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Why Is Diabetes So Common

5 Reasons Why Type One Diabetes Is On The Rise

5 Reasons Why Type One Diabetes Is On The Rise

A 2009 study in The Lancet found that new cases of type 1 diabetes in kids could double in the next 10 years. Possible reasons for this dramatic rise include: Too big too fast. The "accelerator hypothesis" theorizes that children who are bigger and grow more quickly are more likely to develop type 1 diabetes. Too little sun. The "sunshine hypothesis" comes from data showing that countries situated closer to the equator have lower rates of type 1 diabetes. Too clean. The "hygiene hypothesis" is the notion that cleanliness -- lack of exposure to certain germs and parasites -- may increase susceptibility to diseases like diabetes. Too much cow's milk. The "cow's milk hypothesis" states that exposing babies to infant formula containing cow's milk in the first six months of life damages their immune systems, and can trigger autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes. Too much pollution. The "POP hypothesis" alleges that being exposed to pollutants increases diabetes risk. Unlike type 2 diabetes, which is caused by insulin resistance and faulty leptin signaling due to inappropriate diet and lack of exercise, people with type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin and must therefore inject insulin several times a day if they are to remain alive. Tragically those with type 1 diabetes can have the healthiest lifestyle possible yet still suffer many diseases, as current technology is a poor substitute for a fully functioning pancreas. Type 1 diabetes is actually an autoimmune disease, in which the immune system destroys pancreatic cells that produce insulin. The disease tends to progress rather quickly and therefore needs to be diagnosed early, as it can result in serious long-term complications including blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and stroke. While type 1 diabetes is f Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Becoming The Biggest Epidemic Of The Twenty-first Century?

Is Diabetes Becoming The Biggest Epidemic Of The Twenty-first Century?

Diabetes is a major public health problem that is approaching epidemic proportions globally. Worldwide, the prevalence of chronic, noncommunicable diseases is increasing at an alarming rate. About 18 million people die every year from cardiovascular disease, for which diabetes and hypertension are major predisposing factors. Today, more than 1.7 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese. In addition, at least 155 million children worldwide are overweight or obese. A diabetes epidemic is underway. According to an estimate of International Diabetes Federation comparative prevalence of Diabetes during 2007 is 8.0 % and likely to increase to 7.3% by 2025. Number of people with diabetes is 246 million (with 46% of all those affected in the 40–59 age group) and likely to increase to 380 m by 2025. The comparative prevalence of IGT is 7.5% in 2007 and likely to go up to 6.0 by 2025. The number of people with IGT is 308 million in 2007 and likely to be 418 m by 2025. (1) Almost 80% of the total adult diabetics are in developing countries. The regions with the highest rates are the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, where 9.2 % of the adult population is affected, and North America (8.4%). The highest numbers, however, are found in the Western Pacific, where some 67 million people have Diabetes, followed by Europe with 53 million. India leads the global top ten in terms of the highest number of people with diabetes with a current figure of 40.9 million, followed by China with 39.8 million. Behind them come USA; Russia; Germany; Japan; Pakistan; Brazil; Mexico and Egypt. Two major concerns are that much of this increase in Diabetes will occur in developing countries and that there is a growing incidence of Type 2 Diabetes at a younger age in Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Rising Among U.s. Youth

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Rising Among U.s. Youth

are rising among U.S. kids and teens, according to the first national snapshot of diabetes rates among American youths. The new report, presented this weekend in Philadelphia at the American Diabetes Association's annual meeting, shows a 23% rise in rates of type 1 diabetes and a 21% rise in type 2 diabetes rates from 2001 to 2009. Both trends are sounding alarm bells for researchers. The rise in type 1 diabetes is "alarming," says researcher Elizabeth Mayer-Davis, PhD, MSPH, RD, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Even so, it was not a complete surprise, as a similar increase has been reported among European youth, Mayer-Davis says. Diabetes has serious long-term health risks. It makes heart disease, kidney problems, nerve damage, and many other conditions more likely. "This is frightening," says Robert E. Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association. "These are harbingers of adult health problems," he tells WebMD. If the trend is not reversed, there could be an epidemic of heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure when this generation is age 25-35, Ratner says. It's not clear why type 1 diabetes is becoming more common. One theory holds that today's infants are exposed to fewer viruses and bacteria that help the immune system mature, says researcher Dana Dabelea, MD, PhD, of the University of Colorado in Denver. Some studies also suggest a possible link between very early exposure to cow's milk and certain foods to a higher risk of type 1 diabetes. "Studies are exploring whether later introduction of some foods to the infant's diet may be protective," Dabelea tells WebMD. "But we really don't know the cause." The rise in type 2 diabetes, though dramatic, was less surprising. That's because obesity is a major ris Continue reading >>

5 (un)common Myths About Diabetes

5 (un)common Myths About Diabetes

Did you know insulin cures type 1 diabetes? You may have thought so, but you're wrong. Let's clear up other misconceptions there may be about diabetes. Diabetes is a complex disease that millions of Canadians struggle with. In Alberta alone, there are 1 million people suffering from diabetes and prediabetes. With so many people affected, it is easy to create generalizations about what a group of people go through, even though everyone manages their diabetes in different ways. Because of this, we want to do debunk some common and not so common myths about diabetes. Currently, there is no cure for diabetes . Insulin is only a maintenance tool that helps regulate and control diabetes. Insulin injections—which keep blood glucose levels in check—act as a substitute for individuals who cannot produce insulin on their own or are insulin intolerant. You are at an increased risk for type 1 diabetes [CJ1] if you have a parent or sibling who has diabetes because type 1 is genetic—a predisposition pattern is passed down through families, although the inheritance pattern is unknown. Weight and age factors do contribute to your risk of getting type 2 diabetes. However, you are also at risk of type 2 diabetes with any of the following factors: a family member has diabetes, you are part of a high risk group (Hispanic, Native American, South Asian, Asian, or of African descent), or if you have high blood pressure, to name a few. Many people don’t realize that type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the immune system attacks cells in the pancreas; it isn’t caused by poor diet or lack of exercise. Type 1 diabetes is believed to be genetic or brought about through exposure to certain viruses. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body can’t properly use the insulin that Continue reading >>

The Growing Incidence Of Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes In Young People

The Growing Incidence Of Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes In Young People

As the new year begins, many people make resolutions, often having to do with weight. In a country where 71 percent of adults age 20 years and over are overweight or obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it is no wonder that adults are resolving to eat more healthfully, exercise more and lose weight. But, as adults strive to adopt healthier habits, it is important for them not to forget their children. Children too have been increasing in weight. Indeed, as revealed in a new white paper from FAIR Health, Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes as Documented in Private Claims Data: Spotlight on This Growing Issue among the Nation’s Youth, over the years from 2011 to 2015 obesity became a more serious problem for the nation’s young people, as did type 2 diabetes, to which obesity contributes. Type 2 diabetes was once so rare in children that it was often referred to as “adult-onset diabetes.” But, notably, it has now become all too common in young people. In the new white paper, we at FAIR Health, an independent, national, nonprofit organization dedicated to transparency in healthcare costs and health insurance information, consulted our database of over 21 billion privately billed healthcare claims to study trends and patterns in obesity and type 2 diabetes. We investigated the period from 2011 to 2015 in the pediatric population, which we defined as spanning the ages from 0 to 22 years. Findings on type 2 diabetes and obesity We found that claim lines with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis more than doubled in the pediatric population during that period, increasing 109 percent. Claim lines with a diagnosis of obesity also increased across the pediatric population, ranging from a 45 percent rise among 3- to 5-year-olds to a jump of 154 percent a Continue reading >>

G2voice Broadcast #30 Why Is Diabetes So Prevalent In The World?

G2voice Broadcast #30 Why Is Diabetes So Prevalent In The World?

Sunday April 9th at 10 AM CST g2voice.is Upcoming Genesis II Church Seminar It has been one year since we did our last Genesis II Church Seminar in Orange County, California. We will be holding our next G2 Seminar Friday – Sunday, May 19th- 21st at the New Genesis II Chapter 312 Location - Gentry, Arkansas, U.S.A. Please contact Bishop Jonathan by e-mail at: [email protected] if interested. NOTE: Every attendee needs to be registered by May 9th. Do us all a favor and sign up early. The cut off is at 50 people. Early signup really helps in planning to make an even better G2 Seminar. We will be recording a G2Voice Broadcast also at the seminar. We’ve been told, Diabetes is an incurable disease whereby, a person has to rely on medications to control it for the rest of his or her life. This is just another lie being told by the “Big Pharma” so that they can get people on a drug permanently. It is like being put on a monthly payment plan by the pharmaceutical industry every time they get another patient on a lifelong regiment of medications. The patient pays monthly for the rest of their life without any cure in site. Why do people continue to trust those who benefit from sicknesses believing they are looking out for our health? Diabetes has been known for hundreds of years. Below I have included a little history including a chart showing how Diabetes is growing yearly in the U.S. as well as worldwide. Note: Artificial sweeteners are not the answer and may cause Diabetes as well as many more health related problems. The Great news is, we are recording testimonies of people having their health completely restored from Diabetes! Diabetes is a chronic (longterm) dis-ease that affects at least 400 million people worldwide! 1 in 11 people have Diabetes. As of 201 Continue reading >>

Why Indians Are At Higher Risk Of Diabetes

Why Indians Are At Higher Risk Of Diabetes

Compared to those in the developed world, middle classes in India and other developing countries are more susceptible to Type-2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases, thanks to their undernourished ancestors, says a study. The results, published in the journal Cell Metabolism, could explain projections that more than 70 percent of the global burden of Type-2 diabetes will fall on individuals from developing countries by 2030. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), India will have 80 million people with diabetes by 2030. Based on their results that eating a ‘normal’ diet can make animals overweight, if their ancestors had been undernourished for several generations, the researcher from University of Sydney in Australia, the National Centre for Cell Science and the DYP Medical College in Pune, India said that diabetes is linked to the nutrition endured by ancestors. “People in developing countries have faced multi-generational undernutrition and are currently undergoing major lifestyle changes, contributing to an epidemic of metabolic diseases, though the underlying mechanisms remain unclear,” the study said. Increasing prosperity in developing countries has been accompanied by a sudden increase in caloric intake. However their populations’ epigenetic makeup, whereby changing environmental factors alter how people’s genes are expressed, has not compensated for these dietary changes. This means their bodies are still designed to cope with undernourishment; so they store fat in a manner that makes them more prone to obesity and its resulting diseases than populations accustomed to several generations of a ‘normal’ diet. This scenario was recreated in a 12-year study of two groups of rats by associated professor Anandwardhan Hardikar’s te Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

Fatigue is one of the most common disabling diabetes symptoms. Diabetes fatigue can disrupt and interfere with all aspects of daily living. What causes diabetes fatigue, and why is it so common? We’ve written about fatigue before and received tons of great comments on those posts. But this time let’s go deeper and find the whole range of causes and solutions, even if it takes a few weeks. Hopefully, everyone will find something that might help them, because this is a serious problem. For example, Melanie wrote, “[Fatigue] really takes a toll on my family and things we can do. I just want to have the energy to play with my son and to do things around the house or with friends…I can’t drive more than 30 minutes because my husband is afraid I will fall asleep…and wreck [the car]. (I have dozed while driving before.)” Maria commented, “Fatigue is a constant and I have had to learn to do only what I can. I don’t push myself anymore as I pay for it dearly. I get tired of explaining why I don’t feel good, don’t want to do anything. Some understand and some don’t.” And Jan wrote, “I sleep from midnight to noon each day. Then I get depressed because I wasted half a day.” Because of my multiple sclerosis (MS), I live with fatigue sometimes, and I know how limiting it is. I know how difficult it can be to manage. There are more than 15 known causes for fatigue. It helps to figure out what is causing yours, so you can address it. Here are some possibilities. First, diabetes can directly cause fatigue with high or low blood sugar levels. • High blood glucose makes your blood “sludgy,” slowing circulation so cells can’t get the oxygen and nutrients they need. Margaret commented, “I can tell if my sugars are high in the morning, because ‘grogg Continue reading >>

Diabetes More Prevalent In African Americans Due To Living Conditions

Diabetes More Prevalent In African Americans Due To Living Conditions

The higher incidence of diabetes among African Americans when compared to whites may have more to do with living conditions than genetics, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study, available online in advance of publication in the October 2009 edition of the Journal of General Internal Medicine, found that when African Americans and whites live in similar environments and have similar incomes, their diabetes rates are similar, which contrasts with the fact that nationally diabetes is more prevalent among African Americans than whites. Researchers from the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine compared data from the 2003 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) with the Exploring Health Disparities in Integrated Communities Southwest Baltimore (EHDIC-SWB) Study. The Baltimore study was conducted in a racially integrated urban community without race differences in socioeconomic status. In recent decades the United States has seen a sharp increase in diabetes prevalence, with African Americans having a considerably higher occurrence of type 2 diabetes and other related complications compared to whites. "While we often hear media reports of genes that account for race differences in health outcomes, genes are but one of many factors that lead to the major health conditions that account for most deaths in the United States," said Thomas LaVeist, PhD, director of the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions and lead author of the study. Some researchers have speculated that disparities in diabetes prevalence are the result of genetic differences between race groups. However, LaVeist noted that those previous studies were based on national dat Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes Is Becoming More Common

Type Ii Diabetes Is Becoming More Common

Wilma was upset, but not too surprised, when I told her that her blood tests showed she had diabetes. Her brother had had diabetes, and had lost a leg and some eyesight to the disease, before dying of a heart attack. At 65, she feared the same complications, so wanted to learn as much as she could about the disease. The incidence of type II diabetes has been rising among all Americans, but especially seniors. In people age 65 - 74, diabetes has climbed from 9% in 1980 to 17% in 2002, an 89% increase. Why is type II diabetes becoming so common? To understand the answer to this question, one must understand how type II diabetes develops. The basic energy unit of our bodies is the simple sugar molecule called glucose. The digestive system turns most foods, carbohydrates or "carbs," proteins such as meat, and fats such as oil or butter, into glucose, which our body uses to power our muscles and nervous system. When a person eats more food than the body needs, the excess glucose is turned into fat. The hormone responsible for using glucose and storing it as fat is insulin. The more food intake, the more insulin the body needs. The pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach which produces the insulin, tries to keep up with the all the glucose used for energy and the extra stored as fat. In some cases, though, the pancreas can no longer keep up. Because of increasing amounts of body fat, and depending on ones genetic makeup, the body may eventually become resistant to insulin. So, glucose becomes trapped in the blood, levels start to rise, and diabetes sets in. Lack of physical activity and overeating can cause extra fat storage and weight gain, which can overwork the pancreas and worsen insulin resistance. Family history, ethnic background, and getting older can worsen the Continue reading >>

Why Are More American Kids Getting Type 2 Diabetes — And What Can We Do About It?

Why Are More American Kids Getting Type 2 Diabetes — And What Can We Do About It?

Type 2 diabetes, once considered solely an adult disease, affects an increasing number of children under the age of 18. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas gradually loses its ability to produce enough insulin to control a person’s blood sugar levels. People with diabetes may develop serious complications, such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, blindness, and premature death. According to SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth, a multicenter study funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health, during 2008 and 2009 an estimated 18,436 people younger than 20 in the United States were newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year. Also, 5,089 people younger than 20 were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes each year. The study cited obesity, exposure to diabetes in-utero, and endocrine-disrupting chemicals in common household products as possible causes of the rise in type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes disproportionately affects minority groups. According to the CDC, the incidence of type 2 diabetes among those 10 to 19 years old is highest among American Indians, followed by African Americans, Hispanics, and Asian or Pacific Islanders. It is lowest among non-Hispanic whites. Today is World Diabetes Day, and Healthline sat down with two pediatricians to find out why more children are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and what can be done to keep kids from getting the disease. Check Out the Year’s Best Diabetes Apps » More Young Children Now Diagnosed with Adult Diseases Dr. Angela Lennon, a pediatric endocrinologist at the University of Kansas Hospital, told Healthline that she sees obese children 12 to 14 years old with kidney problems, heart problems, and high blood pressure. “A lot of the complications start 10 years after getting d Continue reading >>

Globalization Of Diabetes

Globalization Of Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a global public health crisis that threatens the economies of all nations, particularly developing countries. Fueled by rapid urbanization, nutrition transition, and increasingly sedentary lifestyles, the epidemic has grown in parallel with the worldwide rise in obesity. Asia's large population and rapid economic development have made it an epicenter of the epidemic. Asian populations tend to develop diabetes at younger ages and lower BMI levels than Caucasians. Several factors contribute to accelerated diabetes epidemic in Asians, including the “normal-weight metabolically obese” phenotype; high prevalence of smoking and heavy alcohol use; high intake of refined carbohydrates (e.g., white rice); and dramatically decreased physical activity levels. Poor nutrition in utero and in early life combined with overnutrition in later life may also play a role in Asia's diabetes epidemic. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have contributed substantially to our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology, but currently identified genetic loci are insufficient to explain ethnic differences in diabetes risk. Nonetheless, interactions between Westernized diet and lifestyle and genetic background may accelerate the growth of diabetes in the context of rapid nutrition transition. Epidemiologic studies and randomized clinical trials show that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable through diet and lifestyle modifications. Translating these findings into practice, however, requires fundamental changes in public policies, the food and built environments, and health systems. To curb the escalating diabetes epidemic, primary prevention through promotion of a healthy diet and lifestyle should be a global public policy priority. THE GLOBAL BURDEN OF TYPE Continue reading >>

Why Gestational Diabetes Is On The Rise

Why Gestational Diabetes Is On The Rise

Gestational diabetes cases are soaring, and you (as well as your baby) might be at risk without even knowing it. Find out gestational diabetes symptoms and diet. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), or high blood sugar during pregnancy, used to be relatively rare, occurring in about 3 percent to 4 percent of pregnancies. But in recent years, the rate has doubled—now, up to 6 percent to 8 percent of moms-to-be are diagnosed with this prenatal complication. And new recommendations lowering the cutoff point for diagnosis may lead to an even more dramatic increase. If these new guidelines from an international panel of 50 experts are adopted in the United States, 16 percent of pregnant women may hear the words, "You have gestational diabetes." In women with GDM, excess glucose (blood sugar) passes from the mother's bloodstream through the placenta. Serious pregnancy complications include preeclampsia (a serious high blood pressure condition that can be fatal), preterm delivery and delivery of overweight babies, often via Cesarean section. Some 70 percent to 80 percent of women diagnosed with GDM in the United States eventually develop type II diabetes. New research is showing that GDM can have long-term consequences for children as well. "Children of women with GDM are at risk for developing type II diabetes themselves," says Danielle Downs, Ph.D., an associate professor of kinesiology and obstetrics and gynecology at Pennsylvania State University who conducts research on gestational diabetes. But even normal-size babies who are born to mothers with untreated GDM are at greater risk of becoming overweight kindergarteners—and, consequently, overweight adults. Although being overweight is a major risk factor for GDM, only about half of women diagnosed with it carry excess Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Type 2 Diabetes? Learn Common—and Not So Common—risk Factors

Are You At Risk For Type 2 Diabetes? Learn Common—and Not So Common—risk Factors

Diabetes is not a rare condition – in fact, it’s an epidemic in the U.S. More than 30 million Americans have type 2 diabetes and another 84 million have prediabetes, a condition of elevated blood sugar levels that often leads to type 2. Why do so many Americans have type 2 diabetes? Experts say this major public health problem is due to an aging population, increasing obesity rates and rising sedentary lifestyles. But it’s largely a preventable epidemic and you can offset your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by understanding common—and some not-so-common —type 2 diabetes risk factors, such as: Body Composition You’ve probably heard that being overweight raises your risk. But it’s not really about the number on the scale, it’s about your body composition. If you have higher body fat percentage, your cells may be less sensitive to insulin. Being overweight and/or living a sedentary lifestyle tend to raise your body fat percentage. However, even if you’re at a healthy weight, you’re not necessarily off the hook. You can still be at risk if you’re metabolically obese at normal weight—more commonly known as “skinny fat.” When you’re metabolically obese, you have a normal weight but are out of shape and have low muscle mass. Aging is also tied to this risk factor. As you age, your metabolism and physical activity levels typically slow, causing you to gain fat mass. This is why the risk for type 2 diabetes begins rising after age 45. Eating healthy and strength training can help maintain a healthy body composition. Talk to your doctor before beginning a weight training program. Once you get clearance, you can check out MDVIP’s strength training program, available on Perfect Fit via MDVIP Connect*. Here’s more information on resistance train Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mystery: Why Are Type 1 Cases Surging?

Diabetes Mystery: Why Are Type 1 Cases Surging?

When public health officials fret about the soaring incidence of diabetes in the U.S. and worldwide, they are generally referring to type 2 diabetes. About 90 percent of the nearly 350 million people around the world who have diabetes suffer from the type 2 form of the illness, which mostly starts causing problems in the 40s and 50s and is tied to the stress that extra pounds place on the body’s ability to regulate blood glucose. About 25 million people in the U.S. have type 2 diabetes, and another million have type 1 diabetes, which typically strikes in childhood and can be controlled only with daily doses of insulin. For reasons that are completely mysterious, however, the incidence of type 1 diabetes has been increasing throughout the globe at rates that range from 3 to 5 percent a year. Although the second trend is less well publicized, it is still deeply troubling, because this form of the illness has the potential to disable or kill people so much earlier in their lives. No one knows exactly why type 1 diabetes is rising. Solving that mystery—and, if possible, reducing or reversing the trend—has become an urgent problem for public health researchers everywhere. So far they feel they have only one solid clue. “Increases such as the ones that have been reported cannot be explained by a change in genes in such a short period,” says Giuseppina Imperatore, who leads a team of epidemiologists in the Division of Diabetes Translation at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “So environmental factors are probably major players in this increase.” A Challenge of Counting Type 1 and type 2 diabetes share the same underlying defect—an inability to deploy insulin in a manner that keeps blood sugar from rising too high—but they arise out of almos Continue reading >>

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