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Why Does Being Overweight Increase Risk Of Diabetes?

Your Weight And Diabetes

Your Weight And Diabetes

Diabetes is a group of disorders characterized by chronic high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to the body's failure to produce any or enough insulin to regulate high glucose levels. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, which often occurs in children or adolescents, is caused by the body's inability to make insulin or type 2 diabetes, which occurs as a result of the body's inability to react properly to insulin (insulin resistance). Type 2 diabetes is more prevalent than type 1 diabetes and is therefore seen in roughly 90% of all diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes is predominantly diagnosed after the age of forty, however, it is now being found in all age ranges, including children and adolescents. The impact of diabetes goes beyond chronic hyperglycemia. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness (diabetic retinopathy), end stage kidney diseases (diabetic nephropathy) and non-traumatic lower extremity amputations (diabetic neuropathy) in working-age adults. People with diabetes are also two to four times more likely to experience cardiovascular complications and strokes. Diabetes and its related complications result in an estimated 200,000+ deaths each year, making diabetes one of the major causes of mortality in the U.S. In 2012, the NIH reported an estimated 29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) living with diabetes. Of these, an estimated 8.1 million persons were unaware that they had the disease. How does my weight relate to type 2 diabetes? There are many risk factors for type 2 diabetes such as age, race, pregnancy, stress, certain medications, genetics or family history, high cholesterol and obesity. However, the single best predictor of type 2 diabetes is overweight or obesity. Almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes a Continue reading >>

Diet, Overweight And Obesity

Diet, Overweight And Obesity

Diet and heart health The role of diet is crucial in the development and prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Diet is a key modifiable risk factor for CVD. Change in eating habits Human beings’ average weight is increasing. The latter half of the 20th century saw major changes to daily diets, moving from plant-based diets to high-fat, animal-based diets The obesity epidemic is spreading to low- and middle-income countries as a result of new dietary habits and sedentary ways of life, fuelling chronic diseases and premature mortality Components of a healthy diet A healthy diet is low in saturated fats, salts and refined carbohydrates and high in fruit and vegetables. As well as this, eating whole grains, at least two servings of fish a week, and nuts can reduce the risk of CVD The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends individuals to: Limit energy intake from total fats and shift fat consumption away from saturated fats to unsaturated fats and towards the elimination of transfatty acids Increase consumption of fruits and vegetables, and whole grains and nuts. Adults should consume at least 500g of fresh fruit and vegetables a day. Limit the intake of free sugars and salt (sodium) consumption from all sources . Recent guidance recommends eating less than 1,500 mg of sodium per day Overweight and obesity Overweight and obesity are classified by an individual’s body mass index (BMI). BMI is measured by dividing a person’s weight by their height squared in metres In adults, overweight is defined as a BMI of 25.0 to 29.9 kg/m2; obesity is defined as a BMI of 30.0 kg/m2 or greater Facts & figures: prevalence Latest projections from the WHO indicate that globally in 2005 approximately 1.6 billion adults aged 15 and above were overweight; at least 400 million adu Continue reading >>

Mouthwash May Trigger Diabetes—if You Use Way, Way Too Much Of It

Mouthwash May Trigger Diabetes—if You Use Way, Way Too Much Of It

Update | A new study claims very, very frequent mouthwash use is associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, don’t clear it all out of your bathroom cabinet just yet. The association only existed for people who were using mouthwash at least twice a day, and the study only included people who had a number of pre-existing factors that put them at higher risk for developing the conditions. The study, published on September 20 in Nitric Oxide, used data from 945 overweight or obese people who joined the San Juan Overweight Adults Longitudinal Study, based in Puerto Rico. “Participants who used mouthwash at least twice daily had 55 percent significantly increased risk of developing pre-diabetes or diabetes over a 3-year follow-up compared to less frequent users, and 49 percent higher risk compared to non-users of mouthwash,” the authors wrote. Specifically, 30 percent of the group that used mouthwash at least twice a day developed one of the two conditions; that number was 10 percentage points less in the group of people who used mouthwash less frequently. “There is no reason to believe it is restricted to overweight and obese people,” epidemiologist Kaumudi Joshipura told Newsweek, though being overweight is itself a risk factor for developing diabetes and prediabetes. ”We can’t know for sure, but at the same time, if I had to guess I think it may be generalizable to other populations.” However, the study doesn’t show conclusively that mouthwash is causing diabetes. It only shows an association between significant usage and the disease. Hundreds of people rinse their mouths with mouthwash in Times Square in New York on June 25, 2013 where over 1,200 participants set a Guinness World Record for 'most people using mouthwash simultan Continue reading >>

Understanding Excess Weight And Its Role In Type 2 Diabetes Brochure

Understanding Excess Weight And Its Role In Type 2 Diabetes Brochure

To view a PDF version of this brochure, please click here. To view a digital version of this brochure, click here. Please Note: Throughout this brochure, the words “glucose” and “sugar” are used interchangeably. This brochure is designed to help you better understand the impact of excess weight and its role in type 2 diabetes. Excess weight, obesity and severe obesity are all risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes. Often times, individuals are not aware of the health risk of excess weight until they are diagnosed with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. Through this educational brochure, we hope to provide you with the information needed to improve your quality of health. We will cover various topics, such as: Type 2 diabetes Complications of high blood sugar levels Risk factors for type 2 diabetes and much more What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a chronic, potentially debilitating and often fatal medical condition requiring regular monitoring of an individual’s blood sugar level and treatment. In type 2 diabetes, the body either does not properly produce or use insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps move sugar into cells. Therefore, the body becomes resistant to insulin. This resistance causes high blood sugar levels. What are the complications of high blood sugar levels? Excess sugar in the blood causes many health-related problems. The cells cannot get enough of the sugar they need, and when sugar levels in the blood become too high, it causes damage to nerves and blood vessels, usually in the heart, feet, hands, kidneys and eyes. Other complications of high sugar and insulin resistance include: Increased risk of heart disease and stroke Neuropathy (nerve damage, especially in extremities) Nephropathy (renal impairment, kidney fai Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Obesity

Diabetes And Obesity

Tweet The UK currently ranks as the country with the highest level of obesity in Europe, with more than 1 in 4 (28.1%) adults obese and nearly two out of three (63.4%) overweight. Over the next 20 years, the number of obese adults in the country is forecast to soar to 26 million people. According to health experts, such a rise would result in more than a million extra cases of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer.[10] Obesity is also no longer a condition that just affects older people, although the likelihood does increase with age, and increasing numbers of young people have been diagnosed with obesity. Data from Public Health England suggests that nearly a third (31.2%) of children aged 2 to 15 years old are obese. Links between obesity and type 2 diabetes While the exact causes of diabetes are still not fully understood, it is known that factors up the risk of developing different types of diabetes mellitus. For type 2 diabetes, this includes being overweight or obese (having a body mass index - BMI - of 30 or greater). In fact, obesity is believed to account for 80-85% of the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, while recent research suggests that obese people are up to 80 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those with a BMI of less than 22. How does obesity cause type 2 diabetes? It is a well-known fact that if you are overweight or obese, you are at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes, particularly if you have excess weight around your tummy (abdomen). Inflammatory response Studies suggest that abdominal fat causes fat cells to release ‘pro-inflammatory’ chemicals, which can make the body less sensitive to the insulin it produces by disrupting the function of insulin responsive cells and their ability to respond to insulin. This is kn Continue reading >>

Obesity? Diabetes? We’ve Been Set Up

Obesity? Diabetes? We’ve Been Set Up

When it comes to the nation’s growing obesity and diabetes epidemics, the more we know, the more the evidence points to one conclusion: We’ve been set up. Important findings about humanity’s past, about how we live and eat today, and even about how we typically treat type 2 diabetes — with medications that themselves induce weight gain — are providing clues that explain how the past two decades could see an explosion in overweight and obese Americans and skyrocketing cases of type 2 diabetes, which is usually closely tied to the problem. Harvard’s extensive research on the subject weaves a story of ancient humans who were both extraordinarily active and able to easily gain weight in times of plenty. It illuminates how a modern diet rich in refined carbohydrates and heavy in red meat has preyed on Paleolithic instincts, creating an obese nation, a health crisis, and what one researcher describes as a hard-to-escape cycle of weight gain, insulin resistance, and weight-retaining diabetic medication, leading to more pounds. “It’s not just a trap, it’s a trap and a downward spiral,” said Assistant Professor of Medicine Osama Hamdy, a physician at Harvard-affiliated Joslin Diabetes Center and director of a groundbreaking weight loss program being replicated at Joslin affiliates around the world. Hamdy and hundreds of other Harvard investigators in recent decades have produced a dizzying array of findings on obesity and diabetes. Even a casual look at the years of research on the subject shows a slew of results on how lifestyle affects weight and how weight affects health. It shows new genes discovered, laser surgery to save diabetics’ eyesight, new diabetes drug candidates, and advances in using stem cells to replace the insulin-producing beta cells that Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Factsheet and the link between overweight and obesity What is overweight and obesity? Overweight and obese are terms used to describe the body weight of people who are carrying excess body fat. To determine whether someone is overweight or obese, their body mass index (BMI) is calculated using their height and weight. Becoming overweight or obese happens gradually as a result of either; consuming more energy (kilojoules from food and drinks) than your body needs; consuming more energy (kilojoules from food and drinks) than your body uses by being active; a combination of both. Overweight and obesity is harmful to health as it increases a person's risk of developing chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and some cancers. It also increases their risk of developing other health issues, including high blood pressure, gall bladder disease, fertility problems, lower back pain and sleep apnoea. The more excess weight a person is carrying, the higher their risk of health issues. Want to find out if you are in the healthy weight range? Learn more at www.livelighter.com.au/bmi. What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition that results when the body can't adequately store glucose (sugar) in cells. Glucose is needed by cells for energy and to complete their daily functions. Type 2 diabetes is caused when the hormone insulin needed to store glucose (sugar) in cells doesn't work as it should or isn't produced in large enough quantities. This causes excess glucose to build up in the bloodstream, which is harmful to health. Over time, high blood sugar levels can damage the body's organs. Despite typically occurring in older adults, the rate of type 2 diabetes is continuing to increase among young adults and children. What causes type 2 di Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Print Overview Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it's more common in people older than 40. When to see a doctor If you suspect you or your child may have diabetes. If you notice any poss Continue reading >>

Can Obesity Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Can Obesity Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Obesity is not only a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease; it also plays a central role in diabetes insulin resistance and has been linked to high blood pressure (another risk factor for diabetes). If you are overweight, losing those extra pounds will reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke, improve your sensitivity to insulin, and help you to control your blood sugar levels. Talk with your physician about an appropriate weight loss plan to help you manage your diabetes. The more excess weight on your body, the less sensitive your cells become to insulin, the hormone that manages the movement of sugar into your cells. Being overweight puts you at huge risk for developing type 2 diabetes, where your body’s cells become resistant to insulin and cannot function properly as a result. By getting active and controlling your weight, you can increase your response to insulin. A weight loss of 10 pounds can reduce your chance of getting diabetes by 60%. If you are overweight, with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 25, you're at higher risk for type 2 diabetes, as well as other risk factors for heart disease. Fat around the waistline as opposed to fat in the buttocks and legs is considered a risk factor. There is an increasing amount of data showing that being overweight during childhood and adolescence is significantly associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and elevated blood pressure in young adulthood. For older adults, obesity also increases the risk for diabetes. Obesity and insulin resistance have also been shown to be associated with other risk factors, such as elevated blood pressure. Visceral fat in the abdominal area and surrounding internal organs can increase inflammation, which may lead to heart disease and diabetes. If a person has subcu Continue reading >>

Why Does Obesity Cause Diabetes?

Why Does Obesity Cause Diabetes?

Being overweight or obese increases the chances of developing the common type of diabetes, type 2 diabetes. In this disease, the body makes enough insulin but the cells in the body have become resistant to the salutary action of insulin. Why does this happen? New Research: A report this week in Science proposes that being overweight stresses the insides of individual cells. Specifically, overeating stresses the membranous network inside of cells called endoplasmic reticulum (ER). When the ER has more nutrients to process than it can handle, it sends out an alarm signal telling the cell to dampen down the insulin receptors on the cell surface. This translates to insulin resistance and to persistently high concentrations of the sugar glucose in the blood -- one of the sure signs of diabetes. Comment: Research into diabetes today is far ranging. It ranges from the environment to the deep dark recesses of the single cell. It is much easier to look at the environment, for example, "Super Size Me" in a fast-food culture, than it is to sort out what is going on inside the workings of an individual cell. Barbara K. Hecht, Ph.D. Frederick Hecht, M.D. Medical Editors, MedicineNet.com Study Suggests How Obesity Causes Diabetes HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDayNews) -- Scientists know that obesity is a key player in the development of type 2 diabetes, but exactly how excess weight causes the disease isn't clear. While trying to answer that question, Harvard University researchers have discovered a new pathway that sets in motion a series of reactions that leads to the development of insulin resistance, a precursor of type 2 diabetes, a new study reports. The researchers found that obesity causes stress in a system of cellular membranes called endoplasmic reticulum (ER Continue reading >>

Understanding Excess Weight And Its Role In Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Excess Weight And Its Role In Type 2 Diabetes

Register to attend a seminar and take the first step toward understanding your options. This article is designed to help you better understand the impact of excess weight and its role in type 2 diabetes. Excess weight, obesity and morbid obesity are all risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes. Often times, individuals are not aware of the health risk of excess weight until they are diagnosed with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a chronic, potentially debilitating and often fatal medical condition requiring regular monitoring of an individual's blood sugar level and treatment. In type 2 diabetes, the body either does not properly produce or use insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps move sugar into cells. Therefore, the body becomes resistant to insulin. This resistance causes high blood sugar levels. What are the complications of high blood sugar levels? Excess sugar in the blood causes many health-related problems. The cells cannot get enough of the sugar they need, and when sugar levels in the blood become too high, it causes damage to nerves and blood vessels, usually in the heart, feet, hands, kidneys and eyes. Other complications of high sugar and insulin resistance include: Increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Neuropathy (nerve damage, especially in extremities). Nephropathy (renal impairment, kidney failure). Retinopathy (vision problems, blindness). Cardiovascular disease (heart disease and increased risk of stroke). Erectile dysfunction in men and decreased sexual desire in both men and women. Depression. Amputation. How does excess weight impact type 2 diabetes? Excess weight can greatly affect your health in many ways, with type 2 diabetes being one of the most serious. There are many for Continue reading >>

How Your Weight Affects Your Risk Of Breast Cancer

How Your Weight Affects Your Risk Of Breast Cancer

Managing weight is a challenge for most people in the US. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 70% of American adults are overweight. This puts them at higher risk for serious conditions including diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer. For women, being overweight or obese after menopause increases the risk of breast cancer. Having more fat tissue can increase your chance of getting breast cancer by raising estrogen levels. Also, women who are overweight tend to have higher levels of insulin, another hormone. Higher insulin levels have also been linked to some cancers, including breast cancer. But the connection between weight and breast cancer risk is complicated. Studies suggest the risk appears to be increased for women who gained weight as an adult but may not be increased among those who have been overweight since childhood. Also, having extra fat in the waist area may raise risk more than having extra fat in the hips and thighs. And even though it’s been established that gaining weight raises your risk, it’s not clear whether losing weight reduces your risk. This turns out to be a tough question for scientists to answer, mainly because very few people actually lose weight during adulthood, and those who do lose weight don't usually keep it off over a long period of time. So it is difficult to find a large enough group of people to study. We do know that avoiding weight gain is helpful, whether you are overweight now or not. If you’re carrying extra pounds, losing as little as 5%-10% of your weight improves your overall health. A good goal for most overweight women is to drop half a pound per week for 6 months. What's more, exercise can also lower breast cancer risk above and beyond the impact it can Continue reading >>

Health Risks Of Overweight Children

Health Risks Of Overweight Children

The increased rate of obesity means that obesity-related chronic diseases are becoming common among children and teenagers. Being overweight increases a child's risk for a number of diseases and conditions, including: Asthma — A large number of children who are overweight have asthma. Diabetes — Type 2 diabetes, formerly known as adult onset diabetes, has become increasingly prevalent among overweight children and adolescents. A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that one in three American children born in 2000 will develop diabetes in their lifetime. Gallstones — The incidence of gallstones is significantly higher in those who are obese. Heart Disease — Early indicators of atherosclerosis — also known as hardening of the arteries — begin as early as childhood and adolescence in children with risk factors. Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of heart disease. It is related to high blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels, which are associated with poor eating habits and overweight. High Blood Pressure — Overweight children are more likely to have high blood pressure that can strain the heart. Liver Problems — People who are obese are at higher risk for a liver problem called nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which can lead to cirrhosis. Menstrual Problems — Being overweight may cause a girl to reach puberty at an earlier age. Also, obesity may contribute to uterine fibroids or menstrual irregularities later in life. Trouble Sleeping — Children who are overweight are at risk for obstructive sleep apnea, which is a serious, potentially life-threatening breathing disorder characterized by brief interruptions of breathing during sleep. Over a long period of time, this can lead to heart failure. Metabolic Synd Continue reading >>

Causes

Causes

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood glucose level, or the body is unable to use the insulin that is produced (insulin resistance). The pancreas is a large gland behind the stomach that produces the hormone insulin. Insulin moves glucose from your blood into your cells, where it's converted into energy. In type 2 diabetes, there are several reasons why the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes Three of the main risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes are: age – being over the age of 40 (over 25 for people of south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or black African origin, even if you were born in the UK) genetics – having a close relative with the condition, such as a parent, brother or sister weight – being overweight or obese People of south Asian and African-Caribbean origin also have an increased risk of developing complications of diabetes, such as heart disease, at a younger age than the rest of the population. Read about reducing your risk of type 2 diabetes. Age Your risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases with age. This may be because people tend to gain weight and exercise less as they get older. Maintaining a healthy weight by eating a healthy, balanced diet and exercising regularly are ways of preventing and managing diabetes. White people over the age of 40 have an increased risk of developing the condition. People of south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean and black African origin have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes at a much earlier age. However, despite increasing age being a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, over recent years younger people from all ethnic groups have been developing the condition. It's also becoming more comm Continue reading >>

Being Overweight Increases Risk Of Liver Cancer

Being Overweight Increases Risk Of Liver Cancer

A new study found a culprit for the increasing rates of liver cancer: obesity. The study published in the journal, Cancer Research, found that high body mass index (BMI) and a large waist circumference were associated with an increased risk for liver cancer. In addition, having type 2 diabetes, another result of obesity, also increases the risk. Liver cancer rates have nearly tripled since the mid 1970s. Because obesity rates have increased since then as well, researchers with the American Cancer Society wanted to see if obesity was a cause of the increased liver cancer rates. Though the association has been studied in the past, most studies were small or flawed. In this study, researchers looked at data from 1.57 million adults enrolled in 14 different studies in the United States. Of those enrolled, 2,162 had been diagnosed with liver cancer. Compared to having a normal BMI, being overweight was associated with a 21 percent increased risk of liver cancer. Being obese was associated with an 87 percent increased risk of liver cancer, and the more obese, the higher the risk. For every 5 kg/m2 increase in BMI, there was a 38 and 25 percent increase in the risk for liver cancer in men and women, respectively. Waist circumference also increased the risk though not as much, and type 2 diabetes was associated with more than two and a half times the risk, after accounting for other risk factors like alcohol consumption, smoking, and BMI. The effects appeared to be compounded if people had more than one risk factor. For instance, type 2 diabetes was associated with higher risks of liver cancer at each increased level of BMI. Liver cancer is not as common as some other cancers, and even if the risk is doubled, it remains on the low side. “The lifetime risk of a person developi Continue reading >>

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