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Why Does Metformin Make You Tired

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

Why I've Been Quiet

Why I've Been Quiet

I've been quiet for most of the week; haven't even posted much to Facebook. I apologize, and feel like I owe you all an explanation. Those of you who have listened to this week's podcast know that Dr. Andry, the doctor who diagnosed me with PCOS in the late winter, put me on a new blood sugar drug, Victoza, a week ago this past Wednesday. It seems to be doing the job, though the verdict is not yet in. My morning, fasting blood sugar numbers are sporadically looking better; the question is will that become a constant thing? (For those of you who missed it, Dr. Andry explained that my fasting blood sugar is high because of the same high nighttime cortisol levels that screw up my sleep patterns -- they also stimulate my liver to make too much sugar. Most of the day my blood sugar is fine, and my A1C levels have always been stone normal.) However, one of the side effects of Victoza has been fatigue, sometimes pretty severe fatigue. For over a week, I went through my day yawning, having a hard time thinking enough to write. I looked it up, and this side effect passes for most people by the end of the first month, and indeed today I feel fine. Another side effect is a dramatic reduction in appetite, and -- at least early on -- stomach upset, especially queasiness. My appetite has, indeed, been dramatically reduced. Some days I've practically had to force myself to eat. I have had more than a few moments of queasiness, though I've never actually been sick to my stomach. There are also moments where I can feel that my stomach is empty, but can't think of anything that sounds good. This is a very strange place for a cookbook author to be. I'm not entirely certain who I am when I'm not interested in food, when food is merely something I do because my body requires it. It's early Continue reading >>

Feeling Tired On Metforim

Feeling Tired On Metforim

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Just recently diagnosed with type two diabetes and just started Meforim but I feel so tired - is this normal. Also have an underactive thyroid which does not help. Just really want some reassurance that I will feel better soon. Just recently diagnosed with type two diabetes and just started Meforim but I feel so tired - is this normal. Also have an underactive thyroid which does not help. Just really want some reassurance that I will feel better soon. I think it is the underactive thyroid that makes you feel tired and maybe a too raised blood glucose that also can make people very tired.. if you go low carb I think youll feel much beter in a week or so.. I did , it made a tremendous change in how I felt and my blood glucose came down in a non-diabetic level which is the healthy state to be in, I also ate vitamin B12 and it seemed to make my thyroid hormon work better too.. There are two aspects to Metformin you need to know ; 1. Metformin can over time create a lack of vitamin B12 in your body and hinder your body in uptaking this vitamin 2. Metformin can mask a low thyroid level , that is actually much lower than the TSH (thyrodea stimulating hormon) indicates ; as the Metformin seems to in some ways to destroy the produktion of THS somewhat and when TSH seems low the GP thinks one is much higher in thyroid hormon level than one actually is... and they will many times lower ones level of prescribed thyroid hormons ... making one feel even more fatiqued and one could gain a lot of adding weight on top of that while believing one gets the adequate amunt of added thyroid hormons.. Ill tag @daisy1 so youll get the very valuable information everyone new i Continue reading >>

Regaining Your Energy With Type 2 Diabetes: Tips To Prevent Fatigue

Regaining Your Energy With Type 2 Diabetes: Tips To Prevent Fatigue

No, it's not your imagination: Taking care of yourself when you have type 2 diabetes can be exhausting. Diabetes-related fatigue is common, and you may be feeling it from a variety of sources — your type 2 diabetes symptoms themselves, exhaustion from the responsibilities of managing diabetes daily, ineffective diabetes management, or even from other underlying conditions. Understanding Diabetes-Related Fatigue There are strong associations between diabetes and testosterone levels, kidney disease, and other health complications, all of which can cause you to become very tired, says Ronald Tamler, MD, medical director of the Mount Sinai Clinical Diabetes Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. There’s also a link between diabetes and depression, he adds, and depression is a common cause of extreme fatigue. According to a study published in June 2014 in the journal Current Diabetes Report, depressive symptoms affect up to one-third of people with diabetes. The research also found that depression not only impairs quality of life but also adds to the difficulties experienced in diabetes self-management. "The research highlights a wide range of potential explanations for the association between diabetes and depression, which include having a sedentary lifestyle, eating a diet high in refined sugars, sleeping poorly, and experiencing brain dysfunction due to low and high blood sugars, as well as chronic inflammation that is associated with diabetes," says David Lam, MD, associate director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Other causes of fatigue from diabetes include cells being deprived of sugar, high blood sugar, dehydration from increased urination, loss of calories, and sleep apnea. Graham McMahon, bachelor of med Continue reading >>

Apo-metformin

Apo-metformin

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about metformin It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist or diabetes educator. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date listed on the last page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. You can also download the most up to date leaflet from www.apotex.com.au. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using this medicine against the benefits they expect it will have for you. Pharmaceutical companies cannot give you medical advice or an individual diagnosis. Keep this leaflet with your medicine. You may want to read it again. What this medicine is used for The name of your medicine is APO-Metformin 500, 850 or 1000 tablets. It contains the active ingredient metformin (as metformin hydrochloride). It is used to treat type 2 diabetes (also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus or maturity onset diabetes) in adults and children over 10 years of age. It is especially useful in those who are overweight, when diet and exercise are not enough to lower high blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). For adult patients, metformin can be used alone, or in combination with other oral diabetic medicines or in combination with insulin in insulin requiring type 2 diabetes. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why this medicine has been prescribed for you. Your doctor may have prescribed this medicine for another reason. This medicine is available only with a doctor's prescription. How it works Metformin lowers high blood glucose by helping your body make better Continue reading >>

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

September 30, 2015 by Dr. Brooke in Be Better , Eat Better , pcos 3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin Metformin is recommended by doctors for women with PCOS that want to loose weight or otherwise manage their PCOS and insulin resistance. But there are 3 very important things that you need to know about it including the fact that it's not the only option! Let me first say, I dont hate Metformin for women with PCOS . For some women it really does help spur ovulation, control blood sugar and help with some weight management but.its not without its share of issues. And its definitely not the magic bullet for weight loss although its usually presented that way. How Metformin (or its generic form: Glucophage) Works Metformin is typically given with meals throughout the day, or more commonly now the extended release version is given once with dinner or at bedtime. While only having to pop a pill one time per day is always appealing, this once a day dosing (especially at bedtime) is where I see the most problems with my patients. It lowers both fasting and post meal glucose levels by decreasing the glucose absorption in your intestines after a meal; as well as decreasing the amount of glucose your liver makes for later use. It also does help improve insulin sensitivity by increasing glucose movement into a cell. All sounds good so far right? Not so fast, here are the most common issues I see in women using Metformin: Metformin is notorious for causing sometimes severe digestive issues including stomach pain or upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and even a sense of body weakness or metallic taste in the mouth in some. And it is touted as not causing low blood sugar as many older blood sugar lowering drugs did, however I see it every day in my practice that Metformin can m Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

Dealing With Diabetes Fatigue

Dealing With Diabetes Fatigue

“My days have been getting shorter,” Ron (who has Type 2 diabetes) told me. “I sleep ten hours a night and still need naps in the day. Even when I’m awake, I’m dragging. What can I do?” Ron’s doctor wasn’t much help. At his last appointment six weeks ago, Ron’s A1c was 8.1, and the doc started him on nateglinide (brand name Starlix), but his energy level hasn’t improved. At family picnics, he just watches or naps while the others play softball. “I’m starting to feel depressed, like life is passing me by” he told me. Excessive tiredness like Ron’s is often called fatigue. It’s one of the classic symptoms of diabetes and many other illnesses. But what causes it and what can you do about it? Most experts blame insulin resistance for the fatigue. If your cells are resisting glucose, they won’t have enough fuel, so they tire out. At the same time, the glucose level in your blood will be higher than normal, so blood flows less well (similar to if there were sugar in your car’s gas tank), which could also be tiring. Hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) can also cause fatigue. Blood glucose is far from the whole story, though. Inflammation makes people very tired. Part of the inflammatory response includes cytokines and white blood cells that influence the nervous system and tell us to sleep. That’s why people are so tired with the flu; our immune systems are trying to get us to rest. If you have chronic inflammation, which many people with diabetes do, that could cause fatigue. Infection is another source of fatigue. Our bodies need all the energy they can get to fight the invading germs, so less energy is available for other things. Infection also causes inflammation and can raise blood glucose levels. So someone in Ron’s situation should inv Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Mix Metformin And Alcohol?

Is It Safe To Mix Metformin And Alcohol?

If you’re taking metformin to treat your diabetes, you may be wondering how this drug affects your ability to drink safely. Drinking alcohol can affect your diabetes symptoms directly, but there are additional risks if you drink alcohol with metformin. This article gives you information on how alcohol interacts with metformin and also how drinking alcohol can affect your diabetes. With any medicine you take, you should be aware of interactions that can happen if you use other substances. Metformin and alcohol can interact to increase your risk of harmful effects. You are at much greater risk of these effects if you frequently drink a lot of alcohol or you binge drink (drink a lot in short periods). These effects include an extremely low blood sugar level, called hypoglycemia, and a condition called lactic acidosis. Hypoglycemia Drinking alcohol while you’re taking metformin may cause extremely low blood sugar levels. Some symptoms of low blood sugar levels can be similar to symptoms of having too much alcohol. These include: drowsiness dizziness confusion Tell the people who are with you while you drink that you have diabetes. They can help you watch for these symptoms. If you or the people around you notice these symptoms, stop drinking and eat something right away to help increase your blood sugar level. If your symptoms of hypoglycemia are severe, such as losing consciousness, and you do not have a glucagon hypoglycemia rescue kit, someone with you should call 9-1-1. A glucagon hypoglycemia rescue kit includes human glucagon (a natural substance that helps balance your blood sugar level), a syringe to inject it, and instructions. You can use this kit for severe hypoglycemia when eating food will not help. If you are not familiar with this kit, talk to your doctor Continue reading >>

Why Do I Feel Tired Every Time I Take Metformin? - Quora

Why Do I Feel Tired Every Time I Take Metformin? - Quora

Why do I feel tired every time I take Metformin? Answered Oct 1, 2017 Author has 409 answers and 129.7k answer views Metformin can cause you to be really tired and feel like you have the flu or something. This will get better with time. The nasty taste is another of the side effects that is totally undesirable, but usually inevitable. It too will either go away or you will get used to it. It n u lw blood sugar (hypoglycemia). However, thi n l occur if u delay r miss a meal r snack, drink alcohol, exercise mr thn usual, nnt eat bu f nausea r vomiting, tk rtin medicines, r tk metformin with nthr type f diabetes medicine. Th symptoms f lw blood sugar mut b treated bfr th lead t unconsciousness (passing out). Diffrnt people feel diffrnt symptoms f lw blood sugar. It i important tht u learn whih symptoms f lw blood sugar u uull hv tht u n treat it quickly. Controlling diabetes is actually easy if you get the right support or guide, I was searching online and came upon this website and found out that many had success in controlling blood sugar level, i am also seeing wonderful results, here is that site Control Your Blood Sugar Level . hope it will help those who really want to control their diabetes. 173 Views View Upvoters Not for Reproduction Continue reading >>

Chronic Fatigue With Metformin Still?

Chronic Fatigue With Metformin Still?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I've been taking metformin for over a month and still have chronic fatigue, low energy. I've even started exercising and dieting low carb. I've seen MANY doctors but they all don't take this seriously. Does it take a while for energy to return when you fix your blood sugar level? any ideas would be appreciated!! thanks very much! It depends where you started with your blood sugar levels and how low that you have driven them down and how long your body needs to get used to the change. This is definitely a YMMV (Your Method/Mileage May Vary) thing. At diagnosis, my BG was 426 and A1c: 14.0. Three months later, my A1c was 5.2/5.3. It was a month later before I got past the low energy and some dizziness. Four months of feeling "fatigued". I don't know if it's purely your body getting used to more normal blood sugar levels or your body getting used to a new diet or a little of both. That being said, the feeling of fatigue was much worse early on, but did improve. I feel great now. Just give your body some time to adjust. thanks very much! I've had fatigue for over a year but only recently had my ha1c at 6.3. It's at 5.6 after medication. But I keep vomiting and having diarrhea- I think I may have some kind of GI parasite or infection from travelling to SE Asia.... I've had fatigue for over a year and recently 6 months ago had my ha1c at 6.3. It's at 5.6 after medication but I still have bad chronic fatigue and daytime sleepiness. I keep vomiting- I think I may have some kind of GI parasite or infection from traveling overseas. does fatigue from blood sugar resolve quickly once you have normal bloo Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Metformin And Fatigue/muscle Weakness?

Metformin And Fatigue/muscle Weakness?

I've been on metformin extended release for years with no problems. If I take the regular it will cause me to have GI distress, diarrhea. My doctor is wanting to add this to the Victoza and Lantus. I am not keen to do that as I think I can bring down the A1c by getting involved with Spark. I really don't want to do it if Metformin will cause fatigue. I already have severe fatigue caused by MS. Me and my hubby got off of our Metformin because of everything that is talked, about here and makes you weak and so sleepy and I hated that so much ugh. Thank you for that information. I need to remember to take some of that and probably also iron. Maybe I can wake up then and also not wind up in a lot of pain when I go to do chores or even walk around places. Vitamin B12 deficiency can indeed cause muscle weakness. It strongly affects the neurological system, and so it can cause all kinds of other issues too, up to and including dementia if it's severe enough. I am under treatment for what my doctor called a "profound" B12 deficiency. I take 1000 mcg every night, and it's stabilized for now... my legs felt like they were made of jello and though it's MUCH better, I still have issues with fatigue off and on. Other medical conditions feed into that, though, so... As in most diseases, there are multiple meds to choose from. I think the advice you are receiving from everyone to talk to your doctor is sound. Perhaps there is a different med your doctor could prescribe. I take 1000 mg Met twice daily. I guess it was the right choice for me because I haven't experienced any of these side effects. My A1C is always under 6.0 and my doctor couldn't be happier. However, I've had similar challenges with BP meds where certain ones caused bad reactions AND didn't do the job. It's sort of tria Continue reading >>

Metformin And Sleep Disorders

Metformin And Sleep Disorders

Go to: Abstract Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug. Deterioration of sleep is an important unwanted side effect of metformin. Here, the authors review and present the details on metformin and sleep problem. Keywords: Metformin, sleep disorders, side effect Go to: Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disorder. Millions of patients have to use anti-diabetic drugs. A widely used oral anti-diabetic drug is metformin (C4H11N5 · HCl). Under fasting conditions, about 50 % bioavailability of metformin has been observed.[1] After ingestion, metformin is slowly absorbed and reaches its peak level in blood in 1-3 hours, and its elimination half-life is about 1.5-6 hours.[1] The main route of metformin elimination is tubular secretion.[1] Metformin use results in decreased hepatic glucose production and decreased intestinal absorption of glucose.[1] In addition, metformin can help improve insulin sensitivity via increasing peripheral glucose uptake and utilization.[1] Similar to other drugs, adverse effects of metformin are reported. These can result in poor compliance of the diabetic patient,[1] causing an irregular intake of the drug.[1] Apart from the well known ill effects of hypoglycemia and diarrhea, other unwanted effects of metformin have also been observed. The effect of metformin on sleep is interesting. Here, the authors review and present the details on metformin and sleep problem. Go to: METFORMIN – INDUCED INSOMNIA Metformin – induced insomnia is widely mentioned in old and obese diabetic patients who have been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus recently and prescribed with metformin. The development of insomnia can be seen within a few days after starting metformin. This is an interesting unwanted effect that is not quoted in other antidiabetic drugs Continue reading >>

How To Beat Pcos Fatigue

How To Beat Pcos Fatigue

Being tired is the worst. In fact, the only thing that is worse than being tired is when you realize you are tired of feeling tired all the time. Fatigue is a vague symptom and therefore, it does not get much attention from PCOS experts. But if you ask one of the many women living with PCOS (including me) -fatigue is one of the most troubling symptoms of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. The fatigue I am talking about is different from boredom or being sleepy after a night of Netflix binging. It is a truly physical sense of exhaustion, where you might want to do something, but you just feel too worn out to make it happen. I’ve turned down wine nights with the girls and procrastinated on writing a blog post because fatigue has reared its ugly head. Today I am going to give you a practical approach to managing fatigue. But first I want to tell you to go to your doctor and get a check-up. In case my Lululemon crop pants did not tip you off- I’m a personal trainer and not a physician. Chronic Fatigue could indicate that you have another medical condition. Some the conditions common to PCOS women include: Thyroid Disease Auto Immune Conditions Sleep Apnea Diabetes B-12 deficiences (linked to long-term metformin and birth control pill use) So go to your doctor and rule out all of this stuff. My perspective on PCOS and Fatigue At the center of PCOS is a hormonal imbalance. Our bodies are already dealing with some level of hormonal dysfunction. Therefore, we’re probably more vulnerable to other environmental stressors like a poor diet, sleep deprivation, and unmanaged stress. I believe that fatigue is one way that your body communicates to you that something in your environment is not good for you. Better nutrition, good sleep hygiene, and stress management can reduce PCOS fat Continue reading >>

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