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Why Diabetes Cause Heart Attack

Heart Disease And Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: One Treatment For Both Could Be On Horizon

Heart Disease And Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: One Treatment For Both Could Be On Horizon

Scientists have discovered the conditions are linked by the same genes which could offer hope of combating them with the same drug. Researchers analysed the complete DNA of more than 250,000 people and found seven mutations that increased the risk for heart disease and diabetes. It could help explain why diabetics are 65 and 48 per cent more likely to suffer heart failure or a heart attack, respectively. "Identifying these gene variants linked to both type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease risk in principle opens up opportunities to lower the risk of both outcomes with a single drug,” said Professor Danish Saleheen, Epidemiologist at Pennsylvania University. The findings add to the basic scientific understanding of both major illnesses and point to potential targets for future drugs. Professor Saleheen said: "From a drug development perspective it would make sense to focus on those pathways that are most strongly linked to both diseases." Type 2 diabetes is a significant risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) but the reasons why are still fairly unclear. Coronary heart disease affects more than 2.3 million people in Britain and 69,000 die from heart attacks every year as a result. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. There are an estimated 3.6 million Britons living with type 2 diabetes - a major cause of premature death. Professor Saleheen’s team analysed DNA data from participants of South Asian, East Asian or European descent, uncovered 16 new genetic variants associated with diabetes and one with heart disease. They then showed most known to increase the risk of one also increased the ri Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease In Women

Diabetes And Heart Disease In Women

Dr. Rodriguez-Oquendo’s area of expertise is endocrinology. Cardiovascular risk can occur earlier in women with diabetes Among both men and women, diabetes is one of the strongest cardiovascular risk factors. Epidemiological studies have shown that people with diabetes have more than two times the chance of getting cardiovascular disease than people without diabetes. This includes premenopausal women, a group normally at lower risk for cardiovascular disease. “Men generally have heart disease in their 40’s and 50’s, about a decade before women. But this is generally not true for diabetic women,” says Dr. Annabelle Rodriguez-Oquendo, Associate Professor of Medicine and Diabetes Management Service Director at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. “For diabetic women, the cardiovascular risk occurs earlier. Diabetes takes away much of the protection premenopausal women would normally get from estrogen.” How diabetes raises risk for heart disease The concentration of blood glucose or blood sugar, and how much it sticks to red blood cells and impedes the flow of oxygen in the blood, plays a large role in cardiovascular risk. An important measurement of sugar in the blood over a three-month period is the hemoglobin A1C test. Hemoglobin is just one of the proteins that transport oxygen in the blood. Diabetes is a disease that impacts large blood vessels (such as the coronary arteries) and small vessels (such as arteries that carry blood to nerve endings and kidneys). Diabetes can affect the cardiovascular system by: Attaching glucose to (glycosylating) blood proteins and disrupting the distribution of oxygen throughout the body Causing the clumping of cholesterol-carrying proteins like LDL (bad) cholesterol, which leads to more plaque buildup in the vessel walls Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes And Heart Disease

People with diabetes are at a higher risk for developing heart attacks and stroke than people who do not have diabetes. Adults with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to have heart disease or suffer a stroke than people without diabetes. A person with diabetes can reduce the risk of heart and blood vessel disease by knowing the “ABCs” of diabetes. A is for A1C A1C is a test that measures your blood glucose control over the past 3 months. Even a small drop in A1C reduces the risks of heart disease. You may help improve A1C with a change in your diet, medicines, and exercise routine. B is for Blood Pressure Blood that pushes too hard against artery walls (high blood pressure) makes your heart work harder. High blood pressure also can affect your kidneys. C is for Cholesterol Cholesterol, especially LDL (low-density lipoprotein), and triglycerides (tri-gliss-erides). High levels of fats in the blood may cause narrowing of the blood vessels that feed your heart and brain. It is important to have good control of your blood glucose, blood pressure, and blood lipids if you have diabetes. You should ask your doctor or health care provider 3 important questions about the ABCs of diabetes: What are my A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol numbers? What are my treatment goals? What do I need to do to reach my goals? Treatment goals for people with diabetes (American Diabetes Association Guidelines, 2013) Hemoglobin A1C: less than 7 percent Blood pressure: less than 140/80 mmHg, (but lower goals of less than 130/80 mmHg may be appropriate for certain individuals, such as younger persons, if it can be achieved without a lot of treatment burden. Target lipid levels for people with diabetes are: Total cholesterol: less than 200 LDL cholesterol: less than 100 HDL cholesterol: Mor Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease — An Intimate Connection

Diabetes And Heart Disease — An Intimate Connection

By By Om P. Ganda, M.D., Director, Lipid Clinic, Joslin Diabetes Center A strong link between diabetes and heart disease is now well established. Studies from Joslin Diabetes Center several years ago showed a two- to threefold increase in the incidence of heart disease in patients with diabetes compared with those without diabetes who were being followed in the Framingham Heart Study. Women with diabetes have an even greater risk of heart disease compared with those of similar age who do not have diabetes. In fact, cardiovascular disease leading to heart attack or stroke is by far the leading cause of death in both men and women with diabetes. Another major component of cardiovascular disease is poor circulation in the legs, which contributes to a greatly increased risk of foot ulcers and amputations. Several advances in the treatment of heart disease over the past two decades have improved the chances of surviving a heart attack or stroke. However, as the incidence of diabetes steadily increases, so has the number of new cases of heart disease and cardiovascular complications. Unfortunately, in patients with diabetes, improvement in survival has been less than half as much as in the general population. Why Is Heart Disease So Common in People With Diabetes? Diabetes by itself is now regarded as the strongest risk factor for heart disease; however, a variety of mechanisms—not solely blood glucose levels—most likely come into play. The blood vessels in patients with diabetes are more susceptible to other well-established risk factors, such as smoking, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and more than 90% of patients with diabetes have one or more of these additional risk factors. Some of the increased susceptibility to blood vessel damage that people with diabe Continue reading >>

Women With Diabetes Are Especially Prone To Developing Heart Disease

Women With Diabetes Are Especially Prone To Developing Heart Disease

(iStock) Women typically don’t develop heart disease — or high blood pressure, one of its major risk factors — until after menopause. But “if you have diabetes, that rule no longer applies,” says Christine Maric-Bilkan, a program officer in the vascular biology and hypertension branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Diabetes “dramatically increases the risk” of heart disease at any age — overall, people with diabetes are twice as likely to have heart disease or a stroke as are other people — and its impact “tends to be greater in women than in men,” she says. Diabetes, a disease in which the body either doesn’t produce enough insulin (Type 1) or cannot use it properly (Type 2), can cause spikes in blood sugar. Over time, these spikes can damage nerves and blood vessels, putting diabetics at elevated risk of heart disease and stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also contributes to vision loss, kidney failure and amputations, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. People with diabetes are up to four times as likely to develop cardiovascular disease as are people who do not have diabetes, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to suffer a second heart attack and four times as likely to suffer heart failure as are women who do not have the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association. “The risk of developing hypertension doubles in men and quadruples in women if you have diabetes,” Maric-Bilkan says. (Hypertension is a major contributor to heart disease.) “There is something about diabetes that takes away the protective factor” against heart disease that premenopausal women seem to have, something probably related to estrogen, she says. “W Continue reading >>

Health: Health Issue/cause Of Death From Which Famous People Are Suffered/suffering And Their Best Quotation?

Health: Health Issue/cause Of Death From Which Famous People Are Suffered/suffering And Their Best Quotation?

Insomnia, liver and kidney diseases, malaria, migraine, diabetes and heart ailments as some of the 31 health problems. ANY TYPE OF HEALTH ISSUE/CAUSE OF DEATH/INJURY/ETC.... ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM- HEART FAILURE, CORONARY THROMBOSIS DIABETES MELLITUS TENNIS ELBOW INJURY MYASTHENIA GRAVIS & TB(2000) AMYOTROHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS Muhammad Ali was diagnosed with Parkinson's in 1984 at the age of 42 HEAR FAILURE HEART FAILURE, REACTIVE ARTHRITIS SYPHILIS, HEART ATTACK, STROKE Trigeminal Neuralgia Chronic subdural hematoma CARDIAC ARREST BACK INJURY (2010) In 2003, Larry Page, was diagnosed with Hashimoto's thyroiditis Three sportsmen who fought and beat Cancer Yuvraj Singh "Beating cancer is personal battle. It was one of the toughest opponents I have faced so far, and I think I did reasonably well. Touch wood." "Cancer doesn’t mean that you’re going to die." "When I was taking chemotherapy, there were a lot of elderly patients, and that would inspire me. I thought, 'If they can be cured, why can't I be?" Lance Armstrong "Before Cancer, I Just Lived. Now I Live Strong." “I want all of you to know that I intend to beat this disease. And further, I intend to ride again as a professional cyclist.” “Pain is temporary. It may last a minute, or an hour, or a day, or a year, but eventually it will subside and something else will take its place. If I quit, however, it lasts forever. That surrender, even the smallest act of giving up, stays with me. So when I feel like quitting, I ask myself, which would I rather live with?” “Giving up was never an option” ‎"Make an obstacle an opportunity, make a negative a positive.” Eric Abidal "Rocks on the Road? Store them all One day you will Build a Castle" "We certainly all have a mission on Earth. Mine is to save peopl Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of people age 65 or older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease; and 16% die of stroke. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes. The American Heart Association considers diabetes to be one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Why are people with diabetes at increased risk for CVD? Diabetes is treatable, but even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. That's because people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes, may have the following conditions that contribute to their risk for developing cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure (hypertension) High blood pressure has long been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Studies report a positive association between hypertension and insulin resistance. When patients have both hypertension and diabetes, which is a common combination, their risk for cardiovascular disease doubles. Abnormal cholesterol and high triglycerides Patients with diabetes often have unhealthy cholesterol levels including high LDL ("bad") cholesterol, low HDL ("good") cholesterol, and high triglycerides. This triad of poor lipid counts often occurs in patients with premature coronary heart disease. It is also characteristic of a lipid disorder associated with insulin resistance called atherogenic dyslipidemia, or diabetic dyslipidemia in those patients with diabetes. Learn more about cholesterol abnormalities as they relate to diabetes. Obesity Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease Continue reading >>

The Pathophysiology Of Cardiovascular Disease And Diabetes: Beyond Blood Pressure And Lipids

The Pathophysiology Of Cardiovascular Disease And Diabetes: Beyond Blood Pressure And Lipids

In Brief The pathophysiology of the link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is complex and multifactorial. Understanding these profound mechanisms of disease can help clinicians identify and treat CVD in patients with diabetes, as well as help patients prevent these potentially devastating complications. This article reviews the biological basis of the link between diabetes and CVD, from defects in the vasculature to the cellular and molecular mechanisms specific to insulin-resistant states and hyperglycemia. It concludes with a discussion of heart failure in diabetes, a clinical entity that demonstrates many of the mechanisms discussed. Diabetes is a prime risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Vascular disorders include retinopathy and nephropathy, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), stroke, and coronary artery disease (CAD). Diabetes also affects the heart muscle, causing both systolic and diastolic heart failure. The etiology of this excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is not completely clear. Evidence suggests that although hyperglycemia, the hallmark of diabetes, contributes to myocardial damage after ischemic events, it is clearly not the only factor, because both pre-diabetes and the presence of the metabolic syndrome, even in normoglycemic patients, increase the risk of most types of CVD.1–4 In 2002, a survey of people in the United States with diagnosed diabetes found that, surprisingly, 68% of patients did not consider themselves at risk for heart attack or stroke.5 In addition, only about half of patients surveyed reported that their health care providers discussed the high risk of CVD in diabetes and what steps they could take to reduce that risk.5 Fortunately, we are now making the link. Health care providers are now focuse Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Eyes, Heart, Nerves, Feet, And Kidneys

Diabetes And Your Eyes, Heart, Nerves, Feet, And Kidneys

Diabetes is a serious disease that can affect your eyes, heart, nerves, feet and kidneys. Understanding how diabetes affects your body is important. It can help you follow your treatment plan and stay as healthy as possible. If your diabetes is not well controlled, the sugar level in your blood goes up. This is called “hyperglycemia” (high blood sugar). High blood sugar can cause damage to very small blood vessels in your body. Imagine what happens to sugar when it is left unwrapped overnight. It gets sticky. Now imagine how sugar “sticks” to your small blood vessels and makes it hard for blood to get to your organs. Damage to blood vessels occurs most often in the eyes, heart, nerves, feet, and kidneys. Let’s look at how this damage happens. Eyes. Having high levels of sugar in your blood for a long time can harm the tiny blood vessels in your eyes. This can result in vision problems or blindness. Heart. High blood sugar may also harm larger blood vessels in your body that supply oxygen to your heart and brain. Fat can build up in the blood vessels as well. This can lead to a heart attack or stroke. Nerves. Nerves carry important messages between your brain and other parts of your body. Having high levels of sugar in your blood for many years can damage the blood vessels that bring oxygen to some nerves. Damaged nerves may stop sending pain signals. Feet. Diabetes can harm your feet in two ways. First, it can damage your body’s nerves. Nerve damage stops you from feeling pain or other problems in your feet. Another way that diabetes can cause damage to your feet is from poor blood circulation. Poor blood flow makes it hard for a sore or infection to heal. If sores don’t heal and get infected, it can lead to amputation. Kidneys. Think of your kidneys like Continue reading >>

When Was The Hardest You Have Cried?

When Was The Hardest You Have Cried?

February 20th 2014 I had bought my first car a few months back and being the obsessed wanderer I was, I did a lot of road trips. I'd driven close to 10000kms in two months and had embarked on this road trip covering all the historical monuments in Karnataka, India. My schoolmate was accompanying me on this. While driving from Goa to Mangalore (two lane road), this car coming from the opposite side decided to try an overtake which was impossible to pull off if I didn't go off the road, so I did. Little did I know that the off road was so deep that my car lost control, over steered in a weird way and went into the road (I have no idea why even now), it rammed head on into an oncoming truck. I lost consciousness on the spot and the car was so badly damaged (can't believe I'm still alive when I look back), I was pulled out of the car, was losing blood bad and taken to the hospital. When I woke up I had no memory of the event or the road trip, I was just wondering why my body hurts so bad and why everyone is speaking in kannada (my mother tongue, I live in a place where I don't yet know the native language). I was explained the whole progression by my friend who at that moment was fine. Few hours later, my friend had horrible pain in his abdomen, UT taken and they realise he is bleeding internally and his situation is critical. Closest hospital that can perform the surgery was 2 hours away. They put me to sleep at that point. Here is how badly wrangled my car was (Bless Ford for their great design and airbags) I wake up a few hours later, the nurses let me know that they managed to reach the hospital in time, they didn't disclose more information. Later, they were gossiping about my accident and I got to know that a third person (motorcyclist) was involved and he didn't surv Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease: A Fatal Link

Diabetes And Heart Disease: A Fatal Link

Editor's note: Ann Curley is the assignment manager for the CNN Medical News unit and a type I diabetic. (CNN) -- Diabetes is the fifth-leading killer of Americans, according to the American Diabetes Association. A sobering two out of three people with type I or type II diabetes will die from a heart attack or stroke -- the combined leading causes of death among diabetics. There are few diabetics who haven't heard horror stories about patients who have lost limbs or gone blind because of poor disease control. Keeping a trio of factors -- blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels -- within recommended ranges is key to reducing the risk for diabetes-related complications such as heart attacks, strokes and peripheral vascular disease, which occurs when blood flow to the limbs is impaired. Health professionals often tell diabetics to mind their "ABCs." A stands for A1C This is an important blood test, officially called glycolated hemoglobin, or HbA1C. The A1C test is a reading of the average blood glucose values for the past two or three months. A little science lesson: Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to all the body cells. When diabetes is uncontrolled, too much sugar, or glucose, is in the blood. The extra glucose enters the red blood cells and sticks to -- or glycates -- the hemoglobin. The more excess glucose, the more sugar that sticks to the hemoglobin. And these clumps of glucose and hemoglobin can be measured as a percentage of the blood -- the A1C reading. The test is a bit of a lie detector for glucose control -- your A1C will tell your doctor how much extra sugar has been flowing around in your blood. A nondiabetic will have a normal A1C of 4 to 6 percent, which works out to an average blood sugar of about 65-135 milligra Continue reading >>

Silent Heart Attack

Silent Heart Attack

A heart attack that does not produce the hallmark symptoms of chest pain and difficulty breathing. It is estimated that as many as 4 million Americans have had silent heart attacks, and diabetes raises the risk of having one. A heart attack, also known as a myocardial infarction, occurs when low blood flow to the heart starves it of oxygen, damaging it. Most heart attacks are caused by a blood clot that blocks one of the coronary arteries, the arteries that carry blood and oxygen to the heart muscle. A clot most often forms in a coronary artery that has been narrowed by atherosclerotic plaque. Risk factors for heart attacks include a family history of heart attack, being male, diabetes, older age, high blood pressure, smoking, and blood lipid abnormalities, especially high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels and low HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels. Typically, a heart attack produces chest pain, which may radiate to the arms, shoulders, neck, teeth, jaw, abdomen, or back. Other common symptoms include shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, and anxiety. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should seek medical care immediately. But people with diabetes may not feel these symptoms due to diabetic neuropathy (nerve disease), which can damage the nerves that control the heart, as well as mask the chest and back pain that usually accompanies an attack. Continue reading >>

Why Is There An Increased Rate Of Heart Disease?

Why Is There An Increased Rate Of Heart Disease?

Diabetes puts you at risk of heart disease (even if you have ‘normal’ looking cholesterol and no symptoms). This is because diabetes can change the chemical makeup of some of the substances found in the blood and this can cause blood vessels to narrow or to clog up completely. Heart attacks and strokes are up to four times more likely in people with diabetes For this reason, often people with diabetes are on blood pressure lowering medications, often in combination Maintaining fitness with regular physical activity combined with some weight loss can help reduce high blood pressure Diabetes can change the chemical makeup of some of the substances found in the blood and this can cause blood vessels to narrow or to clog up completely. Maintaining fitness with regular physical activity combined with some weight loss can help reduce high blood pressure. Blood pressure lowering medications are often required for people who have diabetes. Symptoms Often people do not know they have heart disease until they develop symptoms like chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness or excessive fatigue when walking or exercising. It is important to note that symptoms may be mild to severe and sometimes there may be none at all. Examples of some other warning symptoms may be: Arm or jaw discomfort Indigestion Weakness Nausea. If you think you are having a heart attack, phone 000 IMMEDIATELY. How can I reduce the risk? One of the most important things to do to reduce the risk of heart disease is to meet with your doctor and/or Credentialled Diabetes Educator to discuss your individual risk factors and how to reduce them. In general terms you can reduce the risk by: Being physically active Losing weight if you are overweight Not smoking Managing blood fats Managing high blood pressure Ta Continue reading >>

What Are The Causes Of Heart Attack?

What Are The Causes Of Heart Attack?

Answer Wiki It is not surprising that the most common causes of heart attack comprises of lifestyle issues, eating habits, blood pressure and cholesterol levels, weight and stress issues, and diabetes. Coronary Artery Disease: The underlying cause of most heart attacks. This is a result of a build-up (collectively called as plaques) of cholesterol and other substances in the artery. One of these plaques can rupture and spill out cholesterol and other substances (plaque) into the bloodstream causing blood clots that block the coronary artery. Studies show that one fifth of the deaths in India are caused due to coronary heart disease A spasm in the coronary artery: This shuts down the blood flow to the heart muscle causing a heart attack. Drugs like cocaine can cause such a life-threatening spasm. A tear in heart artery: A heart attack can also occur due to a tear in the heart artery (spontaneous coronary artery dissection). Coronary Embolism—a condition, in which small blood clots or tumors travel from other parts of the body to the artery—is an uncommon cause of heart attacks. Decreased Blood Flow to the Heart: When blood flow to the heart is severely decreased, in the case of extremely low blood pressure (shock), it can lead to a heart attack. Family history: Your chances of having a heart attack are higher if you have a family history of heart disease or a history of cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, and obesity. If you still didn’t got the answer check out Dr. Agarwal who is talking about causes of heart attack in the following video, Heart attack warning signs can vary from person to person, and they may not always be sudden or severe. Always bear in mind, act immediately. Some people wait too long because they don’t recognise t Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Avoid Heart Attacks And Strokes If You Have Diabetes

8 Ways To Avoid Heart Attacks And Strokes If You Have Diabetes

Protect your heart Although many people with type 2 diabetes worry about losing their vision or having an amputation, the greater risk is to the heart and brain. About 65% of people with type 2 diabetes die of heart disease or stroke. They are two to four times more likely to die of heart disease than people without diabetes. "When someone does get a diagnosis of diabetes, they probably have had prediabetes for as long as 10 years," says Gerald Bernstein, MD. "By the time their diagnosis is made, their risk for cardiovascular disease is extremely high. And then 10 years later, they will have their first cardiovascular event." An enormous challenge "People with type 2 diabetes are faced with an enormous challenge. Because they not only have the problem of glucose metabolism that has gone astray, but in most patients, they have an associated problem related to their cholesterol and to their blood pressure, and obviously their weight," says Dr. Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at the Gerald J. Friedman Diabetes Institute at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. "All of these things have to be attacked with the same vigor." To help prevent heart attacks and stroke, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recommends the following steps. Control your blood sugar If you've been prescribed medication, take it. To make sure your blood sugar is in the safe zone, get a hemoglobin A1C test at least twice a year. This test measures the amount of glucose stuck to red blood cells, which is a sign of blood sugar control in the previous three months. (Aim for below 7%). For a better sense of your daily blood sugar or how food affects it, you can prick your finger and use a blood glucose monitor to get a reading. (It should be 90 Continue reading >>

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