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Why Diabetics Should Not Put Lotion Between Their Toes?

Why Can't Diabetic People Put Lotion In Between Their Toes?!?!? | Yahoo Answers

Why Can't Diabetic People Put Lotion In Between Their Toes?!?!? | Yahoo Answers

Why can't diabetic people put lotion in between their toes?!?!? My grandmother is diabetic, and I read in one of her magazines that diabetics aren't supposed to put lotion between their toes. It didn't really explain why so can someone clarify? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: We ask diabetics not to put lotion in between their toes because 1) There is already plenty of moisture in between the toes 2) Adding more moisture to the area can cause the skin to macerate (kinda like when you get wrinkly from being in the tub too long) to the point where fissures or breaks will form in the skin. These breaks in the skin can lead to infection. Infection in between the toes can become a serious problem leading to gangrene or worse if the person does not have proper circulation, nerve sensation, and/or a compromised immune system (all of which are known complications of diabetes (I'm not saying all diabetics have these complications, of course.)) Many times, scaling or flaking of the skin is a result of skin that is too moist and covered up, or as a result of athlete's foot, which likes moist, dark, places. The skin may dry quickly when you take your shoes and socks off, but may be moist with them on. American Diabetes Association Guide to Foot Care: Source(s): Podiatrist (foot doctor) and Type 1 diabetic of 30+ years who uses lotion on his feet but does not put it in between his toes. I am writing to tell you what an incredible impact these methods had on my life! I have had type 2 diabetes for 27 years. For me, the worst part of this horrible disease is the severe pain I constantly get in my feet. The pain is so bad that I avoid standing and walking as much as possible. I've got to tell you that within the first month, my feet stopped hurting altogether Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Feet

Diabetes And The Feet

Foot care is an ongoing issue for diabetics. Avoiding foot problems, dealing with minor issues before they become major, and preventing serious infections that could lead to amputation, are all concerns. For all the recent progress in wound care and intervention, prevention is still the best place to begin. Diabetes, over a period of time, can cause circulatory damage and neuropathy, both of which can affect condition of the feet. Because of impaired circulation, the body's ability to heal itself is diminished. Minor traumas, that might otherwise heal quickly, persist and can become infected. Diabetic neuropathy, nerve damage, can impair an individual's ability to detect foot problems. Because it doesn't hurt, you don't intervene, and small problems escalate into big ones. The best place to start is with your shoes and socks. Proper fit is essential! Do not compromise--you have too much to lose. Make sure the shoe is wide enough, and don't let it pinch your toes. Shoes that "breathe," (either leather or running shoes) are best. Avoid sandals, especially those with a thong between the toes. Socks should be seamless, athletic type, of cotton or one of the new fibers like "Thorlo". Before putting your shoes on (and after you take them off), inspect your feet. You are looking for anything out of the ordinary, anything that might escalate from irritant into infection. Be thorough! Blisters, bunions, corns, splinters, raw or discolored patches, ingrown toenails, even "athlete's foot" fungus can require action. Don't assume it will go away by itself! When in doubt, consult your podiatrist. Sight is not necessary to carry out daily foot inspections. Much can be revealed by feel and smell. You are looking for change, anything that shouldn't be there, or that wasn't there before. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Tips For Daily Foot Care

Diabetes: Tips For Daily Foot Care

If you have diabetes, it's essential to make foot care part of your daily self-care routine. That's because "people can develop complications before they realize they even have a problem," says Bresta Miranda-Palma, MD, a professor with the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Medical School. "I've seen people walk on a nail for weeks until infection has developed." When feet and legs have nerve damage, a small cut or wound can go unnoticed. That's why it's critical to check for problems before they get infected and lead to serious complications -- like gangrene or amputation. "Daily foot care is the most important thing," says Miranda-Palma. "About 85% of amputations can be prevented if the patient gets a wound treated in time." That means checking your feet daily and seeing a foot doctor (podiatrist) every two or three months in order to catch problems early. Daily Care you might like Wash and dry your feet with mild soap and warm water. Dry your feet thoroughly, especially between the toes, an area more prone to fungal infections. Use lotion on your feet to prevent cracking, but don't put the lotion between your toes. Do not soak feet, or you'll risk infection if the skin begins to break down. And if you have nerve damage, take care with water temperature. You risk burning your skin if you can't feel that the water is too hot. Weekly Care Trim toenails straight across with a nail clipper. You can prevent ingrown toenails if you don't round the corners of the nails or cut down the sides. Smooth the nails with an emery board. Check the tops and bottoms of your feet, using a mirror if you need it; you can also ask someone else to check your feet for you. Also, be sure to get your feet examined at every doctor's visit. When examining your feet, look for Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care | Why Is Diabetic Foot Care Important?

Diabetic Foot Care | Why Is Diabetic Foot Care Important?

According to the American Diabetes Association, about 15.7 million people (5.9 percent of the United States population) have diabetes. Nervous system damage (also called neuropathy) affects about 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes and is a major complication that may cause diabetics to lose feeling in their feet or hands. Foot problems are a big risk in diabetic patients. Diabetics must constantly monitor their feet or face severe consequences, including amputation. With a diabetic foot, a wound as small as a blister from wearing a shoe thats too tight can cause a lot of damage. Diabetes decreases blood flow, so injuries are slow to heal. When your wound is not healing, its at risk for infection. As a diabetic, your infections spread quickly. If you have diabetes, you should inspect your feet every day. Look for puncture wounds, bruises, pressure areas, redness, warmth, blisters, ulcers, scratches, cuts and nail problems. If necessary, get someone to help you, or use a mirror. Heres some basic advice for taking care of diabetic feet: Dont put your feet on radiators or in front of the fireplace. Dont smoke or sit cross-legged. Both decrease blood supply to your feet. Dont use antiseptic solutions, drugstore medications, heating pads or sharp instruments on your feet. Trim your toenails straight across. Avoid cutting the corners. Use a nail file or emery board. If you find an ingrown toenail, contact our office. Use quality lotion to keep the skin of your feet soft and moist, but dont put any lotion between your toes. Wash your feet every day with mild soap and warm water. When drying your feet, pat each foot with a towel and be careful between your toes. Buy shoes that are comfortable without a breaking in period. Check how your shoe fits in width, length, back, b Continue reading >>

Diabetes Foot Care

Diabetes Foot Care

If you have diabetes, nerve damage, circulation problems, and infections can lead to serious foot problems. However, you can take precautions to maintain healthy feet. Managing your diabetes and maintaining a healthy lifestyle helps keep your feet healthy. This should include: regular medical exams, including foot checks at every visit and checking your ABCs (A1c, blood pressure, and cholesterol) monitoring your blood sugar daily regular exercise eating a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables You can help prevent serious foot problems by following a good foot care regimen. Here are a few foot care habits you can adopt and try to do every day. 1. Inspect your feet Check your feet and toes, inspecting the tops, sides, soles, heels, and the area in between the toes. If you’re physically unable to inspect your own feet, use a mirror or ask someone to help. Contact your doctor immediately if you discover any sores, redness, cuts, blisters, or bruises. 2. Wash your feet Wash your feet every day in warm water with mild soap. Hot water and harsh soaps can damage your skin. Check the water temperature with your fingers or elbow before putting your feet in. Your diabetes may make it difficult to sense water temperature with your feet. 3. Dry your feet Pat your feet to dry them and make sure to dry well. Infections tend to develop in moist areas, so make sure you dry the area between your toes well. 4. Moisturize dry skin If the skin on your feet feels rough or dry, use lotion or oil. Do not use lotion between your toes. Following good foot care habits will go a long way toward keeping your feet healthy. Here are a few helpful tips. Antiseptic solutions can burn your skin. Never use them on your feet without your doctor’s approval. Never use a heating pad, hot water bott Continue reading >>

How Should I Care For My Feet If I Have Diabetes?

How Should I Care For My Feet If I Have Diabetes?

You can do the following to take care of your feet if you are diabetic: Wash your feet in warm water every day: Make sure the water is not too hot, by testing the temperature with your elbow. Do not soak your feet. Dry your feet well, especially between your toes. Look at your feet every day to check for cuts, sores, blisters, redness, calluses, or other problems: Checking every day is even more important if you have nerve damage or poor blood flow. If you cannot bend over or pull your feet up to check them, use a mirror. If you cannot see well, ask someone else to check your feet. If your skin is dry, rub lotion on your feet after you wash and dry them: Do not put lotion between your toes. File corns and calluses gently with an emery board or a pumice stone: Do this after your bath or shower. Cut your toenails once a week or when needed: Cut toenails when they are soft from washing. Cut them to the shape of the toe and not too short. File the edges with an emery board. Always wear slippers or shoes to protect your feet from injuries. Always wear socks or stockings to avoid blisters: Do not wear socks or knee-high stockings that are too tight below your knee. Wear shoes that fit well: Shop for shoes at the end of the day, when your feet are bigger. Break in shoes slowly. Wear them for one to two hours each day for the first few weeks. Before putting on your shoes, feel the insides to make sure they have no sharp edges or objects that might injure your feet. This answer is based on source information from National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Ira M. Baum, DPM, a podiatrist on the Baptist Hospital medical staffs says that, if you have diabetes, many amputations can be prevented by proper daily foot care and periodic examination by a podiatrist Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Taking Care Of Your Feet

Diabetes - Taking Care Of Your Feet

Diabetes can damage the nerves and blood vessels in your feet. This damage can cause numbness and reduce feeling in your feet. As a result, your feet may not heal well if they are injured. If you get a blister, you may not notice and it may get worse. Check your feet every day. Inspect the tops, sides, soles, heels, and between your toes. Look for: Dry and cracked skin Blisters or sores Bruises or cuts Redness, warmth, or tenderness Firm or hard spots If you cannot see well, ask someone else to check your feet. Call your health care provider right way about any foot problems you have. DO NOT try to treat these problems yourself. Even small sores or blisters can become big problems if infection develops or they DO NOT heal. Foot ulcers are a common reason for hospital stays for people with diabetes. Wash your feet every day with lukewarm water and mild soap. Strong soaps may damage the skin. Check the temperature of the water with your hand or elbow first. Gently dry your feet, especially between the toes. Use lotion, petroleum jelly, lanolin, or oil on dry skin. DO NOT put lotion, oil, or cream between your toes. Ask your health care provider to show you how to trim your toenails. Soak your feet in lukewarm water to soften your toenails before trimming. Cut the nails straight across. Curved nails are more likely to become ingrown. Make sure the edge of each nail does not press into the skin of the next toe. Your foot doctor (podiatrist) can trim your toenails if you are unable to. Most people with diabetes should have corns or calluses treated by a foot doctor. If your doctor has given you permission to treat corns or calluses on your own: Gently use a pumice stone to remove corns and calluses after a shower or bath, when your skin is soft. DO NOT use medicated pads or Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Fact And Fiction

Diabetic Foot Care Fact And Fiction

I know that foot care isnt the most exciting topic to read about. But foot care is a crucial part of diabetes self-management. Neglecting your feet can lead to serious problems down the road; even minor problems, such as a scratch, can lead to an infection or foot ulcer, which, if not caught and treated early on, can increase the risk of amputation. Not a cheery thought, for sure, but by paying a little attention to your feet on a daily basis and taking care of your diabetes at the same time, you can greatly lower your risk of developing problems. And since April is National Foot Health Awareness Month, what better time to start? This week, lets look at some facts as well as misunderstandings about foot care. Fact or Fiction: Only people who have high blood sugar levels should check their feet. Fiction. Everyone who has diabetes should get into the habit of checking their feet daily, no matter their HbA1c or blood sugar levels. Looking at your feet every day for cuts, sores, redness and swelling is time well spent to avoid serious issues down the road. Fact or Fiction: Its not a good idea to soak your feet if you have diabetes. Fact. Soaking your feet in tub of warm water can sure feel good, especially if youve been standing all day. However, foot soaking is pretty much a no-no when it comes to diabetes foot care. It may seem strange, but keeping your feet immersed in water can actually dry out your skin. The water removes natural oils on your skin that help to protect your feet. Dry skin is more prone to cracks, which can literally open the door to fungus and bacteria. Also, if you have any nerve damage in your feet that has caused a loss of sensation, you risk burning your skin if the water is too hot. Fact or Fiction: Avoid putting lotion on your feet. Fiction. Its Continue reading >>

How To Care For Your Feet

How To Care For Your Feet

Many people with diabetes have problems with circulation and nerve damage in their feet. This affects how well they can feel hot and cold, pain, and other sensations. People who have problems with feeling and sensation don't get the usual warning signs if something's wrong. They might have a wound that won't heal, or nerve damage might be changing the shape of their feet, without them being aware of it. Without good foot care, sometimes problems can get so bad that a damaged foot needs to be amputated. Good foot care, including daily foot care at home and foot exams at your clinic, can help keep foot problems from getting out of control. Checklist for Daily Foot Care Make these simple steps part of your daily routine. If you aren't able to care for your feet yourself, ask a caregiver or family member for help. Or contact the Resource Line for information about community resources in your area. Check your feet every day: If you can't bend your legs and ankles to see the bottoms of your bare feet, use a mirror. You can place a mirror on the floor and hold each foot over it to look at the bottoms of your feet. Look for cuts, blisters, red spots, and swelling. If you see anything that worries you, contact a member of your health care team right away. Keep your feet clean and moisturized: Wash your feet every day in room temperature water (less than 110° F.) Test the water with your hand or a thermometer to make sure it's not too hot. Dry your feet well after washing. Make sure you dry between your toes. Moisture between your toes can lead to the growth of fungus. Moisturize your feet with cream or lotion. Don't use moisturizer between your toes unless you're using a medicated cream to treat a fungus infection, such as athlete's foot. If your feet sweat easily, dust them li Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Precautions

Diabetic Foot Precautions

Proper footcare is especially critical for diabetics because they are prone to foot problems such as: Simple daily footcare can prevent serious problems. According to the National Institute of Health, the following simple everyday steps will help prevent serious complications from diabetes: Make healthy lifestyle choices to keep your blood sugar close to normal. Work with your health care team to create a diabetes plan that fits your lifestyle characteristics. You may have foot problems that you may not be aware of. Check your feet for cuts, sores, red spots, swelling, or infected toenails. Checking your feet should become part of your daily routine. If you have trouble bending over to see your feet, use a plastic mirror to help. You can also ask a family member to help you. Important Reminder: Be sure to call your doctor immediately if a cut, sore, blister, or bruise on your foot does not heal after one day. Wash your feet in warm, NOT HOT, water. Do not soak your feet because your skin will get dry. Before bathing or showering, test the water to make sure it is not too hot. You should use a thermometer or your elbow. Dry your feet well. Be sure to dry between your toes. Use talcum powder to keep the skin dry between the toes. Rub a thin coat of skin lotion or cream on the tops and bottoms of the feet. Do not put lotion between your toes, because this might cause infection. Wear shoes and socks at all times. Do not walk barefoot, not even indoors. It is extremely easy to step on something and hurt your feet. Always wear seamless socks, stockings, and nylons with your shoes to help avoid the possibility of blisters and sores developing. Be sure to choose seamless socks that are made of materials that wick moisture away from your feet and absorb shock and shear. Socks m Continue reading >>

Can You Use Epsom Salts If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Use Epsom Salts If You Have Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, you should be aware of foot damage as a potential complication. Foot damage is often caused by poor circulation and nerve damage. Both of these conditions can be caused by high blood sugar levels over time. Taking good care of your feet can help lower your risk of foot damage. Although some people soak their feet in Epsom salt baths, this home remedy isn’t recommended for people with diabetes. Soaking your feet may raise your risk of foot problems. Talk to your doctor before soaking your feet in Epsom salts. Epsom salt is also called magnesium sulphate. It’s a mineral compound that’s sometimes used as a home remedy for sore muscles, bruises, and splinters. In some cases, people add Epsom salt to baths or tubs to soak in. If you have diabetes, talk to your doctor before soaking your feet in an Epsom salt bath. Soaking your feet may actually increase your risk of foot problems. It’s recommended that you wash your feet every day, but you shouldn’t soak them. Soaking can dry out your skin. This can cause cracks to form and lead to infections. Some people may recommend Epsom salts as a magnesium supplement. Instead, you should look for magnesium supplements designed for oral use. Check the vitamin and supplement aisle at your local pharmacy. People with diabetes often have low levels of magnesium, a mineral that plays an important role in your body. Research suggests that oral magnesium supplements may help improve blood sugar and blood cholesterol levels in some people with diabetes. Unless your doctor advises otherwise, avoid using Epsom salt footbaths. If you’re interested in oral magnesium supplements, ask your doctor for more information. They can help you assess the potential benefits and risks of taking them. They can also recommend a Continue reading >>

Foot Care And Diabetes

Foot Care And Diabetes

A small cut on a toe once sent Stella Anderson* to the emergency room. Most people would have just slapped a band-aid on the "injury" and forgotten about it. But most people don't have diabetes. Unlike people with normal blood sugar, diabetics need to examine their feet daily for the slightest injury. Since diabetes can cause neuropathy -- nerve death or damage -- a small cut could go undetected and lead to serious infection. After living with type 1 diabetes for 25 years, Anderson knew she had to be careful. The disease had already killed many nerves in her feet, which meant she couldn't feel scrapes, cuts, blisters, or other sores. "I always joked that somebody could cut off my toes, and I'd never feel it," Anderson says. Worse, the disease had harmed her circulation, so that the blood flow to her feet had slowed to a trickle. As a result, even the most trivial sores would be slow to heal. Anderson usually checked her feet after her morning shower, but she let the chore slide during a hectic week. She never noticed the small cut on her toe. By the time she saw a thin red streak running from her foot to her ankle, an infection was already raging. It took a trip to the emergency room and intravenous antibiotics to save her foot. What are diabetes-related foot problems? Anderson still walks on two feet, but many people with diabetes aren't so fortunate. Every year, about 80,000 diabetics lose a leg, foot, or toes. And in almost every case, this catastrophic injury had very humble beginnings. If diabetes has already dulled the sensations and slowed down circulation in your feet, just about any break in the skin can turn into a dangerous, festering wound. It may start with a callus, a small blister, a corn, a cut, or a scrape. Often, these seemingly trivial problems turn i Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? 10 Ways To Protect Your Feet!

Have Diabetes? 10 Ways To Protect Your Feet!

1. Manage Your Diabetes Partner with your health care team to set and reach goals for managing your blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Develop a diabetes self-management plan with your health care team to include maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, monitoring blood sugar and taking medication as directed. Quit or don’t start smoking. Among a number of other serious health complications, smoking can decrease blood circulation to the feet. 2. Inspect Your Feet Daily Examine feet for cuts, sores, cracks, red spots and infected toenails every day. It’s possible you may have foot problems without feeling pain in your feet. Those that may have trouble seeing or reaching their feet can use a mirror or ask for the help of a doctor, family member or caregiver. Call your doctor if you notice pain or loss of feeling in your feet; changes in the shape of your feet or toes; and/or sores, cuts or ulcers on your feet that do not heal. 3. Wash Your Feet Daily Each day, wash your feet in lukewarm (not hot!) water. Be gentle with your feet by using a soft washcloth or sponge and a pumice stone where calluses tend to form. Dry feet by blotting or patting. Make sure to carefully dry between the toes. 4. Trim Toenails Regularly Trim toenails after washing and drying feet on a regular basis. If you can see, reach and feel your feet, trim toenails straight across. Do not cut toenails too short, as this could lead to ingrown toenails. Smooth corners with a nail file. If you can’t see, reach and feel your feet, ask for assistance from your doctor or caregiver. 5. Moisturize Your Feet Keep feet soft and smooth by applying a thin coat of moisturizing lotion or cream on the tops and bottoms of feet. To avoid fungal infection, do not apply lotion between toes. Instead, Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot Problems And Foot Care

Diabetes: Foot Problems And Foot Care

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S People with diabetes are at risk for foot problems. This handout explains why these problems occur and what you can do to protect your feet. Why are foot problems so common in people with diabetes? In people with diabetes, high blood glucose can cause two complications — both of which can result in foot problems. You may have one or both of these: • Nerve damage (neuropathy). Nerve damage from high blood glucose usually begins in the hands and feet. It can cause painful symptoms — tingling, aching, or throbbing — but it can also reduce sensation. If you can’t really feel cold, heat, or pain in your feet, it’s easy to ignore an injury or infection. And unfortunately, in people with diabetes, even a small blister or stubbed toe can become serious. • Poor circulation. High blood glucose can damage your blood vessels and reduce blood flow to your feet. This means that injuries take longer to heal. Over time, poor circulation in your feet can even change the shape of your feet and toes. This can cause problems with the way you walk. Are foot problems really that serious? In people with diabetes, yes — foot problems can be very serious. In the worst cases, they can lead to deformed feet, wounds that won’t heal, and serious infections that require surgery. In fact, diabetes-related foot problems are a leading reason for leg and foot amputations. Fortunately, good care can lower your chance of serious problems. Following the steps outlined at right, you and your medical caregivers can work together to care for your feet. However, the most important things are those you do (and don’t do) on your own to protect your feet. See the next page for these do Continue reading >>

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