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Why Do People Die From Diabetes?

Early Death Warning As Diabetes Crisis Worsens

Early Death Warning As Diabetes Crisis Worsens

The National Diabetes Audit, which covers England and Wales, found diabetics have a 73 per cent greater risk of being admitted to hospital for heart failure compared with the rest of the population. The review of more than two million with the condition found 28 per cent of admissions to hospital for heart failure were among diabetes sufferers. These patients were also found to have more than quadruple the odds of dying in the following year. The risk of premature death among people with diabetes was also much higher – with 24,900 more deaths in 2012 than would normally be expected. Among people with Type 1 diabetes, which usually develops in childhood, 3,300 died in 2012, compared to the 1,440 expected among the same number of the general population. This means people suffering with Type 1 diabetes have a 129 per cent increased risk of death, according to the audit. Of those with Type 2, which is largely avoidable and linked to unhealthy lifestyles and obesity, 70,900 died in 2012. Among the same number of the general population the figure would be estimated at 52,800. This gives a 34 per cent increased risk of death for people with Type 2 diabetes. The audit is managed by the Health and Social Care Information Centre in partnership with Diabetes UK. Dr Bob Young, clinical lead for the audit and a consultant diabetologist at Salford Royal Hospital, said: “This audit is a wake-up call. Heart failure is preventable and treatable. “Every health professional should take note of how much more common heart failure is among patients with diabetes. “This report shows us that over and above the things we recognised as preventable complications of diabetes – heart attacks and stroke – there is this much greater number of people with heart failure. “If we all lived Continue reading >>

Can You Die From Diabetes?

Can You Die From Diabetes?

Can you die from diabetes? Sure. But let’s not be overly morbid, here. You can die from just about anything. If treated properly and you take care of yourself, there is no reason that you can’t live a long and healthy life with diabetes. And, there’s no reason you can’t live longer than most people without diabetes. In fact, my grandmother had type 1 diabetes and lived well into her late 80’s! This was long before we had many of the wonderful technological advances we have today, including the Internet (great source of information), glucose meters, and modern blood sugar medications. What are the Dangers? Hyperglycemia Diabetes is all about controlling your blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes (and some with type 2) requires a person to take insulin to process glucose. If these people do not take insulin, then the glucose cannot be processed. This can lead to a condition called hyperglycemia or high blood sugar. The danger with hyperglycemia is that it can progress to ketoacidoses, diabetic coma and ultimately death if left untreated. Initial symptoms (if any) can be excessive thirst, fatigue, blurry vision, frequent urination and an upset stomach (if very high). Ketoacidosis symptoms are shortness of breath, fruity smelling breath, nausea, vomiting, and a very dry mouth. Can you die from diabetes? I guess we now know that the answer is yes. BUT, while this is a very serious result, normal insulin intake, proper blood sugar monitoring and healthy living should avoid this drastic result! Hypoglycemia The other serious condition that can result is just hypoglycemia. This is where your blood sugar drops too low. Most instances of this condition are mild and are easily solved by consuming some glucose rich foods. However, if left untreated, coma and death can resul Continue reading >>

People Dying Of Diabetes Who Never Knew They Had It, Study Finds

People Dying Of Diabetes Who Never Knew They Had It, Study Finds

People who don't know they have Type 1 diabetes may account for a surprising number of deaths from one complication of the condition, a new study says. Nearly a third of people in Maryland who died over a six-year period from diabetic ketoacidosis, a condition of severe insulin deficiency, had no known history of diabetes, the study of autopsy results found. While the researchers weren't able to definitively tell whether those who died had Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, their high blood sugar levels suggest they probably had Type 1, said study researcher Dr. Zabiullah Ali, the assistant medical examiner for the Office of Chief Medical Examiner in Maryland. The finding highlights the need for regular physicals that include checking blood sugar levels, especially if warning signs of diabetes are present, the researchers said. The study was published in the September issue of the American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology. What happens when the body runs out of sugar Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complication of diabetes that occurs when body cells don't have enough glucose (sugar) to use for energy, so they switch to burning fat instead. (Body cells need insulin in order to take up sugar from the bloodstream; in people with Type 1 diabetes, little or no insulin is produced.) Breaking down fat for energy produces molecules called ketones, which are acids and can build up in the blood. If ketone levels climb too high, they can poison the body, causing chemical imbalances that can lead to coma, or death. In the study, Ali and colleagues looked at 20,406 autopsies and found 107 people who had died from diabetic ketoacidosis, although only 92 had data available for further review. Out of the 92 cases, they found that 60 people were previously diagnosed with diabetes, while 3 Continue reading >>

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

Diabetes is amongst the foremost leading cause of deaths in most of the countries. Today, the disease is widespread like an epidemic and the several complications which diabetes leads to often make people wonder #Can you Die from Diabetes?”. Well, although the answer to the above question cannot be a straight “Yes”, there is no denying of the fact that diabetes can, in fact, turn out to be a deadly disease. As per a report circulated by Diabetes UK, the life expectancy of a type 1 diabetes patient can be reduced by 20 years, while the same can be reduced by 10 in the case of a type 1 diabetes patient. This, of course, can be controlled by adopting a healthy lifestyle and controlling your blood sugar levels. Some of the ways in which you can die from diabetes include the following: High Blood Glucose Levels: The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is the inability to keep the blood glucose levels under control. Lipid Disorders: With diabetes comes a host of various other complications such as heart diseases, kidney disorders, amongst others. The leading cause of these complications is the disorder of the lipids in a diabetic patient. Diabetes Ketoacidosis: The high sugar level in the blood which is a characteristic of diabetes often leads to the high amount of ketone cells in the body. These ketones could be extremely deadly, causing deaths in patients. Complications: Diabetes is known to cause several complications in patients which adversely affect the functioning of the heart, kidney, eyes, and even nerves of different body parts. Any of these complications can become serious and lead to the death of the patient. Hence, can you die from diabetes? Well, yes you can. However, with proper care, regular exercise, following a proper diet, and taking timely me Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: What Effect Does Type 2 Diabetes Have?

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: What Effect Does Type 2 Diabetes Have?

Diabetes can cause serious health complications and have an impact on life expectancy. How much a person's life is reduced depends on a combination of factors, such as the severity of the case, additional complications, and response to treatment. After being diagnosed, most people with diabetes want to know how the condition will affect the length and quality of their life. Each individual varies, but maintaining healthy blood sugar levels often has the largest influence on life expectancy. Relatively few studies have examined the link between diabetes and life expectancy, especially on a large scale. As a result, doctors aren't entirely sure how diabetes relates to how long people with the condition will live. This article will explore more. Fast facts on diabetes and life expectancy: While some estimates exist, there is no way to know exactly how diabetes will affect life expectancy. Type 2 diabetes is thought to have less of an effect on life expectancy than type 1 because people typically develop the condition much later in life. Generally, anything that helps maintain or contribute to healthy blood sugar levels can reduce the toll diabetes takes. What is the life expectancy of people with type 2 diabetes? A 2010 report by Diabetes UK claims type 2 diabetes reduces life expectancy by roughly 10 years. The same report states that type 1 diabetes may reduce life expectancy by at least 20 years. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the average life expectancy in 2014 for American men was 76.4 years and women 81.2 years. A 2012 Canadian study found that women aged 55 years and over with diabetes lost on average 6 years of life while men lost 5 years. Also, a 2015 study concluded that the risk of death associated with type 2 diabetes could b Continue reading >>

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

Q. How do people die from diabetes? A. People who have diabetes cannot regulate their blood sugar levels and if the disease isn’t tightly controlled, blood sugar can spike to abnormally high levels, a condition called hyperglycemia, or dip below normal, a condition called hypoglycemia. Both conditions are potentially life-threatening and can lead to coma and death if not promptly treated. But complications resulting from the disease are a more common cause of death. Heart disease strikes people with diabetes at significantly higher rates than people without diabetes, “and we don’t fully know why,” said Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief medical officer at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. People with diabetes develop heart disease at younger ages and are nearly twice as likely to die of heart attack or stroke as people who do not have diabetes. People with Type 2 diabetes, which is the more common form of the disease, are more likely to have elevated cholesterol, high blood pressure and obesity, Dr. Gabbay said, all risk factors for cardiovascular disease. “The good news,” he said, “is that a lot of treatments, like those for lowering cholesterol, are even more effective at lowering risk in people with diabetes than in people without.” Some new classes of diabetes medications used for Type 2 diabetes have also been shown to reduce cardiovascular risk, he said. People with Type 1 diabetes are also at increased risk for heart disease, though the reasons are less clear. Both types of diabetes can also lead to other long-term complications, like kidney disease, that may result in premature death. Problems like vision loss, nerve damage and infections that may lead to amputations can increase the likelihood of injuries and accidents. Good disease management starting ea Continue reading >>

The Dead In Bed Syndrome

The Dead In Bed Syndrome

Someone with type 1 diabetes is found dead in the morning in an undisturbed bed after having been observed in apparently good health the day before. No cause of death can be established. This is the typical situation of the "dead in bed" syndrome, a very tragic outcome which leaves the family with many unanswered questions: Why, when, how, could it have been avoided? After the first report from UK1 the observations have been confirmed from other countries.2,3 A number of young people with type 1 diabetes have been found dead in the morning without previous symptoms of illness, hyper- or hypoglycemia. The number of deaths of this kind per 10,000 patient years has been estimated to 2-6.4 For a population of 100,000 persons with diabetes, this represents 20-60 deaths per year or approximately 6% of all deaths in persons with diabetes aged less than 40 years.4 A relationship to human insulin1 or intensive insulin treatment2 has been postulated but does not seem likely.4 Autopsies have not revealed the cause of death. The diagnosis of hypoglycemia is difficult to confirm after death.5 There is however one case report where the person who died was wearing a retrospective (non-real-time) sensor, and the sensor reading demonstrated levels below 30 mg/dl (1.7 mmol/l) around the time of death (restrictions on reading glucose levels <40 mg/dl, 2.2 mmol/l, were removed by sensor manufacturer after the event), with at least 3 hours of severe hypoglycemia below <40 mg/dl, 2.2 mmol/l, before death.6 Another report using sensor tracings has shown a lag time of 2-4 hours before the onset of seizures when having severe hypoglycemia.7 In a recent review, clinical reports strongly suggest that nighttime hypoglycemia is a likely prerequisite of the event, but that the death is sudden and pr Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma: Causes, What Happens When You Go Into A Diabetic Coma?

Diabetic Coma: Causes, What Happens When You Go Into A Diabetic Coma?

What is Diabetic Coma and What Happens When You go Into a Diabetic Coma? Diabetic coma is a fatal complication that leads to unconsciousness. Any diabetic person with extremely high (hyperglycemia) or low (hypoglycemia) level of blood sugar can be affected by diabetic coma. A person who has slipped into diabetic coma will not be able to respond to any physical stimulation except for being alive. Diabetic coma can cause death when left untreated or not properly treated on time. There are very less chances of hopes in case of diabetic coma. However one can control his or her health conditions to avoid occurrence of diabetic coma. One should follow their diabetes management plan strictly to avoid a turn towards diabetic coma. Diabetic coma is of three types, ketoacidosis coma, hyperosmolar coma and hypoglycemic coma. Emergency medical facility is required in case of a diabetic coma Hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia is caused by huge rate of fluctuation in the blood sugar level leading to diabetic coma. Whenever there is any extreme fluctuation in the glucose level of the blood, the same has to be reported to the doctor immediately. Never forget that "prevention is better than cure". Make yourself more aware on diabetes and learn the likely consequences of the disease to keep yourself alert. Frequently Asked Questions (F.A.Q's) on Diabetic Coma A person can fall in to diabetic coma while suffering from Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). The person will not remain conscious in this sleep-like state. This state which can be caused by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) or hypoglycemia (low blood glucose), can remain for long time or sometimes lead to death. "Ketones" are generated in the human body when it uses body fat for energy. Ketones are also generated when there is minimum insu Continue reading >>

Dead In Bed Syndrome

Dead In Bed Syndrome

Twitter recently got in a twit about a statement someone found on the Internet: "One in 20 type 1 diabetics die in their sleep due to a sudden drop in their blood sugar." That’s quite a statistic, and one that raises all sorts of questions. Where did this strange and disturbing statistic come from? Does this mean that of all T1 PWD who die, 1 in 20 (5%) die in their sleep from something relating to dropping blood sugar? Does "sudden drop" mean any kind of drop - for instance, from high to normal, or only if it goes low? What’s the evidence that these deaths are indeed due to low blood sugar? And what can we do to prevent such a death? The "Dead in Bed Syndrome" is quite a problem, both for parents of kids with diabetes, and their physicians. One pediatric endocrinologist said "my patients are totally freaked out about this (as am I). My problem is that we have about 1200 patients in our practice with type 1 dm- does that mean statistically 6 patients in my practice will_ __eventually _drop dead in their sleep." A thorough discussion with multiple references, is on-line at the Children With Diabetes website, at The Dead in Bed Syndrome. It should be noted that different authors have developed different definitions for the Dead in Bed Syndrome (sometimes abbreviated DIB), and partially as a result of the differing definitions, and probably mainly as a result of differing patient populations (e.g., country where the study was done, degree of diabetes control of the patients, age breakdown, etc.) the rate of DIB varies widely. The Dead in Bed Syndrome was first discussed in 1991 when the Professional Advisory Committee of the British Diabetic Association published a report, Unexplained deaths of type 1 diabetic patients. They evaluated 50 autopsied deaths of people with Continue reading >>

Why Do Women With Type 1 Diabetes Die More Often Than Diabetic Men?

Why Do Women With Type 1 Diabetes Die More Often Than Diabetic Men?

A new study published in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology has found that women with type 1 diabetes have a 37% increased chance of death than men with the same condition. The study, which analyzed 26 diabetes studies dating back to 1965, also found that the women had more than double the risk of dying from heart disease that the men did. With current medicine, it‘s easy for those without it to think of diabetes more as a potentially dangerous but generally manageable chronic condition than as a truly life-threatening disease. But although diabetics do tend to live longer than they once did, the disease still confers a significantly higher mortality rate than is present in the general population. One obvious drawback of the research is that, as with any other meta-analysis, the different studies that comprise it may not account for confounding factors in quite the same way – in fact, considering that they span over 60 years and have vastly varying follow-up durations, that seems highly unlikely. The authors argue that since confounding factors are likely to be similar across genders in each study, the result of the new analysis is still significant. The meta-analysis covered more than 200,000 patients and some 15,000 deaths gleaned from studies beginning in 1965 and ending in 2010. The initial studies were conducted everywhere from the U.S. to Japan to Estonia, with age caps for subjects generally between 15 and 30 years. Still, across countries the results stay the same: women with type 1 diabetes appear to die more often than men with the same condition. That’s not to say that more women die of the condition overall. In absolute numbers, more men than women actually die of diabetes and its complications. But that’s because more men have the disease anyway. S Continue reading >>

My Wife Died From Diabetes In Her Sleep Aged Just 41 While We Were Celebrating Our Wedding Anniversary

My Wife Died From Diabetes In Her Sleep Aged Just 41 While We Were Celebrating Our Wedding Anniversary

When his wife Louise died in her sleep, aged just 41, while they were on holiday celebrating their wedding anniversary, Stephen Reeves’ life plans were shattered. Although Louise had lived with type 1 diabetes since she was 16, former Everton goalkeeper Steve believed they had everything to look forward to. “It never defined her as a person, she never complained about it, she just got on with everything and battled through,” he told the Liverpool ECHO. “She managed her diabetes exceptionally well, she was very shrewd about her condition and we were looking to have children.” The couple met when 40-year-old Stephen, who played for the Everton in the 1990s, went to Liverpool Tennis Tournament with a friend who was working on the event. “Louise was there with her uncle who was a tennis trainer, we fell in love straight away and we’d both reached a point in our lives where we knew what we wanted,” he recalls. Louise had been mentoring students at Liverpool College for 11 years, while Stephen - having been forced to retire from football through injury in his late 20s - was working in finance with Lloyds Bank. The couple married a year after meeting, in the summer of 2012, and Louise never allowed their lives to be dominated by her diabetes. “Because of it she had something called autonomic neuropathy which affected the nerves in her body, so it did restrict her walking and her diet, but she understood it. She said to me on more than one occasion ‘you know I’ll probably die before you’ and I’d say ‘don’t be stupid’ but we didn’t dwell on it.” Stephen isn’t certain whether or not Louise knew just how serious or how sudden the impact of her neuropathy could be. But it took her life in July last year, when they couple were on holiday in Mexi Continue reading >>

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

Diabetes is recognized as one of the leading causes of disability and death worldwide. There was a time when Type 2 diabetes was common in people in their late forties and fifties. However, thanks to the easy availability of processed foods, sedentary lifestyles, poor sleep and a host of other unfavorable factors, type 2 diabetes affects millions of young adults throughout the globe today. A report was commissioned in 2010 by the National Academy on an Aging Society. It showed that diabetes cut off an average of 8.5 years from the lifespan of a regular, diabetic 50-year-old as compared to a 50-year-old without the disease. This data was provided by the Health and Retirement Study, a survey of more than 20,000 Americans over the age of 50, done every two years by the University of Michigan. Characterized by high blood glucose levels, T2D can be the result of a combination of genes, obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle. If left untreated, diabetes can be life-threatening. Complications of this disease can take a serious toll on a patient’s health and well-being. So, how long do diabetics live, you ask? Does having diabetes shorten one’s life? Let’s address these questions, one by one. MORE: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) How Long Do Diabetics Live? Diabetes is a system-wide disorder which is categorized by elevated blood glucose levels. This blood travels throughout the human body and when it is laden with sugar, it damages multiple systems. When the condition is left unchecked or is managed poorly, the lifespan of diabetic patients is reduced due to constant damage. Early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes for preventing its long-term complications is the best coping strategy. So, don’t ignore your doctor’s advice if you’re pre-diabeti Continue reading >>

Mortality Among Persons With Type 2 Diabetes

Mortality Among Persons With Type 2 Diabetes

Risks of death varied depending on age, glycemic control and renal complications. Type 2 diabetes is one of the most challenging health problems that can cause other complications, such as heart problems and renal disease. An increased mortality rate is associated with this disease. In type 2 diabetes, macrovascular disease was known as the main cause of mortality, followed by renal disease and cerebrovascular disease. The level of glycemic control, cardiovascular disease and renal complications can contribute excess risks of death in patients with type 2 diabetes. A study published in The New England Journal of Medicine focused on those risks according to glycemic control and renal complications among persons with type 2 diabetes In this registry-based study, researchers included patients with type 2 diabetes who were registered in the Swedish National Diabetes Register on or after January 1998. Those patients were followed until December 2011. The controls were selected from the general population. In the results, in the diabetes group, 17.7% of participants died after 4.6 years of follow-up, while 14.5% of participants in the control group died after 4.8 years of follow-up. The rate of cardiovascular death in the diabetes group was higher than that in the control group. The risk was also increased in the people with diabetes who had worse glycemic control and greater severity of renal complications. Patients who were 65 to 74 years old had lower risk of death, compared with patients 75 years old or older. Type 2 diabetes and its related complications reduced patient life expectancy. It is important to let patients maintain good glycemic levels. Healthcare professionals should help those patients optimize their treatments for the atherogenic risk factors, which can ca Continue reading >>

Type 2 Myths And Misconceptions

Type 2 Myths And Misconceptions

While close to 10 percent of Americans have diabetes, there’s a lot of misinformation about the disease. This is especially the case for type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes. Here are nine myths about type 2 diabetes — and the facts that debunk them. 1. Diabetes isn’t a serious disease. Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease. In fact, two out of three people with diabetes will die from cardiovascular-related episodes, such as a heart attack or stroke. However, diabetes can be controlled with proper medications and lifestyle changes. 2. If you’re overweight, you’ll automatically get type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is a serious risk factor, but there are other factors that put you at an increased risk. Having a family history of diabetes, having high blood pressure, or being sedentary are just some of these other factors. 3. Exercising when you have diabetes only increases your chances of experiencing low blood sugar. Don’t think that just because you have diabetes you can skip out on your workout! Exercise is crucial to controlling diabetes. If you’re on insulin, or a medication that increases insulin production in the body, you have to balance exercise with your medication and diet. Talk to your doctor about creating an exercise program that’s right for you and your body. 4. Insulin will harm you. Insulin is a lifesaver, but it’s also difficult to manage for some people. New and improved insulin allows for much tighter blood sugar control with lower risk of low or high blood sugar. Testing your blood sugar levels, however, is the only way to know how your treatment plan is working for you. 5. Having diabetes means your body isn’t producing enough insulin. People with type 2 diabetes typically have enough insulin when they’re Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Causes Of Death

The Top 10 Causes Of Death

Why do we need to know the reasons people die? Measuring how many people die each year and why they died is one of the most important means – along with gauging how diseases and injuries are affecting people – for assessing the effectiveness of a country’s health system. Cause-of-death statistics help health authorities determine the focus of their public health actions. A country in which deaths from heart disease and diabetes rise rapidly over a period of a few years, for example, has a strong interest in starting a vigorous programme to encourage lifestyles to help prevent these illnesses. Similarly, if a country recognizes that many children are dying of pneumonia, but only a small portion of the budget is dedicated to providing effective treatment, it can increase spending in this area. High-income countries have systems in place for collecting information on causes of death. Many low- and middle-income countries do not have such systems, and the numbers of deaths from specific causes have to be estimated from incomplete data. Improvements in producing high quality cause-of-death data are crucial for improving health and reducing preventable deaths in these countries. Continue reading >>

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