However, the study did show a strong connection between those factors. The results show "that people with type 2 diabetes may derive substantial benefits from current vaccines , including protection against hospital admission for some major cardiovascular outcomes," wrote study researcher Dr. Eszter Vamos, from Imperial College London, and colleagues. "These findings underline the importance of influenza vaccination as part of compre Continue reading >>

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