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Why Is Diabetes Genetic?

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http://www.drpompa.com/additional-res... In this video, Dr. Pompa discusses natural solution for diabetes, insulin resistance type 1 diabetes, type 1 diabetes vs type 2 diabetes, diabetes and genetics; true cellular detox support solutions. TIIR, Toxin Induced Insulin Resistance is considered to cause 1/3 of the diabetic population. He reviews the connection between diabetes and cellular inflammation and the reasons the cellular healing national diabetes program was created. Dr. Pompa briefly describes each of the 5R's of True Cellular Detox, R1 removing the source, R2 regenerating the cell membrane, R3 restoring cellular energy, R4 reducing inflammation and R5 reestablishing methylation. About how things like epigenetics, heavy metals, mold exposure, ATP energy, different types of stress, stressors and the Cellular Healing Diet all tie in together.

Diabetes And Genetics

Tweet Genetics play a strong role in the chances of developing both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Other factors include environment and lifestyle. Diabetes is an increasingly common chronic condition affecting millions of people in the UK alone. Diabetes and genetic risk The risk of developing diabetes is affected by whether your parents or siblings have diabetes. The likelihood of developing type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes differ, as you can see below. Type 1 diabetes and genetics - average risks Mother with diabetes increases risk of diabetes by 2% Father with diabetes increases risk of diabetes by 8% Both parents with diabetes increases risk by 30% Brother or sister with diabetes increases risk by 10% Non-identical twin with diabetes increases risk by 15% Identical twin with diabetes increases risk by 40% Type 2 diabetes and genetics - average risks If either mother of father has diabetes increases risk of diabetes by 15% If both mother and father have diabetes increases risk by 75% If non-identical twin has diabetes increases risk by 10% If identical twin has diabetes increases risk by 90% Some other forms of diabetes may be directly inherited, including maturity onset diabete Continue reading >>

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  1. ikesgirl80

    Hi all! I was diagnosed with IR years ago (2003-2004ish), as was my step dad a couple years before me. He has had really good success with metformin. Myself, oh it was H*LL!
    I had burning diarrhea ALL day, and it didn't help the tiredness, hunger, weight loss, or bloating I had. Granted, I did not change my diet. I was also gluten intolerant, and didn't know it yet. And one of the fillers in some brands of metformin is wheat, which was part of the issue. I stopped taking it after a year or so.
    After I spiraled into depression and ate in excess of 10,000 calories a day, PER day, and almost lost my 2 best friends in the entire world due to my addiction to food, which was made worse by the IR, I started getting it together. My starting weight was 350 pounds, and my insulin levels were 4 times the maximum normal limit after nearly 20 hours of fasting.
    By going gluten free, using "The Carbohydrate Addict's Diet" as a jumping ground, and exercising 3-5 days per week (mostly cardio at the beginning), my IR is under control (normal range after 8 hours fasting), and all the symptoms are gone (except tiredness after a sugar binge, and the darkening on my stomach and girl parts, which are still lightening). But it's taken 2 1/2 years to get here. I recently switched over to the Paleo diet, with limiting fruit to 2-3 servings per day, and careful with bananas. I've also lost 160 pounds, and feeling better than I could ever expect!
    So, I was just wondering if there is anyone else out there that controls their IR with just diet and exercise, or other experiences with the metformin? I see all sorts of positives (which is great!), but was wondering if there are other people like me?
    Chris

  2. geoblewis

    I have been controlling IR (and type 2 diabetes) for nearly five years with Paleo diet, exercise and intermittent fasting. Not perfectly, but fairly consistently. When I'm on top of everything, it works pretty great (although losing weight is still a GIANT struggle for me).
    I was put on metformin a little over a year ago. I quit after a month due to similar side effects. After metformin the doctor put me on Janumet (Januvia and metformin), and while my blood sugar numbers were pretty darn perfect (I still had to eat a Paleo diet to achieve that), I felt even worse, spending my days in bed and checking out of my life altogether.
    I have eliminated processed foods entirely. I eat nothing with sugar, grains, legumes (except this morning my sons are supposed to be making me waffles, if they ever wake up!). I strive to eat only organic produce and grass-fed or wild-caught protein sources and similarly sourced healthy fats. I generally don't eat fruit, but I do occasionally have seasonal strawberries and watermelon. I'm still struggling with morning high blood sugar levels, so I'm experimenting with meal timing. I balance each meal with a moderate amount of protein, lots of vegetables (and always a serving of greens with each meal), and plenty of healthy fats. I try to keep carb intake under 75 gm/day.
    When I eat like this, I do feel pretty good. I am struggling with lethargy, which seems to be a thyroid issue. Trying to figure that part of the puzzle out now.
    You've been under quite a bit of stress. I am glad you found your groove!

  3. ikesgirl80

    I am just at the beginning of the Paleo diet, and right now, there is not a lot of extra money to buy the grass fed/wild/organic foods. When I find stuff on sale, I get it (having my first organic orange tomorrow!). I have cut out 95-99% of processed stuff (organic veggie crisps are yummy), and I only eat out 1-2 times per month, instead of 1-3 times per week. Last night I ate BBQ and had turkey, ham, dill pickles, and a baked potato.
    Blood sugar problems have luckily never affected me. Even when my insulin was at it's highest, my sugars were always good. My most recent blood work (Nov 2012) showed they were still good. I will be having blood work done at the end of May, so we will see how the Paleo diet (March 2013-current) is working.
    You're right, my stress has been high lately. Trying to figure the surgery stuff out and the end of the school year, but I am hoping as soon as I get grades in this week and progress reports done, that I will be able to stop freaking out so much! I'm sure my cortisol levels have been way high, which isn't going to help!
    You sound like you have a good plan going! If I ever run into problems with my IR/sugar, you can bet I'll be trying some of the things you described in paragraph 3!
    Chris

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Charlotte Ling associate professor at Lund University Diabetes Centre. Diabetologia March 2013.

Genetics Of Type 1 Diabetes

In western populations, each child has a 0.3–0.4% risk of developing diabetes by the age of 20 years; the risk increases 15-fold in siblings of an affected child. Lifetime risks are more difficult to estimate, but may be about twice as high as this. Some 50% of the genetic risk of type 1 diabetes is conferred by genes in the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) region on chromosome 6. The HLA Class II susceptibility haplotypes DR4-DQ8 and DR3-DQ2 are present in 90% of children with type 1 diabetes, whereas DR15-DQ6 is associated with protection. High risk HLA haplotypes in a child with no family history of disease confer a risk similar to that of having an affected sibling (5–6%), and this risk rises rapidly if one or both haplotypes are shared with the affected sibling. The promoter region of the insulin gene on chromosome 11 contributes about 10% of genetic susceptibility. Many other genes (currently more than 40) make a minor contribution to type 1 diabetes, and several are of particular interest because they influence different aspects of immune function. Their ability to predict diabetes is, however, limited. Empirical risks By the age of 20 years, type 1 diabetes will have affec Continue reading >>

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  1. Msmoonpie

    Foot itching related to diabetes?

    So I was diagnosed T1 early may, so I'm still learning all this stuff. This past week my feet have been itching unbearably, especially on the sides. There is also strange swelling. I can feel my feet fine though, is this diabetes related do you think? If so, any ideas how to stop it?

  2. AnnC

    Not everything you experience is diabetes-related. I suggest you see your doctor for a diagnosis.

  3. furball64801

    I would get into a podiatrist before it drives you nuts and you scratch to get relief. Even with high bg I never had that feeling so is it D related hard to tell.

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This video provides an animated introduction to diabetes type 1 and type 2.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/join -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.

Which Type Of Diabetes Is More Likely To Be Inherited And Why?

Question: Which type of diabetes is more likely to be inherited and why? Answer: Type 1 diabetes typically occurs in childhood, while type 2 diabetes usually develops in adults. However, some adults develop a form of diabetes that looks very similar to type 1 diabetes, and now with the huge increase in obesity, many children and adolescents are getting type 2 diabetes. Now, both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have a genetic component; that means of course, that they tend to run in families. However, we often regard diseases that develop in childhood as being more likely to be due to genetics. But this is not the case for diabetes, and in fact, studies show that type 2, which mostly commonly develops in adulthood, seems to have a greater genetic basis than the childhood form of type 1 diabetes. For example, as you know, identical twins share 100 percent of their genetic material; however, if one twin has type 1 diabetes, the chance of that the other twin will develop it is only 10 to 20 percent. In contrast, if one twin has type 2, or the adult form of diabetes, the other twin has up to a 90 percent chance of developing type 2 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, we know that overeating and la Continue reading >>

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  1. still the same

    did drinking too much beer cause my diabetes?

    Does anyone out there know if drinking too much beer in the past may have caused diabetes? I asked my Dr. once and he didn't think so unless I had pancreatitis. As far as I know I never had pancreatitis. Dr. said maybe if you had chronic pancreatitis which has no symptoms, but that is usually for alcoholics. I never considered myself an alcoholic. I definetly overdrank beer many times, (binge drinked) but only beer not wine or hard stuff. I rarely drink now but when I do it seems to lower my blood sugar considerably. Can anyone help me with these questions of alcohol and blood sugar?

  2. jim55

    I'm sure if your drinking brought with it behavier that too wasn't healthy such as eating binges following binge drinking. I think it takes a host of lifestyle issues working together that may end with type two. Either way, don't beat yourself up over it as it won't change a thing.

  3. still the same

    Your right Jim55! I did eat a lot of junk too when I was drinking, good point. Thanks

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