diabetestalk.net

Why Do Diabetes Get Thirsty

Share on facebook

http://ehow2.co/diabetes-treatment - Visit the link and discover more about type 1 diabetes symptoms. Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms - Diabetes Type 1 Symptoms and Causes | Symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms,Diabetes Type 1 Symptoms and Causes,Symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes,diabetes,type 1 diabetes,diabetes symptoms,health,symptoms of diabetes,type 1,type 1 diabetes (disease or medical condition),diabetes type 1 symptoms,diabetes type 1 treatment,diabetes type 1 cure,diabetes type 1 diet,type 1 diabetes diet,diabetes symptoms type 1,type 1 diabetes symptoms and signs,type 1 diabetes symptoms numbness,type 1 diabetes symptoms vs type 2,piles

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) develop gradually—so gradually, in fact, that it’s possible to miss them or to not connect them as related symptoms. Some people are actually surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they’ve gone to the doctor for something else (eg, fatigue or increased urination). The symptoms develop gradually because, if you have the insulin resistant form of type 2, it takes time for the effects of insulin resistance to show up. Your body doesn’t become insulin resistant (unable to use insulin properly) overnight, as you can learn about in the article on causes of type 2 diabetes. If you’re not insulin resistant—and instead your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process glucose well—the symptoms also develop gradually. Your body will be able to “make do” with lower insulin levels for awhile, but eventually, you will start to notice the following symptoms. Here are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes: Fatigue: Your body isn’t getting the energy it needs from the food you’re eating, so you may feel very tired. Extreme thirst: No matter how much you drink, it feels Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. sdboy777

    Always Thirsty, what to do?

    I was wondering what to do? I don't like to drink just water at all. But I have type 2 and am ALWAYS super thirsty. Sometimes I will give in and drink pepsi as well. But is there anything anyone else out there is drinking that is satisfying for severe thirst. Thank you very much.

  2. angellang

    please please tell me what has worked for you…I have the same problem all the time. I dont like what either so has anything worked for you and my mouth is so dry all the time but I'm always drinking sugar free stuff nothing helps..please contact me my facebook is [email protected]…dont bother emailing me cause I haven't been able to get in that account for years so please send me a private mesg on f/b thanks

  3. cakeybakes

    I love water any way I can get it. I can't tolerate the artificial sweeteners, so I put a lemon slice or a few frozen raspberries or strawberries in my water. Use carbonated water if you need the fizz (I don't like it very much, it gets me too full feeling)
    Keep working on those numbers!

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Learn why people with diabetes get thirsty. Learn about diabetes. Hundreds of diabetes videos.

Why Does Diabetes Make You Thirsty?

Nearly 24 million people in the United States have diabetes. The number continues to grow, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Excessive thirst is one of the warning signs of diabetes and also a common side effect after a diabetic begins treatment for the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). “Hyperglycemia (or high blood glucose) can occur any time blood glucose is above the target range.” the ADA states. “In fact, the symptoms of diabetes are the same as the symptoms of hyperglycemia. That's because diabetes itself causes hyperglycemia.” Diabetes Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that allows your body to turn blood glucose into a form of energy your cells can use. Type 1 diabetics produce little or no insulin, and Type 2 diabetics produce either an insufficient amount of insulin or are resistant to the insulin they do produce. To avoid the long-term side effects of diabetes--like blindness or kidney disease--you must keep your blood sugar under control. The National Institutes of Health recommends a blood glucose range of 80 to 130 before meals and less than 170 after meals. Hyperglycemia High blood sugar can be caused by a r Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. sdboy777

    Always Thirsty, what to do?

    I was wondering what to do? I don't like to drink just water at all. But I have type 2 and am ALWAYS super thirsty. Sometimes I will give in and drink pepsi as well. But is there anything anyone else out there is drinking that is satisfying for severe thirst. Thank you very much.

  2. angellang

    please please tell me what has worked for you…I have the same problem all the time. I dont like what either so has anything worked for you and my mouth is so dry all the time but I'm always drinking sugar free stuff nothing helps..please contact me my facebook is [email protected]…dont bother emailing me cause I haven't been able to get in that account for years so please send me a private mesg on f/b thanks

  3. cakeybakes

    I love water any way I can get it. I can't tolerate the artificial sweeteners, so I put a lemon slice or a few frozen raspberries or strawberries in my water. Use carbonated water if you need the fizz (I don't like it very much, it gets me too full feeling)
    Keep working on those numbers!

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

...So many people do not know this.

Feeling Thirsty And Diabetes

Paying attention to excessive thirst is important because it could be one of the warning signs of diabetes. Why does diabetes make you thirsty? The part of our brain that tells us we are thirsty is called the hypothalamus. Both the brain and kidneys can signal the adaptive ‘thirst’ response telling us we are thirsty. Paying attention to excessive thirst is important because it could be one of the warning signs of diabetes. Excessive thirst & hyperglycemia Two of the most common symptoms associated with diabetes (type 1 & type 2) are increased thirst and increased urine production. The kidneys are a common factor between these two symptoms. Excessive thirst may be a symptom of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). It’s important to be able to recognize any imbalance in thirst or urine production. It’s the function of the kidneys and other organs to help filter out impurities. When there is a buildup of sugar in the bloodstream, our organs, especially the kidneys may become ‘overworked.’ Excess sugar becomes a burden directly on the kidneys as they work to keep up with the volume of excess sugar. The impact of excess blood sugar causes a reaction of hydration which notifies o Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. jpg391

    Why Does Diabetes Make You So Thirsty?
    By Sanjay Gupta, MD
    [Why-does-diabetes-make-me-so-thirsty] Excessive thirst, or polydipsia, can be triggered by different factors such as eating too much salt or taking medications that cause dry mouth. Thirst is also a symptom of diabetes. For people with diabetes, thirst can be a sign of hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar.
    The kidneys play a vital role in regulating levels of blood sugar by filtering the blood and absorbing excess glucose. When very high levels of sugar build up in the blood, the kidneys can’t keep up and they produce more urine than normal — a condition known as polyuria. As a result, you can become dehydrated.
    “People who have well-controlled diabetes should be at no increased risk for excessive thirst compared with somebody who doesn’t have diabetes,” says Noah Bloomgarden, MD, assistant professor of medicine-endocrinology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and clinical endocrinologist in the division of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism at the Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. “It’s really poor control of one’s blood sugar and an increase in urination and excretion of water that makes people [with diabetes] feel very thirsty and increases their need to maintain water balance.”
    As Dr. Bloomgarden points out, even people who are doing a good job of controlling their diabetes can develop very high blood sugar. A cold, infection, or even a very stressful situation can cause blood sugar to rise, and excessive thirst may be the first sign that something is wrong. “If you’re experiencing excessive thirst, you should contact your doctor immediately, because it may indicate severe hyperglycemia,” says Bloomgarden.
    If you have diabetes and you’re not sure whether you’re unusually thirsty, Bloomgarden suggests that you check your blood sugar. If your blood sugar is normal but you’re thirstier than usual (or you’re going to the bathroom more often), consult your doctor.
    If you are experiencing excessive thirst related to hyperglycemia, it’s imperative to get your diabetes under control. Make sure you’re following the treatment plan prescribed by your doctor, including any lifestyle recommendations such as eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly. If you’re having trouble sticking with your treatment plan, you may benefit from consulting with a certified diabetes educator, who can help you self-manage your blood sugar.
    It’s also important to make sure you’re drinking enough water, especially if your blood sugar is elevated. The Joslin Diabetes Center recommends drinking a minimum of eight glasses of water a day.
    “There are no complications associated with increased thirst if people are able to drink water freely,” says Bloomgarden. But it can become a major issue if somebody is elderly or isn’t mobile and doesn’t have the ability to access water or other liquids. “Then they can get profoundly dehydrated, and that can be extremely dangerous,” he warns.
    Updated: 10/17/2016
    Source http://www.everydayhealth.com/columns/paging-dr-gupta/why-does-diabetes-make-you-so-thirsty/?pos=4&xid=nl_EverydayHealthManagingDiabetes_20161104

  2. t1wayne

    James - not sure your motivation in posting this, but just a few observations.
    First, this summary applies to ONLY Diabetes Mellitus (DM)... NOT Diabetes Insipidus (DI). (Authors who simply use the term "diabetes" annoy me). AND... it applies to BOTH forms of DM - T1 and T2. Here's a little summation (a single paragraph from a longer summation) from the NIH:
    "Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus—which includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes—are unrelated, although both conditions {DM and DI} cause frequent urination and constant thirst. Diabetes mellitus causes high blood glucose, or blood sugar, resulting from the body's inability to use blood glucose for energy. People with diabetes insipidus have normal blood glucose levels; however, their kidneys cannot balance fluid in the body."
    (Emphasis mine); {Bracketed insert mine}
    So... frequent urination and thirst are symptoms of both DM and DI... and it applies to both forms of DM, and for the same reasons.
    Last note to the folks that review these posts... I refer to "both" forms of DM because ALL forms, including the "other" forms, are biochemically caused by one of two things - Insulin resistance (T2, gestational and MODY) or Autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells (T1, LADA).
    Here's the link to the NIH article on DI: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/kidney-disease/diabetes-insipidus/Pages/facts.aspx
    w.

  3. maryd98

    My understanding has always been that if your BG is so high that you're urinating frequently, you become dehydrated and thus you get super-thirsty, and then it just becomes a vicious cycle.
    Maybe that's just 'cause these were two symptoms I had when I was diagnosed, but I haven't heard of diabetes (in general) making you so thirsty....but then I looked at James' post again.
    This is (sort of) in the article James quoted, though it kind of got buried, IMO. I had to read through it twice to catch it:
    "When very high levels of sugar build up in the blood, the kidneys can’t keep up and they produce more urine than normal — a condition known as polyuria. As a result, you can become dehydrated."
    This is followed (agian, in James' quote of the article) by....
    “People who have well-controlled diabetes should be at no increased risk for excessive thirst compared with somebody who doesn’t have diabetes,” says Noah Bloomgarden, MD, assistant professor of medicine-endocrinology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and clinical endocrinologist in the division of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism at the Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. “It’s really poor control of one’s blood sugar and an increase in urination and excretion of water that makes people [with diabetes] feel very thirsty and increases their need to maintain water balance.”

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Why Do You Get Thirsty When You Have Diabetes Osmosis

    Diabetes mellitus (type 1, type 2) & diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) - causes & symptoms What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is when there's too much glucose, a type of sugar, in the blood. Diabetes mellitus can be split into type 1, type 2, as well as a couple other subtypes, including gestational diabetes and drug-induced diabetes. Subscribe - goo.gl/w5aaaV. More videos - goo.gl/UhOKiM. Support us on Patreon - goo.gl/ZGHEk4. This video co ...

    diabetic diet Apr 14, 2018
  • Why Do We Get Thirsty When We Have Diabetes?

    A doctor explains how sweet treats affect your body on a cellular level. You just polished off a bowl of mint chocolate chip, and suddenly you're craving a drink. Sound familiar? Post-dessert thirst is a common reaction—but why is it that sweet treats make us feel so parched? To find out, we called Caroline Apovian, MD, a professor in the endocrinology, diabetes, and nutrition department at the Boston University School of Medicine. The reason h ...

    diabetes Dec 31, 2017
  • Why Do Diabetes Get Thirsty

    Last month I was taken to the emergency room because my blood pressure dropped. It turned out I had gone low because of dehydration. I’m really embarrassed because I hadn’t realized how important hydration is. It was scary. I could sit up, but only for about a minute. Then I’d have to lie down again. Couldn’t even think about standing (which is hard enough for me on a good day). I was in the ER for about 12 hours getting IV fluids before ...

    diabetes Jan 3, 2018
  • Why Do You Get So Thirsty When You Have Diabetes?

    I know that extreme thirst is a symptom of diabetes, but can the thirst sometimes be occasional, or is it a constant everyday thing? Excessive thirst can be a symptom of diabetes mellitus, and is usually accompanied by passing excessive amounts of urine. Often there is also weight loss and the person feels unwell. The thirst is continuous, so people often wake at night to drink water. It is treated with insulin or tablets. Another cause of thirst ...

    diabetes Apr 5, 2018
  • Why Do Diabetics Get Thirsty

    Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Dia ...

    diabetes Mar 4, 2018
  • Why Do You Get Thirsty When You Have Diabetes?

    Excessive thirst, when linked to another condition as a symptom or comorbidity, is called polydipsia. It’s usually one of the earliest symptoms of diabetes to develop, and is often accompanied by excessive dryness of the mouth (“cotton mouth”). In most people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, the thirst builds slowly enough that it is often incredibly difficult to notice until other symptoms present themselves or until the point of major dehy ...

    diabetes Dec 30, 2017

More in diabetes