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Why Do Diabetics Pee A Lot At Night

Frequent Urination At Night - Causes And Treatments

Frequent Urination At Night - Causes And Treatments

Frequent urination at night is also known as nocturia (reference 1). Nocturia is when you have to wake up and go to the bathroom at night. Naturally, this can be disruptive on your sleep. This is a problem which is on the rise: an increasing proportion of Singaporeans have nocturia (reference 2), in line with a worldwide trend. Some doctors feel that one event of getting up to go to the bathroom per night is normal, while others believe that only a full 6 to 8 hours at night without emptying the bladder is normal. In any case, regularly rising two or more times per night to go to the bathroom is not considered normal. Frequent urination at night is not a disease in and of itself; however in many cases it is a symptom or an effect of an underlying disease or condition (references 2 and 3). In other cases it may have no obvious cause. However, it is always best to see a doctor if you are experiencing nocturia. This is because some of the underlying causes of frequent night time urination can be quite serious diseases, and seeing a doctor can present a window of opportunity to investigate and treat this condition. Causes There are many possible medical causes of frequent urination at night (references 1 and 3). Some of these are diabetes, hypercalcaemia, renal failure, cardiac disease and oedema. Multiple sclerosis and other neurological conditions such as cord compression and cauda equina can affect bladder control which can also cause nocturia. Diseases of the lower urinary tract can also cause frequent urination at night; some examples of these are urethral disease, inflammation such as interstitial cystitis, urinary tract infection, tumour of the bladder, ureters or urethra, prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy. Sleep apnoea is also known to be a possible ca Continue reading >>

What's A Normal Amount Of Times To Get Up And Pee At Night?

What's A Normal Amount Of Times To Get Up And Pee At Night?

Waking up occasionally to use the bathroom is nothing to worry about. But if it consistently happens at least twice a night, you may have a condition called nocturia that can impede the restorative nature of sleep, affecting your daytime performance and mood. In a recent study of women over 40, more than a third reported experiencing nocturia. Diuretic medications or drinking too many fluids late in the day may be to blame, but nocturia can also be a symptom of diabetes or heart failure. In the case of diabetes, not all excess sugar is reabsorbed by the kidneys and instead ends up in your urine, where it draws in extra water and increases your need to pee. Heart failure can make you feel the urge to go because it causes excess fluids to collect in your kidneys at night. Nocturia can also develop if you've recently experienced a urinary tract infection or other bladder disorder. Much remains to be learned about nocturia but there is likely some overlap with a condition called overactive bladder, also referred to as "urge incontinence." It's caused by frequent involuntary contraction of the bladder's detrusor muscle at inappropriate times, such as when the bladder is only partially full. This results in the sudden and strong urge to urinate any time of day. The condition is more common in women than in men, and an underlying cause often proves elusive. If you're dealing with nocturia, start by limiting fluids and bladder irritants like caffeine, alcohol, and spicy foods after dinner. Avoid feminine wipes that have fragrance, which can irritate the urethra. Practicing kegel exercises can also help strengthen pelvic floor muscles and improve bladder control. After ruling out the medical issues mentioned above, your doctor may recommend drugs that reduce the urge to pee at n Continue reading >>

Frequent Urination At Night Can Be A Sign That Your Kid Might Have Diabetes

Frequent Urination At Night Can Be A Sign That Your Kid Might Have Diabetes

Does your little one tend to have a habit of frequently urinating at night? It can possibly be a sign that your child might have diabetes. According to an expert, frequent urination at night can be a sign of 'polydipsia', a condition that is a symptom of diabetes. Frequent urination isn't always serious, but it's not normal Dr. Oyie Balburias shares that while there are a number of reasons that can potentially cause a child to urinate frequently at night, parents shouldn't just ignore this symptom, especially if their child is a bit on the 'heavier' side. For the most part, some kids tend to urinate frequently at night because they drink lots of liquids. However, if the frequent urination tends to keep them up at night, or if their liquid intake hasn't gone up, then it might be time to get your child checked by a doctor, since frequent urination isn't normal. Here are some questions your pediatrician might ask you: Does your child urinate frequently, and also urinates large amounts every time? Does your child wake up numerous times just to go to the bathroom? If your child is already potty trained, do they tend to frequently wet the bed? Does your child feel that they have to urinate frequently, but suddenly change their mind? It can potentially be diabetes Another probable cause of frequent urination would be polydipsia, which is a symptom of diabetes. Polyuria, or urinating large amounts of urine at a time is also a sign of potential diabetes. These 2 signs, coupled with sudden weight loss can potentially be a sign of diabetes in kids, so it's important for parents to observe their children and get them tested if they think their child has diabetes. Nowadays, diabetes among children is becoming more and more common as a lot of children are getting exposed to sugary sn Continue reading >>

10 Reasons You Always Have To Pee In The Middle Of The Night

10 Reasons You Always Have To Pee In The Middle Of The Night

The first question a doctor will ask you if you complain about having to pee in the middle of the night is, "Did the need to urinate wake you up, or did you wake up and notice you had to urinate?" "How you answer makes a difference," says Randy Wexler, MD, an associate professor of family medicine and vice chair of clinical affairs at the Ohio State University Medical Center. Wexler explains that, when you sleep, increased blood flow to your kidneys can accelerate urine production. So if you wake up because of a snoring bedmate or insomnia or some other reason that has nothing to do with your bladder, you'll still have no problem producing urine if you decide to head to the bathroom. But if having to pee is the reason you're waking up, that's not something to ignore, he says. (Even the color of your pee can give you insight to your health.) Here, he and other experts explain some of the most common causes of having to pee at night—and what to do about them. (Learn the 5 best foods for your brain and pick up tips to naturally protect yourself from dementia and stroke in Prevention's Ageless Brain.) Yes, this is super obvious. But Wexler says some people don't realize just how much H2O they're swallowing in the hours before bed—and how that fluid can disrupt their sleep. "I tell patients to stop drinking water two hours before bed," he says. Also, hit the bathroom before you hop in the sack. If you follow these instructions and you're still waking up to pee, it's time to see a doctor. (Along with bedtime, here are 5 times you shouldn't drink water.) Both alcohol and caffeine can increase your urine output, Wexler says. If you're the type who enjoys a cup of joe after dinner, or if you drink booze before bedtime, you're asking for trouble. Wexler recommends cutting off Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Reasons You Might Be Waking Up In The Middle Of The Night To Pee

10 Surprising Reasons You Might Be Waking Up In The Middle Of The Night To Pee

10 Surprising Reasons You Might Be Waking Up In the Middle of the Night to Pee Sign Up for Our Healthy Living Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Every week I see people whose sleep is disturbed because of frequent urination ( nocturia ). In the case of men, they are frequently put on medications for prostate enlargement that frequently do not work. In the case of women, they are usually placed on medications that inhibit bladder contraction but also cause dry mouth, constipation , and even lethargy. The reason that these therapies often fail to work is that there may be another cause for their nocturia. The following are ten common reasons for nocturia: 1. Sleep Apnea: 50% of people with sleep apnea experience frequent nighttime urination. This is because when we make vigorous efforts breathe against a closed airway, the heart muscle is stretched. It then puts out a hormone, atrial natriuretic peptide, which increases urine production. 2. Congestive Heart Failure : During the day, fluid accumulates in the legs due to gravity and the hearts inability to pump normally. When we lie down at night, this fluid, without the influence of gravity, reenters the blood stream and causes an increase in urine production. 3. Diabetes : Elevated levels of glucose in the kidneys at night draw more fluid into the urine. This can result in increased urine formation and disturbing nighttime urination. 4. Increased Age: Increased age has been associated with decreased bladder capacity, as well as a tendency of bladder muscles to become overactive. 5. Alcohol and Caffeine: Late night ingestion of either of these can cause nocturia that ruins sleep. They both can induce a diuresis resulting in frequent awakening. 6. Medications: Late night use of diuretic medicati Continue reading >>

Are You A Secret Diabetic?

Are You A Secret Diabetic?

Figures reveal that around one million Britons are 'secret diabetics' - unable to recognise the symptoms, so unaware they have the condition. There are 1.4 million known diabetics in the UK and, if left untreated, the disease can have devastating consequences. Most of those are suffering from Type 2 diabetes, which can usually be controlled by diet, exercise and drugs. Undiagnosed Type 1, or insulin-dependent, diabetes causes the sufferer to fall suddenly and acutely ill as a result of a dangerously high blood sugar level. Early diagnosis is therefore essential. So are you diabetic? Assess your risk factor by answering our-specially selected questions: count up the a, b and c totals, then find out what your score reveals. 1 Are you overweight? a) No, I am a standard size for my age and height; b) I am about a stone-and-a- half overweight; c) Yes. I am clinically obese (waist size: female - 34 in, male - 40 in). 2 Are there, or have there ever been, diabetics in your family? a) There are no recorded cases; b) Yes, but not a sibling or a parent; c) Yes. My father/mother/ sister/brother has diabetes. 3 Do you feel excessively thirsty all the time? a) No. I only get thirsty when I am hot or eating something salty; b) I have started to drink more and sometimes I am woken by thirst at night; c) I wake up thirsty every night and often feel thirsty during the day. 4 Are you passing large amounts of urine? a) Only when I have drunk a large amount; b) Sometimes the need to pass urine wakes me at night; c) I now wake up every night needing to urinate and I pass large amounts during the day. 5 Have you noticed significant changes to your vision? a) My vision is pretty stable with no dramatic changes in my powers of focus; b) My vision is less focused than it used to be; c) My visio Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sleep: How High Blood Sugar Steals Sleep Time

Diabetes And Sleep: How High Blood Sugar Steals Sleep Time

It’s probably far from obvious, but your diabetes could be the reason that you’re having trouble sleeping. Type 2 diabetes affects nearly 30 million Americans—and the numbers are growing. Though most of us are aware that the disease has a serious impact on a person’s diet and blood sugar, fewer are familiar with the many related health woes that diabetes can cause—and how they can negatively impact sleep. Take a closer look at the surprisingly intricate relationship between diabetes and sleep—plus how people with the condition can get a better night’s rest. Diabetes and Sleep: A Vicious Cycle? The relationship between diabetes and sleep is complicated, and experts still have a lot to learn about how the whole thing works. What they do know? How much sleep you get could play a role in whether you develop type 2 diabetes in the first place. First, there’s the growing connection between sleep and obesity. Being overweight is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes. (Believe it or not, up to 90% of people who are diagnosed with the disease are also obese.) What’s more, evidence shows that there are several ways that skimping on sleep could lead to weight gain: When you’re zonked, you don’t have the energy to exercise. Research suggests that people who stay up late spend more time sitting than people who wake up early. Feeling tired means you’re less likely to make healthy food choices, too. When you’re exhausted, pizza or takeout just feel easier (and more tempting) than a big kale salad. Staying up late means more time to eat. People who stay up into the wee hours at night have been found to eat 550 more calories than those who go to bed early. Lack of sleep messes with your hormones. Sleep deprivation causes your body to pump out more of the stre Continue reading >>

Urinating More At Night

Urinating More At Night

Drinking too much fluid during the evening can cause you to urinate more often during the night. Caffeine and alcohol after dinner can also lead to this problem. Other common causes of urination at night include: Infection of the bladder or urinary tract Drinking a lot of alcohol, caffeine, or other fluids before bedtime Enlarged prostate gland (BPH) Pregnancy Other conditions that can lead to the problem include: Chronic kidney failure Diabetes Heart failure High blood calcium level Certain medicines, including water pills (diuretics) Waking often during the night to urinate can also be linked to obstructive sleep apnea and other sleeping disorders. Nocturia may go away when the sleeping problem is under control. Continue reading >>

Why Do I Pee So Much At Night?

Why Do I Pee So Much At Night?

Does your bladder nag you out of bed overnight? If you have to go to the bathroom more than once during 6-8 hours of zzz's, you might have nocturia. Your body may make too much urine, or your bladder can’t hold enough. Sometimes it's both. There are many possible causes. Some need medical treatment, others you can manage on your own. You may just be drinking too much or too close to bedtime. Drink less several hours before you go to sleep. Don’t have alcohol or caffeine late in the day. And be sure to use the bathroom before you go to bed. A urinary tract infection (UTI) triggers a need to pee more during the day and at night. It may hurt when you pee, your stomach may ache, and you might have a fever. Your doctor can diagnose and treat a UTI. The older you are, the more likely you are to need to pee at night. As you age, your body produces less of a hormone that helps concentrate urine so that you can hold it until the morning. When you're older you're also more likely to have other health problems that make you need to pee overnight. Your gender can play a role, too: Men: An enlarged prostate is common when you're an older guy. It usually isn’t serious, but it can keep you from emptying your bladder. Women: After menopause, you make less estrogen. That can cause changes in the urinary tract that make you have to go more often. If you’ve had children, the muscles in your pelvis may be weaker, too. Some medicines pull fluid out of your system and make you pee more. Ask your doctor if any of your meds do this. You might solve the problem by taking them earlier in the day, or the doctor may be able to change your medication. Sometimes it’s not the urge to pee that wakes you -- but once you’re up, you need to go. That can happen if you have restless legs syndro Continue reading >>

9 Medical Reasons You Need To Pee All The Time

9 Medical Reasons You Need To Pee All The Time

Bladder acting up? Nicole Fornabaio/Rd.com, shutterstock If you're racing to the bathroom a couple times an hour or waking up frequently throughout the night needing to pee, you're probably super frustrated. Having to go all the time can be really annoying. Sometimes frequent urination can be linked to medical conditions that shouldn't be taken lightly. So, if you're concerned, you'll want to talk to your doctor to rule out any possible diagnoses. And, as a helpful guide, here are a few things that your pee could be trying to tell you, as well as the reasons that you're going oh-so-very much. You have a UTI Nicole Fornabaio/Rd.com, shutterstock If you're needing to pee too often, and it's happening all of a sudden, it could mean you have a urinary tract infection, says Partha Nandi, MD, physician and author of Ask Dr. Nandi. "Frequent urination can be a symptom of many different problems from kidney disease to simply drinking too much fluid," he says. "But, when frequent urination is accompanied by fever, an urgent need to urinate, and pain or discomfort in the abdomen, you may have a urinary tract infection." A urinary tract infection can hit when bacteria makes its way into the bladder, but this can be treated with medication. DirectExpose You're diabetic Frequent urination, with an abnormally large amount of urine, is often an early symptom of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, as the body tries to rid itself of unused glucose through the urine. "Excess sugar builds up in the blood and kidneys are forced to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If they can't keep up, that excess sugar will be excreted into the urine," says Dr. Nandi. "This causes fluids to be taken from your tissues, and because of this, frequent urination happens, which can cause dehydration." And, dehy Continue reading >>

Nocturia

Nocturia

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. Nocturia can be defined as the need to wake and pass urine at night, in contrast to enuresis, where urine is passed unintentionally during sleep - see separate Nocturnal Enuresis in Children article. One episode of nocturia per night is considered within normal limits[1]. The term nocturia, as a symptom, is generally used to mean that the patient is waking to pass urine more frequently than normal, ie more than once per night. The rest of this article will use nocturia in this way. Nocturia is a common symptom in men and women. It can be troublesome in itself, by disturbing sleep, and can have a significant impact on quality of sleep and quality of life. Nocturia is a symptom, not a diagnosis. It is important to assess underlying causes, as some important conditions, such as diabetes, may present in this way[2]. Urinary symptoms defined[1]: Nocturia: waking up at night to pass urine. Daytime urinary frequency: this is so variable that it is difficult to assess; however, establish how it affects lifestyle. Urinary incontinence or leakage: In men, a small urinary leakage at the end of the stream (also known as 'post-micturition dribble') is so common that it does not constitute an abnormality. Many women leak a little urine on coughing. The most important question to follow a complaint of urinary incontinence is: "What protection do you need to cope with the leakage?" Obstructive symptoms (or 'voiding symptoms'): hesitancy, poor stream, intermittent stream, terminal dribbling. Irritative symptoms (or 'filling symptoms') Continue reading >>

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes? More than 100 million American adults are living with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the number of people who know they have the diseases — which can lead to life-threatening complications, like blindness and heart disease — is far lower. Data from the CDC suggests that of the estimated 30.3 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, 7.2 million, or 1 in 4 adults living with the disease, are not aware of it. And among those people living with prediabetes, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the disease. Prediabetes is marked by higher than normal blood sugar levels — though not high enough to qualify as diabetes. The CDC notes that this condition often leads to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years if it's left untreated through diet and lifestyle modifications. Type 2 diabetes, which is often diagnosed when a person has an A1C of at least 7 on two separate occasions, can lead to potentially serious issues, like neuropathy, or nerve damage; vision problems; an increased risk of heart disease; and other diabetes complications. A person’s A1C is the two- to three-month average of his or her blood sugar levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, doctors may use other tests to diagnose diabetes. For example, they may conduct a fasting blood glucose test, which is a blood glucose test done after a night of fasting. While a fasting blood sugar level of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is normal, one that is between 100 to 125 mg/dL signals prediabetes, and a reading that reaches 126 mg/dL on two separate occasions means you have diabetes. People with full-blown type 2 diabetes are not able to use the h Continue reading >>

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

Nocturia

Nocturia

Diabetes and nighttime urination, or nocturia, can be a sign of uncontrolled blood sugar levels. This guide to nocturia explains the basics of recognising nocturia, and how to avoid it. What is nocturia? Nocturia is defined as nocturnal urination. This means the need to get up in the night to go to the toilet. Needing to go to the toilet up to once during the night is considered to be normal. Needing to urinate more than once during the night could indicate a temporary or longer term problem may be present. Causes of nocturia There are a number of possible causes for needing to urinate more frequently than normal at night and these may include one or more of the following: Diabetes insipidus High blood glucose levels Autonomic neuropathy Urinary tract infections Cystitis Prostate diseases Excessive fluid intake - particularly alcohol or caffeine intake Taking diuretic medications Parkinson’s disease Multiple sclerosis Nocturia is more likely to appear as we get older. Diabetes and nocturia Having high blood glucose levels can cause the body to excrete excess glucose via the urine. In this instance, more sugar appears in the urine and simulates extra volumes of urine to be produced. If you regularly have high blood glucose levels, you may increase the risk of picking up a urinary tract infection which can also increase the need to urinate through the night. One specific form of diabetes that is not linked with abnormal blood glucose levels, diabetes insipidus, is closely linked with nocturia. How can nocturia be treated? How nocturia is treated will depend upon what the underlying cause is. If you are having than recommended blood glucose levels, bringing your levels under tighter control could help to reduce the need to urinate at night. Contact your GP or diabetes te Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

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