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Why Does Diabetes Cause Fatigue

Cause Of Fatigue For Days After Exercise In Diabetics

Cause Of Fatigue For Days After Exercise In Diabetics

So when a person with diabetes is still suffering from fatigue even days after exercise, there’s a particular situation going on. “The main cause of fatigue after exercise that lasts is being low on muscle glycogen stores,” explains Sheri Colberg, PhD, Professor Emerita, Exercise Science, Old Dominion University, founder of Diabetes Motion, and one of the world’s leading experts on diabetes and exercise. “Depending on how much of these carbohydrate stores that you use up during an exercise session, it can take 24 to 48 hours to fully replenish them — assuming you’re eating a diet with enough carbohydrates in it. “If you are on a low-carb diet [as many diabetics are], it can take much longer for glycogen to be repleted, and that can make people feel tired when they try to do any type of activity. “If you’re eating enough carbs (usually at least 40 percent of total calories coming from carbs when you’re training regularly is required for optimal recovery), you also have to keep your blood glucose in good control for glycogen restoration to occur in a timely manner.” Causes of Longer Lasting Fatigue in Diabetics After Exercise “Thus, longer lasting fatigue can be related to: 1) not enough carbohydrate intake after workouts so glycogen levels remain lower; 2) poorly managed blood glucose levels (which also can impact glycogen restoration); or possibly 3) low iron levels (anemia).” It’s important to check your blood sugar at various points in the days following your exercise sessions to see if there’s a predictable depletion. A diabetic who works out should have a convenient source of carbohydrate with them so that it can be taken right after the exercise or soon after. For hardcore weight workouts, a healthy carb source may need to be taken e Continue reading >>

9 Medical Reasons You’re Tired All The Time

9 Medical Reasons You’re Tired All The Time

You’re tired because … you’re anemic iStock/Gab13 When you visit your doctor and complain of feeling tired all the time, the first things they’ll often check for is anemia or thyroid disorder because you can detect those with a blood test, says Amy Shah, MD. “When a patient says ‘I’m tired,’ it’s such a broad term and could be so many things, but if someone says ‘I’m tired and feeling a little more short of breath,’ or, ‘I’m having trouble exercising,’ that tends to be anemia." (Don't miss these other silent signs of anemia.) Anemia is when your blood doesn’t carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body and the most common cause of anemia is iron deficiency. Anemics may also experience feeling cold, dizzy, irritable, or have headaches in addition to feeling tired. Try one of these eating habits for more energy. You’re tired because … you have a thyroid problem iStock/champja If you have a thyroid issue, like an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism), in addition to feeling tired, you might also feel like your skin is really dry and you’re constipated a lot, along with the lack of energy, says Dr. Shah. (Don't miss these other surprising thyroid symptoms that could indicate a problem.) Hypothyroidism is a condition that occurs when your thyroid gland doesn't produce enough of certain important hormones. While women are more likely to have hypothyroidism, thyroid function tests can diagnose hypothyroidism easily and if you have an issue, your doctor may prescribe a synthetic thyroid hormone. Plus, you can always start these little habits that are good for your thyroid. From Merrill Lynch You’re tired because you … may have prediabetes or diabetes iStock/MarsBars When you have high blood glucose, your blood circulation may be impaire Continue reading >>

Muscle Weakness

Muscle Weakness

This leaflet looks at types of muscle weakness and discusses the wide range of problems which may cause them. These range from the very common to the very rare. Some are mild and reversible; others are not. However, most can be improved by exercise and physiotherapy. Muscle weakness is a common complaint but the word weakness has a wide range of meanings, including tiredness, reduced power and failure to work at all. There is an even wider range of possible causes. What is muscle weakness? The term muscle weakness can be used to describe several different things. Primary or true muscle weakness This shows itself as an inability to perform what you want to do with a muscle, even the first time you try. There is a reduction in the force which the muscle can exert, however hard you try. The muscle is not working properly - it has become abnormal. When this kind of weakness occurs the muscles are often floppier than usual and reduced in bulkiness. It can happen, for example, following stroke. It is also seen in a condition called muscular dystrophy (discussed further below). Both of these conditions result in weakened muscles which cannot move the usual load. It's a real change in muscle power. Muscle tiredness This is sometimes called asthenia. It is a sense of weariness or exhaustion that you feel when using the muscle. The muscle isn't genuinely weaker, it can still do its job but it takes you more effort to manage it. This type of weakness is often seen in people who have chronic fatigue syndrome, sleep disorders, depression, and chronic heart, lung, and kidney disease. It may be due to a reduction in the speed with which the muscle can get its energy supply. Muscle 'fatigability' Some muscle tiredness is mainly muscle 'fatigability' - the muscle starts off normally but Continue reading >>

Fatigue

Fatigue

Most of the time fatigue can be traced to one or more of your habits or routines, particularly lack of exercise. It's also commonly related to depression. On occasion, fatigue is a symptom of other underlying conditions that require medical treatment. Lifestyle factors Taking an honest inventory of things that might be responsible for your fatigue is often the first step toward relief. Fatigue may be related to: Use of alcohol or drugs Excess physical activity Jet lag Lack of physical activity Lack of sleep Medications, such as antihistamines, cough medicines Unhealthy eating habits Conditions Unrelenting exhaustion may be a sign of a condition or an effect of the drugs or therapies used to treat it, such as: Anxiety Chronic infection or inflammation Grief Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) Medications and treatments, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, pain drugs, heart drugs and antidepressants Pain that's persistent Stress Toxin ingestion Continue reading >>

Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Make You Feel So Tired?

Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Make You Feel So Tired?

If you have type 2 diabetes and you’re feeling tired, you’re not alone. Fatigue is a symptom that’s often associated with the condition. There are many possible causes, including everything from diabetes-related complications to underlying conditions. Simply managing diabetes on a daily basis can zap your energy from time to time. However, the most common cause, by far, is uncontrolled blood glucose, says Joel Zonszein, MD, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at the University Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. With type 2 diabetes, poor blood sugar control typically results in hyperglycemia or high blood sugar, which can cause fatigue among other symptoms. But Dr. Zonszein notes that high blood glucose isn’t the only cause. “Some people — especially the elderly — get dehydrated because their blood sugars are so high [and this leads to increased urination]. The fatigue, in part, comes from the dehydration,” he says. “It can also come from kidney disease.” Underlying conditions and diabetes-related complications are additional factors that can contribute to tiredness. Dr. Zonszein explains that when people have had type 2 diabetes for a long time, they can develop damage in their kidneys, heart, and liver. “Abnormalities in these organs can also cause fatigue,” he says. When fatigue is a concern, Zonszein will also screen for anemia. Anemia is not caused by diabetes, but it frequently occurs in people with diabetes and is a common cause of fatigue. He will also check the thyroid hormone level. People with diabetes are at increased risk for thyroid diseases, especially hypothyroidism. “A sluggish thyroid together with diabetes can be another cause,” says Zonszein. Medicatio Continue reading >>

Why Does Type 1 Diabetes Cause Fatigue? – Why Do Diabetics Always Feel Tired

Why Does Type 1 Diabetes Cause Fatigue? – Why Do Diabetics Always Feel Tired

Why Do Diabetics Always Feel Tired Sugar or October 21, 2016 fatigue increased fatigue; Increased urination, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes tend to start abruptly and dramatically. Tiredness and diabetes And generally does not cause functional grandmother of 62 years, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 25 years ago. I find that I am very tired in the afternoon. Chronic fatigue is common in type 1 diabetes medscape. First, on February 8, 2012, diabetes can cause fatigue directly with high or low blood sugar levels. The high level of glucose in the blood causes the circulation to become slow and pasty, so the cells can not get the oxygen and nutrients they need. Diabetes fatigue diabetes every day made easy health monitor. Fatigue and fatigue, how much sleep do I need? What causes the fatigue of diabetes? Diabetes self management diabetes diabetes management what url? Q webcache. The mental stress of dealing with diabetes can wear down your mind and your spirit. While their complaints do not sound like that, many diabetics with pain in their feet and lower legs on August 16, 2013 will need some experimentation to discover why 1 2 cup of regular soda, fruit juice or spoonful . Enter our cells and therefore not receive the energy they need August 20, the 2013 study showed that patients with type 1 diabetes experience considerably more chronic fatigue than the age Feb 9, 2017 why does it cause fatigue? Having a story about a woman named Cheryl was diagnosed 2 in 60. Googleusercontent search. He cites seven common sources of diabetes distress among people with type 1 diabetes. Jul 18, 2017 see what he can do to improve his mood and increase energy when he is coping. Talk to your doctor to find out what to do if you are at risk for hypoglycaemia. Diabetes and fatigue all Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fatigue — Get Your Energy Back

Diabetes Fatigue — Get Your Energy Back

Fatigue is one of the most common and most disabling symptoms of diabetes. What causes all this exhaustion and how can we get our energy back? Some studies have reported that as many as 85% of people with diabetes experience fatigue, defined as excessive tiredness that interferes with one or more life functions. As a Diabetes Self-Management reader named Donnah wrote, “Since being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, my housework suffers dramatically, I don’t do half of the things that I used to do with my child. When I do find the time and energy to do things, I am easily worn out and need to rest. I can’t even keep a job. I am on disability because of it and I hate this.” Causes of fatigue How does diabetes make you tired? • High blood sugar makes blood sticky, so it can’t get through the capillaries as easily to bring oxygen to cells. You know how you get sleepy after a big meal? High blood sugar can mean having that feeling all the time. • Insulin resistance keeps glucose out of body cells, so they don’t have fuel. • High blood sugar also causes inflammation. Remember how exhausted you get with the flu? That is, in part, inflammation. The same thing happens with poorly controlled diabetes. • Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can cause fatigue. • The mental stress of coping with diabetes can wear out your mind and spirit. Many other conditions besides diabetes can cause fatigue. If your sugars are under control, but you still lack energy, consider being tested for: • Sleep apnea, which causes exhaustion and is very common in diabetes. If you wake up tired, ask your doctor for a sleep test. • Anemia, or a lack of red blood cells or hemoglobin (the protein responsible for transporting oxygen) in the blood. • Low or high thyroid. • Low sex hormo Continue reading >>

Why Diabetics Get Sleepy After Meals

Why Diabetics Get Sleepy After Meals

A healthy meal should leave you feeling energized and ready to accomplish your daily activities. However, if you feel sleepy after a meal or find yourself taking a nap on the couch after eating, it may be because of your diabetes. You will need to do a bit of experimentation to find out the cause of your sleepiness, but it is possible to correct this simple problem. Video of the Day For many people with diabetes, eating too much, and especially eating too much carbohydrates and sugar, makes them feel very tired after the meal. Feeling tired and lack of energy are common symptoms of hyperglycemia, or high-blood sugar levels. You may have a lot of sugar circulating through your bloodstream, but your insulin is either deficient or inefficient at getting that sugar into your cells. If your cells are not getting sugar, which is their main source of energy, they feel tired and so do you. Hyperglycemia also may be, but is not always, accompanied by increased thirst and frequent urination. Hypoglycemia, or low-blood sugar levels, may be the cause of your sleepiness after eating. Hypoglycemia can happen if you have taken too much insulin or diabetes medications for the amount of carbohydrates you ate or if you had quickly digestible carbohydrates that made your blood sugar levels peak high and then crash within one to two hours. If your blood sugar levels drop below 70 mg/dL, it is considered a low-blood sugar level and you need to treat it immediately with either three to four glucose tablets, 1/2 cup of a regular soft drink, 1/2 cup of fruit juice or 1 tbsp. of sugar or honey. If you experience low-blood sugar, you also may feel hungry, shaky, dizzy, weak, confused and irritable. Blood Sugar Target With diabetes, it is important to adjust your treatment plan, which includes yo Continue reading >>

Tired All The Time? It Could Be Your Diabetes

Tired All The Time? It Could Be Your Diabetes

If you’re coping with diabetes and feel wiped out all the time — the kind of fatigue that isn’t helped by eating or getting a little extra sleep — your doctor might tell you that your blood sugar levels are to blame. But research suggests that the fatigue associated with diabetes could have other causes. In a study published in June 2012 in The Diabetes Educator, researchers Cynthia Fritschi, PhD, RN and Laurie Quinn, PhD, RN, found that stress, depression, body mass index (BMI), and lack of physical activity can all be significant contributors to fatigue in people with diabetes. In the study, 83 women ages 40 to 65 with type 2 diabetes completed questionnaires about their health, fatigue levels, diabetes symptoms, depression, emotional distress, physical activity, and how they were managing and coping with diabetes. Some of the women wore a continuous glucose monitor for three days to assess the changes in their glucose (blood sugar) levels. The researchers found no relationship between the women’s fatigue level and their blood sugar control. Fasting blood sugar, glucose fluctuations over the study period, and results from the A1C test, which measures average blood sugar level over the previous two to three months, did not predict how tired the women reported feeling. “It appears that other factors — such as being overweight, getting little physical activity, and having higher levels of distress — could be causing their fatigue,” Fritschi says. A statement published by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in November 2016 in its journal Diabetes Care recommends that physical activity be prescribed to all people living with diabetes in order to manage glycemic control and overall health. In particular, the ADA urges people living with diabetes to in Continue reading >>

Tired Of Your Diabetes? Here’s How To Keep Going

Tired Of Your Diabetes? Here’s How To Keep Going

When you have diabetes, your daily to-do list can seem like a lot. You track your blood sugar, take medicine, watch your diet, and exercise. It can make you feel overwhelmed and burned out. If you’re there: 1. Know that no one is perfect. There are no vacations from diabetes. Even the most diligent people can’t keep their blood sugar or diet or physical activity on target all the time. “Diabetes is unique because [you’re] actually making medical decisions, day-to-day, minute-to-minute,” says Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, PhD, a clinical health psychologist. This can be stressful, says David Nathan, MD, director of the Diabetes Center at Massachusetts General Hospital. “If people are always stressed out about diabetes, they’re miserable,” Nathan says. He says people need to forgive themselves if they miss their goals for a day, a week, or even more. “Chill a little bit,” Nathan says. “We’re going to do the best we can. We need to recognize no one is perfect.” 2. Pay attention to what stresses you out. Living with diabetes can cause fear, anger, worry, and sadness. Lawrence Fisher, PhD, director of the Behavioral Diabetes Research Group at UCSF School of Medicine, has studied what doctors call “diabetes distress” in people with type 1 and those with type 2diabetes. He learned that during any 18-month period, from a third to a half of people with diabetes will feel a good bit of it. He cites seven common sources of diabetes distress among people with type 1 diabetes. The most common is a feeling of helplessness. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety i Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fatigue-control Diabetes And You Control Fatigue

Diabetes And Fatigue-control Diabetes And You Control Fatigue

The connections between fatigue and diabetes What is the connection between diabetes and fatigue? Can diabetes cause fatigue? You can be fatigued for many reasons including worrying, but when you’re a diabetic, it’s more of a cause of being tired all the time. Since having diabetes means you don’t have enough insulin and your blood sugar levels are too high, and in turn causing your fatigue. So if you’re not getting enough sleep, this will tire you throughout your day affecting your blood sugar level control and can impact you for other health factor risks. It seems to be a merry-go-round. Not really merry now, is it? I have to say that, I know I speak for millions of people who have insomnia or can’t sleep for a variety of reasons, that not getting the adequate amount of shuteye just takes it’s toll on you and you feel like a walking zombie the next day and you can’t see straight. Whatever the reason or reasons for not sleeping, we just want a solution. It makes us almost to the point where we can’t function and even complete the simplest tasks. Eating a well balanced diet is a tremendous help! You want to experience weight loss for diabetes too. Other link factors: Dehydration. Being a diabetic, you’re more apt to be dehydration. If your blood sugar levels are high, chances are high too that you’re dehydrated too. Depression. It’s imperative to know the connection between depression and fatigue, because fatigue can be a common symptom of depression. With diabetes, it’s even two times as common to be fatigued. Stress. I’ve mentioned stress in another article and it goes without saying that stress cause fatigue. Not to mention that it wreaks havoc with your sugar levels as well. Caffeine. I think most folks know that too much caffeine keeps you Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Reactive Hypoglycemia And Insulin Resistance

Symptoms Of Reactive Hypoglycemia And Insulin Resistance

Being plagued by excessive fatigue is bad enough, but problems with blood sugar regulation can also lead to even scarier downstream issues including heart disease, stroke, cancer, dementia, and more. Feeling sleepy all the time and being chronically fatigued are classic reactive hypoglycemia and insulin resistance symptoms. The standard American diet, high in simple sugars and processed foods, is notorious for causing problems with blood sugar regulation. In the short term, eating a meal loaded with sugar and refined carbs (like white flour) can cause you to experience wild swings in blood sugar. These large blood sugar swings make you feel tired, anxious, irritable, and hungry for more quickly absorbed sugars. Feeling sleepy all the time and experiencing these other symptoms of blood sugar dysregulation after a high-carb meal is not normal, nor is it healthy. These are the classic signs of what is known as reactive hypoglycemia and they may be insulin resistance symptoms, which is more serious and could be an early warning sign of diabetes down the road according to the medical journal, Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity.[1] So how are sugars and sweets linked to the problem of feeling sleepy all the time along with reactive hypoglycemia and insulin resistance symptoms? Eating this way carries with it a “high glycemic load,” meaning it contains high amounts of the kind of carbohydrates which quickly release their sugars into the bloodstream. High-glycemic-load diets have been shown in human studies to lead to feeling sleepy all the time, daytime fatigue, poorer sleep, and slower cognitive performance.[2,3] In the long term, eating a diet full of empty calories, refined carbohydrates (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes), sugars, and sweetened beverages Continue reading >>

7 Silent Symptoms Of Pre-diabetes

7 Silent Symptoms Of Pre-diabetes

A little fatigue. An extra five pounds you can’t shake. A bruise that just won’t heal. None of these symptoms are especially eyebrow-raising on their own. But taken together, they could be signs of a silent epidemic that’s affecting more and more women across the country: pre-diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that at least 86 million Americans—more than one in three—have the condition, which is marked by blood sugar levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough to qualify as diabetic. But as many as nine in 10 sufferers don’t know they have it, says Ashita Gupta, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “That’s because it’s common for people to feel perfectly normal and healthy while the disease is progressing,” she explains. Still, there are signs and symptoms you can watch out for. And you should, since pre-diabetes can be treated and reversed through dietary tweaks and healthy lifestyle changes when it’s caught earlier. But the longer it goes undiagnosed and untreated, the greater the chance of it turning into full-blown diabetes, which is much harder to rebound from. So in honor of November, which is American Diabetes Month, we asked Gupta to share some of the most common red flags of pre-diabetes. If you’ve experienced any of the symptoms on the slides ahead, ask your doctor to test you as soon as possible. Sudden spikes and dips in your blood sugar (which are common in those with pre-diabetes) can impair your eye’s ability to bend and focus, leading to blurred vision, says Gupta. The blurriness should go away once you get your sugar levels back into normal range. (Here are 10 other Surprising Things Your Eyes Reveal About Your Health.) One of the more well-known sig Continue reading >>

Chronic Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: Highly Prevalent But Not Explained By Hyperglycemia Or Glucose Variability

Chronic Fatigue In Type 1 Diabetes: Highly Prevalent But Not Explained By Hyperglycemia Or Glucose Variability

OBJECTIVE Fatigue is a classical symptom of hyperglycemia, but the relationship between chronic fatigue and diabetes has not been systematically studied. We investigated prevalence, impact, and potential determinants of chronic fatigue in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Out of 324 randomly selected T1DM outpatients, 214 participated in this cross-sectional observational study. Participants were compared with age- and sex-matched population-based controls. Chronic fatigue, functional impairments, current health status, comorbidity, diabetes-related factors, and fatigue-related cognitions and behaviors were assessed with questionnaires, and HbA1c values and comorbidity were assessed with medical records. Sixty-six patients underwent continuous glucose monitoring combined with an electronic fatigue diary for 5 days. Acute fatigue and four glucose parameters were determined: mean, variability, and relative time spent in hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. RESULTS T1DM patients were significantly more often chronically fatigued (40%; 95% CI 34–47%) compared with matched controls (7%; 95% CI 3–10%; P < 0.001). Chronically fatigued patients had significantly more functional impairments. Fatigue was the most troublesome symptom. Age, depression, pain, sleeping problems, low self-efficacy concerning fatigue, and physical inactivity were significantly associated with chronic fatigue. Chronically fatigued patients spent slightly less time in hypoglycemia (proportion 0.07 ± 0.06 vs. 0.12 ± 0.10; P = 0.025). Glucose parameters were not related to acute fatigue. CONCLUSIONS Chronic fatigue is highly prevalent and clinically relevant in T1DM. Its significant relationship with cognitive behavioral variables and weak association with blood gl Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fatigue – Regain Your Energy And Feel Great

Diabetes Fatigue – Regain Your Energy And Feel Great

Diabetes fatigue is a condition that can take a toll on your physical, mental and emotional well-being. Fortunately, there are simple steps you can take to fight fatigue and regain your energy. What exactly is fatigue? Fatigue is different from feeling tired. You may feel tired after working a long week or not getting enough sleep. Fatigue, on the other hand, is a constant and excessive tiredness that is usually not relieved by rest. It affects your energy, motivation, and concentration. What Is Diabetes Fatigue? There is a strong relationship between diabetes and fatigue. In a study published in Diabetes Care, 40% of patients with Type I diabetes experienced chronic fatigue. Some studies show that up to 85% of people with diabetes suffer from fatigue. Fatigue is a distressing disorder that can make daily tasks difficult to carry out. Some signs and symptoms of fatigue: Chronic tiredness Dizziness Irritability Achy muscles Headaches Slowed reflexes Inability to concentrate Low motivation Causes of Diabetes Fatigue Causes of diabetes fatigue are many and are likely due to a combination of physiological, psychological and lifestyle factors. Let’s take a closer look at some of the common causes of diabetes-related fatigue. Physiological Factors Changes in blood: Having diabetes changes your blood. Those with diabetes have been shown to have a higher blood viscosity, or blood thickness, than the average healthy person. Thick blood makes it harder for cells to flow through the bloodstream, carrying energy and oxygen to parts of the body, including the brain. Inflammation: Inflammation, a common problem associated with diabetes, causes fatigue. Inflammation affects the nervous system, which sends messages to the brain that the body needs to take a rest and heal. If that com Continue reading >>

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