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Why Metformin Makes You Sick

Apo-metformin

Apo-metformin

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about metformin It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist or diabetes educator. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date listed on the last page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. You can also download the most up to date leaflet from www.apotex.com.au. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using this medicine against the benefits they expect it will have for you. Pharmaceutical companies cannot give you medical advice or an individual diagnosis. Keep this leaflet with your medicine. You may want to read it again. What this medicine is used for The name of your medicine is APO-Metformin 500, 850 or 1000 tablets. It contains the active ingredient metformin (as metformin hydrochloride). It is used to treat type 2 diabetes (also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or maturity onset diabetes) in adults and children over 10 years of age. It is especially useful in those who are overweight, when diet and exercise are not enough to lower high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). For adult patients, metformin can be used alone, or in combination with other oral diabetic medicines or in combination with insulin in insulin requiring type 2 diabetes. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why this medicine has been prescribed for you. Your doctor may have prescribed this medicine for another reason. This medicine is available only with a doctor's prescription. How it works Metformin lowers high blood glucose by helping your body make better Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

Can Carbs Make You Sick?

Can Carbs Make You Sick?

Hyperinsulimia is a correlate of insulin resistance, which is, itself, the main problem in metabolic syndrome, an inherited condition that affects many people in our society. This problem causes cells to lose their sensitivity to insulin, the hormone needed to allow blood sugar to enter cells for use as fuel. This prompts the pancreas to overcompensate and crank out even more insulin, which can promote weight gain and cardiovascular disease. It can also lead to adult-onset diabetes. People with the genetic tendency to develop metabolic syndrome can avoid it by getting regular exercise and by minimizing consumption of high-glycemic index carbohydrate foods – i.e., those that digest rapidly into glucose (blood sugar). High consumption of refined starches and sugars combined with lack of physical activity are probably responsible for the epidemic of obesity in this country. My colleague Kathleen Johnson, a nutritionist here at the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine, estimates that a great many people, perhaps 50% of the population or more, are genetically predisposed to insulin resistance. This condition can be diagnosed with an insulin level test done after a period of fasting, but you also can presume that it exists among those who have weight problems and also have high serum triglycerides and low HDL (“good” cholesterol). The best way to control insulin resistance is by getting regular exercise, reducing total carbohydrate consumption (to 50 percent of calories or less) and by choosing carbohydrate foods – like beans, sweet potatoes, winter squash, and whole grains – that are lower on the glycemic index (GI) scale. Foods ranked above 60 on that scale are all considered “high” glycemic index foods. You can find a list of common foods and their GI valu Continue reading >>

Metformin For Diabetes

Metformin For Diabetes

Take metformin just after a meal or with a snack. The most common side-effects are feeling sick, diarrhoea and tummy (abdominal) pain. These symptoms usually pass after the first few days of treatment. Keep your regular appointments with your doctor and clinics. This is so your progress can be checked. About metformin Type of medicine A biguanide antidiabetic medicine Used for Type 2 diabetes mellitus Also called Bolamyn®; Diagemet®; Glucient®; Glucophage®; Metabet®; Sukkarto® Available as Tablets and modified-release tablets; oral liquid medicine; sachets of powder Insulin is a hormone which is made naturally in your body, in the pancreas. It helps to control the levels of sugar (glucose) in your blood. If your body does not make enough insulin, or if it does not use the insulin it makes effectively, this results in the condition called sugar diabetes (diabetes mellitus). People with diabetes need treatment to control the amount of sugar in their blood. This is because good control of blood sugar levels reduces the risk of complications later on. Some people can control the sugar in their blood by making changes to the food they eat but, for other people, medicines like metformin are given alongside the changes in diet. Metformin allows the body to make better use of the lower amount of insulin which occurs in the kind of diabetes known as type 2 diabetes. Metformin can be given on its own, or alongside insulin or another antidiabetic medicine. There are a number of tablets available which contain metformin in combination with one of these other antidiabetic medicines (brands include Jentadueto®, Competact®, Komboglyze®, Janumet®, and Eucreas®). Taking a combination tablet like these can help to reduce the total number of tablets that need to be taken each d Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Constantly Feeling Ill

Constantly Feeling Ill

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I really don't know what is going on here but I feel constantly ill it could be a variety of things and I have spoken to the dr about my anxiety but they seem to think by talking to a councillor or doing breathing exercises I will be cured. I am a bit overweight but I am trying to loose that with a battle...now I am on 2 Metformin modified release. I feel generally drained , feeling sick but not actually being sick bad stomach, headache, sweating all time..passed menopause I take citalopram 40 mg and I think I need something along side this for the anxiety I am now waiting for the dr to call can Metformin make you feel like this or is it the diabetes I have seen 4 different dr about my anxiety and not 1 of them will give me anything besides what I am taking. the biggest thing is I get very anxious being in a room with strangers and even my DR which is hard for me I have told them that I feel this way and now I dont know what to do I just feel like crying. Hi. The diabetes and MetforminSR shouldn't be the cause of your problems. Can I suggest if anxiety is one of your concerns that you seek some support for this such as cCBT, counselling etc. I do IT support for our local branch of Mind and know that they provide excellent services for a wide range of mental health concerns including cCBT and counselling etc. You can self-refer or ask your GP to refer you but we have found at Mind that many GPs haven't a clue about local mental health service availability (sound familiar!) so Google Mind and look for your local branch. Hi. The diabetes and MetforminSR shouldn't be the cause of your problems. Can I suggest if anxiety is one of your concerns that you see Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Make You Sick?

Does Metformin Make You Sick?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hi, anyone else out there on metformin? I just found out yesterday that I am pre-diabetic. My A1c is 5.8. My estimated average glucose is 120. I'm not sure how close I am to diabetes, but I'm committed to making changes! I started metformin yesterday and have a horrible headache and am extremely nauseous (it's a struggle to get online as I just want to lie on the couch all day). Do these side effects tend to go away? Also, I am not able to sit at the computer long enough to research what I need to do on my own. I don't know what kind of foods to eat, how much to exercise, increase water, and anything else that may help. I appreciate any advice/feedback. Thank you, Juliahh Welcome Julia! :wavey: Metformin can cause nausea for some people. Sometimes these symptoms resolve with time, sometimes not. It can take metformin a few weeks to reach optimal levels in your system, so you may not see immediate results. Some folks find that the extended-release metformin minimizes these symptoms, so if they continue, you'll want to talk with your doc about switching. I've taken the metformin ER version, 500 mg twice daily for nearly 5 years now w/o problems (unless I eat something really greasy, then I get diarrhea/cramping). Gretchen Becker has a book "Prediabetes: What You Need to Know to Keep Diabetes Away. I've not read this particular book, but her book "The First Year, T2 Diabetes" was a great resource for me. One of the best ways to keep your blood sugar in line is to minimize your carbs. Avoid white foods such as potatoes, rice, bread and pasta, choosing instead, salads, green veggies, cheese, eggs, Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Metformin And Nausea - Want To Quit Taking The Med

Metformin And Nausea - Want To Quit Taking The Med

Metformin and nausea - want to quit taking the med I felt that way about a month ago when I went from 500 to 1000, though I didn't have the vomiting. I was so frustrated. My nurse told me to be sure to take the pills mid-meal and not at the end of my meal, so I started doing that. Peppermints helped with the nausea, and I temporarily cut back a little on complex carbs. It got better after another week or two, but I still find the mint to help if I am feeling a little green. Does your medical clinic have an online messaging system? Mine does, so I can send my doctor a secure message and a nurse will answer if she is out. Metformin causes depletion of vitamin B12 just for starters. Many people complain of GI problems when taking this medication. The dose may be too much for your physiology. Talk with your pharmacist and the doctor. Actos is a cause of bladder cancer so be very aware of this risk. Byetta and Januvia also have very serious side effects. You can learn more by looking up these drugs at rxlist.com. I hope your doctor explained the risks to you as they are required to do so by law. Avoid aspartame and splenda in any products because these interact with the drugs and contribute to problems. Many years ago I tried the regular Metformin and could not tolerate it due to severe diarrhea. My doctor told me never to take it again. When I was in the hospital a few years ago because my sugar was so high, a family practice doctor suggested the extended release Metformin, which came out long after I had tried the regular one. I tried it. I got nauseous and had to increase it very gradually. I now take 1000 mg in the morning and 1000 mg at dinner, always with food, and tolerate it just fine. Talk to your doctor. There are other options. You do not need to be nauseous. The Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Gd: Horrific Metformin Side Effects

Gd: Horrific Metformin Side Effects

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Newbie here. Had a browse, thought I'd post. I'm 19w4d and was diagnosed with GD at 17w5d after glycosuria at 16w1d. Midwives and doctors are very concerned as I'm so early on. I haven't been able to control my bloods by diet and exercise at all, and started metformin this past Tuesday at 18w6d. They are expecting to see me again this coming Tuesday at 19w6d to discuss insulin. The problem is, I am utterly miserable on metformin. I started on 500mg in the morning and 500mg at night and was told to gradually increase the dose, going up to 1000mg at night after two days. The first time I took it, I went to bed feeling sick and then got up to use the bathroom and had very loose stools. With every dose I have taken the side effects have got worse. I now can't keep any food down, have true diarrhoea (sorry) to the extent that I've even had an episode of incontinence. I'm utterly miserable and scared to take it. Today I skipped my breakfast dose and of course I feel much better. I'm petrified of taking it, fed up of being so violently sick. Now I know that lots of people experience digestive issues in the beginning and it then settles, so the best thing is to keep on taking it. But my issues are just getting worse. Should I keep taking it anyway? It makes me vomit and I can't eat, and I also won't be able to leave my house if I do. My appointment is in two days on Tuesday, but I'll be able to call them tomorrow. Nobody is there over the weekend. Has this happened to anyone else? What did you do? Metformin caused me the same problems including the incontinence. However I am not pregnant so can only advise you to phone first thing tomorrow and take advice fro Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Make You Sick? Ride It Out Or Discontinue Use?

Does Metformin Make You Sick? Ride It Out Or Discontinue Use?

Does Metformin make you sick? Ride it out or discontinue use? If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Did your OB-GYN help or hinder your knowledge about Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH) and Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH)? Take our Survey here ! Does Metformin make you sick? Ride it out or discontinue use? Stuck in the bathroom with nausea/diarrhea? Or zero appetite? Are you riding out the storm or discontinuing? Has your doctor recommended an alternative to Metformin? I have PCOS but never was prescribed Metformin. My tests said I was not insulin resistant, but I have a family history of diabetes and difficulty losing weight in the belly...so the reality is I could end up taking Metformin in the future. Just curious to see other experiences. I have PCOS and I'm a bit of a chubster, so they prescribed metformin. I was even SUPER close to being borderline insulin resistant (I think when I took the glucose test before I lost weight I was 2 points away from pre-diabetic). Obviously it works for a lotttt of women like me but my body didn't like it at all! I didn't get the tummy troubles, just got unBELIEVably dizzy at weird times... Sort of space cadety. So it was a brief experiment. my prayers answered, #3 please stay safe! Continue reading >>

Surviving Metformin

Surviving Metformin

What was your first week on Metformin like? Horrendous? Terrible? Filled with waves of nausea? The sickest you’ve felt in your life? Let’s reminisce for a minute: About a dozen years ago, on December 24, I went to the doctor for a routine physical. Are you envious of my holiday plans? This was in the years before Pinterest, so I was carrying on with regular life activities on Christmas Eve morn rather than bedazzling the cap of an Elf on the Shelf. Anyway, at the Christmas Eve check-up, my physician mentioned that he had read promising things about Metformin being used in women with PCOS. We chatted about Metformin for a bit, talked about other PCOS things, finished up the tests, and then I headed to the pharmacy to pick up the prescription. We had our traditional Christmas Eve dinner of ham, funeral potatoes, salad with asparagus and strawberries; rolls, and other delicious items. Breaking with tradition, this year’s Christmas Eve dinner was followed by Metformin for me. After dinner, we read the Christmas story from the Bible, watched a short film depicting the events in Luke 2, read a new Christmas book, and headed off to bed. That’s when the fun began. In sum: Worst Christmas Ever. Pros: Family, friends, gifts, good music, good food. Cons: Visiting the loo every 15 minutes, constant nausea, wanting to curl up in bed and not wake up for days. Public Service Announcement: Do not start Metformin for the first time on the day prior to a major holiday. My first year on Metformin was pretty rough. I felt like I had morning sickness every single day. I had diarrhea and nausea every morning. When I skipped a few doses hoping for relief, my symptoms would be twice as bad when I re-started. Looking back, I’m actually amazed that I kept taking the medication. If I st Continue reading >>

Metformin 850mg Tablets

Metformin 850mg Tablets

1. WHAT METFORMIN IS AND WHAT IT IS USED FOR The name of this medicine is Metformin 500mg or 850mg Tablets (called metformin in this leaflet). It belongs to a group of medicines called biguanides (a type of oral hypoglycaemic). Metformin is used for the sort of diabetes called Type 2 diabetes or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood. This is because your body does not make enough insulin or because it makes insulin that does not work properly. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body tissue to take glucose from the blood and use it for energy or for storage for future use. Metformin works by improving the sensitivity of your body to insulin. It helps your body to use glucose in the normal way again This medicine is given when diet and exercise alone has not been able to control your blood sugar levels. Metformin can be given on its own. However, sometimes it is given with other medicines for diabetes or with insulin. In patients who are overweight, long-term use of metformin also helps to lower the risk of any problems related to diabetes you are allergic (hypersensitive) to metformin or any of the other ingredients in this liquid (see section 6: Further information). An allergic reaction can include a rash, itching or shortness of breath. you have recently had a heart attack or any other heart problems you have severe circulation problems or difficulty in breathing you have had serious problems with your diabetes in the past called diabetic ketoacidosis. When you have this you lose weight quickly, feel sick (nausea) or are sick (vomiting). See also in Section 4: Possible side effects you have recently had a severe infection, injury or trauma (shock) you are going to have an X-ray where you will b Continue reading >>

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