diabetestalk.net

Why Do Diabetes Get Thirsty

Share on facebook

Can A Dry Throat Be A Sign Of Diabetes?

Your throat feels parched and scratchy and your breath is stale. While you may dismiss this as not drinking enough water or coming down with a cold, if you experience a chronic dry throat, diabetes may be to blame. Type 2 or adult-onset diabetes is a chronic condition that raises your blood sugar levels leading to symptoms such as thirst and dry mouth. If you are diagnosed with this disease, rest assured that it is common and manageable. The American Diabetes Association notes that nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes. Dry Throat A dry throat can feel like someone has sandpapered the lining of your throat. Your throat might feel itchy and even sore. The dry, rough feeling may also occur in your mouth and on your tongue. There are many causes of a dry throat including being dehydrated, excessive exercise, habitually sleeping or breathing with an open mouth and an infection. If your dry throat persists no matter how much water you drink and you also seem to urinate more than usual, you may have diabetes. Diabetes.co.uk notes that thirst, excess urination and a dry mouth are signs of diabetes. Thirst in Diabetes Diabetes occurs because your body cannot make enough or adequately u Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. jpg391

    Why Does Diabetes Make You So Thirsty?
    By Sanjay Gupta, MD
    [Why-does-diabetes-make-me-so-thirsty] Excessive thirst, or polydipsia, can be triggered by different factors such as eating too much salt or taking medications that cause dry mouth. Thirst is also a symptom of diabetes. For people with diabetes, thirst can be a sign of hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar.
    The kidneys play a vital role in regulating levels of blood sugar by filtering the blood and absorbing excess glucose. When very high levels of sugar build up in the blood, the kidneys can’t keep up and they produce more urine than normal — a condition known as polyuria. As a result, you can become dehydrated.
    “People who have well-controlled diabetes should be at no increased risk for excessive thirst compared with somebody who doesn’t have diabetes,” says Noah Bloomgarden, MD, assistant professor of medicine-endocrinology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and clinical endocrinologist in the division of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism at the Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. “It’s really poor control of one’s blood sugar and an increase in urination and excretion of water that makes people [with diabetes] feel very thirsty and increases their need to maintain water balance.”
    As Dr. Bloomgarden points out, even people who are doing a good job of controlling their diabetes can develop very high blood sugar. A cold, infection, or even a very stressful situation can cause blood sugar to rise, and excessive thirst may be the first sign that something is wrong. “If you’re experiencing excessive thirst, you should contact your doctor immediately, because it may indicate severe hyperglycemia,” says Bloomgarden.
    If you have diabetes and you’re not sure whether you’re unusually thirsty, Bloomgarden suggests that you check your blood sugar. If your blood sugar is normal but you’re thirstier than usual (or you’re going to the bathroom more often), consult your doctor.
    If you are experiencing excessive thirst related to hyperglycemia, it’s imperative to get your diabetes under control. Make sure you’re following the treatment plan prescribed by your doctor, including any lifestyle recommendations such as eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly. If you’re having trouble sticking with your treatment plan, you may benefit from consulting with a certified diabetes educator, who can help you self-manage your blood sugar.
    It’s also important to make sure you’re drinking enough water, especially if your blood sugar is elevated. The Joslin Diabetes Center recommends drinking a minimum of eight glasses of water a day.
    “There are no complications associated with increased thirst if people are able to drink water freely,” says Bloomgarden. But it can become a major issue if somebody is elderly or isn’t mobile and doesn’t have the ability to access water or other liquids. “Then they can get profoundly dehydrated, and that can be extremely dangerous,” he warns.
    Updated: 10/17/2016
    Source http://www.everydayhealth.com/columns/paging-dr-gupta/why-does-diabetes-make-you-so-thirsty/?pos=4&xid=nl_EverydayHealthManagingDiabetes_20161104

  2. t1wayne

    James - not sure your motivation in posting this, but just a few observations.
    First, this summary applies to ONLY Diabetes Mellitus (DM)... NOT Diabetes Insipidus (DI). (Authors who simply use the term "diabetes" annoy me). AND... it applies to BOTH forms of DM - T1 and T2. Here's a little summation (a single paragraph from a longer summation) from the NIH:
    "Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus—which includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes—are unrelated, although both conditions {DM and DI} cause frequent urination and constant thirst. Diabetes mellitus causes high blood glucose, or blood sugar, resulting from the body's inability to use blood glucose for energy. People with diabetes insipidus have normal blood glucose levels; however, their kidneys cannot balance fluid in the body."
    (Emphasis mine); {Bracketed insert mine}
    So... frequent urination and thirst are symptoms of both DM and DI... and it applies to both forms of DM, and for the same reasons.
    Last note to the folks that review these posts... I refer to "both" forms of DM because ALL forms, including the "other" forms, are biochemically caused by one of two things - Insulin resistance (T2, gestational and MODY) or Autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells (T1, LADA).
    Here's the link to the NIH article on DI: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/kidney-disease/diabetes-insipidus/Pages/facts.aspx
    w.

  3. maryd98

    My understanding has always been that if your BG is so high that you're urinating frequently, you become dehydrated and thus you get super-thirsty, and then it just becomes a vicious cycle.
    Maybe that's just 'cause these were two symptoms I had when I was diagnosed, but I haven't heard of diabetes (in general) making you so thirsty....but then I looked at James' post again.
    This is (sort of) in the article James quoted, though it kind of got buried, IMO. I had to read through it twice to catch it:
    "When very high levels of sugar build up in the blood, the kidneys can’t keep up and they produce more urine than normal — a condition known as polyuria. As a result, you can become dehydrated."
    This is followed (agian, in James' quote of the article) by....
    “People who have well-controlled diabetes should be at no increased risk for excessive thirst compared with somebody who doesn’t have diabetes,” says Noah Bloomgarden, MD, assistant professor of medicine-endocrinology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and clinical endocrinologist in the division of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism at the Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. “It’s really poor control of one’s blood sugar and an increase in urination and excretion of water that makes people [with diabetes] feel very thirsty and increases their need to maintain water balance.”

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

Related Articles

Popular Articles

More in diabetes