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Why Do Diabetics Have To Wear Socks?

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetic Socks

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetic Socks

Diabetes is a disease that requires many medical equipment for daily treatment and monitoring. The most common supplies includes blood glucose monitor, glucose test strips, lancets, and syringes. Although not a lot of people consider diabetic socks a necessity, they are crucial to better health and prevention of various complications. If you are wondering if you should invest in diabetic socks, this article will help you decide by explaining these topics below: What are Diabetic Socks? Diabetic socks are specially designed socks to 1) reduce pressure in the lower leg and foot, 2) prevent blistering on the skin surfaces, and 3) minimize moisture accumulation. Ultimately, their jobs are to protect your feet and provide maximum comfort. These socks are typically non-elastic and seamless. The non-elastic feature is to prevent constriction due to common feet swelling tendencies. The seamless design is to minimize friction to the nerves and minimize neurological discomfort and pain. These socks simply fit well to prevent restrictions in the calf from a tight sock line that can limit circulation. When circulation is decreased, it becomes harder for the body to heal. High blood sugar which is associated with diabetes also causes the immune system to slow down. Specialized socks are one way to combat this duo of issues to prevent the need for future amputation or even death due to foot injury. Aside from the two special structures, these socks are always slightly cushioned to prevent injury. At the same time, there are reinforced moisture-wicking ability so that sweat and humidity from your shoes are not trapped between the sock and foot. By keeping your feet dry, your feet are at less risk of developing blisters and fungal infections. Who Should Use Diabetic Socks? Not all peop Continue reading >>

Diabetic Socks - What Are They, And Why Are They Needed?

Diabetic Socks - What Are They, And Why Are They Needed?

Diabetic Socks - What are they, and why are they needed? Diabetic Socks - What are they, and why are they needed? Why does someone with diabetes need special socks? While not all diabetics are required to wear diabetic socks, people with diabetes are more prone to foot injuries and infections because of damage to their circulatory and nervous systems and even their immune system. Diabetic socks are designed to prevent the dangerous and deleterious consequences that can develop as a result of these medical conditions. For example, nerve damage (or neuropathy) results in decreased sensation and increased risk of injury. Circulatory problems slow down the bodys ability to heal and high blood sugar levels compromise the bodys immune system. All of these medical conditions can result in greater risk of injury and infection to the feet, and diabetic socks address these conditions specifically. Diabetic socks are specially designed to decrease the risk of foot injury, to offer maximum blood flow, and keep the feet dry. Below is a list of the most important features to look for in diabetic socks: Seamless: Socks with seams can rub against the skin and can cause blisters or ulcers, which may be harmful for diabetic feet. Ideally, the seamless design of the socks should feature an inverse linking, which keeps the ends of the toe-linking thread outside. Non-constricting: The fit of diabetic socks should be loose and non-constricting. Tight socks can inhibit circulation, which might be challenging for those who suffer from circulatory issues. Padding: Extra padding and cushioning for sensitive areas help prevent injury and enhances comfort. Normally the extra padding runs along the bottom of the sock, around the toes, and at the heel of the foot. Warmth: Diabetes can cause blood v Continue reading >>

How Do Compression Socks Work For Diabetics?

How Do Compression Socks Work For Diabetics?

Compression therapy is particularly beneficial for patients with diabetes. Compression socks are worn to improve circulation in patients with various medical issues, such as diabetes and varicose veins or those at risk of developing blood clots. As a non-invasive treatment method, compression therapy serves as a tool for maintaining the right amount of pressure in your feet and legs. So, how do compression socks work and why are they particularly helpful for people with diabetes? What Causes Poor Circulation? When patients experience circulation problems in the lower extremities, it is often due to a condition known as venous insufficiency. As you know, the circulatory system consists of arteries that deliver oxygenated blood throughout the body, and veins that return deoxygenated blood and waste products back to the heart and lungs for recirculation. The muscles in your feet and calves act as a pump to help blood flow back up through the legs against the pull of gravity. In some people, vein walls in the legs lose their elasticity and become weak, causing the valves inside the veins to pull apart. These valves normally open and close to allow blood to flow up in one direction. When valves become pulled apart due to weakened vein walls, they do not close properly, allowing blood to flow in two directions. This causes blood to pool in the lower extremities and results in peripheral edema (swelling) in the legs, ankles, and feet. How Do Compression Socks Work to Improve Circulation? Compression socks improve circulation by gently squeezing the foot and calf muscles, which in turn straightens out the vein walls to a better working state. This gentle compression allows the valves to function properly by opening to allow blood flow toward the heart and closing to prevent blo Continue reading >>

More Effectively Than Ordinary Socks?

More Effectively Than Ordinary Socks?

Do Diabetic Socks Actually Reduce the Foot Problems Associated with Diabetes Adam Porter Vanderbilt University Introduction If you are diagnosed with diabetes, chances are you have come across one of the numerous websites that promotes special diabetic socks intended to improve the overall health of your feet. But how are these socks different from ordinary cotton socks that could be purchased at any retail store? In this paper we will look at the reasons why diabetics are more prone to foot problems, examine the differences between the construction of the two different types of socks, look at website, personal, and medical reviews, and then conclude with an examination of the scientific research concerning which type of footwear is actually best for the diabetic’s foot. What causes foot problems in diabetics? According to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society, there are two main reasons why people with diabetes must be especially careful when it comes to the health of their feet. The first problem many diabetics face is called neuropathy, or nerve damage. The Podiarty Channel defines diabetic neuropathy as “a condition in which nerve function deteriorates in the body’s extremities” and “leads to a gradual loss of feeling in the hands, arms, legs, and feet” (www.podiartychannel.com). This loss of feeling leads to decreased ability to realize the severity of foot related injuries. By failing to quickly respond to minor cuts, bruises, or blisters, the injury could quickly become infected and lead to serious health conditions. According to a 2001 study by Bowker and Pfeifer, “a large percentage of diabetic patients undergo nontraumatic amputation after diabetic neuropathy renders them unable to feel festering foot injuries.” The study also found t Continue reading >>

When Diabetic Patients Need Compression Socks

When Diabetic Patients Need Compression Socks

When diagnosed with diabetes, patients work closely with their physician, diabetic educator and pharmacist on how to best take care of their health with an important emphasis on legs and feet. People with diabetes often have circulation problems that can cause peripheral edema (swelling) in their feet, ankles and legs. There are many causes of peripheral edema, not necessarily related to diabetes, such as standing or sitting for long periods of time, physical inactivity, chronic venous disease, lymphedema, heredity, pregnancy, surgery and trauma and some illnesses. Peripheral edema can also be associated with diabetes complications such as heart disease, venous insufficiency, and kidney disease. Certain diabetes medications can also cause edema. New research (1) shows that for many diabetic patients who suffer from edema, compression socks can help keeping legs and feet healthy, and allow the patient to have a more active lifestyle. Graduated compression socks and hosiery have been proven to effectively promote venous blood flow by providing a gentle graduated support to leg veins and valves. A calf-length compression stocking goes over the calf muscle to be most effective. Graduated compression socks and hosiery come in different levels of compression. Features of the SIGVARIS Diabetic compression sock include padding sole, flat seam, non-constricting top band, yarn that breathes and wicks away moisture. Sock and hosiery and should be worn under the direction of a physician. A mild level (up to 25 mmHg) of graduated compression will help reduce the symptoms of swelling, tired and achy legs, spider and varicose veins and other leg discomforts. Higher levels of compression are a noted caution or contraindication for a diabetic patient (2). Your doctor can help to determi Continue reading >>

Sockwear Recommendations For People With Diabetes

Sockwear Recommendations For People With Diabetes

Case Presentation A.B., a 55-year-old man who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 6 months ago, was a new patient in the foot clinic of the Durham VA Medical Center. At the time of his first visit, he was taking metformin, 500 mg twice a day, and maintained adequate blood glucose control. His most recent HbA1c was 6.5%. The skin on his feet was intact, without redness, and its texture was smooth and soft. His nails were intact without signs of onychomycosis. The shape of his feet was normal, and monofilament testing confirmed that foot sensation was intact. He had easily palpable pedal pulses and no edema. During routine discussion of foot-care precautions, he asked what kind of socks he should wear to prevent problems. Discussion Good foot care practices are important for people with diabetes. A large percentage of diabetic patients undergo nontraumatic amputation after diabetic neuropathy renders them unable to feel festering foot injuries. What’s more, within 3 years of a first amputation, up to half of these patients have a second either new same side or contralateral amputation. Within 5 years, as many as 80% have died.1,2 As care providers, we are responsible for the self-care practices our patients use every day. Pronounce-ments such as, “People with diabetes need to keep their feet dry” and “Moisture promotes fungal growth” are common, and it is widely assumed that the sock fabric our patients wear determines how moist or dry the skin on their feet will be. There are three schools of thought regarding the best fabric for socks worn by people with diabetes. Some professionals recommend cotton/wool socks. Others recommend socks or stockings of acrylic or a synthetic blend. And still others advise their patients to wear comfortable, well-fitting socks Continue reading >>

What Are Diabetic Socks?

What Are Diabetic Socks?

Most diabetic socks on the market are socks that are made to keep the feet dry, decrease the risk of foot injury, and avoid preventing or slowing blood circulation. They usually are made of materials that have superior abilities to wick away moisture, are fitted, padded, and nonbinding, and do not have seams. Why People With Diabetes Need Special Socks People with diabetes are at higher risk of foot injuries and infection due to damage to their circulatory and nervous systems caused by high blood sugar levels. Nerve damage, or neuropathy, decreases sensation and increases risk of injury, especially on the bottom of the feet. It can also cause a patient to be unaware of an injury and delay treatment. Circulatory problems make it harder for wounds to heal because it is difficult for them to benefit from the healing properties of the bloodstream. High blood sugar levels also can create a sluggish immune system. These problems can create a situation that could lead to amputation or even death. Clearly, foot care is an extremely important consideration for someone with diabetes. What If I Don't Have Any Foot Issues? People with diabetes who have "normal" feet can wear whatever comfortable socks they like. They should not be tight, constricting, lumpy, or have seams that are uncomfortable. Do not use socks that can lead to injuries, such as friction blisters. Fitted socks are a better choice than tube socks. What If I Have Decreased Sensation? In people with diabetes who are at higher risk for developing ulcers because they cannot sense pressure, a good choice may be a densely padded sock that is made of acrylic fiber. Acrylic fibers seem to have better moisture-wicking abilities. Light or white colored socks can help a person who has decreased foot sensation discover injurie Continue reading >>

The Right Socks For Diabetes

The Right Socks For Diabetes

Do you know what to wear on your feet? The right socks and shoes can prevent complications and improve your life with diabetes. Find the footwear that’s right for you. Why do people with diabetes need good socks and shoes? Diabetes often slows blood circulation to and from the feet. If blood doesn’t flow well from feet to the heart, legs and feet will swell (called edema). If blood gets stuck in veins, it may form blood clots that can travel to your lungs (pulmonary embolism) or brain (stroke), which can be fatal. Arteries bring blood from the heart to the feet. In poorly controlled diabetes, arteries can be blocked with scar tissue and fat deposits. This is called peripheral arterial disease (PAD). According to the University of California-San Francisco Medical Center, people with diabetes have two to four times the risk of developing PAD compared to those without diabetes. Endocrinologist Bonnie W. Greenwald, MD, says, “Poor blood flow makes it harder for the body to heal, which increases the risk for skin ulcers and gangrene, or tissue death.” The end result can sometimes be amputation of a foot or leg. This is where shoes and socks come in. The right footwear can protect feet from injury and infection. It can also improve circulation through the lower half of your body. Diabetes socks Diabetes socks protect feet from injury. According to the medical equipment company Sigvaris, “Most diabetic socks are soft, provide padding on the sole of the foot, and should conform to the foot/leg without wrinkles,” which could irritate the skin. They shouldn’t have anything sharp in them, so they are often seamless or have “flat seams” against the toes or foot. The Sigvaris site says, “The fibers should wear evenly, instead of leaving thin spots where friction Continue reading >>

Find The Right Diabetic Socks

Find The Right Diabetic Socks

Diabetes is a chronic illness that can require lifelong treatment and care. Many complications can occur, some of which affect the feet. If you have diabetes, you’re at risk of developing serious complications like foot infections. Not attending to diabetic foot care carefully and consistently can lead to amputation of the toes, feet, or even the entire leg below the knee. Practicing good foot care, such as choosing appropriate socks, is essential for preventing possible complications. People with diabetes are at risk for complications associated with having high blood sugar levels. One such complication is nerve damage (neuropathy). The most common type of neuropathy affects the nerves in the feet. Symptoms of diabetic neuropathy include: numbness in the feet and toes sharp pains in the feet that are worse at night tingling or burning sensations in the feet muscle weakness foot deformities and ulcers If you have diabetic neuropathy and have lost feeling in your feet, it’s possible to get injured and never feel it. A pebble stuck in your shoe, for instance, may rub against your foot and cause a small ulcer. If you don’t check your feet for these injuries, they can get worse and become infected. Good diabetic foot care means checking your feet every day for injuries, blisters, and infections. It also means wearing footwear that helps prevent injuries. There are many different types of socks for people with diabetes. Generally, they’re designed to minimize foot injuries and keep feet dry and warm. Finding the right pair means selecting socks that best meet your needs. Here are some characteristics of diabetic socks: seamless: Socks with seams can rub against your skin and cause blisters or ulcers. Most diabetic socks are made without them moisture-wicking: Keeping Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Wearing Diabetic Socks |

Benefits Of Wearing Diabetic Socks |

If youve already been diagnosed with diabetes, youre probably well aware of the fact that any nerve damage youve already suffered can lead to a potentially dangerous loss of feeling in your hands, arms, legs and feet. Thats why the use of diabetic socks is so crucially important: Hurting your feet but never realizing it is a very real possibility for diabetics. And so some diabetic socks designs are extra-thick, and will reduce the chance of damage to your feet when the coldest winter weather hits. Most are also seamless and non-constricting. But before you actually purchase a pair, take a few minutes to read up on the benefits and differences of each separate style. This is our most reasonably priced diabetic sock, although the feature you should really be focusing on is the socks full-cushion lining, which was designed for easy and pain-free walking. These socks also have a low-profile seam in the toe area, to reduce unnecessary skin irritation. These are fairly long socks they reach all the way to the legs mid-calf area and the non-restrictive top wont cut off your circulation. All in all, this is a fantastic general purpose diabetic sock and it even comes in ankle length.[ Learn More ] This thin and lightweight pair is a great choice for any diabetic whos especially concerned about blood circulation loss or skin irritation of any sort. The socks toe area, for instance, is completely seamless. And because the top of the sock is non-ribbed and the exterior is made of nylon, the overall feel is very nonrestrictive and free of friction. As with the SoftStep design above, the Seamfree socks are available inmid-calf crew or ankle length, and they can easily be worn as dress socks.[ Learn More ] With a completely seamless toe and a nonrestrictive non-ribbed top, these lig Continue reading >>

Diabetic Sock

Diabetic Sock

A diabetic sock is a non-binding and non-elasticized sock which is designed alleviate pressure of the foot or leg.[1] Typically sufferers of diabetes are the most common users of this type of sock.[2] Diabetes raises the blood sugar level, which can increase the risk of foot ulcers. Diabetic socks are made to be unrestrictive of circulation.[citation needed] Some diabetic socks also control moisture,[2][3] a feature which can reduce the risk of infection. Another beneficial feature of diabetic socks is seamless toe-closures to reduce pressure and blistering.[2] Varieties[edit] Various sock constructions are available, including cotton blend with stretch tops, non-cotton with antimicrobial properties, compression type, and plain non-binding to allow circulation to flow more freely. Extra wide socks are available for excessive edema. Diabetic socks may appear like regular socks, and are available in both low-cut and mid-calf styles. Although various colors are available, white may be preferable for people with open wounds or sores, as this could alert wearers with compromised sensation to a draining wound. The diabetic socks should fit well, without constricting cuffs, lumps, or uncomfortable seams. The socks are generally made of material that does not wrinkle.[4] The advice of a podiatrist may be helpful in choosing a diabetic sock.[5] See also[edit] Compression stockings, which provide the opposite features Diabetic foot Diabetic shoe [edit] Continue reading >>

Diabetic Socks

Diabetic Socks

Tweet Protect iT Socks A new sock brought to the UK by Reed Medical could help prevent these problems developing - reducing the risk of amputation - and is recommended by the Vice Chairman of SOCAP. The PROTECT iT™ sock is a unique design from Switzerland that acts as a second skin and uses the latest technology to: Battle bacteria Eliminate friction Protect sore-prone areas Support arches Wick away moisture Regulate temperature Reflexa Diabetic Socks Reflexa’s Diabetic Socks can help you prevent complications of diabetic foot as they contain a new synthetic yarn called Celliant. Celliant has been clinically proven to relieve pain, promote quicker wound healing, improve sleep quality, heighten athletic performance and help to regulate body temperature. These revolutionary fibres are woven into the sock to help increase blood oxygen levels while retaining heat to keep feet warm. They also feature a flat toe seam (i.e. are seam-free) and do not feature binding. Skinnies Socks Skinnies socks are classified as a class 1 medical device Skinnies Therapeutic Socks has specialist composite yarn used to absorb some moisture while helping retention of emollients and creams to effectively hydrate the skin. Its properties are such that it also removes any allergenic elements of its construction away from contact with your skin while keeping the foot safe and clean. Skinnies Therapeutic socks are 86% Viscose, 11% Nylon & 3% Elastane and do not restrict blood flow, relieve tired feet and aching legs and give protection for your toes. Featuring a low powered stretch, with no actual compression of the foot, they do stay in place despite having seam-free technology. This removes the risk of blisters and calluses and the sock also has no tight rib on the top edge. Silver Socks Do you Continue reading >>

Why Do Diabetics Wear Special Socks?

Why Do Diabetics Wear Special Socks?

It is very important for people with diabetes to take scrupulous care of their feet. Wearing special socks is part of this good foot care. It is very common for people with diabetes to injure their feet for several reasons. Foot injury in people with diabetes is very serious because it can lead to amputations of the lower extremeties. In fact, diabetes is one of the leading causes of limb amputations. The diabetic foot is susceptible to injury because one of the complications of diabetes is diabetic neuropathy which often manifests as a sensory neuropathy. This sensory neuropathy prevents diabetics from knowning when their foot has been injured due to trauma from stubbing their toe, bruising from bumping into things, burns from unknowingly putting feet into bath water that is too hot, foot ulcers from wearing shoes that are too tight, etc. To compound these unfelt injuries to the foot, foot wounds in people with diabetes heal more slowly than in normal people because another complication of diabetes is vascular insufficiency. This is due to endothelial dysfunction of small perfusing blood vessels that are part of what is known as microvascular complications. Diabetics also suffer from accelerated atherosclerosis in large blood vessels that diminish blood flow to limbs. Having good blood flow to the foot is essential for proper wound repair. Thus, diabetics have a tendency to injure their feet without knowing it. Then their injured feet do not heal properly due to poor blood flow. This leads to diabetic foot ulcers and skin infections which can progress to bone infections. These infections are difficult to treat because poor blood supply to the foot and elevated blood sugar levels help bacterial infections to progress faster. Diabetic neuropathy, diabetic micro- and macr Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

How To Care For Your Diabetic Feet

How To Care For Your Diabetic Feet

2. Never walk barefoot, neither indoors nor out. 3. Examine your feet daily for redness, warmth, blisters, ulcers, scratches, cuts and nail problems from shoes or other sources. Look at the bottom of your feet and between the toes. Use a mirror or have someone else look for you. 4. Call your doctor immediately if you experience any injury to your foot. Even a minor injury is an emergency for a patient with diabetes. 5. Examine your shoes for foreign objects, protruding nails and rough spots inside before putting them on. Look and feel. 6. Buy shoes late in the day. Never buy shoes that need "breaking in." They should be immediately comfortable. Request shoes with deep toe boxes and shoes made of leather or other flexible upper material. 7. Do not wear new shoes more than two hours at a time. Rotate your shoes. Do not wear the same ones every day. 9. Lubricate your entire foot if your skin is dry, but avoid putting cream between your toes. Try Curel, Lubriderm, olive oil, vitamin E oil, lanolin or Eucerin cream. 10. Do not soak your feet. Skin can break down and won't heal well. 11. Keep feet away from heat sources (heating pads, hot water bottles, electric blankets, radiator, fireplaces). You can burn your feet without knowing it. Water temperature should be less than 92 degrees. Estimate the temperature with your elbow or bath thermometer (you can get one in any store that sells infant products). 12. Don't use any tape or sticky products such as corn plasters on your feet. They can rip your skin. 13. Do not file down, remove or shave calluses or corns yourself. These should be taken care of by your physician or someone your physician recommends. 14. Do not use any chemicals or strong antiseptic solutions on your feet. Iodine, salicylic acid, corn/callus removers and hy Continue reading >>

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