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Why Do Diabetics Get More Infections?

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Infection In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Infection in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Author: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP; Chief Editor: George T Griffing, MD more... Diabetes increases susceptibility to various types of infections. The most common sites of infection in diabetic patients are the skin and urinary tract. Malignant otitis externa and rhinocerebral mucormycosis are 2 head-and-neck infections seen almost exclusively in patients with diabetes. Malignant or necrotizing otitis externa principally occurs in diabetic patients older than 35 years and is almost always due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. [ 1 ] Infection starts in the external auditory canal and spreads to adjacent soft tissue, cartilage, and bone. Patients typically present with severe ear pain and otorrhea. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis collectively refers to infections caused by various ubiquitous molds. [ 2 ] Invasive disease occurs in patients with poorly controlled diabetes, especially those with diabetic ketoacidosis. Organisms colonize the nose and paranasal sinuses, spreading to adjacent tissues by invading blood vessels and causing soft tissue necrosis and bony erosion. Patients with diabetes have an increased risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and Continue reading >>

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  1. noblehead

    Jaylee said: ↑
    I have absolutely no idea what I would do if they found an outright cure.. I've had 38 years of it.
    But it would be nice to find out Jaylee

  2. Jaylee

    noblehead said: ↑
    But it would be nice to find out Jaylee Lol be my guest & go first mate....!

  3. Jaylee

    Robinredbreast said: ↑
    The human race produce's insulin from the pancreas ! Do these fanatics not realise this, but we became Type 1 because our own bodies attacked the organ and destroyed it so no more insulin Scary to read :-o Scary to read indeed...

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Diabetes And The Risk Of Acute Urinary Tract Infection Among Postmenopausal Women

OBJECTIVE—To examine whether the presence of diabetes alters the risk of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in postmenopausal women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A case-control study of the Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound (GHC), a staff-model nonprofit health maintenance organization in Washington State, was conducted. Subjects were women aged 55–75 years who had been members of GHC for at least 1 year and who had had an acute symptomatic UTI within the preceding month. Laboratory files were used to identify women with a urine culture that grew ≥105 colonies of a urinary pathogen. Medical records were reviewed to confirm the presence of acute, clinically symptomatic UTI. Control subjects were randomly selected from the GHC enrollment file, screened to remove women with recent UTI, and frequency matched to cases by age within 2 years. An interviewer ascertained self-reported clinician-diagnosed diabetes. Diagnosis of diabetes was confirmed by the GHC diabetes registry. A subsample of women underwent measurement of postvoid residual bladder volume (n = 748) and culture of vaginal flora (n = 454). RESULTS—Of the 901 case and 913 control subjects, diabetes was reporte Continue reading >>

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  1. TxTechKimmy

    I just got my test results back from my creatinine clearance test, and the number was 57..which according to the 'normal' range on the results, is low. I did a little research and found that means there is some kidney damage. I haven't heard back from my doctor yet so I was curious if any of y'all know exactly how 'bad' that is. :questionm

  2. camjen1

    What was the reference ranges on your lab results? Each labs reference ranges are different. Did you also submit a 24 hour urine?

  3. TxTechKimmy

    Yes that was from the 24 hour urine. However the blood creatinine was in normal range. The range from the lab is 75 - 115.

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Diabetes And The Risk Of Infection-related Mortality In The U.s.

Abstract OBJECTIVE—To determine whether diabetes predicts infection-related mortality and to clarify the extent to which this relationship is mediated by comorbid conditions that may themselves increase risk of infection. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We performed a retrospective cohort study using the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Mortality Study of 9,208 adults aged 30–74 years in 1976–1980. We defined demographic variables, diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and smoking by self-report; BMI, blood pressure, and serum cholesterol from baseline examination; and cause-specific mortality from death certificates. RESULTS—Over 12–16 years of follow-up, 36 infection-related deaths occurred among 533 adults with diabetes vs. 265 deaths in 8,675 adults without diabetes (4.7 vs. 1.5 per 1,000 person-years, P < 0.001). Diabetes (RR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.2) and congestive heart failure (2.8, 1.6–5.1) were independent predictors of infection-related mortality after simultaneous adjustment for age, sex, race, poverty status, smoking, BMI, and hypertension. After subdividing infection-related deaths into those with (n = 145) and without (n = 156) concurr Continue reading >>

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  1. jjkemp04

    I was wondering what the requirements were by state, if they don't coincide with the federal regulations. I have seen that waivers are needed, but I'd like a timeline of what one would need to do to obtain a CDL if they were insulin-dependant, and what regulations they would need to meet in order to operate a school bus.

  2. littlebit

    I think in TN, if you are shot dependent then you can not drive a bus, but if you use pills to control it, then you can.

  3. jjkemp04

    Thanks. Okay, one step closer, any other states' info?

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