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Why Do Diabetes Get Thirsty

Thirst - Excessive

Thirst - Excessive

Drinking lots of water is healthy in most cases. The urge to drink too much may be the result of a physical or emotional disease. Excessive thirst may be a symptom of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). It may help in detecting diabetes. Excessive thirst is a common symptom. It is often the reaction to fluid loss during exercise or to eating salty foods. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

Thirst: Symptoms & Signs

Thirst: Symptoms & Signs

Thirst is the feeling of needing to drink something. It occurs whenever the body is dehydrated for any reason. Any condition that can result in a loss of body water can lead to thirst or excessive thirst. For this reason, thirst is a characteristic symptoms of certain medical conditions, most notably diabetes mellitus. Thirst may be accompanied by other signs of dehydration such as decreased urine output, reduced sweating and tear production, muscle cramps, weakness, lightheadedness, and nausea. Dehydration and thirst may be minor or severe, depending upon the amount of water lost by the body. Polydipsia is the medical term that refers to increased or excessive thirst. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes insipidus is a condition in which your ability to control the balance of water within your body is not working properly. Your kidneys are not able to retain water and this causes you to pass large amounts of urine. Because of this, you become more thirsty and want to drink more. There are two different types of diabetes insipidus: cranial and nephrogenic. Cranial diabetes insipidus may only be a short-term problem in some cases. Treatment includes drinking plenty of fluids so that you do not become lacking in fluid in the body (dehydrated). Treatment with medicines may also be needed for both types of diabetes insipidus. A note about thirst and water balance in your body Getting the balance right between how much water your body takes in and how much water your body passes out is very important. This is because a large proportion (about 70%) of your body is actually water. Also, water levels in your body help to control the levels of some important salts, particularly sodium and potassium. Your body normally controls (regulates) water balance in two main ways: By making you feel thirsty and so encouraging you to drink and take more water in. Through the action of a chemical (hormone) called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) which controls the amount of water passed out in your urine. ADH is also known as vasopressin. It is made in a part of your brain called the hypothalamus. It is then transported to another part of your brain, the pituitary gland, from where it is released into your bloodstream. After its release, ADH has an effect on your kidneys. It causes your kidneys to pass out less water in your urine (your urine becomes more concentrated). So, if your body is lacking in fluid (dehydrated), your thirst sensation will be triggered, encouraging you to drink. As Continue reading >>

Which Of These 10 Early Symptoms Of Diabetes Do You Have?

Which Of These 10 Early Symptoms Of Diabetes Do You Have?

According to the International Diabetes Federation, 371 million around the world suffer from diabetes and half of them go undiagnosed. This is dangerous because when left untreated, diabetes can lead to a host of health complications such as kidney damage, nerve problems, eye ailment, heart ailments and other diseases. Hence, it is important to ensure that you don’t belong to the ignorant half by learning to spot the symptoms of diabetes. #1 Increase in appetite A diabetic is unable to process glucose so they feel hungry all the time since the cells are craving for glucose. #2 Feeling thirsty all the time Excess sugar in the blood causes diabetics to get dehydrated. This is why diabetics feel thirsty all the time. Here are 5 more causes for excessive thirst you might not know about. #3 Excess urination Due to dehydration and the constant feeling of thirst, diabetics tend to drink more water which is the reason they end up visiting the bathroom more often. Excess urination is a common sign of diabetes. Are you aware of these 6 reasons that lead to urinating more frequently than normal? Since a diabetic’s body is unable to utilise the available glucose, the body burns fat which leads to involuntary weight loss even without exercising or following a healthy diet. (Editor’s Note: Losing weight due to diabetes is not a cause for celebration. The body goes into a state of ketoacidosis, producing chemicals called ketones which break down fats too quickly. They make the blood more acidic which can lead to organ damage.) #5 Feeling fatigued all day long Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms observed in diabetic people. Hence, if you feel more thirsty along with a tired feeling, check your sugar levels. Here are some of most common causes of fatigue you should be aware Continue reading >>

Polydipsia, Or Excessive Thirst, As A Sign Of Diabetes

Polydipsia, Or Excessive Thirst, As A Sign Of Diabetes

Is being thirsty a sign of diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes your pancreas to stop producing insulin, a hormone that is essential to getting energy from food. The disease strikes people of all ages and is unrelated to diet or lifestyle. People living with this disease must regularly monitor their blood-sugar levels, inject or infuse insulin, and carefully regulate doses with eating and activity throughout the day. What is type 1 diabetes? Approximately 1.25 million Americans live with type 1 diabetes. There is no way to prevent type 1 diabetes, and there’s presently no cure. Is polydipsia dangerous? When it comes to diabetes and thirst, polydipsia can be dangerous. The problem is the prolonged dehydration that can lead to nausea, dizziness, headaches and fainting. And if you do have diabetes, but have not yet been diagnosed, this dehydration has the potential to lead to diabetic ketoacidosis which can lead to organ failure, coma or death. Another concern is that extreme dehydration can also make your blood-sugar levels rise more quickly than normal since less urine—and glucose—is being expelled. What should you do next? If you think that you may be experiencing diabetes mellitus polydipsia, it’s important that you see a doctor as soon as possible. Regardless of the cause excessive, unexplainable thirst is a sign that something is not right in your body. So make that appointment today. Your support is more critical than ever Continue reading >>

Why Do We Get Thirsty When We Have Diabetes?

Why Do We Get Thirsty When We Have Diabetes?

Excessive thirst, when linked to another condition as a symptom or comorbidity, is called polydipsia. It’s usually one of the earliest symptoms of diabetes to develop, and is often accompanied by excessive dryness of the mouth (“cotton mouth”). In most people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, the thirst builds slowly enough that it is often incredibly difficult to notice until other symptoms present themselves or until the point of major dehydration. When glucose becomes hyper-concentrated in your bloodstream, usually about 200mg/dL – though this number varies from person to person, your kidney loses the ability to reuptake (pull out) glucose from water. Under normal circumstances, almost all glucose is pulled out of urine and back into the body (as is most of the water, though this depends on how hydrated you are). Since the body can no longer pull glucose out from water in your kidneys, the osmotic pressure (the pressure that builds between a liquid with a high concentration of of solutes and a liquid with a low concentration) builds up. Eventually, it gets so high that water can no longer be absorbed back into your bloodstream, and is in fact being absorbed OUT of your bloodstream. Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Make You Thirsty?

Why Does Diabetes Make You Thirsty?

Nearly 24 million people in the United States have diabetes. The number continues to grow, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Excessive thirst is one of the warning signs of diabetes and also a common side effect after a diabetic begins treatment for the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). “Hyperglycemia (or high blood glucose) can occur any time blood glucose is above the target range.” the ADA states. “In fact, the symptoms of diabetes are the same as the symptoms of hyperglycemia. That's because diabetes itself causes hyperglycemia.” Diabetes Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that allows your body to turn blood glucose into a form of energy your cells can use. Type 1 diabetics produce little or no insulin, and Type 2 diabetics produce either an insufficient amount of insulin or are resistant to the insulin they do produce. To avoid the long-term side effects of diabetes--like blindness or kidney disease--you must keep your blood sugar under control. The National Institutes of Health recommends a blood glucose range of 80 to 130 before meals and less than 170 after meals. Hyperglycemia High blood sugar can be caused by a range of factors including too little insulin, too much food, too little exercise, illness or not taking oral medications as directed. Treatments for hyperglycemia include taking extra insulin and increasing exercise, but the treatments vary based on your individual condition. A personal treatment plan for dealing with hyperglycemia should be developed with your health care professional. Excessive Thirst Hyperglycemia is the reason that diabetics experience excessive thirst. Your kidneys act as a filter and normally absorb the glucose in your blood and recycle it for your body’s use. When you Continue reading >>

Diabetes Or Just Normal Thirst?

Diabetes Or Just Normal Thirst?

Dr. Greene, my 2-year-old daughter drinks a lot during the day. It could be water, juice, milk, or whatever. I am concerned. Is this normal for kids to drink 5-8 bottles of liquid during the day? Or this is a sign of diabetes? Should I bring her in for a test? Are there any other signs I should be looking for? I am really concerned. Thank you. Irina Eilen – The Gap Dr. Greene’s Answer: Irina, just last week on Monday morning, I picked up the top chart from my inbox and began walking to Exam Room 1 (the Safari Room). Before opening the door, I paused to open the chart and glance at the nurse’s notes. I was about to meet a 7-year-old boy whose mother had brought him in because he had been drinking much more than usual for about 2 weeks — especially over the preceding weekend. Could it be diabetes? I stepped in the room and greeted the mother and son. They confirmed what had been written in the chart, adding that he had also been urinating much more than usual, and perhaps had lost some weight. As they spoke I could tell that the mom felt a little guilty about bringing him in unnecessarily, but at the same time she was worried that something might be seriously wrong. Parents often experience this dilemma. Whenever you are battling inside about whether to contact your doctor, do it. The boy’s clothes were indeed loose fitting, but he otherwise appeared healthy. We did a simple urine test in the office, and two minutes later found that he had a huge amount of sugar and ketones in his urine. He had diabetes. Even though the mom suspected the diagnosis, she was totally stunned. She couldn’t believe it was true. I sent them across the parking lot to the hospital lab for some bloodwork. His blood sugar level was 645 mg/dL! A fasting blood sugar over 126 mg/dL or a ra Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Urination And Thirst? A Lesson On Osmosis

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Urination And Thirst? A Lesson On Osmosis

A TABA Seminar on Diabetes I have the pleasure of being an executive member of the Toronto Applied Biostatistics Association (TABA), a volunteer-run professional organization here in Toronto that organizes seminars on biostatistics. During this past Tuesday, Dr. Loren Grossman from the LMC Diabetes and Endocrinology Centre generously donated his time to deliver an introductory seminar on diabetes for biostatisticians. The Institute for Clinical and Evaluative Sciences (ICES) at Sunnybrook Hospital kindly hosted us and provided the venue for the seminar. As a chemist and a former pre-medical student who studied physiology, I really enjoyed this intellectual treat, especially since Loren was clear, informative, and very knowledgeable about the subject. Diabetes Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases that are characterized by a high concentration of glucose in the bloodstream. Glucose is a common monomer of carbohydrates that exists in many foods, including bread, pasta, rice, fruits, vegetables, and refined sugar. It provides the fuel for the cells of our bodies to function. Chemical Structures of Open-Chain and Cyclic Glucose For a variety of reasons that distinguish the different types of diabetes, diabetics cannot absorb glucose normally, leaving an excess of glucose in the bloodstream. Diabetes leads to many health problems, like kidney failure, blindness, heart attacks and strokes. The Growing Prevalence of Diabetes It was interesting but sad for me to learn about the increased prevalence of diabetes in North America and around the world. Loren commented that diabetes was a specialized niche area in endocrinology when he began his research in this field over 25 years ago, but it is now a major area of study in medical research because of its epidemic proportions. Continue reading >>

Why Do Diabetics Get So Thirsty?

Why Do Diabetics Get So Thirsty?

It’s normal to feel thirsty when you don’t drink enough water, during hot days, or after you have powered through a strenuous workout. About 70 percent of your body weight is water. Thirst is natural signal of when your body is running low on water. But if you have diabetes, it may not relieve even though you constantly refill your cup – why? There are some reasons of why diabetics can get so thirsty! Causes and risk factors of diabetes Diabetes is a condition of when the body loses its normal ability to process glucose for energy. Insulin plays a key role to help process sugar (glucose) what you eat. It is produced by a gland called pancreas (behind & below stomach). Here is brief summary of how glucose is processed in the body: The pancreas releases insulin into the bloodstream, particularly after eating or when the amount of glucose in the blood is high. The insulin then circulates through bloodstream, helping glucose to enter cells of the body. As a result, blood glucose level backs to normal. As your blood glucose decreases, so does the amount of insulin released from pancreas. In diabetics, something goes awry with insulin. This often leads to high blood sugar. And poorly-controlled high blood sugar in diabetics is a serious threat. If you have diabetes, it’s very important to keep your blood sugar as normal as possible (see also the normal blood sugar targets for diabetics in this section)! There are several types of diabetes, these include: Type-2 diabetes (the most common diabetes), a condition of when there is no adequate insulin or the body cannot use insulin effectively. It’s likely to be associated with lifestyle factors such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and poor diet. It may also run in families. Type-1 diabetes, a condition of when pancreas Continue reading >>

Feeling Thirsty And Diabetes

Feeling Thirsty And Diabetes

Paying attention to excessive thirst is important because it could be one of the warning signs of diabetes. Why does diabetes make you thirsty? The part of our brain that tells us we are thirsty is called the hypothalamus. Both the brain and kidneys can signal the adaptive ‘thirst’ response telling us we are thirsty. Paying attention to excessive thirst is important because it could be one of the warning signs of diabetes. Excessive thirst & hyperglycemia Two of the most common symptoms associated with diabetes (type 1 & type 2) are increased thirst and increased urine production. The kidneys are a common factor between these two symptoms. Excessive thirst may be a symptom of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). It’s important to be able to recognize any imbalance in thirst or urine production. It’s the function of the kidneys and other organs to help filter out impurities. When there is a buildup of sugar in the bloodstream, our organs, especially the kidneys may become ‘overworked.’ Excess sugar becomes a burden directly on the kidneys as they work to keep up with the volume of excess sugar. The impact of excess blood sugar causes a reaction of hydration which notifies our brain that more fluids are needed causing extreme thirst. Early detection prevents organ damage Not only the kidneys but over time if diabetes goes undiagnosed or untreated the pancreas can also be permanently damaged. If you are noticing extreme thirst, talk with your healthcare provider. There are tests that can be done to determine its cause. Recognizing symptoms like extreme thirst and urine production and getting tested for diabetes, can help prevent organ damage. Urinating often Feeling very thirsty Feeling very hungry - even though you are eating Extreme fatigue Blurry vision Cuts/br Continue reading >>

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

Is It Possible To Improve A Diabetic Condition? What Is The Cause Of Diabetes And What Can Be Done About It.

Is It Possible To Improve A Diabetic Condition? What Is The Cause Of Diabetes And What Can Be Done About It.

For a simple explanation regarding Diabetic Nerve Pain 1) What is Diabetes? 2) Types of Diabetes 3) Side effects of too much sugar in the blood 4) Side effects of too much insulin 5) Diabetic Symptoms 6) 12 Signs of Diabetes 7) Complementary Natural Treatment for Diabetes What is Diabetes? Glucose is a simple sugar which serves as the body's fuel to produce heat and energy. When food is eaten and digestion occurs, the food is broken down into simple glucose molecules which then circulate in the blood to the cells where it can be used. When it is found in the human bloodstream it is referred to as "blood sugar". Carbohydrates are long chains of glucose molecules which are broken down to glucose. How does this become the condition known as diabetes? Glucose cannot penetrate the cell wall unless it is attached to molecules of insulin. The sugars and starches you eat are converted to glucose, which enters your bloodstream to be transported to the cells. This is where insulin comes in. It "unlocks" your cell walls so the glucose can enter. Insulin's job is to push the blood sugar into the cells. In order for this to work, your cells need to be sensitive to insulin. Without this, the glucose does not enter the cells but accumulates in the blood and circulates helplessly, eventually entering the kidneys and then the bladder for excretion in the urine. When your cells aren't sensitive to insulin, your body has to do something with the glucose. It converts some of it into fat, and the rest can become AGEs (advanced glycation end products) -- which can build up in the tissues, and affect cellular function. While circulating, this excess sugar will react with oxygen to form unstable molecules called free radicals which can cause havoc by stealing electrons from your body's healthy Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes Insipidus: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes insipidus is a condition where the body loses too much fluid through urination, causing a significant risk of dangerous dehydration as well as a range of illnesses and conditions. There are two forms of the disease: nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and central diabetes insipidus (also known as neurogenic diabetes insipidus). A number of factors have been linked to the development of diabetes insipidus, which may also occur in pregnancy or with the use of certain medications. Establishing the cause of the problem can help determine the most appropriate treatment to support the regulation of water balance in the body. Diabetes insipidus is a condition that can be managed successfully. Contents of this article: What is diabetes insipidus? An uncommon condition, diabetes insipidus is a disorder affecting the regulation of body fluid levels. Two key symptoms resemble those of the more common forms of diabetes that affect blood sugar levels (diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2).1-5 People with diabetes insipidus produce excessive amounts of urine (polyuria), resulting in frequent urination and, in turn, thirst (polydipsia). However, the underlying cause of these two symptoms is quite different from the causes in types 1 and 2 diabetes. In diabetes mellitus, elevated blood sugar prompts the production of large volumes of urine to help remove the excess sugar from the body. In diabetes insipidus, it is the body's water balance system itself that is not working properly. Here are some key points about diabetes insipidus. More detail and supporting information is in the body of this article. Diabetes insipidus is a condition where the body fails to properly control water balance, resulting in excessive urination. Diabetes insipidus can be caused by low or absent secretion of t Continue reading >>

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