diabetestalk.net

Why Does Diabetes Cause Night Sweats?

8 Ways To Prevent Night Sweats

8 Ways To Prevent Night Sweats

Do you ever wake up drenched in sweat in the middle of the night—even if the thermostat is turned low? Try these diabetes-friendly ways to prevent night sweats. If you’ve ever awakened a few hours after drifting off to sleep, wrapped in damp sheets and dripping with sweat, you know how disruptive it can be to a good night’s rest. Why might your body’s own thermostat be going haywire? “Night sweats are usually related to hypoglycemia, an episode of low blood sugar,” says L.A.-based diabetes educator Lori Zanini, RD. “Other signs of nighttime hypoglycemia include waking up with a headache and having nightmares,” both caused by fitful sleep. A variety of circumstances can throw your blood sugar off balance, from injecting the incorrect amount of insulin to eating or exercising differently than usual. “Focus on preventing your nighttime lows, rather than reacting to the symptoms caused by the lows,” says Zanini. Here’s how: Eat a bedtime snack. “A protein-rich snack is absorbed and processed by the liver slowly enough to ensure blood sugar remains stable throughout the night,” says Zanini. Opt for one that contains at least 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and one to two ounces of protein. Some ideas include: ¾ cup of blueberries and ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese Slice of whole-wheat, high-fiber toast with 1 to 2 tablespoons natural peanut butter One or two servings of string cheese Ask yourself: Have I been more active today? If the answer is “yes,” be sure to adjust for the extra physical activity by snacking or taking less blood sugar-lowering medication to compensate for burning extra sugar. Avoid late-night drinking. Consuming alcohol in the evening can put you at risk for low blood sugar, since your liver is busy clearing the alcohol from Continue reading >>

Metformin Can Cause Night Sweats

Metformin Can Cause Night Sweats

Dear Dr. Roach As a preventive measure for prediabetes, my doctor recommended I take 500 mg of metformin twice a day (morning and evening). I have been following this regimen for two months. I am a female, 58, and other than needing to lose about 20 pounds, am in good health, exercise every day and eat a healthy diet. The same day I started the medication, my night sweats started up again, with a vengeance. On the metformin, my quality of sleep was negatively affected by four to five episodes of bad hot flashes every night. Because hot flashes/night sweats were not mentioned as a side effect either by my doctor or on the information pamphlet, I notified my doctor. He suggested stopping the metformin for two to four weeks to see if the night sweats subsided. I had immediate relief with the night sweats the first day I stopped the medication. Some research indicates that metformin causes hypoglycemia, which then causes the night sweats. A sometimes-mentioned desirable side effect is weight loss. What is your take on metformin and whether it is a help or a hindrance to good health? R.M.T. Answer Metformin was tested in a large trial to see whether it could help prevent people at high risk for diabetes from developing overt diabetes, and it was successful at doing so. It wasnt quite as successful as a good diet and regular exercise, but many experts do use metformin, especially in overweight people, to help them lose weight and reduce their diabetes risk. In my opinion, it works best when combined with a healthy diet and regular exercise. However, it does have side effects. Gastrointestinal side effects, especially diarrhea but also nausea, are the most common. Hot flashes are listed as occurring in 1 to 10 percent of people taking the medication, and I found many people i Continue reading >>

Avoiding Nighttime Lows

Avoiding Nighttime Lows

Nighttime hypoglycemia can be the result of a number of factors in people with diabetes, according to Howard Wolpert, M.D., Director of the Joslin Diabetes Center Insulin Pump Program. It’s important to learn what causes low blood glucose reactions, so you can figure out how to prevent them from happening. Causes of Nighttime Hypoglycemia Having an active day or exercising close to bedtime with diabetes can decrease your blood glucose and cause a hypoglycemic reaction during sleep. Consuming alcohol in the evening can also put you at risk for a lower blood glucose level. This is a result of your liver clearing the alcohol from your blood, instead of producing glucose. In addition, some people forget that their bolus/fast-acting insulin lasts for up to five to six hours. If you have a late dinner and go to sleep a couple hours later, your blood glucose may be normal before going to bed. However, since the insulin you took for dinner is still acting in your body, your blood glucose could drop during the night. Signs of Nighttime Hypoglycemia Signs that you’ve experienced nighttime hypoglycemia can include: Sweating: waking up with damp clothes/sheets Waking up with a headache Having nightmares You may also wake up with a higher blood glucose reading, which is a result of your body rebounding from the overnight low. Experiencing a fast heartbeat and anxiety before bed may be an indication of approaching hypoglycemia. Ways to Avoid Nighttime Hypoglycemia Your target blood glucose reading before bed should be at least 140 mg/dl, Wolpert says. Before you go to bed, consider all of the causes of nighttime hypoglycemia, and if you think you’re at risk, have a snack before heading to sleep. If you use an insulin pump, one option is to reduce your basal rate. If you find yo Continue reading >>

Night Sweats (causes, Remedies, And Treatments In Women And Men)

Night Sweats (causes, Remedies, And Treatments In Women And Men)

Doctors in primary care fields of medicine often hear their patients complain of night sweats as they are common. Night sweats refer to any excess sweating occurring during the night. However, if if you keep your bedroom temperature unusually hot or you are sleeping in too many clothes, you may sweat during your sleep, which is normal. In order to distinguish night sweats that arise from medical causes from those that occur because one's surroundings are too warm, doctors generally refer to true night sweats as severe hot flashes occurring at night that can drench sleepwear and sheets, which are not related to an overheated environment. In one study of 2267 patients visiting a primary care doctor, 41% reported experiencing night sweats during the previous month, so the perception of excessive sweating at night is fairly common. It is important to note that flushing (a warmth and redness of the face or trunk) also may be hard to distinguish from true night sweats. 10 Ways to Deal With Menopause Symptoms Menopause Symptoms: Emotional, Physical, and Sexual Menopause symptoms can be perceived as physical problems, emotional disturbances, or problems associated with sexual functioning. Some of the variety of symptoms of menopause may include: Painful intercourse Hot flashes Insomnia Mood changes Anxiety Forgetfulness or problems with concentration What other signs and symptoms accompany night sweats? Depending upon the underlying cause of the night sweats, other symptoms may occur in association with the sweating. For example: Certain infections and cancers Shaking and chills can sometimes occur if you have a fever. Night sweats due to the menopausal transition are typically accompanied by other symptoms of menopause such as vaginal dryness, daytime hot flashes, and mood cha Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2: Sweating Could Be Caused By Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes Type 2: Sweating Could Be Caused By Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes type 2: Sweating could be caused by low blood sugar levels Diabetes type 2: Sweating could be caused by low blood sugar levels DIABETES type 2 occurs when the body can no longer control blood sugar levels due to problems with the hormone insulin. In the hot weather sweating may occur more frequently, but can it be caused by diabetes? Diabetes type 2 can cause excessive sweating, experts have revealed. Healthline, a medical website, claimed the sweating can occur when your blood sugar levels get too low, causing hypoglycaemia. This happens without any effect from exercise or hot weather, which usually cause sweating to help reduce body temperature. The perspiration on your skin will trigger a fight or flight response from your body, added Healthline on its website. The sweating is caused by excess adrenaline and norepinephrine which is produced by the body. Diabetes type 2: Low blood sugar levels can cause you to sweat excessively The NHS said sweating is just one symptom of low blood sugar. Feeling hungry, tingling lips, shaking and trembling and a fast or pounding heartbeat are other warning signs of the condition. A low blood sugar causes different symptoms for everybody, said the NHS online. Youll learn how it makes you feel if you keep getting it, although your symptoms may change over time. Hypos can also occur while sleeping, which may wake you up during the night or cause headaches, tiredness or night sweats in the morning. Diabetes type 2: Low blood sugar levels can cause excessive sweating (Image: Getty) Diabetes type 2: Foods to lower blood sugar Diabetes type 2: Foods to lower blood sugar Diabetes type 2: Sweating caused by hypoglycaemia could be uncomfortable (Image: Getty) Healthline recommended visiting the doctor if someone experiences excessive Continue reading >>

Excessive Sweating With Diabetes: Causes And Symptoms - Dlife

Excessive Sweating With Diabetes: Causes And Symptoms - Dlife

7 Causes of Excessive Perspiration in People with Diabetes Unless the weather is swelteringor youre having hot flashes, excessive sweating is most likely an indication of a greater health issue. Ask yourself: Do you have a fever or other signs of an infection? Does it involve your palms, soles, and/or armpits? Is your blood glucose level high (or low) during these sweating episodes? Could sweating be a reaction to your diabetes medication? If the answer is yes to any of these questions, talk to your healthcare provider. What are the possible causes of excessive sweating? For people with diabetes, certain complications can affect the sweat glands, making it difficult for the body to cool down in hot weather, triggering heavy sweating even during light activities, or causing sweating in cool temperatures. This is a condition in which hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) interferes with the nerves that control involuntary functions. The autonomic nervous system manages several systems automatically, including bladder control, heart rate, the ability to detect hypoglycemia, and the ability to sweat appropriately. Dry feet are a common symptom of nerve disease , so it is important to inspect your feet daily to be sure there are no cracks from excessive dryness, a condition that tends to occur alongwith sweating. A low blood glucose level is called hypoglycemia . Hypoglycemia triggers a fight-or-flight response in the body. As a result, the body produces additional norepinephrine and adrenaline, which can lead to heavy sweating as well as shakiness and anxiety. Good diabetes management can help keep your blood glucose levels in check. People with diabetes have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Excessive sweating can be a sign of heart failure, heart attack, or strok Continue reading >>

Diabetic Night Sweats: Controlling Blood Sugar Levels At Night

Diabetic Night Sweats: Controlling Blood Sugar Levels At Night

Home / Sleep Health & Advice / Diabetes and Night Sweats Waking up at night feeling shivery and drenched in sweat is not an unusual occurrence if you suffer from diabetes. Even when the weather is cool you can find yourself clammy and unable to sleep comfortably. Youre not alone almost half of Americans are now thought to suffer with diabetes or pre-diabetes so we thought wed shed some light on the link between diabetes and night sweats, and how you can get some night sweats relief to get a better nights sleep. People with diabetes often suffer night sweats due to low blood sugar levels, or nocturnal hypoglycemia . A drop in blood glucose can cause all sorts of symptoms, including headaches and severe sweating. These symptoms of nocturnal hypoglycemia can result in disturbed sleep due to discomfort and damp bedding, and will likely mean you feel less than refreshed in the morning. So, what causes night sweats in diabetics? There are a number of things you may not realize can cause your blood glucose levels to fall during the night. Did you know that if you enjoy a glass of wine or beer before bed, you may be stopping your liver functioning to produce glucose overnight? If youve ever woken up in a cold sweat after a night out this is the cause! Exercising lots during the day can mean you use up your bodys stores of glucose if you dont replenish these before bed you could suffer from nocturnal hypoglycemia.. Did you know, if you manage your diabetes with insulin you may be more at risk of diabetic night sweats as you cant monitor your blood glucose levels at night? How to control blood sugar levels at night There are a few things you can try to reduce the risk of suffering from low blood sugar at night. The main one is to make sure you manage your diabetes as well as you Continue reading >>

What Night Sweats Are

What Night Sweats Are

Most people sweat during the night. If you regularly wake up with soaking wet sheets you should get it checked by a GP. It's normal to sweat during the night if the room or your bedding is making you too hot. Night sweats are when you sweat so much that your night clothes and bedding are soaking wet, even though where you're sleeping is cool. Adults and children can get night sweats. See a GP if you: have night sweats regularly that wake you up or you're worried also have a very high temperature (or feel hot and shivery), a cough or diarrhoea have night sweats and you're losing weight for no reason Treatment from your GP Often you won't need treatment, but your GP will want to check if you have any other symptoms. If your GP thinks your medicine might be causing night sweats you could be prescribed a different one. Causes of night sweats The most common reasons for night sweats are: menopause symptoms ("hot flushes") anxiety medicines – some antidepressants, steroids and painkillers low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) alcohol or drug use a harmless condition called hyperhidrosis that makes you sweat too much all the time Sometimes the cause of night sweats is unknown. Next review due: 12/12/2020 Call 111 If you can’t speak to your GP or don’t know what to do next. Continue reading >>

Night Sweats + High Reading

Night Sweats + High Reading

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 2 diabetic, recently visited doctors and she said my levels were too high so added another tablet to take in the morning ( along with max dose of Metformin twice a day, she did say i may get a bit dizzy feel drunk, etc). Went back to doctors a week ago as was getting very bad night sweats, woke up with legs covered in sweat. He checked my last blood test and couldn't see why i had been prescribed this extra tablet as levels were in range, (trust this doctor as he first diagnosed my diabetes) he gave me a blood test monitor so i could check my levels if i had another sweaty episode. Last night woke with sweat covered legs so took a reading, i was expecting it to be very low and hypo, but it was 11.8 mmol/l instead. Anyone have similar findings ? I'm not a type 2 but I will 'bump' your post up the forum in the hope that you get a reply. I went through a bad patch with my eating a few weeks ago (became obsessed with crisps for some strange reason). I woke up with sweaty legs several nights in a row. Wish I had thought to test my blood sugar at the time (1am). Never made the connection - now I'm kicking myself! I also had a sweaty nights before I am sure because I had high blood sugar levels but when I started to use the long lasting insulin ( lantus) before I go to bed it is not happening anymore. My sugar level is a same in the morning than the last one in the evening. Lantus insulin keeps me on the same level all night. x i am also kicking myself, i regular wake up in the night soaked, i have to throw the pillow off the bed for a fresh one, its litterally soaking, it happened the other night again and wife said what was your bloods like? it never Continue reading >>

Why Diabetes Makes You Sweat Excessively

Why Diabetes Makes You Sweat Excessively

ByAriba Khaliq , Onlymyhealth editorial team Progression of diabetes causes damage to nerves. Fluctuations in blood sugar levels can cause sweating. Hypoglycaemia should be treated as early as possible. Antiperspirants can help control excessive sweating. Excessive sweating is a common concern of diabetics, especially the patients of hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar). According to American Diabetes Association, diabetics have several bouts of excessive sweating no matter how well you are managing your diabetes. Excessive sweating is more common in diabetics who are overweight. Nerve Damage The progression of diabetes over time can damage the autonomic nervous system. It is quite rare but it may impact heart rate, blood pressure, perspiration and digestion. Owing to this, diabetes is often regarded as the causes for autonomic neuropathy. In most cases, nerve damage causes pain while in other cases the body functions get interrupted. Fluctuations in Blood Sugar Levels Despite administration of diabetes, a patient could have blood sugar fluctuations from high to low and low to high. Disorder Treatments The conditions such as hypoglycaemia should be treated as soon as identified. Any delay in treatment for medical conditions such as nerve damage could make blood glucose levels go out of control. Treatments for hypoglycaemia or autonomic neuropathy may result in complications such as excessive sweating. Frequent Night Sweats When you are having have trouble sleeping due to cold sweat in night too often. Generalized sweating When sweating does not confine to head, face, underarms and groin, but wholethe body. Asymmetrical sweating Unusual sweating such as sweating in one armpit is another indication which indicates the need to seek help. Change in sweating pattern Sudden sweat Continue reading >>

8 Causes Of Night Sweats

8 Causes Of Night Sweats

Doctors often hear their patients complain of night sweats. Night sweats refer to excess sweating during the night. But if your bedroom is unusually hot or you are wearing too many bedclothes, you may sweat during sleep, and this is normal. True night sweats are severe hot flashes occurring at night that can drench your clothes and sheets and that are not related to an overheated environment. It is important to note that flushing (a warmth and redness of the face or body) may be hard to distinguish from true night sweats. There are many different causes of night sweats. To find the cause, a doctor must get a detailed medical history and order tests to decide if another medical condition is responsible for the night sweats. Some of the known conditions that can cause night sweats are: Menopause. The hot flashes that accompany menopause can occur at night and cause sweating. This is a very common cause of night sweats in women. Idiopathic hyperhidrosis. Idiopathic hyperhidrosis is a condition in which the body chronically produces too much sweat without any identifiable medical cause. Infections. Tuberculosis is the infection most commonly associated with night sweats. But bacterial infections, such as endocarditis (inflammation of the heart valves), osteomyelitis (inflammation in the bones), and abscesses can cause night sweats. Night sweats are also a symptom of HIV infection. Cancers. Night sweats are an early symptom of some cancers. The most common type of cancer associated with night sweats is lymphoma. However, people who have an undiagnosed cancer frequently have other symptoms as well, such as unexplained weight loss and fevers. Medications . Taking certain medications can lead to night sweats. Antidepressant medications are a common type of drug that can lead to Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Many people with diabetes will experience times when they sweat too much, too little, or at odd times. Diabetes-related nervous system damage and low blood sugars cause these commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Sweating complications can be a sign of poor diabetes management. Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is crucial to both prevention and treatment. Contents of this article: Diabetes and sweating problems People sweat for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are normal and some are not. Sweating is a natural response to physical and emotional stress. But excessive sweating, when the reason is unclear, is often a sign that something is not right. Some people with sweating conditions will sweat even on a cold day or during minimal activity. Low blood sugar levels and diabetes-related nervous system damage cause the most commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Extremely low blood sugars cause a fight-or-flight response, triggering the release of hormones that increase sweating. When blood sugar levels are too high for too long, a loss of nerve function can occur. This condition is known as diabetic neuropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) claim that around half of people with diabetes experience some form of neuropathy. If the nerves that control the sweat glands are damaged, they may send the wrong message to sweat glands, or none at all. In most cases, neuropathies cause either excessive sweating or an inability to sweat. Sweating caused by hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a term to describe abnormally low blood sugar levels. For most adults, blood glucose levels below 70 milligrams per deciliter are considered hypoglycemic. Individual targets can vary, however. Many diabetes management medica Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Trigger Night Sweat Episodes?

Can Diabetes Trigger Night Sweat Episodes?

Diabetes is a lifelong condition, characterized by a person having blood sugar levels that are higher than normal. There are two strands of the condition - type 1 and type 2 - and in both types, night sweat episodes may symptomize abnormally low blood glucose levels. These should always be dealt with immediately, because potential consequences range from disorientation to loss of consciousness, or even death. Read on to learn more about diabetes, how diabetes can be a night sweats trigger, and how to efficiently restore low blood sugar levels. What Is Diabetes? The pancreas gland behind the stomach produces insulin, a hormone that controls glucose levels in the blood and enables the conversion of glucose into energy for the healthy functioning of the body. Diabetics produce insufficient amounts of insulin or insulin that doesn't function properly, which means they are unable to convert glucose into energy naturally. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed during childhood and is controlled by regular insulin injections to replace that which the body cannot produce; type 2 is more commonly associated with adults and obesity, and is managed with a healthy diet and tablets. Part of managing diabetes responsibly means being aware of the symptoms that indicate a change in blood sugar levels in the body. Hypoglycemia For a diabetic, night sweat episodes could be indicative of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is defined as a severe lack of energy caused by abnormally low blood sugar, when glucose levels drop to between three to four millimoles per liter (mmol). Hypoglycemia can occur when a diabetic has taken too much insulin, skipped a meal, or exercised too hard without replenishing lost energy levels. During the day, feeling hungry, dizzy, and shaky are all fairly noticeable symptom Continue reading >>

Night Sweats And Hypoglycemia

Night Sweats And Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is a condition characterized by abnormally low levels of blood sugar (or glucose) in the body. Glucose is the body’s key source of energy. It aids in the breakdown of foods and its conversion into energy, as well as provides the brain with energy for proper psychological functioning. When glucose levels become too low, hypoglycemia occurs and you may experience these psychological side effects: confusion, blurred or double vision, abnormal behavior, inability to complete routine tasks, and/or seizures or loss of consciousness (possible, but rare). In addition to the psychological symptoms, you might also experience physical symptoms including: shakiness, dizziness, heart palpitations, anxiety, increased sweating, night sweats, extreme hunger/hunger pangs, and/or tingling sensation in or around the mouth. When your brain and body experience these symptoms, your nervous system is just responding to the stress of having low levels of circulating blood sugar. Although these symptoms are common in many other conditions, your doctor can perform a blood test to indicate that the cause is hypoglycemia. Can hypoglycemia be a non-diabetic related event? Absolutely. Oftentimes a person whom is fasting for a prolonged amount of time may experience hypoglycemia. Someone who engages in an intense exercise session might also experience these symptoms. The other type of non-diabetic incident that could cause hypoglycemia is something called reactive hypoglycemia. This is when a person has eaten a meal consisting of excessively high carbohydrates and/or sugar, has hyperinsulinism, or has recently had surgery in their digestive system. Like a fever or a rash, hypoglycemia is not a disease itself; it is an indicator of a health problem. Hypoglycemia is commonly associated w Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Is Sweating Normal?

Diabetes: Is Sweating Normal?

Diabetes and Excessive Sweating While many people can experience difficulties with sweating, it can also be an issue for people with diabetes. There are three main types of sweating that you may experience. They are: hyperhidrosis: excessive sweating not caused by temperature or exercise gustatory sweating: caused by food and limited to face and neck areas night sweats: caused by low blood glucose during the night Each of these have different types of treatments. Your doctor can recommend the best treatment to help relieve or stop your excessive sweating. However, since sweating can be a sign of other more serious conditions, you should always talk to your doctor if you experience this type of sweating. Hyperhidrosis Hyperhidrosis is the term for excessive sweating. This is sweating that is not from exercising or the temperature. This can occur when your blood glucose gets too low (hypoglycemia). It will trigger a fight or flight response from your body. You produce excess adrenaline and norepinephrine, which cause excess sweating. Once your blood sugar returns to normal, the sweating should stop. If, along with sweating, you have bladder control problems or an unusual heart rate, it could indicate autonomic neuropathy. This is caused by damage to the nerves that control functions like the bladder, blood pressure, and sweating. Excessive sweating can also occur with obesity. Obesity often accompanies diabetes. However, these are not the only ways diabetes and excessive sweating can be connected. Gustatory Sweating Gustatory sweating is different than hyperhidrosis. It is also not unique to people with diabetes. However, people with diabetic autonomic neuropathy are more likely to experience this than those without nerve damage. Luckily, it is easy to identify. If you br Continue reading >>

More in diabetes