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Why Do Diabetics Pee So Much At Night

Why Does Diabetes Make You Urinate So Much?

Why Does Diabetes Make You Urinate So Much?

More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, but more than a quarter of them don’t know it. Frequent urination may be one of the first signs that you have high blood sugar, a hallmark sign of diabetes. When you have diabetes, your body is unable to regulate blood sugar levels. Excess sugar causes more fluids to pass through the kidneys and increases urinary frequency, known as polyuria. “There are other reasons that people with type 2 diabetes can have increased urinary frequency and incontinence,” says Noah Bloomgarden, MD, assistant professor of medicine-endocrinology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and clinical endocrinologist in the division of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism at the Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. “But the most common cause is hyperglycemia [high blood sugar], or uncontrolled diabetes.” Polyuria is not as serious as many other complications commonly associated with diabetes, such as blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation, and premature death. But it can be a sign that your blood sugar is elevated, so it’s something you should address with your doctor. Frequent urination is not the only bladder problem that occurs in people with diabetes. They may experience a frequent urge to urinate (even if only a small amount of urine comes out), a loss of bladder control that results in leaking urine, and urinary tract or fungal infections. Such infections can also lead to an increase in urinary frequency and incontinence, especially in the elderly. “It really depends on the point a person is at in developing diabetes, and what level of [blood sugar] control they have,” says Dr. Bloomgarden. If diabetes goes untreated or if it has been poorly controlled for a long time, you can develop se Continue reading >>

I Wake Up Twice A Night Because I Have To Urinate. Should I Receive Treatment Or Is This Normal For A Particular Age?

I Wake Up Twice A Night Because I Have To Urinate. Should I Receive Treatment Or Is This Normal For A Particular Age?

Alan Wein, M.D., is chief of the division of urology at Penn Medicine and co-director of the urologic oncology and incontinence programs at Penn Medicine. Wein has authored texts on Nocturia, overactive bladder, and other related topics, and is a leading authority in this area. If you are experiencing this condition, you have nocturia. Nocturia means waking up at night because you have to urinate. It doesn’t mean you urinate because the dog or the TV woke you up. So, what’s abnormal, what’s normal, and what’s bothersome? For those 65 and older, getting up once a night to urinate is average. Whether you get up at night to urinate depends on what your bladder capacity is, and how much urine you make from the time you go to sleep to the time you wake up in the morning (when you don’t go back to bed and are up for the day). If the amount of urine you make exceeds your bladder capacity during that time period, you’re going to get up at least once a night. People generally are not bothered by that. The normal individual puts out about one third of their urine volume during the nighttime hours (one third of 24 is 8). Statistically, the bother starts at two times a night, but not everyone is bothered by waking up two times a night. Most people who get up three times a night are significantly bothered by it. Does getting up to urinate an abnormal number of times affect your general overall health? Evidence shows that nocturia is associated with many health issues, from falls and fractures (from having to go to the bathroom at night), to diseases associated with nocturia that a physician looks for in the evaluation, ones that nocturia doesn’t necessarily cause, but are associated with it, such as diabetes. Two studies show nocturia is associated with increased morta Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

Nocturia

Nocturia

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. Nocturia can be defined as the need to wake and pass urine at night, in contrast to enuresis, where urine is passed unintentionally during sleep - see separate Nocturnal Enuresis in Children article. One episode of nocturia per night is considered within normal limits[1]. The term nocturia, as a symptom, is generally used to mean that the patient is waking to pass urine more frequently than normal, ie more than once per night. The rest of this article will use nocturia in this way. Nocturia is a common symptom in men and women. It can be troublesome in itself, by disturbing sleep, and can have a significant impact on quality of sleep and quality of life. Nocturia is a symptom, not a diagnosis. It is important to assess underlying causes, as some important conditions, such as diabetes, may present in this way[2]. Urinary symptoms defined[1]: Nocturia: waking up at night to pass urine. Daytime urinary frequency: this is so variable that it is difficult to assess; however, establish how it affects lifestyle. Urinary incontinence or leakage: In men, a small urinary leakage at the end of the stream (also known as 'post-micturition dribble') is so common that it does not constitute an abnormality. Many women leak a little urine on coughing. The most important question to follow a complaint of urinary incontinence is: "What protection do you need to cope with the leakage?" Obstructive symptoms (or 'voiding symptoms'): hesitancy, poor stream, intermittent stream, terminal dribbling. Irritative symptoms (or 'filling symptoms') Continue reading >>

Nocturia - Going To The Toilet At Night

Nocturia - Going To The Toilet At Night

Nocturia is when a person has to wake up at night to pass urine. If this happens more than twice a night, it can be a problem. Nocturia is common in older people. It can cause problems in day-to-day life. It can upset your sleep and put you at risk of falls, if you get up in the dark to pass urine. Also, when you have to wake up, you may not be able to get back to sleep and then you might not function as well through the day. You may sleep in the day and then not be able to sleep well at night. Changes like this to your sleep patterns may even make the problem worse: you may be more aware of your filling bladder and so feel like you need to pass urine more often. Having to wake up once or more each night to pass urine increases as you age. It has been found that one in two women, and two out of three men, aged 50 to 59 years have a problem with Nocturia. It is even more common as you get older—seven out of ten women, and nine out of ten men, over the age of 80 years have Nocturia. Bladder control problems are mainly caused by damage to pelvic floor muscles and the tissues that support them. common heart and kidney problems; swollen ankles; taking fluid tablets in the night-time; drinking large amounts of fluids, alcohol and caffeine drinks (tea, coffee and cola) before going to bed at night; poorly controlled diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2); Diabetes Insipidus (a rare hormone problem that causes severe thirst and urine loss); changes in position (going from upright in the day to lying flat at night means more blood can flow over the kidneys, so more night-time urine is made); upset or over-sensitive bladder (such as a bladder infection); overactive bladder (such as after a stroke); pregnancy; broken sleep, such as going to the toilet just because you are awake; and/or con Continue reading >>

I Wake Up At Night To Urinate—is That Normal?

I Wake Up At Night To Urinate—is That Normal?

We’ve all been there before. You are comfortably in bed and then you get that pressure sensation in your bladder. You get up and use the bathroom, but very little comes out. Before you know it, you’ve woken up three more times just to urinate. Sound familiar? You are not alone. According to a National Sleep Foundation survey, about 65 percent of people age of 55 and older reported getting up several times at night to use the bathroom. To be perfectly candid, I wake up once a night to urinate. At the PUR Clinic, patients often ask me if their nightly urinary habits are “normal”. Well, that depends on several things. Drinking too much fluid before bedtime or untreated diabetes are two possible causes of nocturia, the medical term for waking up at night to urinate. If you’re concerned about your nightly urinary patterns, here is some information that can help you differentiate between what is normal and when you should seek medical attention. Where does the urine come from? Urine is made in your kidneys. From there it drops down the ureters (long tubes connecting the kidney to the bladder) and gets stored in the bladder. The bladder, which is like a balloon and is very elastic, stretches to store urine. When it is time to pass your urine, your bladder (which is made of muscle) starts to contract and helps to evacuate your bladder. From there, the urine in females exits through the urethra and in men will bypass the prostate before exiting through the urethra. The whole process is very well regulated from beginning to end. What is normal? A 2010 study in the Journal of Urology examined the prevalence and incidence of nocturia. It found that up to one-third of men between the age of 20 to 40 had at least one instance of urination nightly. For women, the number was Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

7 0 We’ve written before about the signs and symptoms of diabetes. While there are a lot of sources about what symptoms diabetes causes, and even some good information about why they’re bad for you, what you don’t often get are the “whys”. And while the “whys” aren’t necessarily critical for your long-term health, they can help you to understand what’s going on with your body and why it acts the way it does. That, in turn, can help with acceptance and understanding of how to better treat the symptoms, which in turn can help you stay on a good diabetes management regimen. In short, you don’t NEED to know why diabetes causes excessive thirst, but knowing the mechanism behind it can make your blood glucose control regimen make more sense and help you stick to it. So why DOES diabetes cause thirst? First, we’d like to start by saying that excessive thirst is not a good indicator of diabetes. For many people, the symptom creeps up so slowly that it’s almost impossible to determine if your thirst has noticeably increased (unless you keep a spreadsheet of how much water you drink, in which case you also probably get tested pretty regularly anyway). It’s also a common enough symptom that a sudden increase in thirst can mean almost anything. Some conditions that cause thirst increases include allergies, the flu, the common cold, almost anything that causes a fever, and dehydration caused by vomiting or diarrhea. So while excessive thirst is one of those diabetes symptoms that happens, and needs to be addressed, it’s not always a great sign that you should immediately go out and get an A1C test. Why does diabetes cause thirst? Excessive thirst, when linked to another condition as a symptom or comorbidity, is called polydipsia. It’s usually one of the Continue reading >>

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes? More than 100 million American adults are living with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the number of people who know they have the diseases — which can lead to life-threatening complications, like blindness and heart disease — is far lower. Data from the CDC suggests that of the estimated 30.3 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, 7.2 million, or 1 in 4 adults living with the disease, are not aware of it. And among those people living with prediabetes, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the disease. Prediabetes is marked by higher than normal blood sugar levels — though not high enough to qualify as diabetes. The CDC notes that this condition often leads to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years if it's left untreated through diet and lifestyle modifications. Type 2 diabetes, which is often diagnosed when a person has an A1C of at least 7 on two separate occasions, can lead to potentially serious issues, like neuropathy, or nerve damage; vision problems; an increased risk of heart disease; and other diabetes complications. A person’s A1C is the two- to three-month average of his or her blood sugar levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, doctors may use other tests to diagnose diabetes. For example, they may conduct a fasting blood glucose test, which is a blood glucose test done after a night of fasting. While a fasting blood sugar level of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is normal, one that is between 100 to 125 mg/dL signals prediabetes, and a reading that reaches 126 mg/dL on two separate occasions means you have diabetes. People with full-blown type 2 diabetes are not able to use the h Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of Nocturia In The Elderly

Evaluation Of Nocturia In The Elderly

Go to: Report of a Case A colleague asks for your suggestions on the evaluation and treatment of a 78-year-old woman whose chief complaint is that she awakens four to five times each night to urinate. Your colleague adds that the patient does not have diabetes mellitus, is not taking diuretics, and had a physical examination that produced normal findings. Go to: Discussion Nocturia is defined as the interruption of sleep by the need to urinate. While it is a relatively uncommon complaint among younger adults, the prevalence of nocturia increases with increasing age in both men and women. For patients who are age 60 to 70 years, the prevalence of nocturia is between 11% and 50%. For those who are age 80 years, the prevalence rises to between 80% and 90%, with nearly 30% experiencing two or more episodes nightly.1 The older adult already experiences more frequent arousals from sleep and less deep sleep compared with younger adults. The presence of nocturia further disrupts sleep, leading to daytime somnolence, symptoms of depression, cognitive dysfunction, and a reduced sense of well-being and quality of life. Moreover, nocturia is associated with a 1.8-fold increased risk of hip fracture.2 Men who arise more than three times a night to urinate also have a twofold increase in mortality compared with those with fewer episodes of nocturia.3 Nocturia is a frequent patient complaint leading to urologic and nephrologic consultations. The causes of nocturia are many (Table 1). They can be divided into conditions affecting the storage of urine in the bladder and those involving the excessive production of urine by the kidneys. Although it is commonly assumed that the reason for nocturia is bladder dysfunction, particularly among elderly men, this assumption is not accurate. Brus Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Major Warning Sign Of Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Major Warning Sign Of Disease

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. The condition can cause long-term complications - and increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney damage. However it can alter the way the body works in the short-term. People with diabetes of find they are going to the toilet a lot, and often later at night. The term for urinating at night is called nocturia. Experts say needing to go to the toilet once a night is relatively normal, however, any more than this could indicate there are underlying health conditions. Urinating more often than usual can be triggered by excess glucose - or sugar -in the blood. This interferes with the kidney’s ability to concentrate urine. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. More sugar will also appear in the urine and this will cause more volumes of urine to be produced. High blood sugar levels - a hallmark of type 2 diabetes - can also trigger urinary tract infections - which can increase the need to urinate during the night. Urinating at night could also be a sign of prostate diseases, or prostate cancer, or excessive fluid intake. Experts also said it could be a symptom of Parkinson’s disease, a progressive neurological condition. Excessive thirst - which is also called polydipsia are classic diabetes symptoms. Tiredness, itching around the penis or vagina and slow wound healing are also symptoms of the disease. What happens if you ignore the signs? Diabetes UK said: “Type 2 diabetes can be easier to miss as it develops more sl Continue reading >>

Why Do I Pee So Much At Night?

Why Do I Pee So Much At Night?

Does your bladder nag you out of bed overnight? If you have to go to the bathroom more than once during 6-8 hours of zzz's, you might have nocturia. Your body may make too much urine, or your bladder can’t hold enough. Sometimes it's both. There are many possible causes. Some need medical treatment, others you can manage on your own. You may just be drinking too much or too close to bedtime. Drink less several hours before you go to sleep. Don’t have alcohol or caffeine late in the day. And be sure to use the bathroom before you go to bed. A urinary tract infection (UTI) triggers a need to pee more during the day and at night. It may hurt when you pee, your stomach may ache, and you might have a fever. Your doctor can diagnose and treat a UTI. The older you are, the more likely you are to need to pee at night. As you age, your body produces less of a hormone that helps concentrate urine so that you can hold it until the morning. When you're older you're also more likely to have other health problems that make you need to pee overnight. Your gender can play a role, too: Men: An enlarged prostate is common when you're an older guy. It usually isn’t serious, but it can keep you from emptying your bladder. Women: After menopause, you make less estrogen. That can cause changes in the urinary tract that make you have to go more often. If you’ve had children, the muscles in your pelvis may be weaker, too. Some medicines pull fluid out of your system and make you pee more. Ask your doctor if any of your meds do this. You might solve the problem by taking them earlier in the day, or the doctor may be able to change your medication. Sometimes it’s not the urge to pee that wakes you -- but once you’re up, you need to go. That can happen if you have restless legs syndro Continue reading >>

Frequent Urination: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Frequent Urination: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Frequent urination means having an urge to pass urine more often than usual. It can disrupt one's normal routine, interrupt the sleep cycle, and it can be a sign of an underlying medical condition. Many people live with frequent urination, known medically as frequency. When one urinates more than 3 liters a day of urine, this is known as polyuria. Often, there is often a simple cause that can be put right through treatment. Frequency is not the same as urinary incontinence, where there is leakage of urine. Sometimes, frequent urination can indicate a more serious condition. Early identification of the problem can lead to a timely and effective treatment and prevent complications. Contents of this article: Here are some key points about frequent urination. More detail is in the main article. Urinary frequency, or just frequency, is different from urinary incontinence. Most people urinate 6 or 7 times in 24 hours. Urinating more often than this may be referred to as frequency, but everyone is different. It is normally only a problem if it affects a person's quality of life. Frequency can often be treated with exercises, but if there is an underlying condition, such as diabetes, this will need attention. What is frequent urination? Urination is the way the body gets rid of waste fluids. Urine contains water, uric acid, urea, and toxins and waste filtered from within the body. The kidneys play a key role in this process. Urine stays in the urinary bladder until it reaches a point of fullness and an urge to urinate. At this point, the urine is expelled from the body. Urinary frequency is not the same as urinary incontinence, which refers to having little control over the bladder. Urinary frequency just means needing to visit the bathroom to urinate more often. It can occur a Continue reading >>

Frequent Urination: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, And Treatment Tips

Frequent Urination: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, And Treatment Tips

If you have the need to urinate more than you normally would, you suffer from frequent urination or polyuria. While in some situations it can be a temporary issue, it could also be a symptom of an underlying medical condition that requires careful attention. Doctors consider urinating every two hours or more frequent urination. The key to dealing with this problem is figuring out the cause and getting the right treatment. Frequent urination can be a challenge, since in some cases, a person may lose control of their bladder when the urge to go to the washroom strikes. It can be uncomfortable since your bladder can feel very full. Polyuria is not just an inconvenience. It can affect the quality of your sleep since you’re waking up at the night to go to the washroom. It can also be a symptom of a medical condition. Research suggests that many people with this problem avoid discussing it with a doctor because they find it too embarrassing, while others are too afraid to bring it up because they fear the underlying cause may be serious. The truth is, when people seek medical attention for frequent urination, they often discover that the cause is not serious and can be easily treated. In fact, for some people, the reason for the urge to urinate is as simple as drinking too many fluids. Pregnant women urinate a lot because the enlarged uterus is pressing on the bladder, so pregnancy could be the issue for some people. Since some frequent urination causes can be more serious, it is best to get an assessment from a doctor. Causes of frequent urination There are a number of frequent urination causes that doctors consider when a person complains about the sudden urge to urinate or the need to urinate frequently. One cause that sounds almost too simple is anxiety Stress and anxie Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Bladder And Bowel Control

Diabetes And Bladder And Bowel Control

This fact sheet has been developed to assist people looking for more information about diabetes and bladder and control People with diabetes commonly experience problems with controlling their bladder and bowel. The incontinence refers to bladder and bowel control problems. This can involve accidental leakage, incomplete emptying, passing urine frequently (frequency) or feeling the need to rush to the toilet (urgency). Poor control of the bladder and bowel is an important health problem. It can interfere with work, social activities or sexual and personal relationships. It is important that you seek help because these problems can be cured, treated or better managed. Talk to your doctor or call the Continence Helpline 0800 650 659. Normal bladder and bowel control Knowing how the bladder and bowel normally work will help you understand the problems you may be experiencing. The bladder and bowel store and expel body waste. The bladder stores and passes urine (wee) regularly throughout the day. On average we should pass urine 4-6 times during the day and once over night. This will vary depending upon how much you drink, what you drink and how much you exercise and perspire. Your bladder should easily hold 350 – 500 mls. When it is around about half full you will start to become aware of your bladder filling. You should not go to the toilet at this point but put it off until the urge is stronger but not yet urgent. The lower bowel stores and expels faeces (poo). The normal range for bowel movements is anywhere from 3 times per day to 3 times per week. The faeces you pass should be soft formed and easily passed with no straining. The pelvic floor muscles play an essential role in giving us control over the bladder and bowel. When we hold on to go to the toilet we are rely Continue reading >>

Frequent Urination: How Often Is Too Often?

Frequent Urination: How Often Is Too Often?

Most adults urinate four to seven times a day. But some health conditions can send you in search of a bathroom 10, 20, even 30 or more times daily. And that can seriously cramp your ability to do anything else. Whether you're in a business meeting, at a movie, or in the car with your family, you're always thinking about your next bathroom break. Two bladder conditions that often cause frequent urination are interstitial cystitis (IC) and overactive bladder. Fortunately, both conditions are treatable. First, however, you need to recognize that you have a medical problem and seek help for it. Here are some tip-offs that it may be time to see a doctor. Time to make an appointment? You are urinating more frequently than normal if you: Urinate eight or more times in a 24-hour period, or Get up to urinate two or more times a night The problem can be much more than a minor annoyance. If you urinate too frequently during the day, you may miss out on things you want to do because you're always in the bathroom or afraid to wander too far from a toilet. If you urinate too frequently at night, you may not sleep well. Your loved ones are affected, too, whenever you stop the car, cut back on activities, or repeatedly get up at night. If visits to the bathroom are controlling your life, it's time to talk with your doctor. What's causing my problem? Frequent urination can be caused by many different conditions. Examples include an enlarged prostate, diabetes, pregnancy, urinary tract infections, anxiety, or certain medications (such as diuretics). In some cases, frequent urination may simply be a habit. A comprehensive medical evaluation should be able to identify the precise cause, leading to effective treatment. Two other common causes—IC and overactive bladder—are easily confuse Continue reading >>

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