diabetestalk.net

Why Do Diabetes Lose Weight

How Can I Help A Morbidly Obese Loved One With Diabetes Lose Weight?

How Can I Help A Morbidly Obese Loved One With Diabetes Lose Weight?

How to Help Your Obese Loved one Lose Weight Without Hurting Their Feelings It’s quite difficult being the overweight one inside family. This is something Actually, i know first-hand due to mine 25 years with experience. When I has been growing up inside 1970s, being overweight (also termed “fat”) wasn’t as common precisely as it is today. Quite simply all my kin were thin, which include both my moms and dads. So when people realized I needed to do something positive about my excess body fat, they really didn’t have any knowledge of how to really help me. Superior Intentions can Nevertheless Hurt One with my grandparents deemed that singing, “I don’t require her, you may have her, she’s too fat to do! ” was the just one fashion to get me to give up weight successfully. At age twelve, I had yet to obtain this was a line with a popular Polka tune, so I deemed the unkind words to the current song were invented just for people. Did this certain tactic cause me to give up weight? No, it caused people to dislike myself much more and turn to help food for convenience. Like so numerous others out there who ? re struggling with their own weight, I continued to hear the numerous feedback and snide responses from others which I’m sure suggested well. I can’t explain how many circumstances I heard: “Jodi, just cease eating so much therefore only makes sensation that you’ll shed weight. ” Okay, easier in theory. If it was that easy, don’t they realize I might have done that will already? These comments didn’t generate a solution, all people did was get me feel sorry and depressed, together with again, cause me you eat more. Is there ways to help a pet lose weight without having to be hurtful? That constitutes a question and the one that was brought to Continue reading >>

How Can I Convince Someone With Diabetes And High Blood Pressure To Lose Weight?

How Can I Convince Someone With Diabetes And High Blood Pressure To Lose Weight?

People convince themselves that changes of any kind are too hard to even try, and the Medical industry doesn't make money on healthy people. It sounds harsh, but you know it is true, even if a subconscious tendency. My MD just gave me a prescription; seemed happy he had something to “treat”, My dentist told me to lose 10 lbs and the Diabetes 2 would probably go away. It did. I got in the habit of drinking Cokes, and didn’t realize I was consuming a ton of sugar, esp. in the summer. Just quitting them lost the 10 lbs. Today, obesity is known to cause Diabetes, heart disease and HBP. It is statistically linked to breast cancer in women, and it is suspected to influence Alzheimer’s. I am not sure of why the last two are associated with obesity, but the others are a function of Insulin which the pancreas secretes, automatically, when it senses glucose in the blood. Carbs convert to glucose in the digestive track, and the cells can’t take it, or use the insulin to open the glucose receptors, unless we use our muscles. Exercise takes care of both the glucose and the highly-reactive insulin. I’ve had the normal problems of aging, and started studying human physiology when I hit 70. A back problem forced me to the gym, to strengthen my core muscles, and besides fixing that, I couldn’t believe I really felt great. I believe I can show that my exercise has caused an increase in blood flow, around blocked arteries (angiogenesis,) and my heart muscle is very strong, now, because my resting and working pulse rate have dropped so much, since I began. Most of the cardio machines show your pulse, so you don’t push it too hard. In a week, you’ll see it drop as the heart muscle strengthens. Don’t be embarrassed to go to the gym. Everyone I know, there, understands and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

Diabulimia: The Dangerous Way Diabetics Drop Pounds

Diabulimia: The Dangerous Way Diabetics Drop Pounds

At age 14, Erin Williams was tired of medicine. Williams was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic at age 11, and after three years of enduring a never-ending regimen of insulin shots and strict diet restrictions, she was frustrated. Embarrassed by her disease, she kept it a secret from everyone but her closest family and friends. At birthday parties, she made up excuses about why she couldn't have soda or cake. When a classmate saw her drinking juice boxes in the nurses office, she endured weeks of being called the "juice box thief" rather than just tell her classmates she had low blood sugar because of diabetes. Eventually, Williams rebelled the only way she could, she decided not take her insulin. She just didn't want to adhere to the strict diet and medical regimen even though it was vital to her health. "It wasn't this dramatic moment," recalled Williams. "It was mostly like I want to be like everybody else." The next morning when Williams woke up, she felt fine. "Well, nothing bad happened to me," Williams remembered thinking. "It creeps up on you. That's how it does it." Emboldened by her experiment, she continued to restrict her insulin. Without a regimented amount of insulin in her body to process glucose, Williams' body started to burn through fat and muscle. She lost weight very quickly even as she ate all the same foods. Classmates started commenting on her weight loss and remarked that she looked great. "You hear all these things and you're like, 'This is the greatest thing in the world,'" said Williams. "It takes a hold of your life like nothing else." After living with type 1 diabetes for three years, Williams was exhibiting the first signs of a disorder often called diabulimia. The term refers to the dual diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and an eating disorder. Man Continue reading >>

Will Weight Loss Help Your Diabetes?

Will Weight Loss Help Your Diabetes?

There's no question about it. If you're overweight and have type 2 diabetes, you will lower your blood sugar, improve your health, and feel better if you lose some of your extra pounds. You'll want to work closely with your doctor or diabetes educator, because your blood sugar, insulin, and medications will need special attention while you're losing weight. If you drop even 10 or 15 pounds, that has health perks, such as: Lower blood sugar Lower blood pressure Better cholesterol levels Less stress on your hips, knees, ankles, and feet More energy Brighter mood The Right Balance for Diabetes and Weight Loss Keep tight control over your blood sugar levels while you lose weight. You don't want to get high or low levels while you change your eating habits. It’s generally safe for someone with diabetes to cut 500 calories a day. Trim from protein, carbohydrates, and fat. The USDA says that calories for adults should come from: 45% to 55% carbs 25% to 35% fat 10% to 35% protein Carbs have the biggest effect on blood sugar. Those that have fiber (whole-grain bread and vegetables, for example) are much better than eating sugary or starchy carbs, because they’re less likely to spike your blood sugar and quickly make it crash. How Exercise Helps One of the many benefits of working out is that it helps keep your blood sugar in balance. You're also more likely to keep the pounds off if you're active. If you're not active now, check in with your doctor first. She can let you know if there are any limits on what you can do. Aim to get at least 2.5 hours a week of moderate aerobic exercise, like brisk walking, to improve your health. You can split up the time any way you choose. To help yourself lose weight you’ll need to do more physical activity. You should also do strength tr Continue reading >>

What Is The Quickest Way To Lose 130 Pounds? I Am Pre-diabetic So I Need To Get This Weight Of As Soon As Possible.

What Is The Quickest Way To Lose 130 Pounds? I Am Pre-diabetic So I Need To Get This Weight Of As Soon As Possible.

Over the last few years I have lost about 100 lbs. I started at 300 lbs at the start of the eleventh grade, and was about 200 by the end of high school. I am currently a university student, and just finished my undergraduate degree at 190 lbs! (Above: me at 300 lbs) (Above: Me about 1.5 years later, and 100 lbs lighter) (Above: Me recently, at 190 lbs - main difference is face at this point) After undergoing my transformation, I decided that health was something I wanted to devote my life to. As a result, I learned about food through culinary school, exercise by taking my personal training exams, and now medicine through medical school. While its hard to say whether something is the “quickest way” of losing fat, there are a few pieces of advice I can offer. 1. You need to realize that this large of a change requires a change in your lifestyle and mentality. All too many times I see people go on fad diets to try and reduce their weight. While they may be able to shed of 20 lbs or so, it is gruelling to go through, and they gain the weight all back after the diet ends. If you want to get rid of the weight, you're going to need to evaluate what you're doing, and change it. This means you need to watch what you eat, and how much you exercise, and change them to methods that will be conducive to a lower weight. These changes will have to be permanent, and you need to be mentally ready for that. 2. Since the changes are permanent, they need to be sustainable. If you don't like to do something, eventually you’re going to stop doing it. Willpower is an expendable resource and so you won't be able to push yourself to adopt insanely strictly healthy lifestyle practices forever. Therefore, you need to find a way to make an increased exercise regiment and health calorie intak Continue reading >>

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

I recently was included in a discussion on a Facebook group for athletes with diabetes about how hard it can be to lose weight through exercise. While I would never claim to have all the answers on this topic, here are some ideas about what can make you gain weight or keep you from losing weight with diabetes, based on my decades of professional and personal experience with diabetes and weight management, and what you can do about it. Insulin My former graduate student with type 1 diabetes went on an insulin pump and promptly gained about 10 pounds, even though his blood glucose control improved only marginally. Why did this happen to him (and why does it happen to so many other insulin users)? As a naturally occurring anabolic hormone, insulin promotes the uptake and storage of glucose, amino acids, and fat into insulin-sensitive cells around your body (mainly muscle and fat cells). It doesn’t matter whether it’s released naturally, injected, or pumped—all insulin and insulin analogues have these same effects. Going on intensive insulin therapy is associated with fat weight gain (1), for people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Some of the weight gain comes from that if you’re using insulin to keep your blood glucose in control, you’ll be keeping and storing all of the calories that you’re eating instead of losing some glucose through urine (during hyperglycemia). Unfortunately, this realization has led some people to try skipping or limiting their insulin use to help them lose weight (2), but that is a dangerous practice that can lead to loss of excess muscle mass and life-threatening conditions like DKA. The best way to balance your insulin use and your body weight, in my opinion, is to be physically active to keep your overall insulin levels lower. I Continue reading >>

Why Am I Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes?

Why Am I Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes?

Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a master’s degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. If you have type 2 diabetes, weight loss can be a good thing. This is assuming the weight loss is part of a balanced approach to your diabetes management, involving sound nutrition and physical activity. Why weight loss is (usually) a good thing Decreased weight is a goal usually associated with type 2 diabetes for many reasons: it helps in lowering blood sugars, decreases your risk of heart disease, and contributes to overall health, to name a few. In fact, a decrease in body weight by as little as five to 10 percent can result in tremendous benefits when talking about blood glucose and health in general. But if you have type 2 diabetes and you’ve had unintentional weight loss, take it as a warning sign, and consult your physician. More on diabetes and weight loss: How Does Losing Weight Help With Type 2 Diabetes? Weight Loss and Diabetes: A Balancing Act There are three worrisome causes of unintentional weight loss for those with type 2 diabetes: 1. Continual high blood sugar With type 2 diabetes, the body is not able to effectively get glucose from the bloodstream into the cells for use in all bodily functions. And if your type 2 diabetes is not managed or controlled, blood sugar gets high very quickly and stays high until something is done about it. If nothing is done to resolve high blood sugar, the glucose that is causing the high blood sugar can’t get into the body’s cells for energy and is excreted in the urine. In other words, if you eat carbohydrates to fuel your body, those carbohydrates that are broken down into glucose aren’t used as fuel, Continue reading >>

Diet Strategies For Women With Diabetes: Why Some Work And Why Some Don't

Diet Strategies For Women With Diabetes: Why Some Work And Why Some Don't

If you're a woman with diabetes, have you ever cut back on your insulin — perhaps just a little — because you've discovered that you can lose a few pounds in a few days by doing so? And then, when you go back to using your normal amount of insulin, are you dismayed to discover that you gain the weight back — and perhaps more — in equally rapid fashion? Over time, have you come to blame the insulin for your weight gain problems, so you take less insulin than you should — even though you're blood glucose runs higher as a result? Over 40 women with diabetes, many of whom admitted to having let this familiar thought process influence their diabetes program, came together at Joslin's second Women and Diabetes symposium recently. The day-long symposium attracted nearly 100 women with diabetes who heard talks on topics ranging from the interrelationship of diabetes, menopause, and heart disease, to a session on having a healthy pregnancy if you have diabetes. One of the most popular sessions, however, was entitled "Living on the Edge." Presented by Joslin dietitian Karen Chalmers, M.S., R.D., C.D.E., who is the Director of Nutrition Services at Joslin, the session examined the balancing act women with diabetes encounter as they try to keep blood glucose in a safe range — and their weight down too. "Most of the women at the session on insulin and weight gain were between 20 and 55 years old or so," notes Chalmers in an interview after the symposium. "Some were on intensive insulin therapy, but others were doing insulin manipulation to lose weight. This is a fairly common kind of problem in women with diabetes. Weight loss is a big challenge — nearly an obsession — with many women in this day and age. Our society is so hung up on being thin, and these women begin Continue reading >>

6 Tips For Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes

6 Tips For Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes

The benefits of a healthy weight Thinking of dropping a few pounds? If you’re overweight and have diabetes, it’s one of the best things you can do for your overall health. A study at the Kaiser Permanente’s Center for Health Research in Oregon found that people who shed weight within about 18 months of being diagnosed with type-2 diabetes were more likely to keep long-term control over their blood pressure and glucose levels. When you have diabetes, a healthy weight reduces your risk of cardiovascular disease and actually helps your body’s own insulin to work better. “In addition, people who lose weight generally feel better. It’s value added!” says Dr. Ian Blumer, a diabetes specialist in Ajax, Ontario, and author of Diabetes for Canadians for Dummies. Want work towards a healthy number on the scale? These six tips will help you reach your goal. 1. Talk to your healthcare team Let your dietitian, nurse educator and/or doctor know that you’re taking on the task of losing weight. “Find out if there should be some change in your therapy,” says Blumer. Your healthcare professional can also help you set reasonable goals. Fad diets are definitely not recommended. But if you do plan to make drastic changes to your daily menu, it’s critically important you have medical guidance, Blumer says. “Before adopting a low-carb diet, a doctor should be consulted as certain medications-such as insulin-may need to be adjusted in order to avoid low blood glucose.” 2. Count your calories Losing weight means cutting calories, but it doesn’t have to mean eliminating everything you love to eat. Just eat smaller portions, and focus on low-fat foods. Try keeping a record of what you’re eating and how many calories you’re consuming. That way you’ll be able to id Continue reading >>

Question & Answer

Question & Answer

Is sudden weight loss a sign of diabetes? If so, why? Answer: Kimberly Buss, M.D., M.P.H. Weight loss can occur for many reasons, and involuntary weight loss can be a sign of serious underlying illness. Involuntary weight loss can happen even with an increased appetite or thirst. Some causes of this situation can include intestinal disorders that cause lack of absorption of food (like chronic diarrhea), endocrine disorders that cause the body to burn more energy (like hyperthyroidism), and uncontrolled diabetes, which causes the body to lose excess calories by spilling sugar into the urine. Diabetes is a disorder of elevated blood sugars. Sometimes sugars are just mildly elevated at diagnosis. But sometimes blood sugar can become quite elevated before the diagnosis is made. As the blood sugar level goes up, the body cannot reabsorb all of the sugar that is naturally filtered through the kidneys, and the sugar is spilled in the urine. This causes people who have very high sugars to be very thirsty, and to have to urinate very frequently. Patients will often have sudden significant weight loss associated with these symptoms. These same patients will be so thirsty they will often drink sugary drinks (such as sodas, juices or sweetened coffee drinks) which causes the sugars to be even higher, and the weight loss to be more severe. It can become a sudden dangerous cycle. If you suddenly develop significant involuntary weight loss, especially associated with significant thirst or an increased need to urinate, it is critical to see a health care provider as soon as possible. Read more: Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It? Steps for Diagnosing Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes: Preventing High Blood Sugar Emergencies Continue reading >>

How Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. An analysis published in The BMJ aims to let doctors and the public in on a little-known secret: Type 2 diabetes, in many cases, is curable. People can reverse their diabetes by losing about 33 pounds, say the authors of the new paper, despite popular belief that the diagnosis is always a permanent one. If more people were striving for this goal, and if more doctors were documenting instances of diabetes remission, complication rates and health-care costs could both be reduced dramatically, the authors say. The analysis is based on evidence from recent clinical trials. In one from 2011, people who were recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes returned their blood sugar levels to normal when they lost weight on a calorie-restrictive diet. In a 2016 follow-up study, people who had been diabetic for up to 10 years were able to reverse their condition when they lost about 33 pounds. TIME Health Newsletter Get the latest health and science news, plus: burning questions and expert tips. View Sample Sign Up Now Mike Lean, professor of human nutrition at the University of Glasgow in Scotland, is an author of both the new analysis and of those earlier trials. He says a person’s likelihood of remission from diabetes is greatest in the first five years after being diagnosed. Type 2 diabetes, he wrote in an email, is a disease “best avoided by avoiding the weight gain that drives it.” For people who do develop it, he believes that evidence-based weight-loss programs could help them achieve lasting remission. “Not all can do it, but they should all be given the chance with good support,” Lean writes. “Taking tablets or injections for life to reduce blood sugar is a poor second rate treatment.” Current guidelines for the managemen Continue reading >>

7 Scary Reasons You’re Losing Weight Without Trying

7 Scary Reasons You’re Losing Weight Without Trying

It's natural for your weight to fluctuate during the year. A swing of a few pounds up or down is normal—and nothing to worry about. But if you drop 5% of your body weight in less than six months—and you can't pinpoint a good explanation for that weight loss—it's time to let your doctor know what's up, says Anne Cappola, MD, an endocrinologist and professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. "It's not common to lose a significant amount of weight without an obvious reason," she says. "If you're losing weight and nothing's changed with your diet or activity, you need to worry about that a little bit." Other experts agree. While small or temporary weight fluctuations are normal—gaining a few pounds during the holidays, maybe, or losing a few after a stomach bug—more significant weight shifts that don't have an obvious trigger could be an early sign of a serious health condition, says Kerry Hildreth, MD, an assistant professor of geriatric medicine at the University of Colorado. (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get healthy living tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!) Here are 7 health issues that could underlie your unexplained weight loss. Weight loss is a common symptom of hyperthyroidism—or an over-active thyroid, Cappola says. "If I suspected a thyroid issue, I'd probably look for increased hunger or heart palpitations," she explains. Sleeping problems or feeling hot all the time are two more symptoms of an over-active thyroid, she says. Prevention Premium: If You Think Lowering Your Cholesterol Is The Best Way To Prevent Heart Disease, You Need To Read This Celiac disease—an autoimmune disorder tied to gluten—can cause a drop in weight, and tends to be accompanied by other GI symptoms like diarrhea, says Jamile W Continue reading >>

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Our society is obsessed with weight, if you haven’t noticed. More than two thirds of US adults are overweight or obese, there are more diet books published than we can count, and, of course, we have the privilege of watching shows like The Biggest Loser to help keep us in line. And according to government statistics, more than 85% of people with Type 2 diabetes are overweight. So it stands to reason that much of the focus of managing Type 2 diabetes is based on reaching and staying at a healthy weight. It’s important to note that thin people can get diabetes too, and not just Type 1 diabetes. In a 2008 study published in the journal Diabetes Care, adults age 60 to 79 years old with a body-mass index (BMI) of less than 18.5 (which is considered to be underweight) were 30% more likely to get Type 2 diabetes than adults with a “normal” BMI of 18.5 to 24.9. In a society where being thin equates with beauty, youth, intelligence, and success, there is often little sympathy or patience for people who are too thin and who desperately want to gain weight. If you’ve struggled with losing weight and keeping it off, you know all too well how challenging that can be. People who want to gain weight often face the same kind of battle. And to have diabetes on top of that can make it doubly difficult. First things first: identify the cause If you have diabetes, are underweight, and would like to gain weight, it’s helpful to first have a talk with your doctor. Make sure there are no health or medical reasons for you being underweight (especially if you’ve recently lost weight without trying) such as having an overactive thyroid, a digestive disorder (such as Crohn disease), or cancer, for example. A physical exam, blood work, and other tests may be needed to rule out certai Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diets For Weight Loss

Diabetic Diets For Weight Loss

If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. If you’re ready to lose weight and improve your diabetes (or kick it to the curb entirely), use an expert weight loss diet plan to guide you. We review five options for people with diabetes. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes