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Why Is Type 2 Diabetes So Prevalent?

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a disease that causes high blood sugar. It occurs when there is a problem with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes sugar from foods and moves it to the body's cells. If the body does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin well, the sugar from food stays in the blood and causes high blood sugar. There are several different types of diabetes, but the most common is type 2. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Report, 2014, 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes in the United States have type 2. Just 5 percent of people have type 1. Contents of this article: Key facts about diabetes in the U.S. Diabetes is at an all-time high in the U.S. The CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation states that 1 percent of the population, which is about a half of a million people, had diagnosed diabetes in 1958. Today, nearly 10 percent of the population have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). That's 29.1 million Americans, and more than a quarter of these people do not know they have it. The ADA report that the number of people who have diabetes increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. The risk of developing diabetes increases with age. The CDC report that 4.1 percent of people age 20-44 have diabetes, but the number jumps to 25.9 percent for people over 65 years old. As obesity has become more prevalent over the past few decades, so too has the rate of type 2 diabetes. An article in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology states that 25.6 percent of Americans are obese, much higher than the 15.3 percent of obese people in 1995. In that same period, the incidence of diabetes increased by 90 percent. Although the link between obesity and diabetes is well Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes, is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes mainly from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose get into your cells to be used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Too much glucose then stays in your blood, and not enough reaches your cells. The good news is that you can take steps to prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes. Who is more likely to develop type 2 diabetes? You can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. However, type 2 diabetes occurs most often in middle-aged and older people. You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are age 45 or older, have a family history of diabetes, or are overweight or obese. Diabetes is more common in people who are African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander. Physical inactivity and certain health problems such as high blood pressure affect your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you have prediabetes or had gestational diabetes when you were pregnant. Learn more about risk factors for type 2 diabetes. What are the symptoms of diabetes? Symptoms of diabetes include increased thirst and urination increased hunger feeling tired blurred vision numbness or tingling in the feet or hands sores that do not heal unexplained weight loss Symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly—over the course of several years—and can be so mild that you might not even notice them. Many people have no symptoms. Some people do not fi Continue reading >>

Nihr Dc | Signal - Type 2 Diabetes Is Becoming More Common In Children

Nihr Dc | Signal - Type 2 Diabetes Is Becoming More Common In Children

NIHR Signal Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in children The number of children being diagnosed with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is rising, but new cases of type 2 diabetes, the form associated with being overweight, has risen five-fold in about five years. New analysis in this NIHR-supported study suggest that type 2 diabetes now accounts for up to a third of diabetes diagnoses in children. Amongst 100,000 school age children about six new cases of type 2 diabetes a year could be expected in the 1990s. This increased to about 33 new cases per year by the end of the next decade (2009 to 2013). Data was taken from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink, a primary care database of electronic health records. Children who are obese have about a four times greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with those of a normal weight. Having type 2 diabetes brings an increased risk of other complications and healthcare problems for individuals and is associated with extra resource use and costs for society. NICE has produced guidance about preventing type 2 diabetes, but it appears that more needs to be done to promote healthier lifestyles to children and their families. Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Became An Epidemic

How Diabetes Became An Epidemic

It is estimated that almost 8 percent of Americans have some form of diabetes. What's even more worrying is that the number of people with diabetes is on the rise not just in the United States, but all over the world. Scientists have been working to find out why more people are developing diabetes and looking for strategies to help reverse this trend. Diabetes in the United States In the United States, diabetes has become increasingly prevalent in recent years. In 1980, 5.8 million people were diagnosed with diabetes, compared with 17.9 million today. Diabetes is expected to rise significantly in the near future. It is estimated that one in three Americans living today will eventually develop diabetes, and that the number of cases will increase in this country by 165 percent by 2050. Researchers believe that the following factors play a role in the increase: The baby-boomer population is aging, and your chances of developing diabetes increases with age. The Hispanic population is one of the fastest-growing segments of the United States population, and Hispanics are at increased risk of developing diabetes. Americans are becoming increasingly overweight and physically inactive, both known risk factors for diabetes. The Worldwide Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes is now a problem that affects people everywhere. There is evidence that 246 million people worldwide have diabetes. If current trends continue, this number is projected to reach 380 million within the next 20 years. Diabetes affects developed and developing countries alike. In fact, the largest increases in diabetes prevalence in the years to come are projected to take place in developing countries. According to the International Diabetes Federation, India currently has the highest concentration of people with diabetes, Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Rising Among U.s. Youth

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Rising Among U.s. Youth

are rising among U.S. kids and teens, according to the first national snapshot of diabetes rates among American youths. The new report, presented this weekend in Philadelphia at the American Diabetes Association's annual meeting, shows a 23% rise in rates of type 1 diabetes and a 21% rise in type 2 diabetes rates from 2001 to 2009. Both trends are sounding alarm bells for researchers. The rise in type 1 diabetes is "alarming," says researcher Elizabeth Mayer-Davis, PhD, MSPH, RD, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Even so, it was not a complete surprise, as a similar increase has been reported among European youth, Mayer-Davis says. Diabetes has serious long-term health risks. It makes heart disease, kidney problems, nerve damage, and many other conditions more likely. "This is frightening," says Robert E. Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association. "These are harbingers of adult health problems," he tells WebMD. If the trend is not reversed, there could be an epidemic of heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure when this generation is age 25-35, Ratner says. It's not clear why type 1 diabetes is becoming more common. One theory holds that today's infants are exposed to fewer viruses and bacteria that help the immune system mature, says researcher Dana Dabelea, MD, PhD, of the University of Colorado in Denver. Some studies also suggest a possible link between very early exposure to cow's milk and certain foods to a higher risk of type 1 diabetes. "Studies are exploring whether later introduction of some foods to the infant's diet may be protective," Dabelea tells WebMD. "But we really don't know the cause." The rise in type 2 diabetes, though dramatic, was less surprising. That's because obesity is a major ris Continue reading >>

Will You Be Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes? We Reveal The Key Signs And Symptoms To Watch Out For - And How To Lower Your Risk

Will You Be Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes? We Reveal The Key Signs And Symptoms To Watch Out For - And How To Lower Your Risk

Urinating frequently, feeling very thirsty and having an insatiable appetite may appear to be nothing more than minor annoyances. As a result many people simply ignore the issues – trusting they will eventually subside. However, these seemingly insignificant problems are actually three of the most common symptoms of type 2 diabetes – a condition that’s becoming increasingly prevalent across the globe. A report this week published by the World Health Organization revealed the number of adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes has quadrupled in the past 35 years – now affecting 422 million people worldwide. The report didn’t differentiate between type 1 or type 2 diabetes – but experts say the surge in cases is predominantly down to type 2, which is linked to an unhealthy lifestyle. In fact, one in three adults in the US has a condition called prediabetes, which is often a precursor to type 2 diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Similarly, one in three adults in the UK also suffer from prediabetes, the NHS warns. As a result, it is vital for people to learn to recognize the risk factors for type 2 diabetes – as well as common symptoms – to properly prevent, or treat, the disease. THE TOP RISK FACTORS FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body stops making insulin because the immune system is attacking the cells where insulin is produced. The condition largely depends on genetics, environmental factors and potentially even exposure to viruses. The World Health Organization reported that the number of adults with the disease has quadrupled in just 34 years with nearly one in 11 people now estimated to have it. Globally, more men than women now have diabetes, with experts chalking the soaring rates to the growing obesity. High level Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes Is Becoming More Common

Type Ii Diabetes Is Becoming More Common

Wilma was upset, but not too surprised, when I told her that her blood tests showed she had diabetes. Her brother had had diabetes, and had lost a leg and some eyesight to the disease, before dying of a heart attack. At 65, she feared the same complications, so wanted to learn as much as she could about the disease. The incidence of type II diabetes has been rising among all Americans, but especially seniors. In people age 65 - 74, diabetes has climbed from 9% in 1980 to 17% in 2002, an 89% increase. Why is type II diabetes becoming so common? To understand the answer to this question, one must understand how type II diabetes develops. The basic energy unit of our bodies is the simple sugar molecule called glucose. The digestive system turns most foods, carbohydrates or "carbs," proteins such as meat, and fats such as oil or butter, into glucose, which our body uses to power our muscles and nervous system. When a person eats more food than the body needs, the excess glucose is turned into fat. The hormone responsible for using glucose and storing it as fat is insulin. The more food intake, the more insulin the body needs. The pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach which produces the insulin, tries to keep up with the all the glucose used for energy and the extra stored as fat. In some cases, though, the pancreas can no longer keep up. Because of increasing amounts of body fat, and depending on ones genetic makeup, the body may eventually become resistant to insulin. So, glucose becomes trapped in the blood, levels start to rise, and diabetes sets in. Lack of physical activity and overeating can cause extra fat storage and weight gain, which can overwork the pancreas and worsen insulin resistance. Family history, ethnic background, and getting older can worsen the Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Us: A Social Epidemic

Diabetes In The Us: A Social Epidemic

A recent series of articles in the New York Times highlighted a phenomenon that has increasingly alarmed public health advocates in the United States: a virtual epidemic of Type 2 diabetes throughout the country, an epidemic that is growing at a faster pace in New York City than anywhere else. The seriousness of this health crisis has been known for some time in medical circles. As the Times articles make clear, the disease in so prevalent in working class and poor communities that its victims take it almost as a matter of course. In terms of public recognition, however, diabetes is under the radar, so to speak, compared to more highly publicized health issues such as breast cancer and AIDS. Type 1 diabetes, often called childhood diabetes, occurs when the pancreas does not produce the insulin required for the body’s metabolism, and those afflicted must take insulin daily for the rest of their lives. This variety of the disease is strongly identified with genetic predisposition. Type 2 diabetes is the more common form, representing more than 90 percent of cases. It is also the type that is growing rapidly in the US. In this form of the disease, insulin is not properly used in the body. Type 2 diabetes is sometimes relatively mild in its manifestations, and more easily controlled with medication. Its first symptoms are either insidious or negligible, and it is often undetected for years, especially among people who do not see a doctor regularly. Untreated or inadequately treated Type 2 diabetes can be just as deadly in the long term as the less common Type 1, however. Typically seen in adults over the age of 40, it is linked more to conditions like obesity and physical inactivity, although there is also a genetic component. An estimated 21 million Americans have diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetes Becoming Alarmingly Common Worldwide, New Study Finds

Diabetes Becoming Alarmingly Common Worldwide, New Study Finds

Nearly 10 percent of the world’s adults have diabetes, and the prevalence of the disease is rising rapidly. As in the United States and other wealthy nations, increased obesity and inactivity are the primary cause in such developing countries as India and in Latin America, the Caribbean and the Middle East. That’s the sobering conclusion of a study published Saturday in the journal Lancet that traces trends in diabetes and average blood sugar readings in about 200 countries and regions over the past three decades. The study’s findings predict a huge burden of medical costs and physical disability ahead in this century, as the disease increases a person’s risk of heart attack, kidney failure, blindness and some infections. “This study confirms the suspicion of many that diabetes has become a global epidemic,” said Frank Hu, an epidemiologist at Harvard’s School of Public Health who was not involved in the research. “It has the potential to overwhelm the health systems of many countries, especially developing countries.” Worldwide, the prevalence of diabetes in men older than 25 rose from 8.3 percent in 1980 to 9.8 percent in 2008. For women older than 25, it increased from 7.5 percent to 9.2 percent. “This is likely to be one of the defining features of global health in the coming decades,” said Majid Ezzati, an epidemiologist and biostatistician at Imperial College London, who headed the study. “There’s simply the magnitude of the problem. And then there’s the fact that unlike high blood pressure and high cholesterol, we don’t really have good treatments for diabetes.” There are two types of diabetes, a metabolic ailment in which the body is unable to rapidly or adequately move sugar out of the bloodstream and into tissues after a meal. T Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Becoming The Biggest Epidemic Of The Twenty-first Century?

Is Diabetes Becoming The Biggest Epidemic Of The Twenty-first Century?

Diabetes is a major public health problem that is approaching epidemic proportions globally. Worldwide, the prevalence of chronic, noncommunicable diseases is increasing at an alarming rate. About 18 million people die every year from cardiovascular disease, for which diabetes and hypertension are major predisposing factors. Today, more than 1.7 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese. In addition, at least 155 million children worldwide are overweight or obese. A diabetes epidemic is underway. According to an estimate of International Diabetes Federation comparative prevalence of Diabetes during 2007 is 8.0 % and likely to increase to 7.3% by 2025. Number of people with diabetes is 246 million (with 46% of all those affected in the 40–59 age group) and likely to increase to 380 m by 2025. The comparative prevalence of IGT is 7.5% in 2007 and likely to go up to 6.0 by 2025. The number of people with IGT is 308 million in 2007 and likely to be 418 m by 2025. (1) Almost 80% of the total adult diabetics are in developing countries. The regions with the highest rates are the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, where 9.2 % of the adult population is affected, and North America (8.4%). The highest numbers, however, are found in the Western Pacific, where some 67 million people have Diabetes, followed by Europe with 53 million. India leads the global top ten in terms of the highest number of people with diabetes with a current figure of 40.9 million, followed by China with 39.8 million. Behind them come USA; Russia; Germany; Japan; Pakistan; Brazil; Mexico and Egypt. Two major concerns are that much of this increase in Diabetes will occur in developing countries and that there is a growing incidence of Type 2 Diabetes at a younger age in Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Causes

Type 2 Diabetes Causes

Type 2 diabetes has several causes: genetics and lifestyle are the most important ones. A combination of these factors can cause insulin resistance, when your body doesn’t use insulin as well as it should. Insulin resistance is the most common cause of type 2 diabetes. Genetics Play a Role in Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes can be hereditary. That doesn’t mean that if your mother or father has (or had) type 2 diabetes, you’re guaranteed to develop it; instead, it means that you have a greater chance of developing type 2. Researchers know that you can inherit a risk for type 2 diabetes, but it’s difficult to pinpoint which genes carry the risk. The medical community is hard at work trying to figure out the certain genetic mutations that lead to a risk of type 2. Lifestyle Is Very Important, Too Genes do play a role in type 2 diabetes, but lifestyle choices are also important. You can, for example, have a genetic mutation that may make you susceptible to type 2, but if you take good care of your body, you may not develop diabetes. Say that two people have the same genetic mutation. One of them eats well, watches their cholesterol, and stays physically fit, and the other is overweight (BMI greater than 25) and inactive. The person who is overweight and inactive is much more likely to develop type 2 diabetes because certain lifestyle choices greatly influence how well your body uses insulin. Lack of exercise: Physical activity has many benefits—one of them being that it can help you avoid type 2 diabetes, if you’re susceptible. Unhealthy meal planning choices: A meal plan filled with high-fat foods and lacking in fiber (which you can get from grains, vegetables, and fruits) increases the likelihood of type 2. Overweight/Obesity: Lack of exercise and unhealthy me Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Epidemic

Diabetes: The Epidemic

On Barbara Young's office table is a graph. A bar chart, actually: four columns of green, purple, red and bright blue showing the progression, in England, of rates of coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes over the past five years. The first two are flatlining or falling. Cancer, in red, is rising, but slowly. Trace a line between the blue bars from 2005 to 2010, and it soars off the chart. "Diabetes," says Young flatly, "is becoming a crisis. The crisis. It's big, it's scary, it's growing and it's very, very expensive. It's clearly an epidemic, and it could bring the health service to its knees. Something really does need to happen." Baroness Young is, admittedly, the chief executive of Diabetes UK, Britain's main diabetes charity and campaigning group. It's her job to say such things. But the figures are behind her all the way: diabetes is fast becoming the 21st century's major public-health concern. The condition is now nearly four times as common as all forms of cancer combined, and causes more deaths than breast and prostate cancer combined. Some 2.8m people in the UK have been diagnosed with it; an estimated 850,000 more probably have type 2 diabetes but don't yet know. Another 7m are classified as high-risk of developing type 2; between 40% and 50% of them will go on to develop it. By the year 2025, more than 5m people in this country will have diabetes. The implications for the NHS, obviously, don't bear thinking about. Diabetes already costs the service around £1m an hour, roughly 10% of its entire budget. That's not just because the condition generally has to be managed with medication or insulin, but because by the time they are diagnosed, around half the people with type 2 – by far the most common and fastest growing form – have developed a Continue reading >>

Why Are More American Kids Getting Type 2 Diabetes — And What Can We Do About It?

Why Are More American Kids Getting Type 2 Diabetes — And What Can We Do About It?

Type 2 diabetes, once considered solely an adult disease, affects an increasing number of children under the age of 18. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas gradually loses its ability to produce enough insulin to control a person’s blood sugar levels. People with diabetes may develop serious complications, such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, blindness, and premature death. According to SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth, a multicenter study funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health, during 2008 and 2009 an estimated 18,436 people younger than 20 in the United States were newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year. Also, 5,089 people younger than 20 were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes each year. The study cited obesity, exposure to diabetes in-utero, and endocrine-disrupting chemicals in common household products as possible causes of the rise in type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes disproportionately affects minority groups. According to the CDC, the incidence of type 2 diabetes among those 10 to 19 years old is highest among American Indians, followed by African Americans, Hispanics, and Asian or Pacific Islanders. It is lowest among non-Hispanic whites. Today is World Diabetes Day, and Healthline sat down with two pediatricians to find out why more children are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and what can be done to keep kids from getting the disease. Check Out the Year’s Best Diabetes Apps » More Young Children Now Diagnosed with Adult Diseases Dr. Angela Lennon, a pediatric endocrinologist at the University of Kansas Hospital, told Healthline that she sees obese children 12 to 14 years old with kidney problems, heart problems, and high blood pressure. “A lot of the complications start 10 years after getting d Continue reading >>

Why Is Diabetes So Prevalent Today?

Why Is Diabetes So Prevalent Today?

In the Stone Age, sugar, fat, and salt were in short supply; our bodies had to store them when we came across them. To help ourselves survive, we adapted to hunger for sugars—literally, we craved them. When our ancestors were fortunate enough to find a batch of juicy berries, they couldn't afford not to eat every one in sight, since it might be weeks or months before they stumbled across the next batch. That worked fine back when there were no grocery stores, fast-food restaurants, and pie-baking grandmothers. Now? Our energy-processing machinery is still geared to life in the Stone Age while our energy supply system is 21st Century. Because sugar (glucose) was always scarce, we developed a very efficient metabolism that could process small amounts of food and extract the maximum amount of energy. Today, diabetes is the result of a fundamental mismatch between our ancestral insides and our modern world outside. You: Staying Young: The Owner's Manual for Extending Your Warranty International bestselling authors of YOU: The Owner's Manual and YOU: On a Diet give you all the tools and know-how to stay young and defy the ageing process. Drawing lively parallels between your... Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide. How serious is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a serious medical condition that often requires the use of anti-diabetic medication, or insulin to keep blood sugar levels under control. However, the development of type 2 diabetes and its side effects (complications) can be prevented if detected and treated at an early stage. In recent years, it has become apparent that many people with type 2 diabetes are able to reverse diabetes through methods including low-carb diets, very-low-calorie diets and exercise. For guidance on healthy eating to improve blood glucose levels and weight and to fight back against ins Continue reading >>

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