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Why Diabetes Will Never Be Cured

Diabetes Experts Confident They Can Wipe Out Killer Disease In 25 Years

Diabetes Experts Confident They Can Wipe Out Killer Disease In 25 Years

UK teams are leading the race against a disease which will hit 6.25 million people by 2035 – 10 per cent of the population – and already costs the NHS £1million an hour. In an exclusive interview, Britain’s most respected diabetes researcher said he was confident the insulin-deficiency disease would be wiped out by the time he retires in 25 years. Dr Nick Oliver, diabetes consultant at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, said: “There is a race on, that’s why what we are doing is incredibly exciting.” Asked whether the disease could ever be cured he added: “I really hope so. I am reasonably early in my career and there is lots of really exciting work going on behind the scenes. “There are lots of avenues that will lead to potential cures for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and if I could see it in my career that would be incredibly exciting.” He added: “Diabetes can’t be cured at the moment. The race is on to get effective treatments for people. Their quality of life is important.” Dr Alasdair Rankin, director of research for Diabetes UK, said: “We think it is possible we could have a vaccine for Type 1 within 20 years.” Diabetes can’t be cured at the moment. The race is on to get effective treatments for people. Their quality of life is important Human trials have already started on the world’s first artificial pancreas, created by 39-year-old Dr Oliver’s team. It would offer sufferers of Type 1 diabetes, an auto immune disease, the most effective treatment available. The Bio-Inspired Artificial Pancreas – BiAP – is attached to the abdomen via a thin tube. It reads sugar levels and sends information to an insulin pump which releases the hormone around the clock. This eliminates painful daily blood tests and injections. One researcher Continue reading >>

Will Diabetes Go Away?

Will Diabetes Go Away?

There is no cure for diabetes. Neither type 1 (juvenile onset or insulin-requiring) diabetes or type 2 (adult-onset) diabetes ever goes away. In type 1 diabetes, patients sometimes experience what physicians have come to call a "honeymoon period" shortly after the disease is diagnosed. During the "honeymoon period" diabetes may appear to go away for a period of a few months to a year. The patient's insulin needs are minimal and some patients may actually find they can maintain normal or near normal blood glucose taking little or no insulin. It would be a mistake to assume that the diabetes has gone away, however. Basically, type 1 diabetes occurs when about 90 percent of the body's insulin-producing cells have been destroyed. At the time that type 1 diabetes is diagnosed, most patients still are producing some insulin. If obvious symptoms of type 1 diabetes emerge when the patient has an illness, virus or cold, for example, once the illness subsides the body's insulin needs may decrease. At this point, the number of insulin-producing cells remaining may be enough — for the moment — to meet the person's insulin needs again. But the process that has destroyed 90 percent of the insulin-producing cells will ultimately destroy the remaining insulin-producing cells. And as that destruction continues, the amount of injected insulin the patient needs will increase — and ultimately the patient will be totally dependent on insulin injections. Scientists now think that it is important for people with newly diagnosed diabetes to continue taking some insulin by injection even during the honeymoon period. Why? Because they have some scientific evidence to suggest that doing so will help preserve the few remaining insulin-producing cells for a while longer. Patients diagnosed wi Continue reading >>

Johnson & Johnson, Viacyte Testing Possible Diabetes Cure

Johnson & Johnson, Viacyte Testing Possible Diabetes Cure

Johnson & Johnson, continuing its long quest for a Type 1 diabetes cure, is joining forces with biotech company ViaCyte to speed development of the first stem cell treatment that could fix the life-threatening hormonal disorder. They've already begun testing it in a small number of diabetic patients. If it works as well in patients as it has in animals, it would amount to a cure, ending the need for frequent insulin injections and blood sugar testing. ViaCyte and Johnson & Johnson's Janssen BetaLogics group said Thursday they've agreed to combine their knowledge and hundreds of patents on their research under ViaCyte, a longtime J&J partner focused on regenerative medicine. The therapy involves inducing embryonic stem cells in a lab dish to turn into insulin-producing cells, then putting them inside a small capsule that is implanted under the skin. The capsule protects the cells from the immune system, which otherwise would attack them as invaders - a roadblock that has stymied other research projects. Researchers at universities and other drug companies also are working toward a diabetes cure, using various strategies. But according to ViaCyte and others, this treatment is the first tested in patients. If the project succeeds, the product could be available in several years for Type 1 diabetes patients and down the road could also treat insulin-using Type 2 diabetics. "This one is potentially the real deal," said Dr. Tom Donner, director of the diabetes center at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "It's like making a new pancreas that makes all the hormones" needed to control blood sugar. Donner, who is not involved in the research, said if the device gives patients normal insulin levels, "it's going to prevent millions of diabetics from getting dangerous com Continue reading >>

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for 25 years now. The relentlessness of type 1, and the fact that I will probably live with this non-preventable condition for the rest of my life never goes away, but I have almost made peace with it. A few days ago, I saw something that gave me pause. “British man with type 1 diabetes to receive tests after coming off insulin,” read Diabetes.co.uk’s headline. The article goes onto say that, “Daniel Darkes, from Daventy in Northamptonshire, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes seven years ago. But his recent tests have baffled doctors as his pancreas has shown signs of working properly again.” My first thoughts upon reading this were, “this can’t be true,” and “what’s the real explanation here?” There are many types of diabetes including type 2, LADA, and monogenic. Maybe he actually had one of those types instead of type 1. Usually, tests can determine this quickly though, so why was it not the case with Dan? I live in the UK and I wanted to get to the bottom of things. I managed to get in touch with ‘Miracle Dan’, as he’s been called by his friends. Although he is saving the specific details of his recent test results from the U.S. for an upcoming exclusive interview with another media outlet, he spoke to me and answered some of my questions about everything that has been happening. Please tell us a bit about yourself and your diabetes. When were you diagnosed? I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes back in February 2011 at the age of 23, after just leaving the army. I started a new engineering job and within two weeks of starting, I noticed the traditional symptoms of type 1 diabetes: thirst, weight loss, blurry vision, and a lot of vomiting. I collapsed and was taken by ambulance to hospital where I wa Continue reading >>

Introduction To Type I Diabetes

Introduction To Type I Diabetes

Three Articles On Type I Diabetes: Article #1: Introduction to Type I Diabetes (This Article) Article #2: Possible Causes of Type I Diabetes Article #3: The Treatment of Type I Diabetes Introduction to Type I Diabetes Did you know that there are two products that have cured advanced Type I diabetes cases? Both of them will be discussed in this article. But more importantly, one of these products can reverse cumulative severe side-effects of Type I or Type 2 diabetes. Type I diabetes is actually a set of symptoms, meaning it can be caused by several different things. The symptoms are that the blood lacks insulin. There are actually several things that can cause an abnormally low level of insulin in the blood. Type I diabetes is a very severe disease. The average lifespan of Type I diabetic is 5-8 years shorter than an average person. But death is not the worst thing about Type I diabetes. Here is a list of some of the health problems it can lead to: Amputation of limbs Blindness (retinopathy) – diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in America — 12,000 to 24,000 case annually Kidney failure (nephropathy) – frequently leading to dialysis or a kidney/pancreas transplant Liver disease Arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) Heart disease Stroke (e.g. paralysis) High blood pressure Nerve damage (neuropathy) Dementia Urinary tract infection (mostly in women) Depression – Note: Aspartame (e.g. Equal, NutraSweet, etc.) and sugar are the leading causes of depression in non-diabetics. However, because the average diabetic consumes more aspartame than the average person, it is highly possible that aspartame is by far the REAL cause of depression in diabetics!! A diabetic should absolutely avoid aspartame and all other artificial sweeteners! Bone quali Continue reading >>

Can I Cure Myself Of Diabetes Without Pills Or Injections? Let's Find Out!

Can I Cure Myself Of Diabetes Without Pills Or Injections? Let's Find Out!

By Tara Bellucci, Special to Everyday Health I didn’t need a blood test to tell me I wasn’t invincible, though one proved to be quite the reminder. With a family history of diabetes and a BMI firmly planted in the “obese” range for much of my life, I shouldn’t have been so surprised to find I had a fasting blood glucose level of 170. On January 22, 2014, I became one of 25.8 million Americans diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. A few months earlier, I had my first meeting with a psychic. I had just turned 30, and we were talking about my dad. He died last June at 56 years old from kidney failure and other complications stemming from decades of mismanaging his diabetes. When I was a kid, my father suffered a string of diabetic shocks that nearly killed him, one while my younger brother and I were in the car with him on a busy road. From then on, I knew he would die too soon from a disease that doesn’t have to be a death sentence. The psychic told me that I would be the one to break the cycle. I initially thought she meant I’d never get it, that I wouldn’t have to ever deal with having this disease. While that would’ve been nice, I’m clearly meant to break the cycle in a different way. Though it wasn’t completely out of the blue, the diagnosis still shocked me. It’s weird — feeling like a statistic, a cliche, the rule rather than the exception. In that instant, I was reduced to a set of numbers, a wrong equation meant to be corrected. My humanity seemed to drain away. While the test results left me feeling punched in the gut, I’m not really one to dwell on the negative. I’m big into meditation, mantras, and The Universe, so I quickly flipped my story from doom and gloom to “all good is coming from this situation.” And shortly thereafter, I se Continue reading >>

Is There A Conspiracy Preventing A Diabetes Cure?

Is There A Conspiracy Preventing A Diabetes Cure?

For as long as there has been research to cure diabetes, there have been people who believe that a cure will never happen because treating this disease is simply far too profitable. Those who believe in this so-called "conspiracy theory" are convinced that pharma companies have a vested interest in keeping diabetes around as long as possible because peddling their treatments is far bigger business than a cure could ever be. We all know that diabetes is a multi-billion dollar industry, including sales of insulin, oral agents and injectibles like Victoza, and medical devices such as insulin pumps, glucose monitors and their pricey test strips, and new continuous glucose monitors. Type 2 diabetes is increasing exponentially, but even type 1 diabetes is growing at a dramatic rate, which means more and more consumers. The latest flare-up over a possible "conspiracy" occurred in August, when a news article about controversial researcher Dr. Denise Faustman circulated around the diabetes community. In the article, Faustman says that when she approached pharmaceutical companies for funding, she was told "there wasn't enough money to be made in a cure that used an inexpensive, generically available vaccine." But is that even true? Certainly, there are legitimate financial considerations these companies' research & development decisions. But does that mean they never work on cure research? Would pharma really sweep a possible cure under the rug to protect their own interests -- especially if it turned out to be a cheap vaccine? Who's to say? We decided it would be fascinating to tap some prominent experts in the diabetes community to get their perspective on the "D-conspiracy theory." Exploring Motives Kelly Close, a type 1 PWD and president of diabetes consulting firm Close Conc Continue reading >>

Targeting A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Targeting A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

How Long Will We Have To Wait? about the book Every person touched by diabetes wants to know when there will be a cure. A lot of work is going on, but what are the chances of a breakthrough? Targeting a Cure for Type 1 Diabetes is diaTribe's comprehensive overview of where we are and where we're headed in that search. Rich in detail and written for patients and their families, the report features the latest information on the most promising approaches for curing diabetes. These include immune therapeutics, islet and pancreas transplantation, beta cell regeneration and survival agents, and the artificial pancreas. With an introduction by Dr. Aaron Kowalski of the JDRF, and with concluding remarks by our Editor in Chief, Kelly Close, Targeting a Cure for Type 1 Diabetes is essential reading for anyone who wants to know more about what a cure might look like or when it will be available. Although a cure may not be right around the corner, this book lays bare the possibilities of all the exciting research now underway. To buy a copy of Targeting a Cure, visit the ADA's store. critical acclaim "Targeting a Cure for Type 1 Diabetes will give you hope that someday struggling with the management of type 1 diabetes will only be a memory."- Richard M. Bergenstal, MD (Executive Director, International Diabetes Center, Minneapolis, MN) “After reading about Kelly Close and her teams’ incredible journey of discovery, we cannot only continue to dream, but we can open our eyes each morning to a reality that brings us closer, inch by inch, discovery by discovery, to a day when glucose control will be automatic and people with type 1 diabetes will be ‘cured.’”- Francine R. Kaufman, MD (Chief Medical Officer and Vice President, Global Medical, Clinical & Health Affairs, Medtroni Continue reading >>

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Here are some "bits and pieces" updates for December. Update on Dr. Faustman's Phase-II Trial of BCG Dr. Faustman's lab has published their Fall 2017 newsletter, which you can read here: This newsletter includes more information on her research, especially from the 3rd International BCG conference, The BCG Working Group, and the 2nd edition of the BCG and Autoimmunity book she edited. There are three pieces of new news there: The phase-II trial was fully enrolled in Summer of 2017. This is important because we now know when the trial will end. Since this is a five year study, they should finish collecting data in Summer of 2022 and publish before Summer of 2023. They have given BCG to the three untreated patients from their phase-I trial, so they will have data from six people to report in the future. The lab is going to be recruiting for more studies in the future, so would like to hear from anyone who is interested in participating. No details on future trials were provided. Another piece of news is that Dr. Faustman is branching out, and trying to apply BCG treatment to Fibromyalgia. This research is being done in collaboration with EpicGenetics, and they hope to start the trial in early 2018. If anything applicable to the type-1 world comes up in this research, I'll report it. Since Fibromyalgia is not generally considered an autoimmune disease, I'm not sure how much "cross pollination" of results there will be. You can read more about it here: DILfrequency Trial Completed There is a lot of research ongoing on IL-2 which is part of the immune system. About 18 months ago, I summarized all this research here: with an update here: One of those clinical trials was called "DILfrequency" and that trial has finished, and the results published. The purpose of that trial was Continue reading >>

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

Dreaming of a cure for diabetes: Fact or Fiction? With tears in her eyes but a faint smile, Camp Director Maura Prescott, approached the podium. I would like to say that I am overjoyed that we are closing our Diabetes Camp with the announcement from the CDC that Type 1 Diabetes has now been eradicated, and that the services of our camp are no longer needed. I look forward to continuing to work in the diabetes world, but with the older Type 2 population, helping to fine tune their diabetes control with the Bionic Pancreas and increase their quality of life and time on this earth. I have given my life to working with and improving the lives of those with diabetes, and I will continue to do so. By the end of my life, I hope to see that there is not one single person with diabetes on this planet, and that our children and grandchildren are taught about this debilitating chronic illness in history class. We have come so far since the 1920’s, where we saw the discovery of insulin. We have come to the point of cure. Here, in 2056, we can say that on the horizon, we can see a world without diabetes. I stand before you today in awe at the shear genius of scientists who have worked tirelessly in efforts to make this day come. From the introduction of the vaccine for Type 1 diabetes in 2032, we have seen worldwide eradication similar to that seen many years ago with polio. The camp closes because there are no more children with diabetes to attend it, and is that not what we have all been working for? Honestly, I never expected to be able to say those words in my lifetime. But here we are. Tania Prescott read the scribbled notes from her mother’s speech some 25 years before. She had just read a news article online explaining how there are now only a few people left on the earth Continue reading >>

Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Reversed Or Cured?

Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Reversed Or Cured?

There’s a lot of misleading language out there regarding type 2 diabetes – language that is generally used in order to generate the power of hope in whoever comes across it. Sometimes, this language comes through well-meaning folks; sometimes, through products and all-around health industry peddlers; and sometimes through the promise of medical procedures such as gastric bypass. Unfortunately, many of these folks feed on the ignorance of the general public and the general type 2 diabetes population who aches for a cure and the desire to be free from their medications and often, cumbersome medical routines. But can type 2 diabetes be reversed? Is there a cure for type 2 diabetes? The simple answer to this question is no. There is currently no cure for type 2 diabetes1 and type 2 diabetes itself may not currently be reversed. The more complex answer is that unless a person is in the earliest of stages of pre-diabetes (which is extremely rare, considering a person generally goes undiagnosed for several years), type 2 diabetes is a permanent condition. But everyone talks about reversing type 2 diabetes — what do they mean by this? When someone refers to ‘reversing’ type 2 diabetes, they are – in general – referring to the reversal of the symptoms of uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, not to reversing the type 2 diabetes itself.2 When our glucose levels are out of control for extended periods of time, we may have many unpleasant symptoms such as blurry vision, fatigue, slow healing wounds, urinary tract and yeast infections, excessive thirst and urination, moodiness, etc. Some persons may even develop the beginnings of peripheral neuropathy. When we take control of our glucose levels, most of these symptoms may go away in their entirety, and some nerve damage may ev Continue reading >>

Why There Will Never Be A Cure

Why There Will Never Be A Cure

This is a conversation that I had today at lunched. Now, some of you may agree and some of you will disagree, strongly. The discussion was brought up about the $100 million Obama is going to send to the care of Haiti. The question was posed to me, “Doesn’t that piss you off that they send $100 million to another country, and that money could be spent on diabetes research?” Now, I didn’t know how to answer this question at first. Of course I don’t want to see anybody have to suffer, but I also see the side that my tax money could go to something like research instead. So, my answer was, “well, there will never be a cure.” And then the conversation went on with my explaining why, which I will here as well. And it can be summed it very easily. You think we are in a recession now? Find a cure to diabetes and see what kind of recession we hit. How would scientists that spent their whole life searching for a cure and doing studies about diabetes get a paycheck if there was a cure? How would they pay their bills. How would the stores they shop at be affected. How would the people that work for diabetes companies and products make a living? It would hit our economy harder than just about anything. Do I hope for a cure, of course! Do I still donate funds and do volunteer work, of course. But realistically, no, I don’t think it is likely. There will be advancements in the management of it and there will be tools that may make it easier to live with diabetes and maybe even ways to rid yourself of all complications, but never a cure. Companies can still make money off of advancements, but not off of a cure. But like I said before, this thought will not stop me from doing what I can to help find one. Do any of you share this same feeling? Continue reading >>

Can Synthetic Biology Finally Cure The Autoimmune Disease?

Can Synthetic Biology Finally Cure The Autoimmune Disease?

Lev Dolgachov/Thinkstock Type 1 diabetes is a discouraging disease. Despite the availability of synthetic insulin and increasingly sophisticated monitoring technology, it’s still a condition that requires incessant vigilance: Diabetics must constantly track their blood sugar levels and carefully use that information to calibrate drug doses. Even if you manage to do all of that well, bad days remain almost inevitable. Take too much insulin, and you can spiral into a hypoglycemic delirium. Take too little, and your glucose levels will rise, filling the body with dangerous levels of ketones. Less immediately frustrating—but no less familiar for diabetics—is the state of diabetes research. Possible cures routinely pop up only to fade from view, their benefits never quite surpassing the simple efficacy of an insulin injection. More recently, though, the field of synthetic biology—a hybrid discipline that aims to construct or redesign biological components and systems—has shown the potential to produce a novel set of treatments. The solutions remain speculative, but they do offer cautious reasons for hope. “Type 1 diabetes, in theory, should be relatively easy to solve. That has been the mantra of researchers for the last 30 years. And I still take insulin every day.” John Glass, a researcher working on one such new effort, knows how maddening false hope can be, having lived with the disease for decades. “Type 1 diabetes, in theory, should be relatively easy to solve,” he told me over the phone. “That has been the mantra of type 1 diabetes researchers for the last 30 years. And I still take insulin every day.” I had originally called Glass, a synthetic biologist with the J. Craig Venter Institute, in the hopes of better understanding how his burgeoning f Continue reading >>

The Cure For Type 2 Diabetes Is Known, But Few Are Aware

The Cure For Type 2 Diabetes Is Known, But Few Are Aware

The cure for type 2 diabetes is known, but few are aware I recently posted to Facebook about a cure for diabetes and suggested someone try it. Just six days later, I received the following message from a friend: I just wanted to drop you a line and thank you for that post… My lab results at the beginning of the month were 230. After just this last week it’s down to 155. I think I’ll be in normal range within a month. Really miraculous… It’s really been a game changer for me already and I wanted you to know how much I appreciated the info and how much of a difference I think it will make in my life. Four months later, the friend posted this to Facebook: I started on this regiment when Nathan posted about it [four months ago]. My blood glucose level at that time, while taking two daily glucose meds, was 235. Two weeks ago, my [fasting] glucose level, WITHOUT the meds, was 68. If you google “diabetes cure” you are directed to websites like WebMD and the Mayo Clinic where you find information on diet, exercise, medication, and insulin therapy, but nothing about the cure. This lack of information may have to do with the fact that Americans spend $322 billion a year to treat diabetes, $60 billion a year on weight-loss programs, and $124 billion a year on snack foods. This is about 3% of the US economy! Because so many peoples’ livelihoods are supported by diabetes and its main cause, obesity, the viral effect of people getting cured and telling others is greatly diminished. Because of this understandable stifling of the message, if you are like my Facebook friend and have already experienced the type 2 diabetes cure for yourself — there are thousands of you out there — it is important for you to share your success stories as far and wide as possible. You c Continue reading >>

Will There Ever Be A Cure For Diabetes? Why Or Why Not?

Will There Ever Be A Cure For Diabetes? Why Or Why Not?

For More tips,read more about diabetes Diabetes Full Control- Live a Better Life What is type 1 diabetes? Around 400,000 people in Germany are producing cells of the pancreas and destroys them. As a result, it comes within a few days to weeks for lack of insulin production. Type 1 diabetes often occurs as early as childhood and adolescence. The hormone insulin is responsible for the locks of dietary sugar from the blood into the cells that need it for energy. In insulin deficiency, the glucose in the blood accumulates - the blood sugar level rises. This can damage permanently the blood vessels, nerves and numerous organs. Patients with type 1 diabetes need throughout their lives several times daily insulin injections to prevent acute metabolic disorders and related diseases due to high blood sugar levels. What is the difference between Type 1 diabetes and Type 2? In contrast to type 1 diabetes is the type 2 diabetes, below the estimated about seven million people in Germany suffer, not the consequence of a lack of insulin, but an insulin resistance. This means that the cells no longer speak adequately to insulin, so that the hormone can not smuggle the sugar into the cells. The blood sugar level rises. To compensate, the pancreas initially produces larger amounts of insulin. Also no longer sufficient to overcome the insulin resistance, a type 2 diabetes develops. The main causes of type 2 diabetes are genetic predisposition, obesity and lack of exercise. While the type 1 diabetes is more likely in recent years, a type 2 diabetes often develops at an advanced age in patients. Training: What to know patients Typically, a person with Type 1 diabetes leads his therapy in everyday life through their own, as long as no problems or complaints arise. In children take parents th Continue reading >>

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