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Why Do Diabetics Get Sores On Their Feet

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

Diabetic Blisters: What You Need To Know

Diabetic Blisters: What You Need To Know

People with diabetes can sometimes experience blisters on their skin. These are known as diabetic blisters, bullosis diabeticorum, or diabetic bullae. Although more than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, diabetic blisters are relatively rare, affecting just 0.5 percent of those with the condition. The blisters typically occur in people with uncontrolled diabetes. They are painless and tend to heal on their own without the need for medical intervention. This article looks at the causes and symptoms of diabetic blisters and lists several ways to treat and prevent them. Contents of this article: Causes The exact cause of diabetic blisters is not known, but several factors are thought to play a role in blister development. The blisters may result from: wearing shoes that do not fit properly reduced circulation a fungal infection called Candida albicans other injury or irritation to the feet or hands Furthermore, certain people with diabetes are more at risk of developing diabetic blisters than others. People at risk of developing diabetic blisters include: people whose blood sugar levels are not under control people with sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) light men, as research reveals men are twice as likely as women to have diabetic blisters Symptoms Diabetic blisters most commonly appear in people who have had uncontrolled diabetes for several years. In some cases, however, they may be the first indication of diabetes or even prediabetes. Blisters are usually clear bumps that typically appear on the legs, feet, and toes, as well as the arms, hands, and fingers. They may be: irregularly-shaped up to 6 inches across clustered or, less commonly, occurring as a single lesion filled with a clear fluid itchy The skin around diabetic blisters will usually look Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Blisters

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Blisters

If you have diabetes and experience the spontaneous eruption of blisters on your skin, they may well be diabetic blisters. These are also called bullosis diabeticorum or diabetic bullae. Although the blisters may be alarming when you first spot them, they’re painless and normally heal on their own without leaving scars. A number of skin conditions are associated with diabetes. Diabetic blisters are fairly rare. An article in the International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries notes that in the United States, the disorder occurs in only 0.5 percent of people with diabetes. Diabetic blisters are twice as likely to be found in men than in women. Diabetic blisters most often appear on your legs, feet, and toes. Less frequently, they show up on hands, fingers, and arms. Diabetic blisters can be as large as 6 inches, though they’re normally smaller. They’re often described as looking like blisters that occur when you get a burn, only without the pain. Diabetic blisters seldom appear as a single lesion. Rather, they are bilateral or occur in clusters. The skin surrounding the blisters isn’t normally red or swollen. If it is, see your doctor promptly. Diabetic blisters contain a clear, sterile fluid, and they’re usually itchy. Read about the eight best remedies for itching. Given the risk of infection and ulceration when you have diabetes, you may want to see a dermatologist to rule out more serious skin conditions. Diabetic blisters usually heal in two to five weeks without intervention, according to an article in Clinical Diabetes. The fluid in the blisters is sterile. To prevent infection, you shouldn’t puncture the blisters yourself, though if the lesion is large, your doctor may want to drain the fluid. This will keep the skin intact as a covering for Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Foot Care And Foot Ulcers

Diabetes, Foot Care And Foot Ulcers

Some people with diabetes develop foot ulcers. A foot ulcer is prone to infection, which may become severe. This leaflet aims to explain why foot ulcers sometimes develop, what you can do to help prevent them, and typical treatments if one does occur. Why are people with diabetes prone to foot ulcers? Foot ulcers are more common if you have diabetes because one or both of the following complications develop in some people with diabetes: Reduced sensation of the skin on your feet. Narrowing of blood vessels going to the feet. Your nerves may not work as well as normal because even a slightly high blood sugar (glucose) level can, over time, damage some of your nerves (neuropathy). Read more about diabetic neuropathy. If you have diabetes you have an increased risk of developing narrowing of the blood vessels (arteries), known as peripheral arterial disease. The arteries in the legs are quite commonly affected. This can cause a reduced blood supply (poor circulation) to the feet. Skin with a poor blood supply does not heal as well as normal and is more likely to be damaged. What increases the risk of developing foot ulcers? If you have reduced sensation to your feet (see above). The risk of this occurring increases the longer you have diabetes and the older you are. If your diabetes is poorly controlled. This is one of the reasons why it is very important to keep your blood sugar (glucose) level as near normal as possible. If you have narrowed blood vessels (arteries) - see above. The risk of this occurring increases the longer you have diabetes, the older you become and also if you are male. The risk also increases if you have any other risk factors for developing furring of the arteries. For example, if you smoke, do little physical activity, have a high cholesterol leve Continue reading >>

Blisters & Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Blisters & Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Living With Diabetes Starts With Proper Management Blisters & Diabetes: What You Need to Know As atype 1diabetic for the past 8 years, Im always trying to stay on top of the latest news and trends when it comes to diabetes complications. Did you know that every 30 seconds, somewhere in the world, someone loses a lower limb as a result of diabetes. Thats because diabetes and wounds are a dangerous combination. If you have diabetes, theres no such thing as a minorwoundto the foot even small blisters or foot sores can turn into anulcerthat, if not properly treated, can lead to amputation. The rate of amputation for people with diabetes is 10 times higher than for those who dont have the disease. There is no single known cause for diabetic blisters. Many of those who have diabetic blisters may also tend to suffer fromneuropathyandnephropathy. Some researchers think that a decreased ability to sustain an injury may play a role. Also in people with heart failure, the swelling that can result from that condition may be enough to cause the blisters.Many people who develop the diabetic blisters have had diabetes for many years or have several complications from the disease. Symptoms of diabetic blisters include intenseitchingandburningsensation of the skin. When the mucous membranes of the mouth are affected, it can cause pain, burning, peeling away of affected inner lining tissues, and sensitivity to acidic foods. Eating can be difficult, and involvement in the deeper areas of the throat can cause coughing. Involvement of the inner nose can cause nosebleeds. The disease typically worsens (exacerbates) and improves (remits) over time. It is crucial that you report any slow-healing blisters to your doctor because if infection occurs it can threaten the well-being of your entire Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

Chronically high blood sugar (glucose) levels can be associated with serious complications in people who have diabetes. The feet are especially at risk. Two conditions called diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can damage the feet (and other areas of the body) in people who have diabetes. What is diabetic neuropathy? Chronically high sugar levels associated with uncontrolled diabetes can cause nerve damage that interferes with the ability to sense pain and temperature. This so-called "sensory diabetic neuropathy" increases the risk a person with diabetes will not notice problems with his or her feet. Nearly 10% of people with diabetes develop foot ulcers due to peripheral vascular disease and nerve damage. People with diabetes may not notice sores or cuts on the feet, which in turn can lead to an infection. Nerve damage can also affect the function of foot muscles, leading to improper alignment and injury. What is peripheral vascular disease? Diabetes is associated with poor circulation (blood flow). Inadequate blood flow increases the healing time for cuts and sores. Peripheral vascular disease refers to compromised blood flow in the arms and legs. Poor blood flow increases the risk that infections will not heal. This, in turn, increases the risk of ulcers and gangrene, which is tissue death that occurs in a localized area when there is an inadequate blood supply. What are common foot problems of people with diabetes? The following images show common foot problems that anyone can get; however, those with diabetes are at increased risk for serious complications associated with these conditions, including infection and even amputation. Athlete's foot Fungal infection of the feet is called athlete's foot. Cracked skin, itching, and redness are associated w Continue reading >>

Foot Ulcers

Foot Ulcers

Tweet Closely linked with diabetes neuropathy, diabetic nerve pain and diabetes foot care, diabetic foot ulcers affect many people with diabetes. Experts suggest that around 10 per cent of people with diabetes develop a foot ulcer at some point. Foot ulcers can affect people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Diabetes influences foot ulcers in a number of ways, and it is important for people with diabetes to understand the potentially severe consequences of leaving a foot ulcer untreated. What is a diabetic foot ulcer? Foot ulcers can occur in anyone, and refer to a patch of broken down skin usually on the lower leg or feet. When blood sugar levels are high or fluctuate regularly skin that would normally heal may not properly repair itself because of nerve damage. Even a mild injury can therefore start a foot ulcer. Why are people with diabetes more likely to get foot ulcers? People with diabetes may have reduced nerve functioning due to peripheral diabetic neuropathy. This means that the nerves that usually carry pain sensation to the brain from the feet do not function as well and it is possible for damage to uccur to your foot without feeling it. Treading on something, wearing tight shoes, cuts, blisters and bruises can all develop into diabetes foot ulcers. Narrowed arteries can also reduce blood flow to the feet amongst some people with diabetes and this can impair the foot’s ability to heal properly. When the foot cannot heal, a foot ulcer can develop. What are the risk factors for diabetes foot ulcers? The following can increase the likelihood of developing a foot ulcer: Poor blood circulation Insufficiently well controlled diabetes Wearing poor fitting footwear Walking barefoot People who have diabetes for a longer period or manage their diabetes less effec Continue reading >>

Diabetic Blisters

Diabetic Blisters

Share: Diabetic blisters are also called bullosis diabeticorum or diabetic bullae. They can sometimes develop in people with diabetes, although the condition is relatively rare. Only about one-half of one percent of those with diabetes is ever diagnosed with diabetic blisters. The blisters often appear on the legs and arms and seem to appear for no reason. In most cases, when they disappear, they do not leave scars. What Causes Diabetic Blisters? There is no single known cause for diabetic blisters. Many of those who have diabetic blisters may also have neuropathy and nephropathy. Some researchers think that a decreased ability to sustain an injury may play a role. And in people with heart failure, the swelling that can result from that condition may be enough to cause the blisters. Many people who develop the diabetic blisters have had diabetes for many years or have several complications from the disease. What Are the Symptoms of Diabetic Blisters? Most commonly, the blisters appear on the legs and feet. Rarely, you may also notice them on your fingers or the backs of your hands. You might go to bed one night with no blisters, wake up, and notice them. The blisters tend to be large and irregularly shaped. Sometimes, they look like a burn. There are commonly clear and contain sterile liquid. You might feel a burning sensation or a twinge of discomfort, but many people do not feel anything - other than a bit of surprise at seeing the blisters where there were none before. How Are Diabetic Blisters Treated? In many cases, the blisters heal by themselves, within two to four weeks, and no treatment is needed other than keeping them clean. On occasion, though, the blisters may burst. If this happens, your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic ointment or something to help dry Continue reading >>

How To Spot And Treat Common Diabetic Foot Ulcer Symptoms

How To Spot And Treat Common Diabetic Foot Ulcer Symptoms

If left untreated, diabetic foot ulcers can cause permanent damage that affects your mobility. Approximately 15% of people with diabetes suffer from foot ulcers, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). Knowing how to recognize diabetic foot ulcer symptoms is crucial, because untreated ulcers can lead to permanent disfigurement. APMA reports that diabetic wounds are the leading cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations in the United States. However, proper wound care can help reduce the chances of surgical intervention, infection, and foot deformation. The following information will help you recognize wound symptoms and find an effective diabetic foot ulcer treatment. Causes Neuropathy occurs when blood vessels supplying nerves with oxygen and nutrients are damaged. The feet of a person with diabetes are particularly susceptible to neuropathy because of insufficient blood flow and unchecked blood sugar. These conditions can destroy nerve cells and cause pain, tingling, and numbness. People with diabetic neuropathy may lose enough sensation in their feet that they cannot feel the pain or the intense itching of foot injuries. Foot issues like ingrown toenails or dry skin cuts may go unnoticed unless you check your feet at least once a day for open wounds or other trauma. Diabetes also interferes with normal wound healing. Skin breaks on the feet are affected by diminished blood flow and the restriction of white blood cells that are needed to initiate the wound healing process. Symptoms Diabetic foot ulcers almost always form on the soles of the feet, where skin is subject to constant pressure. Under the weight of the body, skin deteriorates and eventually becomes an open sore. These ulcers frequently form underneath calluses and cannot be f Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Article

Diabetic Foot Care Article

A A A Diabetes mellitus (DM) represents several diseases in which high blood glucose levels over time can damage the nerves, kidneys, eyes, and blood vessels. Diabetes can also decrease the body's ability to fight infection. When diabetes is not well controlled, damage to the organs and impairment of the immune system is likely. Foot problems commonly develop in people with diabetes and can quickly become serious. With damage to the nervous system, a person with diabetes may not be able to feel his or her feet properly. Normal sweat secretion and oil production that lubricates the skin of the foot is impaired. These factors together can lead to abnormal pressure on the skin, bones, and joints of the foot during walking and can lead to breakdown of the skin of the foot. Sores may develop. Damage to blood vessels and impairment of the immune system from diabetes make it difficult to heal these wounds. Bacterial infection of the skin, connective tissues, muscles, and bones can then occur. These infections can develop into gangrene. Because of the poor blood flow, antibiotics cannot get to the site of the infection easily. Often, the only treatment for this is amputation of the foot or leg. If the infection spreads to the bloodstream, this process can be life-threatening. People with diabetes must be fully aware of how to prevent foot problems before they occur, to recognize problems early, and to seek the right treatment when problems do occur. Although treatment for diabetic foot problems has improved, prevention - including good control of blood sugar level - remains the best way to prevent diabetic complications. People with diabetes should learn how to examine their own feet and how to recognize the early signs and symptoms of diabetic foot problems. They should also l Continue reading >>

3 Steps To Treating A Blister

3 Steps To Treating A Blister

A small blister from a new pair of shoes might seem harmless at first, but that tiny mark can lead to some big problems if you're not careful. If the blister breaks, germs can get into your foot. These germs can cause not only an infection on the skin, but also in the bone. Bone infections are very difficult to treat, and when they worsen, you could end up with an amputation. Here are three steps to prevent a blister from turning into a serious problem: Wash your feet carefully in gentle soap and water and dry them thoroughly. Then put a small amount of antibiotic ointment on a dressing and cover the wound. Next, although a blister may seem like a small concern, place a call to someone on your medical team. You'll probably get a foot exam and possibly an antibiotic to prevent infection. Last, stop wearing the shoes that caused the blister, even if you think you're on your way to "breaking them in." A comfortable pair of shoes is one of the best investments you can make. And remember, they must properly fit your feet at the store. This kind of careful attention can prevent future problems. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Wounds: Caring For Sores

Diabetes And Wounds: Caring For Sores

When you have diabetes, it's vital to treat foot injuries right away. Even minor wounds can turn into serious foot ulcers, which can cost you a foot -- or an entire leg -- if you don’t care for them quickly and thoroughly. These easy steps can prevent problems down the road. Common Causes What you put on your feet matters. "You can get a foot ulcer from something as simple as walking in new or tight-fitting shoes or getting a small pebble stuck in the shoe,” says Raul Guzman, MD, a vascular surgeon at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. If you have diabetes, you may get a kind of nerve damage that stops the feeling in your feet. Doctors call this neuropathy. If you can’t feel your feet, you may not know you’re hurt, and a small cut or sore can turn into something bigger. Or you might have poor blood flow to your feet, which makes it hard for even minor cuts to heal. Your doctor can tell you whether you have nerve damage or blood-flow problems. Guzman says he can do a test that shows how blood moves through your body. If the results are normal, you can have standard wound-care treatments. “If the results of this blood-flow test are abnormal, that means you have poor circulation that needs to be repaired,” he says. Surgery can help. “We can use a balloon and stent,” Guzman says, “or we can do a bypass procedure, where we connect the artery above the blockage to one of the arteries in the calf or foot.” Wound Treatment Options If you do injure your foot, don't try to take care of it at home. Go to a wound-care center or your doctor, even for blisters, calluses, and scratches. “Put on some antibiotic ointment and see a wound center or your doctor, at the latest, the next day,” says Harold Brem, MD, chief of the wound healing and regenerative medici Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

What Does A Foot Ulcer Look Like? An Indianapolis Podiatrist Answers

What Does A Foot Ulcer Look Like? An Indianapolis Podiatrist Answers

As a Indianapolis podiatrist that specializes in diabetic foot care and wound care, I often get asked by patients as well as by family & friends, what does a foot ulcer look like? And why do people with diabetes develop foot ulcers? A foot ulcer is an open sore. These can be superficial such as a blister that has opened with underlying pink raw tissue exposed or an ulcer can be deep and extend down to the bone. Some ulcers are infected and drain heavily while some have very little or no drainage. An ulcer may or may not be painful. People develop foot ulcers for many different reasons and you don’t need to have diabetes to develop a foot ulcer. Pressure, trauma, and poor circulation can all lead to foot ulcers. A diabetic with a red open sore on the bottom of their foot generally surrounded by a callus has a diabetic foot ulcer. A diabetic foot ulcer, also called a neuropathic ulcer, occur most often on the bottom of the foot over a bony prominence. Ulcers can also develop on the sides of the foot or tops of the toes from friction and pressure of shoes or from poor circulation. For example, a person with diabetes develops a callus on the bottom of their foot. A callus is a build-up of skin due to increased pressure on the foot. Left untreated or, often when self-treated, the callus becomes infected or breaks down into an ulcer. The callus and the eventual ulcer many times go left untreated because a diabetic patient lacks feeling called neuropathy and is unaware that the ulcer is present. This is why you often hear that diabetics should check their feet daily and see a foot doctor routinely. Or the person may be aware of the ulcer but because it is not painful they do not seek immediate treatment. Once an ulcer is discovered it is imperative that professional treatmen Continue reading >>

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