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Why Diabetes Will Never Be Cured

A Team Cured Diabetes In Mice Without Side Effects

A Team Cured Diabetes In Mice Without Side Effects

A Cure for Diabetes A potential cure for Type 1 diabetes looms on the horizon in San Antonio, and the novel approach would also allow Type 2 diabetics to stop insulin shots. The discovery, made at The University of Texas Health Science Center, now called UT Health San Antonio, increases the types of pancreatic cells that secrete insulin. UT Health San Antonio researchers have a goal to reach human clinical trials in three years, but to do so they must first test the strategy in large-animal studies, which will cost an estimated $5 million. Those studies will precede application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Investigational New Drug (IND) approval, Bruno Doiron, Ph.D., a co-inventor, said. The scientists received a U.S. patent in January, and UT Health San Antonio is spinning out a company to begin commercialization. The strategy has cured diabetes in mice. “It worked perfectly,” Dr. Doiron, assistant professor of medicine at UT Health, said. “We cured mice for one year without any side effects. That’s never been seen. But it’s a mouse model, so caution is needed. We want to bring this to large animals that are closer to humans in physiology of the endocrine system.” Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Diabetes at UT Health, is co-inventor on the patent. He described the therapy: “The pancreas has many other cell types besides beta cells, and our approach is to alter these cells so that they start to secrete insulin, but only in response to glucose [sugar],” he said. “This is basically just like beta cells.” Insulin, which lowers blood sugar, is only made by beta cells. In Type 1 diabetes, beta cells are destroyed by the immune system and the person has no insulin. In Type 2 diabetes, beta cells fail Continue reading >>

Experts Are Confident A Cure For Diabetes Will Be Discovered In The Next 25 Years

Experts Are Confident A Cure For Diabetes Will Be Discovered In The Next 25 Years

Researcher and diabetes consultant Dr Nick Oliver said he hopes for a cure 'within a generation' 39-year-old said Britain is leading the race to develop a cure A leading expert has claimed diabetes could be cured in the next 25 years. Researcher Dr Nick Oliver, diabetes consultant at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, said he expects to see the condition wiped out before he retires. He told The Daily Express Britain is leading the race to combat the disease, which is caused by the pancreas failing to any insulin (Type 1) or insufficient levels of the hormone (Type 2). Insulin is needed to break down sugar in the blood to allow the body to use the glucose as fuel. The disease is expected to affect 6.25million people by 2035, and already costs the NHS £1million an hour in treatments and drugs. Dr Oliver said: 'There are lots of avenues that will lead to potential cures for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and if I could see it in my career that would be incredibly exciting.' 'Diabetes can’t be cured at the moment. The race is on to get effective treatments for people. Their quality of life is important.' Dr Oliver, 39, is currently leading a team carrying out human trials on the world's first artificial pancreas. If successful the step forward would offer the 400,000 sufferers of Type 1 diabetes - when a person's body cannot produce enough insulin - a new and effective treatment. The Bio-Inspired Artificial Pancreas – BiAP – is attached to the abdomen via a thin tube. The device reads a patients' sugar levels and transmits information to an insulin pump. The pump then releases hormones as and when it is needed. The invention would eliminate the need for daily blood tests and injections, required by diabetics. Jess Bristow, 46, of Surrey, one of 20 in the trial, said: Continue reading >>

Is There A Cure For Diabetes?

Is There A Cure For Diabetes?

At this time there is no known cure for Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes. However, we are funding pioneering, life-changing research into care, treatment and prevention, and working to find a cure for all types of diabetes. Is there a cure for diabetes? Video chat with Dr Alasdair Rankin How is diabetes treated, and is there a cure? Currently, there is no cure for Type 1 diabetes, but it can be treated successfully by administering insulin, either by an injection or pump, and by following a healthy, balanced diet and getting regular physical activity. Looking after diabetes requires planning and attention, which may feel overwhelming at times, especially when your child is first diagnosed. However, there’s no reason for it to stop your child living the healthy, happy and successful life you had hoped for them. Diabetes UK funded projects development of an artificial pancreas, a vaccine (Type 1 diabetes) further understanding of genetic mechanisms, very low-calorie diet (Type 2 diabetes) Research Project Directory Our research project directory showcases the diverse and exciting array of diabetes research projects that we are supporting all over the UK. Everything you see is possible thanks to the continued support of our members, donors and voluntary groups – who help us decide which studies deserve the charity's support and help raise the money that is vital to research. Ever since Diabetes UK awarded its first research grant in 1935 (for £50), we have been one of the largest funders of diabetes research in the UK. We support a wide range of pioneering initiatives into the causes and prevention of diabetes, improvements in care and treatment and the search for a cure. Note:You can search for projects in this directory based on the type of research involved or th Continue reading >>

Scientists May Have Found A Functional Cure For Type-1 Diabetes

Scientists May Have Found A Functional Cure For Type-1 Diabetes

Type-1 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects an estimated 42 million people worldwide, and occurs when the pancreas produces little to no insulin. Those with the condition must take supplemental insulin so their bodies can process sugars. But now, researchers at ViaCyte, a regenerative medicine company, have some good news: They're working on a therapy based on stem cells that can automatically release insulin into the body when it's needed. The treatment is specifically aimed at patients with high-risk type-1 diabetes. ViaCyte estimates that around 140,000 people in the US and Canada suffer from the condition, which can cause life-threatening events. The use of stem cells to replace pancreatic insulin cells has been tried before, but without much success. ViaCyte's approach shows promise because the stem cells can mature within the body itself through an implant the company calls PEC-Direct. There has already been a round of clinical trials to test whether the stem cells could fully grow into the type of cells necessary to produce insulin -- called islet cells. That was a success. But the number of cells within the implants wasn't enough to actually treat the patients; it was solely to test whether the cells could, in fact, be grown. Now, in coordination with JDRF, an organization that funds type-1 diabetes research, ViaCyte has implanted PEC-Directs into two patients as a trial. It's important to note that this isn't a full cure. It's what ViaCyte President and CEO Paul Laikind calls "a functional cure." It doesn't address and treat the specific causes of the condition. Additionally, patients using this treatment would be required to take immunosuppressive drugs to protect the created cells from the body's immune system, according to New Scientist. Regardless, Continue reading >>

Changes In One’s Diet Is Not A Cure For Diabetes

Changes In One’s Diet Is Not A Cure For Diabetes

I cannot see the E on the eye chart with my natural eyes. I know that the first symbol is an E because I’ve been taking eye exams since I was 10 years old. Since the 5th grade, I’ve been wearing eye glasses, in high school I switched to contacts, and from college until I now I enjoy switching between the two. I have needed corrective lenses for more than two decades in order to see “normally” and I have never had anyone (not even once) say to me “eye glasses have cured your poor vision.” It easy for people to accept that my eyes are bad and they will be that way for the rest of my life. It’s widely accepted that carrots will not restore my vision. Matter of fact, eye glasses have become in vogue (thankfully) and people who don’t need eye glasses want to wear them. Everyone knows that when it comes to having vision as poor as mine that Lasik is the only cure. Lasik eye surgery will give me the ability to see IMMEDIATELY and I will be able to donate my eye glasses and contacts to someone else because I will NEVER need them again. I may need reading glasses at some point, but my extreme case of myopia (nearsightedness) will be gone…FOREVER! This, we get. This, I have no problem explaining. This, gets me urgent responses when I say, “Help, I can’t find my eye glasses!” However, when it comes to diabetes, things are quite different. It’s hard for people to accept that my pancreas is like my eyes–another vital part of me that will NEVER be “normal” again. When I tell people that I manage diabetes with diet and exercise, some are determined to hear me say that I am “cured.” Well, I am not. Diet and exercise are like wearing contacts or eye glasses….they help me “MANAGE” the problem, it hasn’t cured it. Recently I got into a discussio Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Be Cured? A Review Of Therapies And Lifestyle Changes

Can Diabetes Be Cured? A Review Of Therapies And Lifestyle Changes

Diabetes is a condition that affects blood sugar levels and causes many serious health problems if not managed well. The health impacts of diabetes can be limited, but can it ever be "cured"? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that develops when the body destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. This means people with type 1 diabetes do not make insulin. In those with type 2 diabetes, there is a decreased sensitivity to insulin and the body does not make or use as much insulin as it needs. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1 diabetes. This article reviews therapies and lifestyle changes that can help reduce the effects of diabetes on a person's health. It also explores whether these treatments can help "cure" diabetes, or if they are simply helpful ways to manage the condition. Contents of this article: Is diabetes curable? Medically speaking, there is no cure for diabetes but it can go into "remission." Diabetes in remission simply means the body does not show any signs of diabetes. However, the disease is technically still there. According to Diabetes Care, remission can take different forms: Partial remission: When a person has had a blood glucose level lower than that of a person with diabetes for at least 1 year without any diabetes medication. Complete remission: When the blood glucose level returns to normal, not simply pre-diabetic levels, for at least 1 year without any medications. Prolonged remission: When complete remission lasts for at least 5 years. Even if a person has had normal blood sugar levels for 20 years, their diabetes is still considered to be in remission rather than "cured." There is no known cure for diabetes. The good news is that remission is possible in many cases and can be as simple as making some lifestyl Continue reading >>

Can Type Ii Diabetes Be Cured?

Can Type Ii Diabetes Be Cured?

Recently one of the readers of my website commented on on my post “Is There a Nature Cure for Diabetes”. He brought up a good point about genetics and type II diabetes. He is right. There is a genetic link to type II diabetes. So if your parents had type II diabetes, you have an increased risk of getting it also. I wanted to take this chance to expand on why I often say that type II diabetes can be cured because that seems to get the most attention about that particular post. Genetics aside, it's also true that there is an environmental cause to type II diabetes. Those whose diabetes is linked to environmental factors are who I was primarily writing to in my post “Is there a natural cure for diabetes? Most people get type II diabetes because they eat too many calories and don't do enough physical activity. I believe when it comes to type II diabetes that most people don't know that with proper exercise and weight loss, that in most cases it can go into remission. In my book, I call that a “cure” but I am willing to concede that the diabetes will return if people go back to their old ways. I believe that most type II diabetics I see don't take their diabetes seriously. I'm not kidding. I've seen it first hand. I think this is because people keep getting answers to their diabetes problems. This is the usual (and simplified) scenario of what happens when somebody starts to show symptoms of type II diabetes or metabolic syndrome: 1. First they are given a pill because their blood sugar is getting high. Then, when that stops working, they get another pill. Then another pill. Eventually the pills are not enough… 2. As diabetes gets worse, they are the told to take a shot of insulin. That becomes 2 shots. Then it becomes 3 shots. 3. Then, as they gain weight and it Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Be Cured, But Not By Targeting Blood Sugar: Scientists

Diabetes Can Be Cured, But Not By Targeting Blood Sugar: Scientists

Increased blood sugar is only a symptom, not the root cause. Treating symptoms is not sufficient to reverse the condition New Delhi, August 7: In a provocative piece of research, scientists in a Pune-based institute used computer simulation to show that the current treatment modalities are not the best for type 2 diabetes and a change in approach could make the nasty disease one of the curable. The scientists led by evolutionary biologist Milind Watve at the Indian Institute of Science (IISER) Pune, created a computer model by putting together for the first time all known metabolic, hormonal, neuronal, immunological and behavioural signals involved in the onset of diabetes and in its manifestation in the human body. Network model To construct the network model, Watve’s team scoured nearly 500 published papers. This helped them identify as many 330 different interactions — involving over 70 molecules or signals — associated with diabetes. “Glucose and insulin are just two of them,” Watve told BusinessLine. “The network is like a giant cobweb in which perturbing one thread perturbs the entire network,” said Shubhankar Kulkarni, Watve’s PhD student and first author of the paper, which appeared in the journal PLOS One last week. Significantly, even though the effects are complex, they are far from being chaotic, he said. The IISER scientists, to their surprise, found that the network is highly structured and with any perturbation it ends up in either of the two possible configurations – one is insulin-sensitive and the other insulin-resistant. Using the model, the researchers could not only mimic many known patterns and processes associated with diabetes, but could also make a number of surprising predictions, the remarkable one being that diabetes can be Continue reading >>

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Here are some "bits and pieces" updates for December. Update on Dr. Faustman's Phase-II Trial of BCG Dr. Faustman's lab has published their Fall 2017 newsletter, which you can read here: This newsletter includes more information on her research, especially from the 3rd International BCG conference, The BCG Working Group, and the 2nd edition of the BCG and Autoimmunity book she edited. There are three pieces of new news there: The phase-II trial was fully enrolled in Summer of 2017. This is important because we now know when the trial will end. Since this is a five year study, they should finish collecting data in Summer of 2022 and publish before Summer of 2023. They have given BCG to the three untreated patients from their phase-I trial, so they will have data from six people to report in the future. The lab is going to be recruiting for more studies in the future, so would like to hear from anyone who is interested in participating. No details on future trials were provided. Another piece of news is that Dr. Faustman is branching out, and trying to apply BCG treatment to Fibromyalgia. This research is being done in collaboration with EpicGenetics, and they hope to start the trial in early 2018. If anything applicable to the type-1 world comes up in this research, I'll report it. Since Fibromyalgia is not generally considered an autoimmune disease, I'm not sure how much "cross pollination" of results there will be. You can read more about it here: DILfrequency Trial Completed There is a lot of research ongoing on IL-2 which is part of the immune system. About 18 months ago, I summarized all this research here: with an update here: One of those clinical trials was called "DILfrequency" and that trial has finished, and the results published. The purpose of that trial was Continue reading >>

Is There A Diabetes Cure?

Is There A Diabetes Cure?

With all the research on diabetes and advances in diabetes treatments, it's tempting to think someone has surely found a diabetes cure by now. But the reality is that there is no cure for diabetes -- neither type 1 diabetes nor type 2 diabetes. (Although lifestyle changes can achieve remission in type 2 diabetes in some cases.) However, there are treatments, including simple things you can do daily, that make a big difference. No. Natural therapies such as deep abdominal breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery, and biofeedback can help relieve stress. And emotional stress affects your blood sugar levels. So learning to relax is important in managing your diabetes. Supplements don't cure diabetes, either. Some natural supplements may interact dangerously with your diabetes medication. Others have been shown to help improve your diabetes, but always check with your doctor before taking any supplement. Be skeptical about claims of a diabetes cure. A genuine cure will have been tested repeatedly in clinical trials with clear success. Even though there's no diabetes cure, diabetes can be treated and controlled, and some people may go into remission. To manage diabetes effectively, you need to do the following: Manage your blood sugar levels. Know what to do to help keep them as near to normal as possible every day: Check your glucose levels frequently. Take your diabetes medicine regularly. And balance your food intake with medication, exercise, stress management, and good sleep habits. Plan what you eat at each meal. Stick to your diabetes eating plan as often as possible. Bring healthy snacks with you. You’ll be less likely to snack on empty calories. Exercise regularly. Exercise helps you keep you fit, burns calories, and helps normalize your blood gluc Continue reading >>

Can I Cure Myself Of Diabetes Without Pills Or Injections? Let's Find Out!

Can I Cure Myself Of Diabetes Without Pills Or Injections? Let's Find Out!

By Tara Bellucci, Special to Everyday Health I didn’t need a blood test to tell me I wasn’t invincible, though one proved to be quite the reminder. With a family history of diabetes and a BMI firmly planted in the “obese” range for much of my life, I shouldn’t have been so surprised to find I had a fasting blood glucose level of 170. On January 22, 2014, I became one of 25.8 million Americans diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. A few months earlier, I had my first meeting with a psychic. I had just turned 30, and we were talking about my dad. He died last June at 56 years old from kidney failure and other complications stemming from decades of mismanaging his diabetes. When I was a kid, my father suffered a string of diabetic shocks that nearly killed him, one while my younger brother and I were in the car with him on a busy road. From then on, I knew he would die too soon from a disease that doesn’t have to be a death sentence. The psychic told me that I would be the one to break the cycle. I initially thought she meant I’d never get it, that I wouldn’t have to ever deal with having this disease. While that would’ve been nice, I’m clearly meant to break the cycle in a different way. Though it wasn’t completely out of the blue, the diagnosis still shocked me. It’s weird — feeling like a statistic, a cliche, the rule rather than the exception. In that instant, I was reduced to a set of numbers, a wrong equation meant to be corrected. My humanity seemed to drain away. While the test results left me feeling punched in the gut, I’m not really one to dwell on the negative. I’m big into meditation, mantras, and The Universe, so I quickly flipped my story from doom and gloom to “all good is coming from this situation.” And shortly thereafter, I se Continue reading >>

Will There Ever Be A Cure For Diabetes? Why Or Why Not?

Will There Ever Be A Cure For Diabetes? Why Or Why Not?

For More tips,read more about diabetes Diabetes Full Control- Live a Better Life What is type 1 diabetes? Around 400,000 people in Germany are producing cells of the pancreas and destroys them. As a result, it comes within a few days to weeks for lack of insulin production. Type 1 diabetes often occurs as early as childhood and adolescence. The hormone insulin is responsible for the locks of dietary sugar from the blood into the cells that need it for energy. In insulin deficiency, the glucose in the blood accumulates - the blood sugar level rises. This can damage permanently the blood vessels, nerves and numerous organs. Patients with type 1 diabetes need throughout their lives several times daily insulin injections to prevent acute metabolic disorders and related diseases due to high blood sugar levels. What is the difference between Type 1 diabetes and Type 2? In contrast to type 1 diabetes is the type 2 diabetes, below the estimated about seven million people in Germany suffer, not the consequence of a lack of insulin, but an insulin resistance. This means that the cells no longer speak adequately to insulin, so that the hormone can not smuggle the sugar into the cells. The blood sugar level rises. To compensate, the pancreas initially produces larger amounts of insulin. Also no longer sufficient to overcome the insulin resistance, a type 2 diabetes develops. The main causes of type 2 diabetes are genetic predisposition, obesity and lack of exercise. While the type 1 diabetes is more likely in recent years, a type 2 diabetes often develops at an advanced age in patients. Training: What to know patients Typically, a person with Type 1 diabetes leads his therapy in everyday life through their own, as long as no problems or complaints arise. In children take parents th Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is A Fully Curable Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Is A Fully Curable Disease

Type 2 diabetes is a fully curable disease. And still conventional medicine treat it as the opposite – as a chronic and progressive disease. We try to mask the symptoms and slow down the complications, instead of curing it! It’s quite easy to prove that type 2 diabetes is a curable disease. Have a look at this chart of the number of required drugs for treating the disease, over 12 months on three different treatments in a 2012 study: The top graph is conventional treatment. Everyone starts out on three different medications and they keep having to take the drugs. This is what we normally do. It simply does not work as a cure and may even make the diabetes worse. The bottom two graphs are common variants of obesity surgery, where a large (healthy) part of the stomach is removed. Many patients suddenly don’t need drugs anymore, their diabetes completely goes away! The point is not to recommend surgery that removes healthy organs – I don’t recommend that. The point it that type 2 diabetes is a fully curable disease. Luckily it’s not even necessary to remove healthy organs to do so, it’s also possible by just changing your lifestyle. Here’s a longer post on the subject by the great Dr. Jason Fung: IDM: Surgery Reverses Diabetes – T2D3 I just spent a few days with Dr. Fung and we have some really interesting plans. If you’re at all interested in this topic I think you’ll love what we have coming up soon. More Continue reading >>

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for 25 years now. The relentlessness of type 1, and the fact that I will probably live with this non-preventable condition for the rest of my life never goes away, but I have almost made peace with it. A few days ago, I saw something that gave me pause. “British man with type 1 diabetes to receive tests after coming off insulin,” read Diabetes.co.uk’s headline. The article goes onto say that, “Daniel Darkes, from Daventy in Northamptonshire, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes seven years ago. But his recent tests have baffled doctors as his pancreas has shown signs of working properly again.” My first thoughts upon reading this were, “this can’t be true,” and “what’s the real explanation here?” There are many types of diabetes including type 2, LADA, and monogenic. Maybe he actually had one of those types instead of type 1. Usually, tests can determine this quickly though, so why was it not the case with Dan? I live in the UK and I wanted to get to the bottom of things. I managed to get in touch with ‘Miracle Dan’, as he’s been called by his friends. Although he is saving the specific details of his recent test results from the U.S. for an upcoming exclusive interview with another media outlet, he spoke to me and answered some of my questions about everything that has been happening. Please tell us a bit about yourself and your diabetes. When were you diagnosed? I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes back in February 2011 at the age of 23, after just leaving the army. I started a new engineering job and within two weeks of starting, I noticed the traditional symptoms of type 1 diabetes: thirst, weight loss, blurry vision, and a lot of vomiting. I collapsed and was taken by ambulance to hospital where I wa Continue reading >>

Targeting A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Targeting A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

How Long Will We Have To Wait? about the book Every person touched by diabetes wants to know when there will be a cure. A lot of work is going on, but what are the chances of a breakthrough? Targeting a Cure for Type 1 Diabetes is diaTribe's comprehensive overview of where we are and where we're headed in that search. Rich in detail and written for patients and their families, the report features the latest information on the most promising approaches for curing diabetes. These include immune therapeutics, islet and pancreas transplantation, beta cell regeneration and survival agents, and the artificial pancreas. With an introduction by Dr. Aaron Kowalski of the JDRF, and with concluding remarks by our Editor in Chief, Kelly Close, Targeting a Cure for Type 1 Diabetes is essential reading for anyone who wants to know more about what a cure might look like or when it will be available. Although a cure may not be right around the corner, this book lays bare the possibilities of all the exciting research now underway. To buy a copy of Targeting a Cure, visit the ADA's store. critical acclaim "Targeting a Cure for Type 1 Diabetes will give you hope that someday struggling with the management of type 1 diabetes will only be a memory."- Richard M. Bergenstal, MD (Executive Director, International Diabetes Center, Minneapolis, MN) “After reading about Kelly Close and her teams’ incredible journey of discovery, we cannot only continue to dream, but we can open our eyes each morning to a reality that brings us closer, inch by inch, discovery by discovery, to a day when glucose control will be automatic and people with type 1 diabetes will be ‘cured.’”- Francine R. Kaufman, MD (Chief Medical Officer and Vice President, Global Medical, Clinical & Health Affairs, Medtroni Continue reading >>

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