diabetestalk.net

Why Has Diabetes Become An Epidemic

An American Epidemic

An American Epidemic

ON February 10th thousands of people crowded into a diabetes exhibit in Denver. They waited in lines to test the newest blood sugar meters. Matt Hoover, a star of the small screen, spoke about how he lost 157lb (71kg) and gained a wife. Representatives dispensed gewgaws. “It's an insulated bag,” explained one, “So if you've got a hot chicken...” No one had a hot chicken, though. The diabetic diet can be a Spartan affair. Over at the “Cooking Cardiologist” presentation, a dietician announced that people with diabetes should feel free to enjoy raisins—just not too many raisins. Not so many years ago such a scene would have been strange. Colorado is the kind of healthy, outdoorsy state where everyone seems to have a big dog and SUVs are splattered with mud. It has the lowest rate of obesity in the nation, and not coincidentally, about the lowest rate of diabetes. Just under 5% of Coloradans have been diagnosed with the disease. But that is not all that low. And the fact that it is one of the lowest in the country suggests the extent of the diabetes epidemic in America. The disease has become more than twice as common since 1980, and the rate is rising precipitously. According to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, 7% of Americans, roughly 21m people, have diabetes. At least 54m Americans have elevated blood sugar levels and are at risk of developing the full-blown disease. Rates are considerably higher among American Indians, African-Americans and Latinos. The economic costs of the disease were conservatively estimated at $132 billion in 2002, and the figure is rising. “If you look forward 10 or 15 years,” says Dr C. Ronald Kahn of the Joslin Diabetes Centre in Boston, “we really won't be able to afford the amount of health care this is goin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Has Become An Epidemic In The United States

Diabetes Has Become An Epidemic In The United States

In honor of November being national diabetes month, I thought I would share a little information on diabetes and help bring awareness to the disease. Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood sugar, or blood glucose, is too high. Glucose is a type of sugar that you get from the food you consume. Your body uses glucose as its main source of energy. The glucose that travels through your bloodstream to your cells is called blood glucose or blood sugar. The hormone insulin, which is made in the pancreas, moves glucose from your blood into the cells for energy and storage. Issues arise when the body does not make enough, make any insulin, or does not properly use the insulin, ultimately causing glucose to stay in the blood and not reach the cells. There are several types of diabetes, the most common being type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Individuals with type 1 diabetes are unable to make insulin. In a previous post (here) I discussed that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. With type 1 diabetes the immune system attacks and destroys the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed during childhood or adolescents. Individuals with type 2 diabetes do not make or use insulin properly. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can occur at any age but is more common among middle aged and older individuals. There is an alarming increase in the amount of children being diagnosed due to the increase in childhood obesity. Let’s focus on type 2 diabetes. According to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) more than 29 million US adults have diabetes. Approximately 25% of those individuals do not know they have diabetes1. More than one third of Adults in the United States have pre-diabetes and approxim Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Epidemic

The Diabetes Epidemic

In the 1990s, the prevalence of diabetes took a sharp and unexpected upward turn, according to annual surveys of more than 100,000 participants conducted by scientists at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Their study, "Diabetes Trends in the U.S.: 1990-1998," appeared in the September 2000 issue of Diabetes Care . Related Articles 'Poisoning by sugar' and the 'safe for diabetics' foods myth Do 'heart healthy' diets cause diabetes? What is diabetes? The glycemic index: why everyone's talking about it Diabetes is a potentially devastating disease that tends to be taken less seriously than it should because its beginning symptoms may not be alarming. However, its slow progression can lead to recurrent infections and ulcerations, nerve damage, gangrene (which often results in amputations), blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and stroke. Individuals with diabetes have a reduced life expectancy. About 16 million Americans have diabetes, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases' latest estimates. As a result of the new research, that figure could increase by several million. Frightening statistics he study found that in eight years, the prevalence of diabetes among adults in the United States rose by 33 percent, from 4.9 percent in 1990 to 6.5 percent in 1998. Among Hispanics, it increased by 38 percent, going from 5.6 percent to 7.7 percent. Among African-Americans, it increased by 26 percent, going from 7.0 percent to 8.9 percent. These numbers are cause for concern. But by far the most worrying are those in the 30 to 39 age group. There, the prevalence increased by 70 percent, from 2.1 percent in 1990 to 3.7 percent in 1998. The youngest age group that the study considered, those 18 to 29, showed on Continue reading >>

Diabetes: America's Newest Health Epidemic (infographic)

Diabetes: America's Newest Health Epidemic (infographic)

As one of today’s fastest growing health challenges, diabetes has become increasingly prevalent in the United States. In fact, the number of Americans diagnosed with diabetes has risen from 10.4 million people in 1998 to 21 million people today, according to the CDC, and the number is expected to rise even more in the near future. The American Diabetes Association projects that one in three Americans living today will eventually develop diabetes, and that by 2050, the number of diagnoses will increase by 165 percent. As we recognize American Diabetes Month during November, let’s take a closer look at why more people are developing the disease and what our UnityPoint Clinic providers say we can do to reverse this trend. The Rise of Diabetes in the United States The number of people living with diabetes isn’t just up in the United States, but all over the world. While diabetes is now a problem that affects people everywhere, the CDC estimates that as many as 29.1 million Americans have diabetes (21 million who are diagnosed and another 8.1 million who are undiagnosed). This means that over 9 percent of the United States population has some form of diabetes. The rise in diabetes incidence across the United States is largely linked to the following three factors: More Americans are becoming overweight or obese and increasingly physically inactive – both known risk factors for diabetes. A person’s chances of developing diabetes increases with age. Now that the baby-boomer population is aging, more people from this generation are being diagnosed with the disease. Type 2 diabetes is especially common among African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans and certain Asian populations, which are all growing populations in the United States. Diabetes Complications Type 2 D Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Became An Epidemic

How Diabetes Became An Epidemic

It is estimated that almost 8 percent of Americans have some form of diabetes. What's even more worrying is that the number of people with diabetes is on the rise not just in the United States, but all over the world. Scientists have been working to find out why more people are developing diabetes and looking for strategies to help reverse this trend. Diabetes in the United States In the United States, diabetes has become increasingly prevalent in recent years. In 1980, 5.8 million people were diagnosed with diabetes, compared with 17.9 million today. Diabetes is expected to rise significantly in the near future. It is estimated that one in three Americans living today will eventually develop diabetes, and that the number of cases will increase in this country by 165 percent by 2050. Researchers believe that the following factors play a role in the increase: The baby-boomer population is aging, and your chances of developing diabetes increases with age. The Hispanic population is one of the fastest-growing segments of the United States population, and Hispanics are at increased risk of developing diabetes. Americans are becoming increasingly overweight and physically inactive, both known risk factors for diabetes. The Worldwide Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes is now a problem that affects people everywhere. There is evidence that 246 million people worldwide have diabetes. If current trends continue, this number is projected to reach 380 million within the next 20 years. Diabetes affects developed and developing countries alike. In fact, the largest increases in diabetes prevalence in the years to come are projected to take place in developing countries. According to the International Diabetes Federation, India currently has the highest concentration of people with diabetes, Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Biggest Epidemic In Human History

Diabetes: Biggest Epidemic In Human History

Remember back in history class, when they talked about the Great Diabetes Epidemic of 1665? Of course you don’t; there was never any such thing. Certainly, there have been many epidemics throughout history. These could be enormously destructive; killing millions, toppling empires, depopulating entire landscapes.1 But diabetes as a mass killer? That’s something new. But that is exactly where we are today. Epidemiologists are warning that the Great Diabetes Epidemic is upon us – right now. The result of the combination of obesity and type 2 diabetes (“diabesity”) is likely to be the biggest pandemic in human history.2 Perhaps the word “epidemic” sounds overly dramatic to some ears. But the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) explains that “epidemic” simply refers to an increase in the number of cases of a disease above what is normally expected in a population in a given area. Relatedly, “pandemic” refers to an epidemic that has spread over several countries or continents, usually affecting a large number of people.3 And so CDC refers quite specifically to the diabetes “epidemic” that currently affects almost 30 million Americans, which is forecast to rise to nearly 55 million people over the next decade.4, 5 This chart illustrates the growth in diabetes in the U.S. through the year 2030: Regarding the spread to other countries, the World Health Organization estimates that the number of people with diabetes grew by nearly 300% from 1980 to 2014, to 422 million worldwide.6 That number is also predicted to rise, to 642 million people living with diabetes worldwide by 2040.7 Altogether, taking into account both the number of people it will affect, and what it will cost to treat, one researcher has gone so far as to predict that type 2 diabetes is on t Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Became A Global Epidemic

How Diabetes Became A Global Epidemic

The rate of type two diabetes continues to rise around the world, and many experts agree that it has become a global health crisis. Worldwide, the rate of diabetes increased by about 8 percent in men and nearly 10 percent in women from 1980 to 2008, according to a 2011 study published in the journal Lancet. The study, which tracked diabetes trends in 200 countries over the past three decades, found that nearly one in ten adults worldwide have some form of diabetes. The primary causes of this preventable disease are related to a poor diet and lack of exercise. Educating the world population on the importance of a healthy lifestyle is the best way to avert this public health crisis. Preventative care is the easiest way to keep individuals, families and communities healthy and active. Global Rise in Diabetes Diabetes is the condition in which the body does not properly process food for use as energy, and it manifests in the body in two ways, according to the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Type one diabetes is an autoimmune disease that begins in childhood and requires an individual to take insulin. Type two diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed diabetes cases, according to the CDC and is controlled by insulin, pills and in some cases by weight loss and exercise. Type two diabetes usually comes on after the age of 25. According to the results of the Lancet study the disease is most common in the islands of the South Pacific, Saudi Arabia, China, and India. Among high-income countries the rise in the US is the steepest. The study found that between 1980 and 2008, the number of diabetics more than doubled from 153 million to 347 million. About 30 percent of that increase came from a rise in disease across all age groups. About 30 percent cam Continue reading >>

Diabetes Has Stealthily Become An Epidemic

Diabetes Has Stealthily Become An Epidemic

William Herman has spent decades researching diabetes, treating patients grappling with complications and trying to educate people on prevention. During those same years, he also has seen the prevalence of the disease grow virtually unabated. “It really is an epidemic, both in the U.S. and globally,” said Herman, director of the University of Michigan’s Center for Diabetes Translational Research and a consultant to the World Health Organization. The statistics are staggering. More than 29 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have diabetes — but a quarter of them don’t yet realize it, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An additional 86 million Americans have pre-diabetes, which is marked by higher-than-normal blood-sugar levels and puts them at an elevated risk of developing diabetes. The WHO estimates that nearly 350 million people worldwide have the condition. Year after year, diabetes exacts a massive human and economic toll. Those who have it are at a higher risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and blindness, and of losing toes, feet and legs to amputation. “The costs of diabetes are enormous, and they are growing,” Herman said. “People with diabetes account for a substantial portion of the total cost of health care in the United States.” Medical expenses tend to be twice as high, on average, for people with diabetes than for those without the disease. The American Diabetes Association estimates that treating patients with the disease accounts for more than $1 of every $5 spent on health care in the United States. “It has affected all segments of the population,” said Edward Gregg, chief of the epidemiology and statistics branch of the CDC’s diabetes division. “But it hasn’t affected Continue reading >>

Diabetes Has Become A Full-blown Epidemic

Diabetes Has Become A Full-blown Epidemic

Diabetes is a major public health problem -- an epidemic -- in the United States. One out of 10 people over the age of 20 now has diabetes -- primarily Type 2 or "adult onset" diabetes -- and the disease is rapidly increasing. This increase has been particularly striking in the several Southeastern states comprising what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls the "Diabetes Belt." In Kentucky, for example, one out of eight people now has the disease, a frightening fact. Even more frightening is the fact that 25 percent of those with diabetes do not know they have the disease! If this epidemic is not interrupted, by 2050 about one out of three people in this country will have diabetes. For minorities, that figure will be closer to one out of two. Diabetes itself poses a significant health problem, but the real burden of the disease is its complications. These complications are BAD: Blindness, Amputations and Dialysis. The high blood sugar levels characteristic of diabetes, plus the effects of high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol levels, damage both small and large blood vessels. Over time, those with diabetes frequently go blind, have a toe or foot amputated, lose the functioning of their kidneys and then frequently die of a stroke or heart attack. The cost of diabetes is staggering. In 2025, the annual direct and indirect cost of diabetes to the country is projected to exceed $500 billion. Here's what we need to do about this epidemic. First, we need to focus on primary prevention of the disease, and that means stressing proper nutrition and regular exercise. Early childhood is the time to begin good dietary habits, and the conscious selection of food for school snacks and lunches provides an excellent opportunity for establishing these habits. With Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Became An Epidemic – T2d 10

How Diabetes Became An Epidemic – T2d 10

The World Health Organizations earlier this week released new statistics on the global epidemic of diabetes. Diabetes mellitus has been recognized as a disease throughout human history for thousands of years. The ancient Egyptian medical text Ebers Papyrus, written around 1550 B.C. first described this condition of ‘passing too much urine’. Around the same time, ancient Hindu writings note the disease of madhumeha, loosely translated as honey urine. Patients were mysteriously wasting away, but curiously, ants were attracted to their urine. By 250 B.C. Greek physician Apollonius of Memphis (I should start referring to myself as Jason of Toronto, so cool…) termed the condition ‘diabetes’ which, by itself connotes excessive urination. Thomas Willis added the term ‘mellitus’ meaning ‘from honey’ in 1675. Another much rarer form of diabetes was termed diabetes insipidus, meaning ‘bland’. This disorder is also characterized by excessive urination, but the urine is not sweet. The primary cause of diabetes insipidus is brain injury, most commonly from trauma or neurosurgery. Commonly, the term diabetes refers to diabetes mellitus. We will also use the term diabetes to mean diabetes mellitus. A more complete description of diabetes mellitus would wait until the 1st century AD when Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappacdocia wrote the classic description of type 1 diabetes as a “melting down of flesh and limbs into urine”. This captures the essence features of this disease in its untreated form. There is excessive urine, but also complete wasting away of all tissues. Patients cannot gain weight no matter what they eat. He further comments that “life (with diabetes) is short, disgusting and painful” as there was no effective treatment. Lovely. The classic Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Epidemic

Diabetes: The Epidemic

On Barbara Young's office table is a graph. A bar chart, actually: four columns of green, purple, red and bright blue showing the progression, in England, of rates of coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes over the past five years. The first two are flatlining or falling. Cancer, in red, is rising, but slowly. Trace a line between the blue bars from 2005 to 2010, and it soars off the chart. "Diabetes," says Young flatly, "is becoming a crisis. The crisis. It's big, it's scary, it's growing and it's very, very expensive. It's clearly an epidemic, and it could bring the health service to its knees. Something really does need to happen." Baroness Young is, admittedly, the chief executive of Diabetes UK, Britain's main diabetes charity and campaigning group. It's her job to say such things. But the figures are behind her all the way: diabetes is fast becoming the 21st century's major public-health concern. The condition is now nearly four times as common as all forms of cancer combined, and causes more deaths than breast and prostate cancer combined. Some 2.8m people in the UK have been diagnosed with it; an estimated 850,000 more probably have type 2 diabetes but don't yet know. Another 7m are classified as high-risk of developing type 2; between 40% and 50% of them will go on to develop it. By the year 2025, more than 5m people in this country will have diabetes. The implications for the NHS, obviously, don't bear thinking about. Diabetes already costs the service around £1m an hour, roughly 10% of its entire budget. That's not just because the condition generally has to be managed with medication or insulin, but because by the time they are diagnosed, around half the people with type 2 – by far the most common and fastest growing form – have developed a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Becoming A Childhood Epidemic | Miami Herald

Type 2 Diabetes Becoming A Childhood Epidemic | Miami Herald

Before, the only people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes were older adults. However, times have changed. In the past 20 years, new cases of Type 2 diabetes in childhood have increased from less than 5 percent to more than 20 percent of all new diagnoses. What is causing this disturbing trend? What is Type 2 diabetes, and how can we protect our children from this disease? Type 2 diabetes is the form of diabetes in which the body is resistant to the action of insulin. Insulin levels rise, and when the body can no longer make enough insulin, blood sugars rise. This is different from Type 1 diabetes, in which the body stops making insulin. Although Type 1 diabetes is still more common among children, Type 2 diabetes — previously called adult onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes — is becoming more common among adolescents and even younger children. Type 2 diabetes occurs in children as young as 6, and is increasing at an alarming rate, primarily due to the epidemic of obesity in children and adolescents. Type 2 diabetes is also more common among some ethnic groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, Asians and Native Americans. Another risk factor is a family history of Type 2 diabetes or if diabetes occurred in the mother during pregnancy. Never miss a local story. Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access. SUBSCRIBE NOW There are a number signs parents should watch for if they suspect their child has diabetes, including: ▪ Frequent urination or new bed-wetting. ▪ Increased thirst and appetite. ▪ Decreased energy. ▪ Unexplained weight loss. ▪ Genital yeast infection. Another sign that your child is at risk for Type 2 diabetes is the appearance of darker and thicker skin on your child’s neck or armpits, which may make skin app Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Becoming The Biggest Epidemic Of The Twenty-first Century?

Is Diabetes Becoming The Biggest Epidemic Of The Twenty-first Century?

Diabetes is a major public health problem that is approaching epidemic proportions globally. Worldwide, the prevalence of chronic, noncommunicable diseases is increasing at an alarming rate. About 18 million people die every year from cardiovascular disease, for which diabetes and hypertension are major predisposing factors. Today, more than 1.7 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese. In addition, at least 155 million children worldwide are overweight or obese. A diabetes epidemic is underway. According to an estimate of International Diabetes Federation comparative prevalence of Diabetes during 2007 is 8.0 % and likely to increase to 7.3% by 2025. Number of people with diabetes is 246 million (with 46% of all those affected in the 40–59 age group) and likely to increase to 380 m by 2025. The comparative prevalence of IGT is 7.5% in 2007 and likely to go up to 6.0 by 2025. The number of people with IGT is 308 million in 2007 and likely to be 418 m by 2025. (1) Almost 80% of the total adult diabetics are in developing countries. The regions with the highest rates are the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, where 9.2 % of the adult population is affected, and North America (8.4%). The highest numbers, however, are found in the Western Pacific, where some 67 million people have Diabetes, followed by Europe with 53 million. India leads the global top ten in terms of the highest number of people with diabetes with a current figure of 40.9 million, followed by China with 39.8 million. Behind them come USA; Russia; Germany; Japan; Pakistan; Brazil; Mexico and Egypt. Two major concerns are that much of this increase in Diabetes will occur in developing countries and that there is a growing incidence of Type 2 Diabetes at a younger age in Continue reading >>

A Growing Problem – The Global Epidemic Of Diabetes

A Growing Problem – The Global Epidemic Of Diabetes

In 1916, Elliott Joslin, MD, published the first edition of “The Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus,” and he would become one of the leading voices on the disease and treatment. Now, 100 years later, the disease has reached epidemic status as the global population rapidly approaches 500 million diabetics, a startling increase from 108 million cases in 1980. – Type 2 diabetes is not only impacting more individuals annually; it is also creating a serious financial burden. In 2012, in the US alone, $176 billion was spent treating diabetes. And it is estimated that in the US, 29 million people are diabetic and 87 million, one out every three adults, is at high-risk of developing the disease. Research has shown that diabetes knows no bounds — poor and affluent countries alike have shown steady increases in the prevalence of diabetes. The driving factor behind the growth in type 2 diabetes is excessive weight and obesity. When people are overweight, there is added pressure on their body to use insulin to control blood sugar levels, making it more likely to develop the disease. Vulnerable Populations and Diabetes While obesity is affecting everyone, it’s hitting vulnerable populations at an even higher rate. It has been well documented that high-quality, healthier foods are more expensive to purchase and more difficult to obtain. For low-income families, access to full-service grocery stores may be limited, making it both logistically challenging and expensive to purchase fresh foods. As a result, their diets may rely more on unhealthy foods — items packed with refined grains, added sugar, and saturated fat. Additionally, low-income families may have fewer opportunities for physical activity with not as many safe recreational areas or affordable organized sports. With Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Its Drivers: The Largest Epidemic In Human History?

Diabetes And Its Drivers: The Largest Epidemic In Human History?

Abstract The “Diabesity” epidemic (obesity and type 2 diabetes) is likely to be the biggest epidemic in human history. Diabetes has been seriously underrated as a global public health issue and the world can no longer ignore “the rise and rise” of type 2 diabetes. Currently, most of the national and global diabetes estimates come from the IDF Atlas. These estimates have significant limitations from a public health perspective. It is apparent that the IDF have consistently underestimated the global burden. More reliable estimates of the future burden of diabetes are urgently needed. To prevent type 2 diabetes, a better understanding of the drivers of the epidemic is needed. While for years, there has been comprehensive attention to the “traditional” risk factors for type 2 diabetes i.e., genes, lifestyle and behavioral change, the spotlight is turning to the impact of the intra-uterine environment and epigenetics on future risk in adult life. It highlights the urgency for discovering novel approaches to prevention focusing on maternal and child health. Diabetes risk through epigenetic changes can be transmitted inter-generationally thus creating a vicious cycle that will continue to feed the diabetes epidemic. History provides important lessons and there are lessons to learn from major catastrophic events such as the Dutch Winter Hunger and Chinese famines. The Chinese famine may have been the trigger for what may be viewed as a diabetes “avalanche” many decades later. The drivers of the epidemic are indeed genes and environment but they are now joined by deleterious early life events. Looking to the future there is the potential scenario of future new “hot spots” for type 2 diabetes in regions e.g., the Horn of Africa, now experiencing droughts and f Continue reading >>

More in diabetes