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Why Did Diabetes America Close

Almost Half The Us Population Has Diabetes Or Its Precursor

Almost Half The Us Population Has Diabetes Or Its Precursor

Almost Half the US Population Has Diabetes or Its Precursor Almost one in10 US adults has diabetes, while more than one in threehas prediabetes, indicates the latest National Diabetes Statistics Report by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). As of 2015, 30.3 million adults living in the United States or 9.4% of the population, have diabetes, according to the new report. Moreover, nearly one in four adults living with diabetes, or 7.2 million American adults, are not aware that they have it. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, the report indicates. And nine in 10 adults with prediabetes are not aware they have a condition that places them at high risk to progress to type 2 diabetes within 5 years, according to a statement by the CDC. This is important, as the authors point out, because individuals with prediabetes can cut their risk of type 2 diabetes in half by being more active and making healthier food choices. On the other hand, the rate at which new cases of diabetes are being diagnosed remains steady, with an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes being spotted in American adults in 2015. "Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes," Brenda Fitzgerald, MD, director of the CDC said in the statement. "Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease," she added. Native Americans Have Double the Risk of Diabetes Compared With Whites The National Diabetes Statistics Report, which comes out approximately every 2years, was published online July 18. As the report notes, the likelihood that an individual will be diagnosed with diabetes increases with age and depends on race or ethnicity. Of adults aged 18 to 44 ye Continue reading >>

We Finally Have An “artificial Pancreas” For Diabetes. But It's A Letdown.

We Finally Have An “artificial Pancreas” For Diabetes. But It's A Letdown.

Melinda Wedding The first thing Melinda Wedding thinks about when she wakes at 6:15 am is checking her daughter Carson’s blood sugar to see if she needs another dose of insulin. "Type 1 diabetes is constant," Wedding told me. "There’s no downtime." Throughout the day she might look at her watch, which gives her a reading of her daughter’s blood sugar, up to 100 times. With that data comes hundreds of decisions about when Carson should eat and how to use her insulin pump. Every night, Wedding wakes up two or three times to check on her daughter’s blood levels again. If Carson misses a dose of insulin — and she sometimes does as she learns to manage her condition — her blood sugar will rise. Over time, that could lead to all sorts of adverse effects, from brain fogs and stomachaches to a coma or kidney failure. You'd think that a new device called the "artificial pancreas" would be a godsend for someone like her. Designed to make insulin delivery less of a hassle by automating it, the MiniMed 670G by Medtronic was called "revolutionary" and a game changer after the Food and Drug Administration approved it in September. But families like the Weddings say the device, slated to hit the market in spring 2017, has been incredibly overhyped. For starters, it isn’t a true artificial pancreas — it only automates the delivery of one type of insulin — and patients who use it still have to do a lot to manage their condition. "I hate [the name]," Wedding summed up. "It gives the connotation that the problem is solved, when it’s far from solved." The device also does nothing to fix one of the most pressing problems facing the 1 million people with Type 1 diabetes in America: The cost of insulin is skyrocketing so much that some patients are being forced to cut back Continue reading >>

Animas Corporation To Close Operations And Exit Insulin Pump Market

Animas Corporation To Close Operations And Exit Insulin Pump Market

Company will work with Medtronic as a partner-of-choice to help ensure a smooth transition for patients on insulin pumps Animas has selected Medtronic plc (NYSE: MDT), a world leader in diabetes, as its partner-of-choice to facilitate a seamless transition for patients, caregivers and healthcare providers. Patients using an Animas insulin pump will be offered the option to transfer to a Medtronic pump. Patient safety and continuity of care is of utmost importance and Animas will continue to provide customer service, training and warranty support, including providing pump supplies that are used in conjunction with the Animas® Vibe® and OneTouch Ping® insulin pumps, through a transition period. “We recognize that patients living with diabetes rely on our products to provide critical care, and we want to reassure them that we will be with them every step of the way throughout this transition,” said Valerie Asbury, General Manager of Animas Corporation. “Our number one priority is ensuring patients have a seamless experience as they transition to Medtronic. For over 30 years, Medtronic has been a global leader in the treatment of those living with diabetes, and we are confident they will provide outstanding support to our patients and their healthcare teams.” “We are incredibly grateful to our patients and healthcare partners for the trust, confidence and loyalty they have placed in Animas products over the last 12 years,” Asbury said. “With changing needs of customers, rapidly evolving market dynamics, and increased competitive pressures, it proved too difficult to sustain the insulin pump business and we decided to pursue an exit of the business. This decision was extremely difficult and comes following the extensive exploration of all other viable option Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is On The Rise In America's Kids And Experts Don't Know Why

Diabetes Is On The Rise In America's Kids And Experts Don't Know Why

A new study is the first to look at diabetes diagnosis trends in America's youth. Video provided by Newsy Newslook The rate at which America's kids are diagnosed with diabetes is climbing and researchers don't know why. A first-ever study of new diabetes diagnoses of U.S. youth under age 20 found both Types 1 and 2 diabetes surged from 2002-2012. The diagnosis of new cases of Type 2 diabetes, associated with obesity, increased about 5% each year from 2002 to 2012, the study said, while new cases of Type 1, the most common form for young people, went up about 2% every year. The National Institutes of Health, which funded the study along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said the cause of the rise is "unclear." "These findings lead to many more questions," explained Dr. Barbara Linder, senior advisor for childhood diabetes research at NIH's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. "The differences among racial and ethnic groups and between genders raise many questions. We need to understand why the increase in rates of diabetes development varies so greatly and is so concentrated in specific racial and ethnic groups." The study, published Friday in the New England Journal of Medicine, showed higher rates of diabetes diagnoses among minorities. Type 2 diabetes, which the CDC stated makes up about 90% to 95% of diagnosed diabetes cases, rose by 8.5% in Asian Americans ages 10-19. Blacks in the same age group saw a 6.3% increase, followed by a 3.1% bump in Hispanics and whites at fewer than a 1% increase. Hispanics saw the biggest rate increase of Type 1 diabetes with a 4.2% increase, followed by blacks at 2.2% and whites at 1.2% In terms of gender, girls and women 10-19 saw a 6.2% increase in Type 2 diabetes, while men and boys of Continue reading >>

In The Treatment Of Diabetes, Success Often Does Not Pay

In The Treatment Of Diabetes, Success Often Does Not Pay

With much optimism, Beth Israel Medical Center in Manhattan opened its new diabetes center in March 1999. Miss America, Nicole Johnson Baker, herself a diabetic, showed up for promotional pictures, wearing her insulin pump. In one photo, she posed with a man dressed as a giant foot - a comical if dark reminder of the roughly 2,000 largely avoidable diabetes-related amputations in New York City each year. Doctors, alarmed by the cost and rapid growth of the disease, were getting serious. At four hospitals across the city, they set up centers that featured a new model of treatment. They would be boot camps for diabetics, who struggle daily to reduce the sugar levels in their blood. The centers would teach them to check those levels, count calories and exercise with discipline, while undergoing prolonged monitoring by teams of specialists. But seven years later, even as the number of New Yorkers with Type 2 diabetes has nearly doubled, three of the four centers, including Beth Israel's, have closed. They did not shut down because they had failed their patients. They closed because they had failed to make money. They were victims of the byzantine world of American health care, in which the real profit is made not by controlling chronic diseases like diabetes but by treating their many complications. Insurers, for example, will often refuse to pay $150 for a diabetic to see a podiatrist, who can help prevent foot ailments associated with the disease. Nearly all of them, though, cover amputations, which typically cost more than $30,000. Patients have trouble securing a reimbursement for a $75 visit to the nutritionist who counsels them on controlling their diabetes. Insurers do not balk, however, at paying $315 for a single session of dialysis, which treats one of the disease Continue reading >>

Dfw Diabetes Care

Dfw Diabetes Care

Peripheral Vascular Disease (Ankle-Brachial Index) Screening Our providers take a comprehensive treatment approach tailored to the needs of our patients. With centers located throughout the DFW area, we are dedicated to provide state of the art diabetescare. Care management through education and appropriate care recommendations with expert advice andsupport. Achieving patient goals and overcomingbarriers. Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) Diabetes is a chronic, complex disease that can be challenging to manage. A diabetes educator makes controlling your diabetes easier and gives you the tools and ongoing support to make diabetes care a manageable part of your life. Diabetes Self-Management Education is a comprehensive program that includes 7 content areas. When you meet with a diabetes educator, they will help you develop an individualized plan to help control your diabetes. It is a critical component in coping with and managing your diabetes, and preventing diabetes complications. A diabetes educator can help you set priorities and coach you on each of these areas. Healthy lifestyle (nutrition and physical activity) Develop individual goals for blood sugar control Continue reading >>

More Than 29 Million Americans Have Diabetes; 1 In 4 Doesn’t Know

More Than 29 Million Americans Have Diabetes; 1 In 4 Doesn’t Know

This website is archived for historical purposes and is no longer being maintained or updated. More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, up from the previous estimate of 26 million in 2010, according to a report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One in four people with diabetes doesn’t know he or she has it. Another 86 million adults – more than one in three U.S. adults – have prediabetes, where their blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Without weight loss and moderate physical activity, 15 percent to 30 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years. “These new numbers are alarming and underscore the need for an increased focus on reducing the burden of diabetes in our country,” said Ann Albright, Ph.D., R.D., director of CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation. “Diabetes is costly in both human and economic terms. It’s urgent that we take swift action to effectively treat and prevent this serious disease.” Key findings from the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014 (based on health data from 2012), include: 29 million people in the United States (9.3 percent) have diabetes. 1.7 million people aged 20 years or older were newly diagnosed with diabetes in 2012. Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native adults are about twice as likely to have diagnosed diabetes as non-Hispanic white adults. 208,000 people younger than 20 years have been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or type 2). 86 million adults aged 20 years and older have prediabetes. The percentage of U.S. adults with prediabetes is similar for non-Hispanic whites (35 percent), non-Hispanic blacks (39 percent), and Hispanics Continue reading >>

Closure Of Texas Diabetes Centers Catches Some Patients, Staff Off Guard

Closure Of Texas Diabetes Centers Catches Some Patients, Staff Off Guard

A network of diabetes care centers with roots in Houston and locations in about a dozen cities in Texas, including Arlington, Plano and Las Colinas, will permanently close on Friday. Diabetes America posted a note on its website about a month ago. Patients and staff described the announcement as “sudden” and “surprising.” The closures, with little explanation, left thousands of patients in search of new diabetes care providers. Doctors, nutritionists and other specialists at the centers had to move quickly to find new jobs. The Las Colinas, Pearland and Central San Antonio locations will close at the end of business Friday. Nine other locations shuttered in early April. According to the Texas Administrative Code, when a physician's office closes, signage must be posted at least 30 days prior. The provider must ensure patients receive “reasonable notification” and have the opportunity to obtain or transfer their medical records. Diabetes America was founded in Houston in 2004 as The Diabetes Centers of America Inc. The name changed in 2007. The facilities were touted as a “one-stop-shop,” where patients with diabetes could access specialized clinicians, order lab work and learn about nutrition. The company grew quickly to 17 clinics in Texas and one in Arizona by 2008. It generated average monthly revenue of almost $1.3 million by 2010 and saw an estimated 51,000 patient visits a year, according to court documents. But the for-profit provider soon saw financial woes. The company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2012. In its filing, it cited long leases that prevented it from closing poor performing centers and billing issues with government and commercial insurers. Similar issues are being faced by Lewisville-based Adeptus, the nation’s largest operat Continue reading >>

Diabetes America :: San Antonio, Texas (tx) :: Clinic/hospital Profile :: Super Doctors

Diabetes America :: San Antonio, Texas (tx) :: Clinic/hospital Profile :: Super Doctors

Home | About | Selection Process | Advertising | Contact | Physician FAQ | Advanced Search | Browse Listings 2018 Super Doctors , MSP Communications. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Information in this Web site is not medical advice, nor is Super Doctors a physician referral service. We strive to maintain a high degree of accuracy in the information provided, but make no claim, promise or guarantee about the accuracy, or adequacy of the information contained in, or linked to superdoctors.com or its associated Web sites. Selecting a physician is an important decision; it should not be based solely on advertising or listings. Super Doctors is the name of a publication. It is not a title or moniker conferred upon individuals. No representation is made that the quality of the medical services provided by the physicians listed in this Web site will be greater than that of other licensed physicians and past results do not guarantee future success. Super Doctors is an independent publisher that has developed its own selection methodology; itis not affiliated with any federal, state or regulatory body. Self-designated practice specialties listed in Super Doctors do not imply "recognition" or "endorsement" of any field of medical practice, nor does it imply certification by a Member Medical Specialty Board of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS), or that the physician has been trained or has special competence to practice the specialty. Use of this site is subject to additional Terms and Conditions. Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Became An Epidemic

How Diabetes Became An Epidemic

It is estimated that almost 8 percent of Americans have some form of diabetes. What's even more worrying is that the number of people with diabetes is on the rise not just in the United States, but all over the world. Scientists have been working to find out why more people are developing diabetes and looking for strategies to help reverse this trend. Diabetes in the United States In the United States, diabetes has become increasingly prevalent in recent years. In 1980, 5.8 million people were diagnosed with diabetes, compared with 17.9 million today. Diabetes is expected to rise significantly in the near future. It is estimated that one in three Americans living today will eventually develop diabetes, and that the number of cases will increase in this country by 165 percent by 2050. Researchers believe that the following factors play a role in the increase: The baby-boomer population is aging, and your chances of developing diabetes increases with age. The Hispanic population is one of the fastest-growing segments of the United States population, and Hispanics are at increased risk of developing diabetes. Americans are becoming increasingly overweight and physically inactive, both known risk factors for diabetes. The Worldwide Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes is now a problem that affects people everywhere. There is evidence that 246 million people worldwide have diabetes. If current trends continue, this number is projected to reach 380 million within the next 20 years. Diabetes affects developed and developing countries alike. In fact, the largest increases in diabetes prevalence in the years to come are projected to take place in developing countries. According to the International Diabetes Federation, India currently has the highest concentration of people with diabetes, Continue reading >>

Allegiance Health To Close Diabetes Center After 20 Years Of Providing Services To Diabetic Patients

Allegiance Health To Close Diabetes Center After 20 Years Of Providing Services To Diabetic Patients

Allegiance Health to close Diabetes Center after 20 years of providing services to diabetic patients Type 2 diabetes patient Bryan Koszegi has his finger pricked in order to have his blood sugar leveltested at the Allegiance Diabetes Center. JACKSON, MI Allegiance Health administrators plan to close the Jackson hospital's Diabetes Center onJan. 1. The center, 817 W. High St., has provided medical support and diabetes education to its patients since it was founded in 1994. "Services for our diabetic patients won't change," said Ondrea Bates, senior vice president and chief nursing officer at Allegiance Health. Bates said the hospital will relocate its diabetes educators to its 2200 Springport Road location and patient care will be provided at the hospital. All non-emergency diabetes treatment and education is done at the center. Of the 13 staff members at the center, four business office support employees "will have the opportunity to redeploy elsewhere in the organization," Bates said, adding there is no guarantee the four employees will be rehired at Allegiance Health. The remaining nine employees will remain in their various roles as nurses and registered dietitians. Bates said there is no plan for the building at High Street after the center is disbanded. Linda Dale, a retired nurse, started the center with Dr. David Halsey in 1994. She said the decision to close the center is "shortsighted." "It's a true tragedy," said Dale, 66. "I'm so proud of what this center has become and what it means to the people and physicians in our community, but I also understand where the hospital is coming from." Dale said the center was "never a money maker." "The hospital is in the red, and has been for a while," she said. "The center maybe broke even twice in the 20-plus years it w Continue reading >>

Harvard And Mit Close To Cure For Type 1 Diabetes Which Will End Daily Injections

Harvard And Mit Close To Cure For Type 1 Diabetes Which Will End Daily Injections

Harvard and MIT close to cure for Type 1 diabetes which will end daily injections Sufferes of type 1 and type 2 diabetes may have to inject insulin dailyCredit:Alamy A cure for type 1 diabetes is closer than ever after scientists showed they can switch off the disease for six months in animals which would equate to several years in humans. In 2014, researchers at Harvard University discovered how to make huge quantities of insulin-producing cells , in a breakthrough hailed as significant as antibiotics. Now a team at MIT has proven that planting the cells into mice can completely restore insulin function for a long time. "These treatments aim to effectively establish long-term insulin independence and eliminate the daily burden of managing the disease for months, possibly years, at a time" Julia Greenstein JDRF, the type 1 diabetes research charity It could mean the end of daily insulin injections for the 400,000 people in Britain living with Type 1 diabetes. Instead they would simply need a transfusion of engineered cells every few years. Researchers say human trials are just a few years away. We are excited by these results, and are working hard to advance this technology to the clinic, said Dr Daniel Anderson, professor of applied biology at MIT. These results lay the groundwork for future human studies using these formulations with the goal of achieving long-term replacement therapy for type one diabetes. We believe (the cells) have the potential to provide insulin independence for patients suffering from this disease. "It has the potential to provide diabetics with a new pancreas that is protected from the immune system, which would allow them to control their blood sugar without taking drugs. Thats the dream. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that causes Continue reading >>

Scientists Believe They're Close To A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Scientists Believe They're Close To A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Scientists believe they’re closing in on a cure for Type 1 diabetes, and perhaps making daily insulin shots a thing of the past for patients, according to studies published Monday. Researchers from MIT, Harvard and Boston Children’s Hospital said they’re on the verge of developing replacements for pancreatic cells that are mysteriously destroyed by a patient’s own body — thus making it impossible to make insulin, which regulates blood sugar levels. Scientists, writing in the journals Nature Medicine and Nature Biotechnology, said they’ve engineered material from brown algae that could work for up to six months at a time — in a huge relief from daily doses of insulin, whether by injection or insulin pump. “We are excited by these results, and are working hard to advance this technology to the clinic,” said Daniel Anderson, an MIT chemical engineering professor. Type 1 diabetes, previously known as juvenile diabetes, afflicts about 1.25 million Americans, and about 200,000 of them are under 20, according to a CDC report in 2014. Type 1 diabetes is believed to have a genetic connection and is not related to weight or lifestyle, as is Type 2 diabetes. “Encapsulation therapies have the potential to be groundbreaking for people with (Type 1 diabetes),” said Julia Greenstein, vice president of discovery research of the JDRF, formerly known as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. “These treatments aim to effectively establish long-term insulin independence and eliminate the daily burden of managing the disease for months, possibly years, at a time without the need for immune suppression.” Continue reading >>

Diabetes America, Inc.: Private Company Information - Bloomberg

Diabetes America, Inc.: Private Company Information - Bloomberg

Diabetes America, Inc. operates a network of diabetes care centers in Texas. It provides specialized diabetes medical care, personalized diabetes education, nutrition coaching/weight management, lifestyle instruction and exercise, and labs and diagnostic testing services to patients; and employer/health plans. The company also offers a DietIQ, a weight management program. Diabetes America, Inc. was formerly known as Diabetes Centers of America, Inc. and changed its name to Diabetes America, Inc. in June 2004. The company was founded in 2004 and is based in Houston, Texas. It has locations in Houston, Humble, Katy, Pasadena, Pearland, Sugar Land, Shenandoah, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Arlington, Irvin... Diabetes America, Inc. operates a network of diabetes care centers in Texas. It provides specialized diabetes medical care, personalized diabetes education, nutrition coaching/weight management, lifestyle instruction and exercise, and labs and diagnostic testing services to patients; and employer/health plans. The company also offers a DietIQ, a weight management program. Diabetes America, Inc. was formerly known as Diabetes Centers of America, Inc. and changed its name to Diabetes America, Inc. in June 2004. The company was founded in 2004 and is based in Houston, Texas. It has locations in Houston, Humble, Katy, Pasadena, Pearland, Sugar Land, Shenandoah, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Arlington, Irving, Plano, and San Antonio, Texas. Continue reading >>

Diabetes America In Pasadena, Tx With Reviews - Yp.com

Diabetes America In Pasadena, Tx With Reviews - Yp.com

A metabolic disorder is a condition that occurs when the body's metabolic process is disrupted by dysfunctional chemical reactions. Some types of metabolic disorders are inherited, and these are usually caused a defective gene. Metabolic disorders may also be caused by a compromised liver or pancreas. The symptoms of this condition may include seizures, lethargy, weight loss, and jaundice. Diabetes is a disease that affects the body's ability to generate or respond to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that's made by the pancreas, and it impacts your body's ability to properly manage its blood sugar levels. Diabetes can cause sugars to build up in the blood, and this can result in health problems such as heart disease, blindness, and kidney failure. In severe cases, diabetes may lead to amputations of the lower extremities. What type of training does an endocrinologist receive? Endocrinologists are doctors, and they must obtain a medical degree from an accredited medical school and meet certain requirements before beginning work as licensed physicians. An endocrinologist must complete an undergraduate pre-medical degree, four years of medical school, a three-year residency in internal medicine, and two to three years of fellowship training in endocrinology. Part of the endocrine system, the pituitary gland is located at the base of the brain. The pituitary gland weighs about 0.5 grams and is about the size of a pea. It is often known as the body's "master gland" due to its role in overseeing the growth, development, and functioning of the body's other endocrine glands. Osteoporosis is a bone disease in which tissue loss causes bones to become fragile and brittle. With this disease, bones are at a higher risk from damage and breaking. In severe cases of osteoporosis, even a Continue reading >>

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