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Why Does Someone With Diabetes Have An Increased Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease?

Diabetes & Its Link To Heart Disease

Diabetes & Its Link To Heart Disease

Online Health Chat with Dr. Leslie Cho and Dr. Vinni Makin Introduction Cleveland_Clinic_Host: People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing heart disease at some point in their lives. It is important to control risk factors early on. Join cardiologist Leslie Cho, MD, and endocrinologist, Vinni Makin, MD,online for answers to your questions concerning the link between diabetes and heart disease. Leslie Cho, MD,is Director of Cleveland Clinic’s Women’s Cardiovascular Center. She is also Section Head,Preventive Cardiology and Rehabilitation in the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Cho is board-certified in interventional cardiology, cardiovascular medicine, and internal medicine. Her specialty interests focus on general cardiology, heart disease, and peripheral arterial and vascular disease and their attendant therapies and treatments. Dr. Cho specializes in heart disease in women. A graduate of the University Of Chicago Pritzker School Of Medicine, Dr. Cho completed her residency in internal medicine at University of Washington Medical Center. She completed cardiovascular medicine and interventional cardiology fellowships at Cleveland Clinic. Vinni Makin, MD, is an endocrinologist in Cleveland Clinic’s Endocrinology & Metabolism Institute. She is board certified in endocrinology and internal medicine, and her specialty interests include general endocrinology, diabetes, hirsutism, acne, and thyroid disorders. A graduate of Delhi University’s Lady Hardinge Medical College, Dr. Makin completed her residency in internal medicine at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County in Chicago. She completed her endocrinology fellowship at Cleveland Clinic. Cleveland_Clinic_Host: Welcome to our Online Health Continue reading >>

Review Article Coronary Artery Disease And Diabetes Mellitus

Review Article Coronary Artery Disease And Diabetes Mellitus

Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are closely related. DM is a risk factor for CAD, but it is also equivalent to established CAD. The prevalence of DM and CAD is growing primarily due to the rising prevalence of obesity. The rapidly changing life style, especially in developing countries, plays major role in the occurrence of these diseases. We performed a literature review to summarize and explore the relationship between CAD and DM with a special focus on Arab countries in terms of risk factors and prevalence. We suggest future directions to prevent escalation in the incidence of DM and CAD in Arab countries. An important part of any preventive program for CAD should include clear prevention strategies for DM and other associated metabolic risk factors, such as obesity. Preventive measures, such as physical exercise in high-risk groups, at the population level should be encouraged. Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of people age 65 or older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease; and 16% die of stroke. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes. The American Heart Association considers diabetes to be one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Why are people with diabetes at increased risk for CVD? Diabetes is treatable, but even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. That's because people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes, may have the following conditions that contribute to their risk for developing cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure (hypertension) High blood pressure has long been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Studies report a positive association between hypertension and insulin resistance. When patients have both hypertension and diabetes, which is a common combination, their risk for cardiovascular disease doubles. Abnormal cholesterol and high triglycerides Patients with diabetes often have unhealthy cholesterol levels including high LDL ("bad") cholesterol, low HDL ("good") cholesterol, and high triglycerides. This triad of poor lipid counts often occurs in patients with premature coronary heart disease. It is also characteristic of a lipid disorder associated with insulin resistance called atherogenic dyslipidemia, or diabetic dyslipidemia in those patients with diabetes. Learn more about cholesterol abnormalities as they relate to diabetes. Obesity Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And You

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And You

Diabetes is a common disease that is on the rise in America. Having diabetes raises your risk for developing other dangerous conditions, especially heart disease and stroke. November is National Diabetes Month, a time to raise awareness about preventing and managing diabetes and protecting yourself from its complications. Diabetes is a serious condition that happens when your body can’t make enough of a hormone called insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it has. Insulin helps your body digest sugars that come from what you eat and drink. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in your blood. Over time, that sugar buildup damages your nerves, blood vessels, heart, and kidneys. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, or about 1 of every 11 people. 1 About 8 million of them don’t know they have diabetes. Another 86 million—more than 1 in 3 Americans older than 20 years—have prediabetes, a condition in which a person’s blood sugar is high, but not yet high enough to trigger diabetes.2 Most people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Adults with type 2 diabetes are about twice as likely to die from heart disease as adults who do not have diabetes.3 Surprising Facts About Diabetes Women with diabetes have a 40% greater risk of developing heart disease and a 25% greater risk of stroke than men with diabetes do.5 Experts aren’t sure why the risk is so much greater in women with diabetes than in men with diabetes. Women’s biology may play a role: Women usually have more body fat, which can put them at greater risk for heart disease and stroke. If you are a woman with diabetes, you can take steps to control your condition and improve your chances for avoiding heart disease and stroke (see below). Almost 7 in 10 people with diabetes over age 65 will die o Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease In Type 2 Diabetes From Population To Man To Mechanisms

Cardiovascular Disease In Type 2 Diabetes From Population To Man To Mechanisms

Epidemic of diabetes, affecting about 3–5% of Western populations, is one of the main threats to human health in the 21st century (1). Changes in the human environment, behavior, and lifestyle have resulted in a dramatic increase in the incidence and prevalence of diabetes in people with genetic susceptibility to diabetes. The global number of people with diabetes was 151 million in 2000, and it is projected to increase to 221 million in 2010 (an increase of 46%) both in developed and developing countries (2). Chronic hyperglycemia leads to many long-term complications in the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart, and blood vessels. Individuals with pre-diabetes, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes, and long-lasting type 2 diabetes are at high risk of all complications of macrovascular disease, coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease. More than 70% of patients with type 2 diabetes die of cardiovascular causes (3). Therefore, the epidemic of type 2 diabetes will be followed by an epidemic of diabetes-related cardiovascular disease (CVD). Over the years, epidemiological studies have produced important information on the prevalence and incidence of diabetes complications in different populations. They have also given important information on different risk factors determining susceptibility to diabetes complications (Fig. 1). This information is crucial for mechanistic studies in physiology at the tissue level and for molecular biology studies at the cellular level. A good example is glycated hemoglobin. Several studies have indicated that glycated hemoglobin is associated with diabetes complications in prospective epidemiological studies. That information has been crucial for the planning of clinical trials to test the hypothesis that the treatment of chron Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease — An Intimate Connection

Diabetes And Heart Disease — An Intimate Connection

By By Om P. Ganda, M.D., Director, Lipid Clinic, Joslin Diabetes Center A strong link between diabetes and heart disease is now well established. Studies from Joslin Diabetes Center several years ago showed a two- to threefold increase in the incidence of heart disease in patients with diabetes compared with those without diabetes who were being followed in the Framingham Heart Study. Women with diabetes have an even greater risk of heart disease compared with those of similar age who do not have diabetes. In fact, cardiovascular disease leading to heart attack or stroke is by far the leading cause of death in both men and women with diabetes. Another major component of cardiovascular disease is poor circulation in the legs, which contributes to a greatly increased risk of foot ulcers and amputations. Several advances in the treatment of heart disease over the past two decades have improved the chances of surviving a heart attack or stroke. However, as the incidence of diabetes steadily increases, so has the number of new cases of heart disease and cardiovascular complications. Unfortunately, in patients with diabetes, improvement in survival has been less than half as much as in the general population. Why Is Heart Disease So Common in People With Diabetes? Diabetes by itself is now regarded as the strongest risk factor for heart disease; however, a variety of mechanisms—not solely blood glucose levels—most likely come into play. The blood vessels in patients with diabetes are more susceptible to other well-established risk factors, such as smoking, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and more than 90% of patients with diabetes have one or more of these additional risk factors. Some of the increased susceptibility to blood vessel damage that people with diabe Continue reading >>

Risk Factors

Risk Factors

90% of Australians have at least one risk factor for heart disease. The more risk factors for coronary heart disease you have, the greater your chance of developing it. The good news is that for most risk factors, you can do something about them. Risks you can control Smoking Cholesterol High Blood Pressure Being inactive Diabetes Being overweight Unhealthy diet Risks you can’t control Age: As you get older, your risk of heart disease increases. Gender: Men are at higher risk of heart disease. Women’s risk grows and may be equal to men after menopause. Ethnic background: People of some origins (e.g. from the Indian sub-continent) have higher risk. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have more risk because of lifestyle factors. Family history: If someone in your family has cardiovascular disease, speak to your doctor about your risk. SMOKING Smokers are almost twice as likely to have a heart attack compared with people who have never smoked. Stopping smoking is one of the best ways to prevent heart disease and it’s never too late to give up. How does smoking damage your heart? Smoking damages the lining of your arteries, leading to a build-up of fatty material (atheroma) which narrows the artery. This can cause angina, a heart attack or a stroke. The carbon monoxide in tobacco smoke reduces the amount of oxygen in your blood. This means your heart has to pump harder to supply the body with the oxygen it needs. The nicotine in cigarettes stimulates your body to produce adrenaline, which makes your heart beat faster and raises your blood pressure, making your heart work harder. Your blood is more likely to clot, which increases your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Second-hand smoke When non-smokers breathe in second-hand smoke – also known as pass Continue reading >>

Survey Reveals Most People Don’t Know Heart Disease Is The No. 1 Killer Of People With Type 2 Diabetes

Survey Reveals Most People Don’t Know Heart Disease Is The No. 1 Killer Of People With Type 2 Diabetes

Boehringer Ingelheim and Lilly launch For Your SweetHeart™, an educational campaign to help bridge knowledge gap and encourage people with type 2 diabetes to know their cardiovascular risk Physician and host of The Doctors, Dr. Travis Stork, joins the campaign to urge people with type 2 diabetes and their loved ones to take action by taking the Heart You Quiz PR Newswire – Ridgefield, Conn. and Indianapolis, November 22, 2016 — A new national survey of more than 1,500 adults, including 501 who have type 2 diabetes, finds that three out of four Americans and two out of every three people with type 2 diabetes don’t know that heart disease is the number one health-related killer of people with type 2 diabetes. The survey also finds more than half (52 percent) of adults with type 2 diabetes do not understand that they are at an increased risk for heart disease and related life-threatening events, such as heart attack, stroke or even death. To address this critical information gap, Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) are launching For Your SweetHeart™: Where diabetes and heart disease meet. The For Your SweetHeart campaign aims to raise awareness of the link between type 2 diabetes and heart disease and to encourage people with type 2 diabetes to know their risk and speak to their healthcare provider, for the sake of their health and the people they cherish the most. Reaching Millions of Hearts Across the Country Cardiovascular disease (which includes heart disease and other problems with the heart and blood vessels like heart attacks and strokes) causes approximately two-thirds of deaths in people with type 2 diabetes, making it the number one cause of death. But the good news is, the sooner people understand their risk, the sooner they can Continue reading >>

Preventing Cardiovascular Disease In Diabetic Patients

Preventing Cardiovascular Disease In Diabetic Patients

Heart disease is a major issue in the United States, responsible for every one in four deaths. It is the leading cause of death for both men and women, according to the Center for Disease Control. While that may seem like a bleak statistic, new research is constantly being done to better understand heart disease and how it can be treated. A key part of preventing heart disease is knowing the risk factors. Some of these risk factors include obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, and family history. Diabetes is also a large risk factor for heart disease. However, it is controllable. The American Heart Association views diabetes as one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Diabetes “The issue is patients with diabetes have a much higher risk of cardiovascular disease than a patient without diabetes,” explained Dr. Enrico Cagliero, Associate Physician at Massachusetts General Hospital. “It’s about a two-fold increase in risk.” According to the American Heart Association, adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than other patients. In addition, 68 percent of diabetic patients over the age of 65 die from some form of heart disease. “Patients with diabetes have double to triple the risk of heart attack, stroke, and heart failure.” said Dr. Cagliero, explaining what type of issues patients with diabetes face. Patients with diabetes often have other health issues that are associated with cardiovascular disease, such as high blood pressure, high triglyceride and cholesterol levels, and obesity. While these statistics may seem negative, diabetic patients should not lose hope. There are many things that patients can do to improve their chances at staying heart-healthy. New St Continue reading >>

Diabetes Increases Heart Attack Risk By 48%

Diabetes Increases Heart Attack Risk By 48%

"People with diabetes 48% more likely to suffer heart attack, researchers find," says The Guardian. Meanwhile, the Daily Mail reports that people with diabetes are "65% more likely to have heart failure than the rest of the population". Both stories are based on the most recent report of the National Diabetes Audit, which presents data from England and Wales on the complications that arise due to diabetes. Diabetes makes it difficult for the body to control blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels and lead to range of complications, such as: angina – chest pain that results from a temporary restriction of blood supply to the heart retinopathy – where the retina (the light-sensitive layer of tissue at the back of the eye) is damaged foot ulcers, which in the most serious cases, require a section of the foot or lower leg to be amputated People with type 1 diabetes can also experience a dangerous complication called diabetic ketoacidosis where the body breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. Left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis can be fatal. The National Diabetes Audit report highlights these complications, as well as deaths in people with diabetes. The audit confirms and quantifies these risks, and provides recommendations on how the NHS can benefit from addressing the complications of diabetes, and how this can improve the lives of people with diabetes. Who produced the report? The National Diabetes Audit is produced by the NHS Information Centre each year. It looks at diabetes care and outcomes throughout England and Wales. The portion of the report covered in the media specifically focuses on complications and deaths related to diabetes. The current report covers the eighth year of the audit, and is based on data from 2010-11. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: A Major Risk Factor For Cardiovascular Disease

Diabetes Mellitus: A Major Risk Factor For Cardiovascular Disease

Abundant evidence shows that patients with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes are at high risk for several cardiovascular disorders: coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, cardiomyopathy, and congestive heart failure. Cardiovascular complications are now the leading causes of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. The public health impact of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with diabetes is already enormous and is increasing. Several explanations are behind this increase. First, the incidence of diabetes rises with advancing age, and the number of older people in the United States is growing rapidly. Second, insulin treatment for persons with type 1 diabetes has prolonged their lives significantly, and with each year of additional life comes an increased risk for CVD complications. Third, type 2 diabetes occurs at an earlier age in obese and overweight persons, and the prevalence of obesity is rising in the United States. The risk for diabetes in overweight persons is heightened by physical inactivity; unfortunately, the majority of Americans engage in little regular or sustained physical activity. Fourth, the populations that are particularly susceptible to diabetes—African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Asians—are growing in this country. Fifth, improved medical care, particularly when extended to susceptible populations, will bring an increasing number of patients with type 2 diabetes into the medical care system. All of these factors will lead to an absolute increase in the number of patients who will require medical intervention to prevent the complications of diabetes. Diabetes has long been recognized to be an independent risk factor for CVD. Prospective studies, such as the Framingham, Honolulu Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes

The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes

Ways for Diabetics to Protect Their Heart Most people living with diabetes are aware that they have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. But the statistics can be truly staggering regarding heart disease and the diabetes. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over time, high blood glucose levels damage nerves and blood vessels, leading to complications such as heart disease and stroke, the leading causes of death among people with diabetes The Connection Between Heart Disease and Diabetes The connection between diabetes and heart disease starts with high blood sugar levels. With time, the high glucose in the bloodstream damages the arteries, causing them to become stiff and hard. Fatty material that builds up on the inside of these blood vessels can eventually block blood flow to the heart or brain, leading to heart attack or stroke. Your risk of heart disease with diabetes is further elevated if you also have a family history of cardiovascular disease or stroke. According to the National Institutes of Health, about 65 percent of people with diabetes actually die of heart disease or stroke, and a person with diabetes has twice the chance of developing heart disease as someone without diabetes. connection. DID YOU KNOW? A person with diabetes who has had one heart attack has a much greater risk of having another. A middle-aged person who has diabetes has the same chance of having a heart attack as someone who is not diabetic, but already had a heart attack. People with diabetes develop cardiovascular disease at a much earlier age than others. People with diabetes who have heart attacks are more apt to die as a result. People with diabetes have a higher-than-average risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Increase The Risk Of Heart Disease?

How Can Diabetes Increase The Risk Of Heart Disease?

Diabetes is a disease that affects blood vessels. While we hear about the blood vessels in the eyes or the feet more commonly in diabetes, all blood vessels are affected. Usually we see the effect on the small vessels, but we also see an effect on the large vessels of the heart. People with diabetes, independent of other problems, have more heart attacks. An adult diagnosed with diabetes has the same high cardiac risk as someone who has already had a heart attack. At least 65% of people with diabetes will die from some type of cardiovascular disease -- a death rate that is two to four times that of the general population. Diabetes can also cause chronic kidney disease, which, in turn, can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease even more. The relationship between diabetes and heart disease is clear, but the causes are complex. Over time, too much glucose in the blood damages nerves and blood vessels. This in turn can cause heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases. Damage to the arteries leading to the brain can result in stroke. In addition, damage to the blood vessels in the legs can result in poor circulation and increase the risk of foot ulcers and amputations, while damage to the blood vessels that supply blood to the kidneys can cause kidney failure. Damage to the small blood vessels in the eye can eventually cause blindness. High blood glucose levels do not fully explain the relationship between diabetes and cardiovascular disease. People with diabetes also tend to have low-level inflammation of the lining of the arteries, which can interfere with the proper function of the blood vessels and make them more susceptible to developing atherosclerotic plaque - buildup of a fatty substance that narrows the artery. In addition, with diabetes there is a greate Continue reading >>

Heart Disease & Stroke

Heart Disease & Stroke

People with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease and stroke, also known as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cerebrovascular disease. People with diabetes may develop heart disease 10 to 15 years earlier than individuals without diabetes. Coronary artery disease is the most common form of heart disease in diabetes. It develops when the arteries that supply the heart with blood become narrowed or blocked by fatty deposits. This process is often called “hardening of the arteries.” If the arteries that supply the brain are hardened , this may lead to a stroke. High blood glucose (sugar) is one risk factor for heart attack or stroke, but people with diabetes often have a number of other risk factors. These include being overweight (especially if they have excess fat around the waist), inactive lifestyles, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. People who smoke or have a family history of heart disease or stroke are at even higher risk. Reducing risk Protect your heart with our vascular protection self-assessment tool. The good news is that people with diabetes can lower their risk of heart disease and stroke considerably by paying careful attention to all of their risk factors. Working with your health-care team to achieve the following targets is the key to good diabetes management. Achieving and maintaining a healthy weight through regular physical activity and healthy eating are important, but most people with diabetes will also require a number of medications to reach these goals. Do you know your ABCDEs? Ask your doctor about the ABCDEs to REDUCE your risk of heart attack and stroke: A – A1C – Glucose control target is usually seven per cent* or less (A1C is a blood test that is an index of your average blood glucose level over the preceding 120 da Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease Atheroma

Cardiovascular Disease Atheroma

The cause of most cardiovascular disease is a build-up of atheroma - a fatty deposit within the inside lining of arteries. There are lifestyle factors that can be taken to reduce the risk of forming atheroma. These include not smoking; choosing healthy foods; a low salt intake; regular physical activity; keeping your weight and waist size down; drinking alcohol in moderation. Your blood pressure and cholesterol level are also important. All people aged over 40 years should have a cardiovascular health risk assessment - usually available at your GP surgery. If you have a high risk of developing a cardiovascular disease, treatment to reduce high blood pressure (hypertension) and/or cholesterol may be advised. What is cardiovascular disease? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Cardiovascular diseases are diseases of the heart or blood vessels. However, the term cardiovascular disease is used to desc Continue reading >>

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