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Why Fructose Rather Than Glucose Is Used In Slimming Foods?

Sugar Explained

Sugar Explained

You've probably heard the terms fructose, glucose, lactose and sucrose before, and you may know that they're all types of sugar. But do you know how they differ from one another, or whether some are better for you than others? Use our handy guide to shed some light on the secrets of sugar... What are complex and simple carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are classified into two basic groups, complex and simple. Complex carbohydrates are composed of multiple simple sugars, joined together by chemical bonds. The more chains and branches of simple sugars, the more complex a carbohydrate is and in turn, the longer it takes to be broken down by the body and the less impact it has on blood sugar levels. Examples of complex carbohydrates include wholegrains such as jumbo oats, brown rice, spelt, rye and barley. Simple carbohydrates are either monosaccharides (one sugar molecule) or disaccharides (two sugar molecules). They are digested quickly and release sugars rapidly into the bloodstream. The two main monosaccharides are glucose and fructose. The two major disaccharides are sucrose (composed of glucose and fructose) and lactose (which is made up of galactose and glucose). Glucose What is glucose? Glucose is the primary source of energy your body uses and every cell relies on it to function. When we talk about blood sugar we are referring to glucose in the blood. When we eat carbohydrates, our body breaks them down into units of glucose. When blood glucose levels rise, cells in the pancreas release insulin, signalling cells to take up glucose from the blood. As the cells absorb sugar from the blood, levels start to drop. The nutritional profile of glucose The glycemic index is a ranking of how quickly foods make your blood sugar levels rise after eating them. High GI foods are very Continue reading >>

All Sugars Aren't The Same: Glucose Is Better, Study Says

All Sugars Aren't The Same: Glucose Is Better, Study Says

Correction Appended: April 21, 2009 Think that all sugars are the same? They may all taste sweet to the tongue, but it turns out your body can tell the difference between glucose, fructose and sucrose, and that one of these sugars is worse for your health than the others. In the first detailed analysis comparing how our systems respond to glucose (which is made when the body breaks down starches such as carbohydrates) and fructose, (the type of sugar found naturally in fruits), researchers at the University of California Davis report in the Journal of Clinical Investigation that consuming too much fructose can actually put you at greater risk of developing heart disease and diabetes than ingesting similar amounts of glucose. In the study, 32 overweight or obese men and women were randomly assigned to drink 25% of their daily energy requirements in either fructose- or glucose-sweetened drinks. The researchers took pains to eliminate as many intruding factors as possible by asking the volunteers to commit to a 12-week program; for the first and last two weeks of the study, each subject lived at UCD's Clinical and Translational Science Center, where they underwent rigorous blood tests to determine their insulin and lipid levels, among other metabolic measures. (Take a quiz on eating smart.) Both groups gained similar amounts of weight by the end of the 12 weeks, but only the people drinking fructose-sweetened beverages with each meal showed signs of unhealthy changes in their liver function and fat deposits. In this group, the liver churned out more fat, while the subjects consuming similar amounts of glucose-sweetened drinks showed no such change. The fructose-drinking volunteers also were not as sensitive to insulin, the hormone released by the pancreas to capture and br Continue reading >>

Foods | Free Full-text | How Can Diet Affect The Accumulation Of Advanced Glycation End-products In The Human Body? | Html

Foods | Free Full-text | How Can Diet Affect The Accumulation Of Advanced Glycation End-products In The Human Body? | Html

Foods 2016, 5(4), 84; doi: 10.3390/foods5040084 How Can Diet Affect the Accumulation of Advanced Glycation End-Products in the Human Body? Axel Guilbaud 1, Celine Niquet-Leridon 2, Eric Boulanger 1 and Frederic J. Tessier 1,* University Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, U995-LIRIC-Lille Inflammation Research International Center, F-59000 Lille, France UniLaSalle, EGEAL Unit, F-60026 Beauvais, France Received: 8 November 2016 / Accepted: 30 November 2016 / Published: 6 December 2016 The accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is associated with the complications of diabetes, kidney disease, metabolic disorders and degenerative diseases. It is recognized that the pool of glycation products found in the human body comes not only from an endogenous formation, but also from a dietary exposure to exogenous AGEs. In recent years, the development of pharmacologically-active ingredients aimed at inhibiting endogenous glycation has not been successful. Since the accumulation of AGEs in the human body appears to be progressive throughout life, an early preventive action against glycation could be effective through dietary adjustments or supplementation with purified micronutrients. The present article provides an overview of current dietary strategies tested either in vitro, in vivo or both to reduce the endogenous formation of AGEs and to limit exposure to food AGEs. glycation; Maillard; advanced glycation end products; carboxymethyllysine; calorie restriction; fructose; probiotics; vitamins; diabetes; ageing Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are a complex group of molecules that have been found almost everywhere among tissues and organs of the human body [ 1 ]. Their concentration increases with age, but is also closely related to renal failure and diabetes [ 2 ]. W Continue reading >>

Differential Effects Of Fructose Versus Glucose On Brain And Appetitive Responses To Food Cues And Decisions For Food Rewards

Differential Effects Of Fructose Versus Glucose On Brain And Appetitive Responses To Food Cues And Decisions For Food Rewards

Differential effects of fructose versus glucose on brain and appetitive responses to food cues and decisions for food rewards cDiabetes and Obesity Research Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90089; and cDiabetes and Obesity Research Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90089; and cDiabetes and Obesity Research Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90089; and dNeuroscience Graduate Program, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90089 cDiabetes and Obesity Research Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90089; and dNeuroscience Graduate Program, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90089 1To whom correspondence should be addressed. Email: [email protected] . Edited by Todd F. Heatherton, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, and accepted by the Editorial Board April 8, 2015 (received for review February 18, 2015) Author contributions: S.L. and K.A.P. designed research; S.L. and K.S. performed research; S.L., J.R.M., and K.A.P. analyzed data; and S.L., J.R.M., and K.A.P. wrote the paper. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Fructose compared with glucose may be a weaker suppressor of appetite. Here we sought to determine the effects of fructose versus glucose on brain, hormone, and appetitive responses to food cues and food-approach behavior. We show that the ingestion of fructose compared with glucose resulted in smaller increases in plasma insulin levels and greater brain responses to food cues in the visual cortex and left orbital frontal cortex. Ingestion of fructose versus glucose also led to greater hunger and desire for food and Continue reading >>

Why Is Fructose Rather Than Glucose Used In Slimming Foods?

Why Is Fructose Rather Than Glucose Used In Slimming Foods?

Why is fructose rather than glucose used in slimming foods? Why is fructose rather than glucose used in slimming foods? Would you like to merge this question into it? already exists as an alternate of this question. Would you like to make it the primary and merge this question into it? Answers.com is making the world better one answer at a time. it tastes sweeter and has less calories than glucose it tastes sweeter and has less calories than glucose Answer . its sweeter then sucrose (regular sugar) so you get the same sweetness for a smaller amout there for less calories Fructose and glucose are both monosacharides. Sucrose is a disaccharide containing fru-glu. Both are sweet, but fructose tastes sweeter per mole. I believe 2 times greater. Which is why glucose from corn starch is enzymatically converted to fructose in the production of high fructose corn syrup and sweeteners. The product will give more sweetness. The lower amount of sugar you need in your food and beverages to satisfy your sweet taste, the better. Cheaper and less calories. The reason why. Your tongue has sweet receptors. Fructose has a more optimal structure for binding affinity to the receptor. Which then elicits a neural response; impulse travels to brain telling you it is sweet and how sweet. Other compounds, non-sugars can also bind to the receptor. e.g. Aspartame (derived from the amino acid asparagine), and some proteins. They are non- to low caloric and low tooth decay. depends, are you using glucose tablets?. depends, are you using glucose tablets, what kinda yeast? breads . crackers . brownies . cookies . figs . pineapple . apples . raisins these are just a few Fructose is a highly concentrated type of sugar. It is sweeter thanglucose becomes it comes from fruits and glucose is more of asimp Continue reading >>

Your Brain Responds Differently To Fructose Than Glucose And Causes You To Want To Eat

Your Brain Responds Differently To Fructose Than Glucose And Causes You To Want To Eat

Your Brain Responds Differently To Fructose Than Glucose And Causes You To Want To Eat Not all sugars are the same. According to research presented today at the annual meeting of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, your brain responds differently to two types of sugar. Fructose amplifies the reward circuits in your brain, causing you to want to eat whenever you see a food cue, such as a commercial on TV. However, your brain responds to glucose in a less dramatic way and also causes an opposite effect: you feel sated (full), not hungry, when you see an image of food. Such opposite reactions can make all the difference in the world if you are battling obesity or wanting to lose weight. Technically, there are three types of simple sugar: glucose, fructose, and galactose, which is not usually added to commercially processed foods as it is not as sweet. Glucose is the bodys primary source of energy and is usually produced through the breakdown of complex carbohydrates. Foods high in glucose include dried fruits, fresh fruits, and to a lesser extent grains, beans, vegetables, and nuts. While the same foods, especially fruit, also contain fructose, this type of simple sugar is added to many processed foods in the form of high-fructose corn syrup. Scientific studies have shown that glucose reduces activity in the region of the brain known as the hypothalamus, whereas fructose does not. The hypothalamus controls hunger and thirst, among other metabolic processes. Compared to glucose, eating fructose also has been found to produce a smaller increase in satiety hormones. Finally, when fructose is delivered directly to the brains of rats they begin to feed, whereas given glucose in the same way, they act as if sated. For the current experiment, Dr. Kathleen Page at th Continue reading >>

Enzymes Flashcards | Quizlet

Enzymes Flashcards | Quizlet

The enzyme amylase is produced in the salivary glands, the pancreas and the small intestine. This enzyme catalyses the breakdown of starch into Protease enzymes are produced by the stomach, These enzymes catalyse the breakdown of proteins into amino acids in the stomach and the small intestine. Lipase enzymes are produced by the pancreas and These enzymes catalyse the breakdown of lipids (fats and oils) into fatty acids and glycerol in the small intestine. Protease is used to pre-digest proteins during the manufacture of baby foods Carbohydrase used to convert starch syrup, which is relatively cheap, into sugar syrup, which is more valuable - for example, as an ingredient in sports drinks Lipase used - together with protease - in biological detergents to break down - digest - the substances in stains into smaller, water soluble substances Isomerase used to convert glucose syrup into fructose syrup - fructose is sweeter than glucose, so it can be used in smaller amounts in slimming foods Different parts of the human digestive system help to break down molecules of fat so that they can be absorbed into the body. Continue reading >>

The Difference In How Fructose And Glucose Affect Your Body

The Difference In How Fructose And Glucose Affect Your Body

My regular readers know that I consider agave to be a BIG enemy to health and beauty- which is very high in fructose (up to 97% fructose). It truly irks me that sly marketing makes the general public think agave is a “healthy” sweetener, and that it continues to be used in “health” products purported to be better than regular baked or other goods, as well as in many restaurants. It is not. There is a myth that exists that fructose is a “healthy” sugar while glucose is bad stuff. In fact, in recent years, there has been a rise in sweeteners that contain this “healthy” sugar, such as the dreaded agave nectar. I sincerely hope that this information (please help spread it!) makes more people aware of the differences in sugar types, and makes more people know to avoid agave at all costs. S.O.S: Save Our Skin!!! Fructose Fructose is one type of sugar molecule. It occurs naturally in fresh fruits, giving them their sweetness. Because of this, many people consider fructose “natural,” and assume that all fructose products are healthier than other types of sugar. Likewise, fructose has a low glycemic index, meaning it has minimal impact on blood glucose levels. This has made it a popular sweetener with people on low-carbohydrate and low-glycemic diets, which aim to minimize blood glucose levels in order to minimize insulin release. But the glycemic index is not the sole determining factor in whether a sweetener is “healthy” or desirable to use. Because fructose is very sweet, fruit contains relatively small amounts, providing your body with just a little bit of the sugar, which is very easily handled. If people continued to eat fructose only in fruit and occasionally honey as our ancestors did, the body would easily process it without any problems. Unfortu Continue reading >>

High Consumption Of Fructose Rather Than Glucose Promotes A Diet-induced Obese Phenotype In Drosophila Melanogaster

High Consumption Of Fructose Rather Than Glucose Promotes A Diet-induced Obese Phenotype In Drosophila Melanogaster

Prykarpatian National University named after V. Stefanyk During the last 20 years, there has been a considerable scientific debate about the possible mechanisms of induction of metabolic disorders by reducing monosaccharides such as glucose or fructose. In this study, we report the metabolic rearrangement in response to consumption of these monosaccharides at concentrations ranging from 0.25% to 20% in a Drosophila model. Flies raised on high-glucose diet displayed delay in pupation and increased developmental mortality compared with fructose consumers. Both monosaccharides at high concentrations promoted an obese-like phenotype indicated by increased fly body mass, levels of uric acid, and circulating and stored carbohydrates and lipids; and decreased percentage of water in the body. However, flies raised on fructose showed lower levels of circulating glucose and higher concentrations of stored carbohydrates, lipids, and uric acid. The preferential induction of obesity caused by fructose in Drosophila was associated with increased food consumption and reduced mRNA levels of DILP2 and DILP5 in the brain of adult flies. Our data show that glucose and fructose differently affect carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in Drosophila in part by modulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling. Some reported similarities with effects observed in mammals make Drosophila as a useful model to study carbohydrate influence on metabolism and development of metabolic disorders. Do you want to read the rest of this article? ... The glycogen was converted into glucose by amyloglucosidase from Aspergillus niger (25C, 4 hours). For triglyceride (TAG) determination, flies were weighed, homogenized in 20 mM PBST (phosphate buffered saline containing 0.05% Triton X100), boiled and ce Continue reading >>

Why Fructose Rather Than Glucose Is Used In Slimming Foods?

Why Fructose Rather Than Glucose Is Used In Slimming Foods?

Why fructose rather than glucose is used in slimming foods? why is fructose better than glucose for slimming foods, is it because it is more sweeter? Both Fructose, Glucose, and Sucrose is bad for you. There is no such thing as slimming foods. There is 2 types of food. REAL FOOD and PROCESSED FOOD.... show more Both Fructose, Glucose, and Sucrose is bad for you. There is no such thing as slimming foods. There is 2 types of food. REAL FOOD and PROCESSED FOOD. Processed foods contain all 3 above and real foods contain Natural sugars that are metabolically healthy for you like galactose. That's a simple sugar and is good for you. So to answer your question in the long run neither one is going to do you a darn bit of good one makes you fat slowly and the other makes you fat faster. Might as well stick with good ol' healthy real foods(: Diabetes, also called diabetes mellitus, has become a very common heath problem. How to reverse diabetes naturally are two main... show more Diabetes, also called diabetes mellitus, has become a very common heath problem. How to reverse diabetes naturally There are two main types of diabetes- type 1 diabetes in which the body does not produce insulin and type 2 diabetes in which the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin that is produced does not work properly. Some of the common symptoms of diabetes include fatigue, weight loss (even though you are eating more), excessive thirst, increased urination, cut and bruises that are slow to heal and blurred vision. While there is no cure for diabetes, with your blood sugar level under control you can live a totally normal life. There are various natural remedies for diabetes that will help you control your blood sugar level. What is Fructose?Carbohydrates have been an important compone Continue reading >>

Hassaan's Biology Challenge

Hassaan's Biology Challenge

How are muscle cells adapted to release a lot of energy? Any two from:(contain) mitochondria, many (mitochondria), respiration (occurs in mitochondria) Which one of these is a chemical reaction that produces water in the body?: Breathing, osmosis, respiration, sweating If the body loses more water than it gains, it becomes dehydrated. The concentration of the solution surrounding the body cells increases. This causes the cells to lose water. By which process do cells lose water? Fructose syrup is much sweeter than glucose syrup. Why do manufacturers of slimming foods use fructose syrup rather than glucose syrup? Here are some of the properties of enzymes:they all work at atmospheric pressures, they are easily broken down by high temperature or the wrong pH,they are soluble in water, so it may be difficult to separate them from products, they are expensive to buy, they work well at 2545 C. Using only this information give two advantages of using enzymes in industry. They all work at atmospheric pressures they work well at 25-45C Here are some of the properties of enzymes: they all work at atmospheric pressures, they are easily broken down by high temperature or the wrong pH, they are soluble in water, so it may be difficult to separate them from products, they are expensive to buy, they work well at 2545 C. Using only this information give two disadvantages of using enzymes in industry. Any two from: they are easily broken down by high temperature or the wrong pH, they are soluble in water, so it may be difficult to separate them from products, they are expensive to buy If a tuna eats 1 kg of herring, it gains about 65 g in mass. Give two reasons why so little of the mass of the herring is converted into mass of the tuna. any two from: waste / excreted / urine / faeces Continue reading >>

High-fructose Corn Syrup

High-fructose Corn Syrup

"HFCS" redirects here. It is not to be confused with HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons) . Structural formulae of fructose (left) and glucose (right) High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) (also called glucose-fructose, isoglucose and glucose-fructose syrup [1] [2] ) is a sweetener made from corn starch that has been processed by glucose isomerase to convert some of its glucose into fructose . HFCS was first marketed in the early 1970s by the Clinton Corn Processing Company, together with the Japanese Agency of Industrial Science and Technology where the enzyme was discovered in 1965. [3] :5 As a sweetener, HFCS is often compared to granulated sugar , but manufacturing advantages of HFCS over sugar include that it is easier to handle and more cost-effective. [4] The United States Food and Drug Administration has determined that HFCS is a safe ingredient for food and beverage manufacturing. [5] There is debate over whether HFCS presents greater health risks than other sweeteners. [6] Uses and exports of HFCS from American producers have continued to grow during the early 21st century . [7] Apart from comparisons between HFCS and table sugar, there is some evidence that the overconsumption of added sugar in any form, including HFCS, is a major health problem, especially for onset of obesity . [4] [8] [9] Consuming added sugars, particularly as sweetened soft drinks , is strongly linked to weight gain. [4] [10] The World Health Organization has recommended that people limit their consumption of added sugars to 10% of calories, but experts say that typical consumption of empty calories in the United States is nearly twice that level. [10] In the U.S., HFCS is among the sweeteners that mostly replaced sucrose (table sugar) in the food industry. [11] Factors in the rise of HFCS use include p Continue reading >>

Enzymes In Industry

Enzymes In Industry

We have been using enzymes for thousands of years to make various drinks and things to eat, such as cheese, yoghurt, bread, beer, and wine. Of course the people who first discovered how to make these knew nothing about enzymes. In this unit we can see how these amazing biological catalysts are used in making these traditional foodstuffs, and also in making new products. Human beings have been making wine and beer for at least the past 8,000 years. No one knows for certain how the practice started, but it is possible that the first wine was made when squashed grapes became fermented and someone decided to taste the juice (and liked it!). Have you ever noticed the white 'bloom' on the skin of a grape? This is a natural form of a fungus called yeast. So leaving the grape juice around lets the Yeast is a fungus whose enzymes aid the breakdown of sugar (glucose) into alcohol (ethanol) and carbon dioxide in the absence of oxygen. It is used in the brewing and baking industries. yeast feed on the sugars in the juice and produce alcohol. The enzymes in yeast break down sugar (glucose) into alcohol (ethanol) and carbon dioxide gas: This reaction, which takes place in the absence of oxygen, is called fermentation. Fermentation is the breakdown of glucose (and other sugars) into alcohol (ethanol) and carbon dioxide by enzymes in yeast (in the absence of oxygen). Fermentation works best if the yeast and glucose solution are kept warm. That's why home brewers leave their fermenting mixtures in the airing cupboard. (Remember that enzymes work best at their optimum temperature, but become ineffective if the temperature gets too high.) We use the fermentation reaction to make all alcoholic drinks. However, stronger drinks, such as whisky or vodka, have to be distilled after fermentati Continue reading >>

Fructose

Fructose

Fructose is a natural simple sugar found in fruits, honey, and vegetables. In its pure form, fructose has been used as a sweetener since the mid 1850s and has advantages for certain groups, including people with diabetes and those trying to control their weight. Of course, fructose has been consumed for centuries in foods we still eat. It is known as a simple sugar because it is a single sweetening molecule. Fructose is also known as a monosaccharide. For more about fructose, visit FructoseFacts.org High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is also a sweetener and is used to sweeten foods and beverages. However, HFCS is not the same as fructose. HFCS is a mixture of fructose and glucose, made by an enzymatic process from glucose syrup from corn. The most common forms are HFCS-42 and HFCS-55, which contain 42% fructose (and 58% glucose) or 55% (and 45% glucose).Table sugar (sucrose) has 50% fructose (and 50% glucose) and so is very similar to HFCS. Misinformation about fructose recently appeared in the media. This misinformation alleges obesity and negative health consequences from the consumption of HFCS and fructose. Many incorrectly use the terms fructose and HFCS interchangeably, confusing the public as well as health and nutrition professionals. It is important to be aware of the differences between these sweeteners. Fructose is one of the main types of sugars found in fruits such as apples, in fruit juices, and in honey. It is also a component of sucrose (table sugar) in equal quantity to glucose to which it is linked. As with table sugar, fructose can be bought at the supermarket; both can be used in the same ways in home cooking and processing. Hence fructose is found also in processed foods such as desserts, dairy products, and preserves. An important difference is that Continue reading >>

Do Fructose And Fruit Make You Fat And Unhealthy?

Do Fructose And Fruit Make You Fat And Unhealthy?

Does regular fructose intake ruin insulin sensitivity, cause weight gain, and damage your metabolism? Many health gurus claim that fruit can cause horrible things in the body due to the sugar molecule it contains, known as fructose. I’ve known many people that were thoroughly convinced that they would get fatter if they ate any fruit (many of whom were already overweight, which is ironic), and that couldn’t believe I was able to stay in the single-digit body fat percentages eating over 100 grams of carbohydrate from fruit every day (apples, oranges, and bananas are my favorites). Some pretty heavy claims have been leveled at fructose in the “pop culture” of nutrition and diet. A popular crusader against it is Dr. Robert H. Lustig, whose talk entitled Sugar: The Bitter Truth currently has over 3.4 million views on YouTube. According to Lustig and others, fructose has special qualities that directly induce fat storage, and that make it toxic to the liver. But does the current scientific evidence support these positions? Is fructose, and fruit, bad for our health? What is Fructose Anyway, and What’s the Big Deal? Fructose is a simple carbohydrate that, together with glucose, makes up sucrose (table sugar). It’s found in many plant sources like honey, fruits, flowers, and root vegetables., and is one of the three basic forms of sugar that our body can use as fuel (the other two are glucose and galactose). Eating an abundance of refined sugars–fructose included–can definitely cause problems beyond just added calories. They have addictive properties normally found with drug abuse, and that can lead to cravings, bingeing, and withdrawal symptoms. Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is particularly bad, and has been associated with weight gain and o Continue reading >>

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