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Why Is Diabetes Called The Silent Killer

Diabetes—“the Silent Killer”

Diabetes—“the Silent Killer”

WHEN he was 21 years old, Ken developed a puzzling, unquenchable thirst. He also had to urinate frequently—eventually about every 20 minutes. Soon Ken’s limbs began to feel heavy. He was chronically tired, and his vision became blurry. The turning point came when Ken caught a virus. A visit to the doctor confirmed that Ken had more than the flu—he also had Type 1 diabetes mellitus—diabetes, for short. This chemical disorder disrupts the body’s ability to utilize certain nutrients, primarily a blood sugar called glucose. Ken spent six weeks in the hospital before his blood-sugar level stabilized. That was more than 50 years ago, and treatment has improved considerably during the past half century. Nevertheless, Ken still suffers from diabetes, and he is not alone. It is estimated that worldwide, more than 140 million people have the disorder, and according to the World Health Organization, that number could double by the year 2025. Understandably, experts are concerned about the prevalence of diabetes. “With the numbers we’re starting to see,” says Dr. Robin S. Goland, codirector of a treatment center in the United States, “this could be the beginning of an epidemic.” Consider these brief reports from around the world. AUSTRALIA: According to Australia’s International Diabetes Institute, “diabetes presents one of the most challenging health problems for the 21st century.” INDIA: At least 30 million people have diabetes. “We hardly had any patients under 40 about 15 years ago,” says one doctor. “Today every other person is from this age group.” SINGAPORE: Nearly a third of the population between 30 and 69 years of age have diabetes. Many children—some as young as ten—have been diagnosed. UNITED STATES: Approximately 16 million people Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: The Silent Killer

Type 2 Diabetes: The Silent Killer

Are you one of the 1 in 4 living with this silent killer inside and do not even realize? In a culture hijacked by sugar, the average American consumes 85 grams a day! That’s 170 pounds a year! Thus, making Type 2 Diabetes on the rise. But refined sugar is not the only culprit. Carbohydrates and starches in everyday foods also account for sugars in our bloodstream. Therefore the American Heart Association recommends daily sugar allowances. The maximum daily consumption of added sugar to your diet should not exceed 25 grams for women and 36 grams for men. Why is this a concern? Your Health According to a report released in 2014 by the CDC, more than 29 million adults in the U.S. have diabetes. And 1 in 4 is not even aware they have the disease. More alarming is that another 86 million adult Americans have Pre-diabetes. If left unattended it can develop into full-blown Type 2 Diabetes in as early as six months. And these numbers are expected to have increased significantly in the past three years. The Silent Killer Diabetes, called the “Silent Killer” because many people do not recognize signs or symptoms until it’s in the advanced stages. Common symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes include: Increased Thirst Frequent Urination Extreme Fatigue Blurry Vision Tingling, pain, or numbness in the hands and feet Meanwhile, 56% of people diagnosed with pre-diabetes ignore the diagnosis. And within six months develop full-blown advanced Type 2 Diabetes. But left unattended diabetes can cause serious, even life-threatening complications. Some of the complications include: Skin Conditions Hearing Impairment Severe Nerve Damage Kidney Damage (resulting in kidney failure) Cardiovascular Disease (resulting in heart attack or stroke) Eye Damage (resulting in blindness) Poor Blood Circulat Continue reading >>

What Are The Most Telling Health Indicators That People Can Measure Themselves With Relative Ease?

What Are The Most Telling Health Indicators That People Can Measure Themselves With Relative Ease?

Short answer: just these metrics which you can measure by yourself after some practice if you're willing to invest about USD 100,- in a validated blood pressure monitor for a list of which see dabl Educational Trust|Monitors for Self-measurement of Blood Pressure (SBPM). Avoid those el cheapo unvalidated stuff, you wouldn't know what your measurements means so is a waste of money. -As you might know, high blood pressure, causing stroke, heart attacks, heart failure, kidney failure, even blindness if left untreated for a long time, we call the silent killer. That's why it is important to measure it (have it measured) properly say once a year, more frequent if it was higher than 140/90 mmHg especially if treated. -As long as your pulse rate isn't very high (resting > 100 bpm) or low (<50 bpm unless very fit) and not irregular of lesser importance to us docs although we always check for that, semi-automatic blood pressure monitors (which as a doc I don't use when seeing patients, too slow) display the pulse rate too. -Body weight in these modern days we mostly measure to see if someone was overweight, because that is linked to a higher risk of developing diabetes, high blood pressure, high serum lipids, cardiovascular disease, cancer. If you without meaning to lose weight it could point you to having some disease (hyperthyroidism, bowel disease, chronic inflammation, cancer). So these indeed are important metrics you can obtain by yourself. Other than this, it is important to take note of anything out of the ordinary, we fear most one losing blood from some natural orifice (anus, vagina, when coughing, vomiting blood, less so for nose bleeds), or developing a bleeding tendency, changes in bowel habits (like developing diarrhea, or getting constipated) could also point to s Continue reading >>

Diabetes The “silent” Killer

Diabetes The “silent” Killer

DIABETES is a preventable disease because it is a result of how people live and the choices they make rather than something passed on. Yesterday, Nov 14, was the day chosen by the World Health Organisation and the International Diabetes Federation as World Diabetes Day (WDD). President of the Papua New Guinea Diabetes Association, (PNG DA) Dr Lutty Amos said that WDD was the largest diabetes campaign throughout the world, commemorated annually by the 151 countries that are registered under the International Diabetic Federation (IDF). It was a chance to draw global attention to the threat posed by a disease which continues to have a devastating impact on the health of the Pacific island nations. To that end, Port Moresby General Hospital diabetes clinic head Dr Steven Bogosia said the disease is a serious complex condition which can affect the entire body requires daily self care and if complications develop, the disease can have a significant impact on quality of life and can reduce life expectancy. While there is currently no cure for diabetes, a person can live an enjoyable life by learning about the condition and effectively managing it. But Dr Bogosia said the regular medical check-ups and screening could help detect the on set of the disease and allow the individual to take steps to manage or avoid it altogether. Diabetes is a word heard so often in hospitals and on medical charts and it is safe to assume many educated Papua New Guineans are aware of the condition but Dr Bogosia described it as a “silent” disease. He stressed the need for people to have medical check-ups regularly but in a country where health care is not always readily available or affordable for many Papua New Guineans that might be a tall order. So what can people do to prevent developing di Continue reading >>

Why Is Diabetes Known As The Silent Killer?

Why Is Diabetes Known As The Silent Killer?

While diabetes is often called a "chronic" disease, it is also known as the "silent killer" which I believe is a very accurate description. Here are some of the primary reasons for this: Diabetes Often Goes Undetected For a Very Long Time It is estimated that 5.7 million people in the US alone have diabetes and don't even know it. An estimated 50 million people have pre-diabetes. You should keep in mind that pre-diabetes is literally one tenth of a point away from being diagnosed with diabetes and health professionals don't always agree on the cut-off point. Many people with pre-diabetes have no idea they are on the verge of getting diabetes. This information comes from the CDC which stands for the "Centers For Disease Control and Prevention," a division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. This information is about as accurate as it gets since they are able to pull from several national medical databases. Even Those Who Know They Are Diabetic Don't Always Realize Just How Serious It Is Ignorance is one of the biggest dangers of diabetes. This is especially true for diabetics that do not take insulin. They often don't realize how serious they should take their illness. Some of them seem to think can take a pill or two every day and not worry about it after that. In fact, many family members should a great deal of frustration watching their diabetic loved one think all they have to do is take an extra pill before they go on a sugar binge. Nothing could be further from the truth but trying to convince some diabetics of this can be quite challenging. Diabetics Die From the Complications of the Disease Rather Than the Disease Itself Diabetes is an underlying metabolic disease that affects every system in your body. Therefore, diabetics suffer from many complic Continue reading >>

Diabetes – The Silent Killer – Know The Symptoms

Diabetes – The Silent Killer – Know The Symptoms

Diabetes is often called the silent killer because of its easy-to-miss symptoms. The warning signs can be so mild that it may go un-noticeable. Many wouldn’t even be aware that they are diabetics, which might just pop up in a general routine check-up or until problems surface from long-term damage caused by the disease. People at risk include being overweight, no physical activity, high blood pressure or a family history of diabetes. It’s better to get your blood sugar tested routinely if you are at risk for diabetes. Also, a single high blood sugar test won’t rule out diabetes because blood sugar can fluctuate with stress and sickness. But if repeated tests show an upward graph, then it’s alarming. The good news is that detecting it early before you have any of the following signs and symptoms can help you get treated and avoid serious complications later. The greater sugar levels are left uncontrolled, the greater is the risk for heart disease, kidney disease, neuropathy, blindness, and other serious complications. Here’s a look at the symptoms which may arise due to diabetes. Increased urination - Excessive thirst – Weight loss – Excessive hunger – Excessive pangs of hunger may arise due to fluctuating blood sugar levels. When you eat high carb foods, insulin is released and within a while, sugar drops down. At this stage, the body sends low-energy signals and you crave for food – hunger pangs. This can be a vicious cycle. Skin problems – Acanthosis Nigricans may be a warning sign for diabetics wherein the skin darkens around the neck, armpits, elbow, knees, knuckles, lips, palms. Excess insulin causes normal skin cells to reproduce rapidly which stores more melanin. In diabetes, though the pancreas are producing insulin, the body cannotutilize it Continue reading >>

Diabesity: Could You Have This Silent Killer?

Diabesity: Could You Have This Silent Killer?

What is Diabesity? Diabesity is a new term that has been coined to refer to the growing epidemic of obesity, diabetes, and associated health complications. The problem of Diabesity is getting significant attention in the United States, but it is also a growing concern in Europe and other developed parts of the world. While obesity is a major risk factor of Diabesity, it is not the only risk factor. First, we will discuss the link between diabetes and obesity. Second, we will cover the simple steps you can take in order to stay healthy. Diabetes And Obesity Type 1 diabetes has a very different cause than Type 2 diabetes. Therefore, it is not really part of this discussion. Type 1 is usually inherited and is not really associated with the entirely preventable risk factors associated with Type 2 diabetes. Obesity is one of the major risk factors that is associated with Type 2, and it is this disease that is becoming an epidemic in many developed countries. Of course, most people who suffer from Type 1 diabetes can also benefit from the sensible steps that are outlined below. Of course, genetics may play a role in people who develop Type 2 diabetes. In the case of this disease, your genetics are not your destiny! Many doctors now believe that Type 2 diabetes is entirely preventable by controlling diet, getting moderate exercise, and of course, controlling weight. There are people who develop Type 2 later in life and maintain a fairly normal weight, so obesity might not be responsible for 100 percent of cases. However, some people manage to maintain a “normal” weight without enjoying a good diet or getting exercise, so even conservative doctors will argue that weight control, diet, and exercise are major factors for avoiding Diabesity. These “normal weight” people ar Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Me: How Silent Killer Caught Up With Nhs Chief

Diabetes And Me: How Silent Killer Caught Up With Nhs Chief

'I just knew something was wrong with me. For several months I had been becoming increasingly, unusually tired and was needing to go to the toilet five or six times a night. I knew it wasn't overwork or stress but didn't know what it could be. My wife Sarah-Jane thought I was just a bit rundown. This was towards the end of 2012. However, the travelling involved in being chief executive of the NHS, the birth of my daughter Rosa that November and the fact that I'd just moved house meant I didn't get round to seeing my GP until Christmas Eve, a while after the symptoms appeared. Pretty much right away my GP said: "It sounds like diabetes to me". He took some blood, put it into a machine and it showed that my blood glucose level was way beyond what it should be. That confirmed that I had type 2 diabetes. He said: "You're going to the toilet a lot as your kidneys are responding to high levels of sugar in your blood and your body deals with that by urinating it out." I said, 'Can I be cured? Can I get out of this?' But he said, 'No, you've got it for life." He also explained that the main complications of diabetes are heart failure, stroke, kidney failure, blindness and amputation of a lower limb. I knew all that already; I'd given evidence to the public accounts committee about diabetes a few months earlier, ironically. But to hear a doctor saying this to me about me was sobering and very scary. It was particularly sobering because my father, who'd been a plasterer, died when he was 68 from emphysema and asthma. He spent his last years in a wheelchair. My grandfather, a labourer in a brass factory, also died in his 60s, of heart failure. So I'd always assumed I would die early too; that I wouldn't make 70. My expectations were for no longer than that. It may sound weird but Continue reading >>

Why Diabetes Called – A Silent Killer?

Why Diabetes Called – A Silent Killer?

The inability of body to produce healthy level of glucose is medically known as diabetes – a silent killer. It is well known as a metabolic disorder in which body unable to respond or produce insulin which is required for the healthy life. You can’t imagine but it is true that millions of people globally are living with this silent killer disease. According to the research of WHO (world Health organization), diabetes takes more lives as compare to breast cancer and HIV. Apart from that, Diabetes is also responsible for the other serious health problems like kidney disorder, blindness, stroke and heart diseases. In other words, diabetes affects your entire body including main organs of the body. There are no initial symptoms of diabetes that is why this disease is termed as “a Silent killer”. If you are suffering with the diabetes then remember one thing, there is no cure of diabetes and you can only manage this condition with self care. Learning about the diabetes control is the only way to live a quality of life. Diabetes is a complex and serious disease in which you body unable to receive energy because of unhealthy glucose level, which further leads to the long terms health problems. Lest us discuss about the Diabetes types Type 1 diabetes Type 1 is less known form of diabetes and occurred because of beta cells destruction which makes insulin. These cells are mainly found in the pancreas and destroyed by the immune system. There is another similar condition known as secondary diabetes, but in which beta cells are safe but pancreas is not working properly because of injury or disease. In other words, improper function of beta cells is mainly form type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes It is worldwide known form of diabetes and mainly experienced by people after the Continue reading >>

7 Silent Symptoms Of Pre-diabetes

7 Silent Symptoms Of Pre-diabetes

A little fatigue. An extra five pounds you can’t shake. A bruise that just won’t heal. None of these symptoms are especially eyebrow-raising on their own. But taken together, they could be signs of a silent epidemic that’s affecting more and more women across the country: pre-diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that at least 86 million Americans—more than one in three—have the condition, which is marked by blood sugar levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough to qualify as diabetic. But as many as nine in 10 sufferers don’t know they have it, says Ashita Gupta, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “That’s because it’s common for people to feel perfectly normal and healthy while the disease is progressing,” she explains. Still, there are signs and symptoms you can watch out for. And you should, since pre-diabetes can be treated and reversed through dietary tweaks and healthy lifestyle changes when it’s caught earlier. But the longer it goes undiagnosed and untreated, the greater the chance of it turning into full-blown diabetes, which is much harder to rebound from. So in honor of November, which is American Diabetes Month, we asked Gupta to share some of the most common red flags of pre-diabetes. If you’ve experienced any of the symptoms on the slides ahead, ask your doctor to test you as soon as possible. Sudden spikes and dips in your blood sugar (which are common in those with pre-diabetes) can impair your eye’s ability to bend and focus, leading to blurred vision, says Gupta. The blurriness should go away once you get your sugar levels back into normal range. (Here are 10 other Surprising Things Your Eyes Reveal About Your Health.) One of the more well-known sig Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Silent Killer Essay

Diabetes: The Silent Killer Essay

No Works Cited Length: 1265 words (3.6 double-spaced pages) Rating: Purple Open Document Need writing help? Check your paper » - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Diabetes: The Silent Killer Roughly 25 million Americans have diabetes; it is called the “Silent Killer” because almost half of those 25 million have no idea that they even have the disease; it can strike and kill without warning. I am interested in the disease because both my grandfather and my maternal great grandmother had diabetes. However, both of them had late onset diabetes, or Type II. Diabetes Mellitus is the cause of many serious health complications such as stroke, heart disease, renal failure, and blindness, among others. It can destroy the major organs in your body; untreated it can take your life. What is Diabetes Mellitus? The official definition is: a condition in which the pancreas no longer produces enough insulin, or cells stop responding to the insulin that is produced, so that glucose in the blood cannot be absorbed into the cells of the body. (Thefreedictionary.com) There are two types of Diabetes, Type I and Type II. Both types are very different. Type I Diabetes is known as juvenile diabetes because it most commonly diagnosed and begins at adolescence. In this form, little or no insulin is produced by the body. That is also why it is referred to as insulin dependent, because people need to receive daily injections of insulin. In Type II Diabetes, enough insulin is produced by the pancreas, but the cells don’t work effectively because they have become insulin resistant. This form of diabetes is most often diagnosed when a patient is being seen for another concern, which was unknowingly caused by the diabetes. Each type of diabetes has its own risk f Continue reading >>

Why Diabetis Is Called Silent Killer?

Why Diabetis Is Called Silent Killer?

Diabetes is not a killer at all .Diabetes is a a sign that your are not taking care of your health .Mostly people who are overweight get this gift from god to save themselves from complications of obesity ,But they took this as Disease and get into vicious circle of taking medication which put them in Life long conditin . What actually required to do in this condition is take care of your physical health by doing exercise and eating healthy food . Go in to low crab diet avoid all form of white (Rice,sugar,bread ) start doing exercise and do intermittent fasting . Diabetes is not a issue of low insulin in most cases it is issue of insulin resistance (it happens when there are too much insulin in your body). Eat healthy and avoid taking tobacco in any form .You will be fine within 3 month. Dont ever take any medictaion in any circutsnaces for diabetes . If you are overweight lose weight .Within 3 month your blood sugar will stabilize . Continue reading >>

Why Is The Zodiac Killer Called That?

Why Is The Zodiac Killer Called That?

The Zodiac killer sent out letters to the newspapers, where he confessed the murders. He called himself "Zodiac" in those letters - actually in the first few letters he remained anonymous, and then starting with the letter sent in August 1969, he introduced himself as "Zodiac". This is the first letter where the murderer called himself Zodiac: Continue reading >>

Diabetes The Silent Killer Essay

Diabetes The Silent Killer Essay

The Silent Killer: Diabetes Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death by disease. It is a chronic disease that has no cure. Therefore it comes to no surprise that this disease has acquired countless number of attentions. Unfortunately, 5.4 million people in the United State are unaware that they have this disease. Until they do, they have already developed life-threatening complications. This may include blindness, kidney diseases, nerves diseases, heart diseases, strokes, and amputations. It is no wonder that diabetes is known as the silent killer. Diabetes is condition where the body does not produce or properly use insulin, which is a type of hormone that converts sugar, starches, and other types of foods into the energy that humans …show more content… This occurs more likely when one is under a lot of stress. When the glucose level does increase, problems such as headaches, blurry vision, thirst, frequent trips to the restroom, and dry itchy skin may occur. When the body lacks blood glucose, a problem such as low blood glucose may occur. This is also called hypoglycemia. When hypoglycemia occurs, one may feel shaky, tired, hungry, nervous and confused. With all of these serious complications, it is highly recommended that people get checked for diabetes before other problems arise. Diabetes seems to be targeting at certain ethnic groups. Because of this information, a biological/genetic factor may be involved. The percentages, calculations, and estimates, seems to be pointing at three ethnic groups: African American, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans. According to the Diabetes American Association, it is estimated that African Americans are 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes than Hispanic whites. Thus, Hispanic Americans are almost twice as likely Continue reading >>

Why Is Prostate Cancer A Silent Killer?

Why Is Prostate Cancer A Silent Killer?

Hello and good question! I discuss prostate health problems in my book, “Men's Health: Natural approaches for better prostate health,” which you may find to be a good read whenever you have time. Prostate cancer is considered a silent killer because this deadly disease often shows no symptoms, silently attacking its victims with no warning signs. Although symptoms may not always appear, there may be warning signs. Some symptoms include: a frequent need to urinate, especially at night difficulty controlling urination or bowel movements painful or burning sensation during urination blood in urine or semen difficulty having an erection painful ejaculation frequent pain or stiffness in the spine, hips, ribs, and other bones weakness or numbness in the legs or feet Prevention is ideal Prevention of prostate cancer is based on a set of good lifestyle choices. Several studies have mentioned regular exercise as a key to reduce the risk of getting prostate cancer. Being overweight or obese can further complicate prostate cancer, so maintaining a healthy lifestyle is important. The sooner it is detected, the higher the survival rate When detected early, the survival rate for prostate cancer is much higher than if detected at a later stage. Men should talk to their doctors about the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screenings to make an informed decision about testing. Most men should consider yearly prostate screenings beginning at age 50. Treatment is essential Prostate cancer, depending on the stage, will be treated differently. Doctors will determine the most appropriate treatment for each patient, but possible treatment options include surveillance, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy, or a combination thereof. Some patients with prostate ca Continue reading >>

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