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Why Is Diabetes Called The Silent Killer

Diabetes

Diabetes

Over 18 million people in the United States, or 6 percent of the population, have diabetes. While an estimated 13 million have been diagnosed with diabetes, 5.2 million people (or nearly one-third) are unfortunately unaware that they have the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin – a hormone that is necessary to convert sugar, starches, and other food into energy needed for daily life. The cause of the disease is not known exactly, except that genetics and environmental factors such as obesity and lack of exercise appear to play roles. Types of Diabetes There are two major types of diabetes: Type 1. An autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce any insulin, most often occurring in children and young adults. People with type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections to stay alive. Type 1 diabetes accounts for five to 10 percent of all cases. Type 2. A metabolic disorder resulting from the body's inability to make enough, or properly use, insulin. It is the most common form of the disease. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is nearing epidemic proportions, due to an increased number of older Americans, and a greater prevalence of obesity and sedentary lifestyles. Complications from diabetes include heart disease, stroke, vision loss/blindness, amputation, and kidney disease. Back to top Diabetes is sometimes called the "silent killer" because the signs of the disease are not always dramatic. They may not even be noticeable. In fact, the American Diabetes Association estimates that millions of Americans have type 2 diabetes and are not even aware of it. If you notice any of the symptoms below, you should see your docto Continue reading >>

Diabetes – The Silent Killer – Know The Symptoms

Diabetes – The Silent Killer – Know The Symptoms

Diabetes is often called the silent killer because of its easy-to-miss symptoms. The warning signs can be so mild that it may go un-noticeable. Many wouldn’t even be aware that they are diabetics, which might just pop up in a general routine check-up or until problems surface from long-term damage caused by the disease. People at risk include being overweight, no physical activity, high blood pressure or a family history of diabetes. It’s better to get your blood sugar tested routinely if you are at risk for diabetes. Also, a single high blood sugar test won’t rule out diabetes because blood sugar can fluctuate with stress and sickness. But if repeated tests show an upward graph, then it’s alarming. The good news is that detecting it early before you have any of the following signs and symptoms can help you get treated and avoid serious complications later. The greater sugar levels are left uncontrolled, the greater is the risk for heart disease, kidney disease, neuropathy, blindness, and other serious complications. Here’s a look at the symptoms which may arise due to diabetes. Increased urination - Excessive thirst – Weight loss – Excessive hunger – Excessive pangs of hunger may arise due to fluctuating blood sugar levels. When you eat high carb foods, insulin is released and within a while, sugar drops down. At this stage, the body sends low-energy signals and you crave for food – hunger pangs. This can be a vicious cycle. Skin problems – Acanthosis Nigricans may be a warning sign for diabetics wherein the skin darkens around the neck, armpits, elbow, knees, knuckles, lips, palms. Excess insulin causes normal skin cells to reproduce rapidly which stores more melanin. In diabetes, though the pancreas are producing insulin, the body cannotutilize it Continue reading >>

Diabetes The Silent Killer Essay

Diabetes The Silent Killer Essay

The Silent Killer: Diabetes Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death by disease. It is a chronic disease that has no cure. Therefore it comes to no surprise that this disease has acquired countless number of attentions. Unfortunately, 5.4 million people in the United State are unaware that they have this disease. Until they do, they have already developed life-threatening complications. This may include blindness, kidney diseases, nerves diseases, heart diseases, strokes, and amputations. It is no wonder that diabetes is known as the silent killer. Diabetes is condition where the body does not produce or properly use insulin, which is a type of hormone that converts sugar, starches, and other types of foods into the energy that humans …show more content… This occurs more likely when one is under a lot of stress. When the glucose level does increase, problems such as headaches, blurry vision, thirst, frequent trips to the restroom, and dry itchy skin may occur. When the body lacks blood glucose, a problem such as low blood glucose may occur. This is also called hypoglycemia. When hypoglycemia occurs, one may feel shaky, tired, hungry, nervous and confused. With all of these serious complications, it is highly recommended that people get checked for diabetes before other problems arise. Diabetes seems to be targeting at certain ethnic groups. Because of this information, a biological/genetic factor may be involved. The percentages, calculations, and estimates, seems to be pointing at three ethnic groups: African American, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans. According to the Diabetes American Association, it is estimated that African Americans are 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes than Hispanic whites. Thus, Hispanic Americans are almost twice as likely Continue reading >>

Diabetes - The Silent Killer

Diabetes - The Silent Killer

Drs Cameron Meyer & Mareliza Jurgens, Intercare November is World Diabetes Awareness Month, with 14 November being World Diabetes Day. Intecare is not only emphasizing the importance of regular blood sugar tests, but are hosting free tests at all our practices. Diabetes is sometimes called 'the silent killer' because so many people today are living with the disease - and dying from it - without even knowing they have it. Diabetes is a serious disease that causes your blood glucose (also called blood sugar) to be too high. Although glucose is needed for body energy, an excess can create a health risk. A diabetic is more than twice as likely to suffer a heart attack, stroke, or other complications, including blindness, kidney disease, gum infections and amputation. The good news is that diabetes can be controlled and those with the disease can live long and full lives. There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational diabetes. Type 1 occurs when the pancreas stops producing insulin. It usually starts in young people under the age of 30 (and affects children). Type 2 is caused when the insulin, which the pancreas produces, is either not enough or your body becomes resistant to its effect. Most adults who suffer from diabetes account for this type and sadly, many are undiagnosed. Gestational diabetes is a temporary condition that occurs during pregnancy. Both mother and child have an increased risk of developing diabetes in the future. Signs and symptoms of diabetes include unusual thirst, frequent urination, unusual weight loss, extreme fatigue or lack of energy, blurred vision, frequent or recurring infections, cuts and bruises that are slow to heal, boils and itching skin and tingling and numbness in the hands or feet. However, many people who have Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure - A Silent Killer

High Blood Pressure - A Silent Killer

High Blood Pressure - A Silent Killer One in every three adults -- some 75 million people in the USA alone -- have high blood pressure. But many people are unaware that they have the condition. Untreated hypertension increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. These are the first and third commonest causes of death in the USA. Hypertension can also damage the kidneys and increase the risk of blindness and dementia. That is why hypertension is referred to as a "silent killer." Everyone is at risk from high blood pressure. However, the elderly tend to have a different hypertension profile compared with younger people, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), which is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). It is important to raise our collective consciousness of a particular type of high blood pressure known as isolated systolic hypertension (ISH). Systolic pressure is the first number in a blood pressure reading and is an indicator of blood pressure when the heart contracts. The second number, the diastolic pressure, reflects pressure when the heart relaxes between beats. In the past, many doctors diagnosed high blood pressure based on diastolic pressure, the smaller number. However, new research suggests that systolic pressure is a much better indicator of hypertension, particularly in the elderly. Diastolic pressure increases up to age 55 and then tends to decline, according to the NHLBI. On the other hand, systolic pressure continues to increase with age and is an important determinant of elevated blood pressure in middle-aged and older adults. While any pressure above 140/90 is considered elevated, about 65% of people with hypertension who are over age 60 have ISH. High blood pressure interacts with other major risk factors suc Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day: The Silent Killer

World Diabetes Day: The Silent Killer

This World Diabetes Day, let’s talk about the implication of Diabetes on Pregnant Women. Gestational diabetes is one of the common complications of pregnancy. More than a million cases occur in India every year. What is gestational diabetes? Any diabetes or raised blood sugar levels detected during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. The diabetes might or might not have existed before the pregnancy. It includes diabetes that might be controlled with diet alone or with insulin. What is the incidence of this complication of pregnancy? The incidence of this condition varies from 3.8% to 21% in various parts of India. Southern India has a higher incidence. Prevalence is more in urban areas in comparison to rural regions. Asian women, particularly ethnic Indians are at a higher risk of developing it. Why does it happen? During pregnancy your body produces several kinds of hormone. The placenta produces lactose and as a result the body’s cells utilize insulin less effectively. This condition is called insulin resistance. More insulin (as much as thrice the normal levels) is required. When body is unable to produce insulin as required, it’s unable to utilize glucose for energy. As a result the blood levels of sugar rise. What are the symptoms of gestational diabetes? In most women, there are no obvious symptoms, but the following might be present: Dry mouth with increased thirst Frequent urination, especially at night, Tiredness, Repeated infections, such as thrush (a yeast infection) Blurred vision. Risk factors for developing gestational diabetes? You may be more likely to get this disease if: Overweight before you got pregnant. Gain weight very quickly during your pregnancy. You have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetic (blood sugar le Continue reading >>

Detecting The Silent Killer - Understanding Diabetes

Detecting The Silent Killer - Understanding Diabetes

Diabetes, known officially as diabetes mellitus (DM), is a common but severe long-term metabolic disease. The World Health Organization’s 2014 data indicates that about 9% of the global adult population (age > 18) suffered from this disease and more than 1.5 million people died from complications caused by diabetes. Governments and private companies invest huge amounts of money into research to fight diabetes each year. Diabetes, known officially as diabetes mellitus (DM), is a common but severe long-term metabolic disease. The World Health Organization’s 2014 data indicates that about 9% of the global adult population (age > 18) suffered from this disease and more than 1.5 million people died from complications caused by diabetes. Governments and private companies invest huge amounts of money into research to fight diabetes each year. At the same time, improving education about the causes and symptoms of this disease is critical in preventing diabetes and performing early treatment to patients. Today, we will give an introduction about the basic knowledge of diabetes. Diabetes can refer to a group of chronic diseases that occur when there are increased levels of blood sugar over a prolonged period of time. In general, diabetes can develop when the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin, or when insulin cannot be properly processed by our cells. In either of these cases, the glucose in the blood will not be utilized efficiently. In addition, the resulting high blood glucose will cause a number of symptoms including frequent urination, increased thirst and hunger, and weight loss. The body can also switch to burning fatty acids rather than using glucose for energy. In this situation, the fatty acids are converted into ketone bodies through beta-oxidation to release e Continue reading >>

What Are The Most Telling Health Indicators That People Can Measure Themselves With Relative Ease?

What Are The Most Telling Health Indicators That People Can Measure Themselves With Relative Ease?

Short answer: just these metrics which you can measure by yourself after some practice if you're willing to invest about USD 100,- in a validated blood pressure monitor for a list of which see dabl Educational Trust|Monitors for Self-measurement of Blood Pressure (SBPM). Avoid those el cheapo unvalidated stuff, you wouldn't know what your measurements means so is a waste of money. -As you might know, high blood pressure, causing stroke, heart attacks, heart failure, kidney failure, even blindness if left untreated for a long time, we call the silent killer. That's why it is important to measure it (have it measured) properly say once a year, more frequent if it was higher than 140/90 mmHg especially if treated. -As long as your pulse rate isn't very high (resting > 100 bpm) or low (<50 bpm unless very fit) and not irregular of lesser importance to us docs although we always check for that, semi-automatic blood pressure monitors (which as a doc I don't use when seeing patients, too slow) display the pulse rate too. -Body weight in these modern days we mostly measure to see if someone was overweight, because that is linked to a higher risk of developing diabetes, high blood pressure, high serum lipids, cardiovascular disease, cancer. If you without meaning to lose weight it could point you to having some disease (hyperthyroidism, bowel disease, chronic inflammation, cancer). So these indeed are important metrics you can obtain by yourself. Other than this, it is important to take note of anything out of the ordinary, we fear most one losing blood from some natural orifice (anus, vagina, when coughing, vomiting blood, less so for nose bleeds), or developing a bleeding tendency, changes in bowel habits (like developing diarrhea, or getting constipated) could also point to s Continue reading >>

Diabetes, The Silent Killer

Diabetes, The Silent Killer

Before being diagnosed with diabetes, persons often live without recognizing the symptoms as problematic and because of that, they can suffer for a long period of time. When the body does not process food efficiently for use as energy, the condition is called diabetes. After we eat, the food is turned into sugar or glucose for our bodies to use as energy. The pancreas makes insulin to help the body get glucose into our cells. However, sometimes the body can't make enough insulin and that causes sugars to build up in your blood. Types of Diabetes There are two types of Diabetes, Type 1 is usually diagnosed in children and young adults and Type 2 which is the most common form. Type 1 Diabetes Previously known as juvenile diabetes, this illness is characterized by the body not producing enough insulin. Type 1 diabetes accounts for approximately 5-10% of all cases. Around 1.25 million Americans have it, and it's estimated that 40,000 people are diagnosed annually. Type 2 Diabetes Accounting for 90-95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, Type 2 diabetes has many risk factors/reasons for development. A family history of diabetes, obesity, race/ethnicity and age are a few of the associated risk factors. Black people are 1.7 times more likely to develop diabetes and they are 27% more likely to die from the disease than white/caucasian persons. Native Americans, Latinx and Asians also have a higher risk for diabetes than white Americans. Treatment Type 1 diabetes is treated by taking insulin shots while Type 2 diabetes is treated by frequent exercise and healthy eating or diet control and medication. How to recognize if you have diabetes Knowing the symptoms of diabetes and being familiar with them is a kind of safeguard against the silent killer; the sooner you recognize the sy Continue reading >>

Diabetes—“the Silent Killer”

Diabetes—“the Silent Killer”

WHEN he was 21 years old, Ken developed a puzzling, unquenchable thirst. He also had to urinate frequently—eventually about every 20 minutes. Soon Ken’s limbs began to feel heavy. He was chronically tired, and his vision became blurry. The turning point came when Ken caught a virus. A visit to the doctor confirmed that Ken had more than the flu—he also had Type 1 diabetes mellitus—diabetes, for short. This chemical disorder disrupts the body’s ability to utilize certain nutrients, primarily a blood sugar called glucose. Ken spent six weeks in the hospital before his blood-sugar level stabilized. That was more than 50 years ago, and treatment has improved considerably during the past half century. Nevertheless, Ken still suffers from diabetes, and he is not alone. It is estimated that worldwide, more than 140 million people have the disorder, and according to the World Health Organization, that number could double by the year 2025. Understandably, experts are concerned about the prevalence of diabetes. “With the numbers we’re starting to see,” says Dr. Robin S. Goland, codirector of a treatment center in the United States, “this could be the beginning of an epidemic.” Consider these brief reports from around the world. AUSTRALIA: According to Australia’s International Diabetes Institute, “diabetes presents one of the most challenging health problems for the 21st century.” INDIA: At least 30 million people have diabetes. “We hardly had any patients under 40 about 15 years ago,” says one doctor. “Today every other person is from this age group.” SINGAPORE: Nearly a third of the population between 30 and 69 years of age have diabetes. Many children—some as young as ten—have been diagnosed. UNITED STATES: Approximately 16 million people Continue reading >>

Why Is Hypertension Considered A Silent Killer?

Why Is Hypertension Considered A Silent Killer?

Essential hypertension, by its definition, is high blood pressure, which has no cause. Although likely caused by a collaboration of genetic and environmental factors, the real cause is not clear. Around 90% of people diagnosed with hypertension are essential hypertension cases. Essential hypertension not only has no cause, but also, more strangely, has very few symptoms. Consistent blood pressure readings starting at 120/80 are signs of hypertension, and individuals with this blood pressure would rarely have any symptom related to the heightened blood pressure. Despite the lack of symptoms, hypertension is deadly. This is how it got its macabre nickname: 'The Silent Killer.' From: Page on quickmedical.com Continue reading >>

Fighting Diabetes, The ‘silent Killer’

Fighting Diabetes, The ‘silent Killer’

(CBS) — Every year, another 1.5 million people are diagnosed with diabetes. Lifestyle changes and medication can help control the disease and prolong lives, but a new study finds many people delay treatment. “It’s a secret killer. It’s scary.” And that’s why Mark Pence was floored when he found out he had diabetes three years ago, after his brother-in-law — who’s diabetic — jokingly asked to check his blood sugar. “It was like out of the ballpark. I had no symptoms. I felt fine. Then I went to my doctor and he said yes, you are a Type Two diabetic,” Pence says. He adds: “It was a pretty big shock because I exercise a lot. I eat fairly well. I’m not a sugar freak or anything like that.” It’s a big shock for many patients, according to Northwestern’s Dr. Amisha Wallia. That, combined with misconceptions about diabetes and fear of needles and injections, can prompt some patients to delay treatment. A recent study found three in 10 adults with Type 2 diabetes put off insulin treatments, for about two years. “That two-year delay can be very significant, so high blood sugars in the immediate period can cause increase in infection, can acutely cause blurry vision, and long-term can worsen kidney disease as well as eye disease,” Wallia says. Dr. Wallia adds it’s hard to reverse course once the complications occur. “Prevention is always the key.” That’s exactly what Pence did, and through changes in his lifestyle and eating habits, he lost 15 pounds. As of this summer, he lowered his blood sugar enough to be considered pre-diabetic. “I’ve got to keep vigilant,” Pence says. Both Pence and Dr. Wallia say awareness is key to fighting diabetes, and that’s why they’ll join CBS 2 and hundreds of others for the Step Out Walk to Stop Continue reading >>

Diabetes The “silent” Killer

Diabetes The “silent” Killer

DIABETES is a preventable disease because it is a result of how people live and the choices they make rather than something passed on. Yesterday, Nov 14, was the day chosen by the World Health Organisation and the International Diabetes Federation as World Diabetes Day (WDD). President of the Papua New Guinea Diabetes Association, (PNG DA) Dr Lutty Amos said that WDD was the largest diabetes campaign throughout the world, commemorated annually by the 151 countries that are registered under the International Diabetic Federation (IDF). It was a chance to draw global attention to the threat posed by a disease which continues to have a devastating impact on the health of the Pacific island nations. To that end, Port Moresby General Hospital diabetes clinic head Dr Steven Bogosia said the disease is a serious complex condition which can affect the entire body requires daily self care and if complications develop, the disease can have a significant impact on quality of life and can reduce life expectancy. While there is currently no cure for diabetes, a person can live an enjoyable life by learning about the condition and effectively managing it. But Dr Bogosia said the regular medical check-ups and screening could help detect the on set of the disease and allow the individual to take steps to manage or avoid it altogether. Diabetes is a word heard so often in hospitals and on medical charts and it is safe to assume many educated Papua New Guineans are aware of the condition but Dr Bogosia described it as a “silent” disease. He stressed the need for people to have medical check-ups regularly but in a country where health care is not always readily available or affordable for many Papua New Guineans that might be a tall order. So what can people do to prevent developing di Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is Still A Silent Killer - Most People Diagnosed Did Not Recognise Early Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Is Still A Silent Killer - Most People Diagnosed Did Not Recognise Early Symptoms

Just over half (56 per cent) of people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes last year did not even suspect they could have the condition, as they failed to identify its early symptoms, says a new report by Diabetes UK. Late diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes leaves people at risk of developing the serious complications of the condition, including stroke, heart disease, blindness, kidney disease and amputation - half of the people with the condition already show signs of complications by the time they are diagnosed. Most only diagnosed 'by accident' In addition, the majority of people were diagnosed with the condition 'by accident' while undergoing routine medical tests or while being treated for other conditions or medical issues: only 16 per cent of people were diagnosed after they proactively asked for a diabetes test. Up to half a million unaware of their diabetes Diabetes UK estimates that there are up to 500,000 people in the UK who have diabetes but are not aware of it. Be aware of the risk and ask for a test “We need to make sure that people are aware of the risk factors and symptoms of Type 2 diabetes and we need to encourage them to ask for a diabetes test if they are at risk of developing the condition," said Douglas Smallwood, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK. Early diagnosis helps prevent complications “Diabetes awareness is key if we want to prevent people from facing a future of ill health: being diagnosed early means that you are less likely to develop the serious complications of diabetes. Making diabetes a high Government priority "We already know that more and more people are developing the condition in the UK and therefore we urge the Government to keep diabetes and diabetes awareness at the top of the health agenda. Diabetes UK leads the way "Diabetes UK will Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: The Silent Killer

Type 2 Diabetes: The Silent Killer

Are you one of the 1 in 4 living with this silent killer inside and do not even realize? In a culture hijacked by sugar, the average American consumes 85 grams a day! That’s 170 pounds a year! Thus, making Type 2 Diabetes on the rise. But refined sugar is not the only culprit. Carbohydrates and starches in everyday foods also account for sugars in our bloodstream. Therefore the American Heart Association recommends daily sugar allowances. The maximum daily consumption of added sugar to your diet should not exceed 25 grams for women and 36 grams for men. Why is this a concern? Your Health According to a report released in 2014 by the CDC, more than 29 million adults in the U.S. have diabetes. And 1 in 4 is not even aware they have the disease. More alarming is that another 86 million adult Americans have Pre-diabetes. If left unattended it can develop into full-blown Type 2 Diabetes in as early as six months. And these numbers are expected to have increased significantly in the past three years. The Silent Killer Diabetes, called the “Silent Killer” because many people do not recognize signs or symptoms until it’s in the advanced stages. Common symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes include: Increased Thirst Frequent Urination Extreme Fatigue Blurry Vision Tingling, pain, or numbness in the hands and feet Meanwhile, 56% of people diagnosed with pre-diabetes ignore the diagnosis. And within six months develop full-blown advanced Type 2 Diabetes. But left unattended diabetes can cause serious, even life-threatening complications. Some of the complications include: Skin Conditions Hearing Impairment Severe Nerve Damage Kidney Damage (resulting in kidney failure) Cardiovascular Disease (resulting in heart attack or stroke) Eye Damage (resulting in blindness) Poor Blood Circulat Continue reading >>

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