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Why Can You Not Drink Alcohol With Metformin?

Can You Drink Alcohol While On Metformin?

Can You Drink Alcohol While On Metformin?

Home Q & A Questions Can you drink alcohol while... Can you drink alcohol while on metformin? If you're diabetic then you have to be careful of the drinks you have, because of sugar. The interaction checker says Ask your doctor before using ethanol together with metFORMIN. Taking this combination may cause a condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these symptoms of lactic acidosis: weakness, increasing sleepiness, slow heart rate, cold feeling, muscle pain, shortness of breath, stomach pain. Use alcohol cautiously. If your doctor prescribes these medications together, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safey take this combination. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor. Having one drink for women (12 oz beer, 5 oz glass of wine and 0.5-1 oz hard liquor means one drink) or two drinks (same measurements except for hard alcohol can be only 1 1/2 oz liquor between two drinks) for men is usually permissible but you must consider the drink as a sugar/carb in your diet. Alcohol becomes pure glucose in your body, just like eating a high carb/sugar dessert. If you have alcohol, have it with a meal or snack (be sure to adjust for the alcohol's added carbs so you will need to reduce carbs somewhere else in the diet). One effect of alcohol is that it shuts off your liver from releasing stored glucose from your liver into your blood stream which increases the likelihood of experiencing low blood sugar. Many of the symptoms of low blood sugar resemble intoxication (like dizziness, slurred speech, blurred vision, muscle weakness and a shaky feeling). If you are on insulin or pills, the medication Continue reading >>

What Happens If I Drink A Lot While I Am Taking Metformin?

What Happens If I Drink A Lot While I Am Taking Metformin?

Drinking a lot of alcohol while taking metformin (Glucophage, Fortamet), especially over a short period of time (known as "binge drinking"), increases your risk of a side effect called lactic acidosis. This is a buildup of lactic acid in the bloodstream, which in some cases can cause death. Drinking even small amounts of alcohol when you're taking metformin -- a drug used to control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes -- can also increase the risk of lactic acidosis. You should not drink alcohol while on this medicine. Continue Learning about Metformin Videos Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. Continue reading >>

What Is The Effect Of A Glass Of Wine After Taking Metformin?

What Is The Effect Of A Glass Of Wine After Taking Metformin?

It is generally acceptable to drink a glass of wine while taking metformin; however, it's best to be careful because of the risk of lactic acidosis. Additionally, there is a risk of hypoglycemia when a diabetes patient drinks alcohol, whether or not the patient takes metformin. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include hunger, shakiness, nervousness, sweating, dizziness, sleepiness, confusion, difficulty speaking, anxiety and weakness. Symptoms of lactic acidosis include nausea, vomiting, hyperventilation, abdominal pain, lethargy, anxiety, hypotension, rapid or irregular heart rate and metal status changes. If you take metformin or are diabetic, ask your doctor if it's safe to drink alcoholic beverages. Video of the Day Metformin is a biguanide, a type of oral medication used to treat Type 2 diabetes by helping control the amount of glucose in the blood. It primarily works to reduce gluconeogenesis, glucose production by the liver, but also aids in blood glucose control by increasing insulin sensitivity and decreasing glucose absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common side effects of metformin are gastrointestinal related, but rarely, lactic acidosis can occur. Hypoglycemia is an unlikely side effect of metformin when it is used alone. The liver is largely responsible for clearing lactate from the body, and when a patient takes metformin, the rate of clearance by the liver is reduced. This is part of the reason for the correlation between taking metformin and the risk of lactic acidosis. Dr. Thomas Higgins, an endocrinologist at Boulder Medical Center, cautions against prescribing metformin to patients with conditions that predispose them to lactic acid accumulation. For example, use of metformin, which is not metabolized but cleared via tubular secretion into th Continue reading >>

Glipizide And Metformin

Glipizide And Metformin

Pronunciation: GLIP ih zyd and met FOR min slide 1 of 9, Glipizide-Metformin 2.5 mg-250 mg-MYL, slide 2 of 9, Glipizide-Metformin 2.5 mg-250 mg-TEV, slide 3 of 9, Glipizide-Metformin 2.5 mg-500 mg-MYL, slide 4 of 9, Glipizide-Metformin 2.5 mg-500 mg-TEV, slide 5 of 9, Glipizide-Metformin 5 mg-500 mg-MYL, slide 6 of 9, Glipizide-Metformin 5 mg-500 mg-TEV, What is the most important information I should know about glipizide and metformin? You should not use glipizide and metformin if you have severe kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking glipizide and metformin. Some people taking metformin develop a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Stop taking this medicine and get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Glipizide and metformin is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Glipizide and metformin is used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. This medicine is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glipizide and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking glipizide and metformin? You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to glipizide or metformin, or if you have: metabolic acidosis or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). If you ne Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Metformin is a medication that helps manage type 2 diabetes and occasionally prediabetes. In general, drinking alcohol while taking metformin is not helpful and not recommended by doctors. The side effects of metformin can be life-threatening with excessive alcohol consumption. Metformin and alcohol both put stress on the liver, so intensifying the harmful effects and increasing the risk of liver complications. How does metformin and alcohol affect the body? Metformin is a popular, effective, and inexpensive management medication, prescribed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In 2014, some 14.4 million people in the United States were prescribed metformin. Metformin is also being used more and more frequently in prediabetes cases. Metformin use in overweight people with type 1 diabetes may also reduce insulin requirements and increase metabolic control. The drug works by improving insulin sensitivity, promoting the uptake of glucose into tissues and lowering sugar levels in the bloodstream. By increasing how effectively the existing glucose is used, metformin reduces the amount of glucose the liver produces and the intestines absorb. Alcohol also affects blood sugars significantly. Alcohol digestion puts stress on the liver, an organ dedicated to the removal of poisons from the body. When the liver is forced to process high amounts of alcohol, it becomes overworked and releases less glucose. Long-term alcohol use can also make cells less sensitive to insulin. This means that less glucose is absorbed from the blood and levels in the bloodstream increase. Over time, alcohol consumption damages the liver, especially when it is consumed in excess. It reduces the liver's ability to produce and regulate glucose. Conditions like alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis of the live Continue reading >>

Metaformin And Alcohol Consumption

Metaformin And Alcohol Consumption

I second the low carb lifestyle on metformin. When I first started, I was on WW, and I had major 'reactions' It was bad. Since I started low carb/low sugar, I have been able to take it without reparcussions. I have cut way back on drinking and stick to Diet coke and bacardi. It's a pretty guilt free way to drink with my friends. yeah the best thing i've figured out with the met is to stay on a low carb, low sugar diet. it tends to help me with the stomach problems, though it doesn't make them go away. and if you're going to drink on occassion i would say to stck with something like sprite and club soda with lime.. try to stay away from sugar mixers. ... but if you drink heavily don't take metformin at all. it can cause a sometimes fatal condition called lactic acidosis. ...met is a wonderful medicine for PCOS, but you have to use it wisely and correctly! I only drink occassionally as is. I take 500 three times a day. I have never gotten hangovers before, now I always feel terrible the next day after drinking. Honestly, though I have been feeling pretty terrible for the entire year and half I have been on Met. I get nauseous a lot and have to be careful anytime I have anything with a lot of sugar in it because it just gives me a horrible stomach ache. I am so shocked by this news...I just started metformin this week but I have a trip planned down south with my girlfriends in about 3 weeks. I specifically asked my doctor about drinking while I was on it, because we are going all inclusive, and who am I kidding, I will definitely be drinking more than 1 or 2 drinks...he said it should be fine, but if i get diareha (tmi) to stop taking it. My tummy has been slightly upset since I started taking it, but I figured i would get over it before I left on the trip. My pharmacist Continue reading >>

Metformin And Alcohol

Metformin And Alcohol

Tweet It is generally recommended that people not use metformin and alcohol at the same time. Taking metformin and alcohol together can increase your risk of developing a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. However, drinking small amounts of alcohol should not be a problem for most people taking the medication. Before taking metformin, be sure to talk to your healthcare provider about drinking alcohol while taking the drug. An Overview of Metformin and Alcohol Metformin (Glucophage®) is a prescription medication licensed as a type 2 diabetes treatment. Often, people are warned to avoid alcohol entirely while taking metformin. This may (or may not) be good advice, depending on your particular situation. Metformin, Alcohol, and Lactic Acidosis Taking metformin increases your chance of developing a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis (see Metformin and Lactic Acidosis). Drinking large amounts of alcohol also increases your risk for lactic acidosis, and combining metformin and large amounts of alcohol can be dangerous (due to the risk of lactic acidosis). As a result, drinking large amounts of alcohol (either on a daily basis or as "binge drinking") is not recommended while taking metformin. Small amounts of alcohol should not be a problem for most people taking metformin. However, because other medical conditions may also increase your risk of lactic acidosis (including kidney or liver problems), there may be some situations where avoiding alcohol entirely might be a good idea. Metformin and Alcohol: Suggestions It is usually not necessary to completely avoid alcohol while taking metformin. However, drinking large amounts of alcohol while taking metformin is not recommended. Be sure to ask your healthcare provider if it would be okay to drink Continue reading >>

Pcos And Alcohol: Health Risks & Safe Drinking Tips

Pcos And Alcohol: Health Risks & Safe Drinking Tips

It’s Friday night and your friends are insisting you join them at the club for Ladies Night Out. You haven’t agreed yet ‘coz you’re just not sure about the connection between PCOS and alcohol. You’ve been diligent with your PCOS diet and are concerned whether a drink (or two!) will set you back. And you simply don’t want to sit there with your friending holding a club soda with lemon slices….where’s the fun in that? We get it. All those talks of lifestyle and diet modifications to reverse PCOS talk about eliminating alcohol from your diet. But is it really all that dangerous? Do you need to give up alcohol and become a teetotaler for life with PCOS? Let’s find some of those answers! 10 Reasons Why PCOS And Alcohol Don’t Mix Well The first thing to understand is how alcohol affects the body, especially of women with PCOS. Additionally, women process alcohol much slower as compared to men. This means that alcohol has a greater physical impact on women, which makes things a bit trickier. Here’s a look at 10 reasons why women with PCOS should be careful of alcohol intake. 1. Leads To Sugar Overload Cocktails are sugar bombs. Once you mix alcohol with a sugary mixer, the result is a beverage that is high in sugars and carbs. Wine, beer, and distilled alcohols are also high in calories. Sugars from grapes or the carbs from grain can cause a spike in blood sugar levels when had in excess. And they will only add to your PCOS weight gain woes. 2. Messes Around With Insulin Alcohol consumption, especially in excess, can reduce insulin sensitivity. Also, alcohol increases the secretion of glucagon and other hormones that raise glucose levels. This can further cause insulin levels to fluctuate. 3. Affects Your Fertility Research has found that heavy alcohol co Continue reading >>

What Happens If You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin

What Happens If You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin

What is Metformin? It is an oral diabetes drug that is used to control blood glucose levels. Metformin can be used alone or in combination with other medications to treat people with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes refers to a chronic condition where the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin or use it properly. Insulin is a natural hormone which transports glucose from the blood stream to the body tissue to be stored or used for energy. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter the body’s cells and stays in the bloodstream. Too much glucose in the bloodstream can lead to serious health complications. People with type 2 diabetes can take this medicine to help them reduce their blood sugar levels. However, this medication should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes, a condition where the body produces little or no insulin at all. This is because the drug works by helping the body respond properly to the insulin it already makes. In addition, it reduces the amount of glucose produced by the liver and decreases the amount of glucose absorbed by the intestines. This helps to control high blood glucose levels. How to take this medication The dosage of metformin will vary depending on the patient’s medical condition and response to treatment. To reduce the risk of side effects such as stomach upset, your doctor may advise you to start on a lower dose then increase it gradually. Make sure you take this medication exactly as it is prescribed by your doctor. This medication is supposed to be taken by mouth, normally one to three times per day together with meals. Use this medication every day so that you can get the most benefit out of it. Your doctor may need to change your dose occasionally so that you can get the best results. Remember to use this drug at the same time every Continue reading >>

Is It O.k. To Drink Alcohol If On Metformin?

Is It O.k. To Drink Alcohol If On Metformin?

Thanks for taking the trouble to reply, however don't think your answer is quite what I meant by Q. Of course it's better for ALL to be cautious in use of alcohol, not just diabetics It was more the combination Metfomin/ Alcohol reaction that I was interested in It is definitely not good to use alcohol when on Metformin as alcohol is disruptive the intended effects of metformin. Most feared is that the combination of Metformin and alcohol can also lead to some potentially severe consequences, one of which is a resulting possible side effect of lactic acidosis. This can be fatal if not treated in time. This condition can occur when the blood does not have enough oxygen, which is required to transport the glucose throughout the body. The glucose then transforms into lactic acid. Although this is a naturally produced chemical agent within the body, increased levels can result in potentially fatal toxic effects. This resulting lactic acidosis and Metformin side effects with alcohol consumption will first appear in the form of breathing difficulties, fluctuations in heartbeat, nausea and vomiting. The patient should inform the prescribing physician immediately if any of these warning signs occur. Metformin works in relationship to the liver and its ability to regulate insulin production levels. Additionally, alcohol has a severe detrimental effect on the liver, especially when ingested in vast quantities over long periods of time. A common result of alcoholism is irreversible liver damage. Therefore, the combination of Metformin and alcohol can only exacerbate this possibility. Alcohol consumption also produces the tendency to gain weight. If the prescribing of Metformin is used as a medication therapy for weight loss as in patients who suffer from polycystic ovary syndrome Continue reading >>

Why No Alcohol With Metformin?

Why No Alcohol With Metformin?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. On my Metformin bottle it says to avoid alcohol while taking this drug. Anyone know the real reason why? My pharmacist couldn't really answer that and my Endo. couldn't give me a real good answer either. She just said that she thought it was because Metformin works with the liver and that alcohol also messes with the liver and that's the only reason she could think of. But she didn't seem to think it was a big concern unless you were overdoing it with the alcohol. Anyway, does someone know the real reason they put that on the label? Looking for a more technical description of why I can't take both at the same time. I googled "metformin and alcohol interaction," and the link said that alcohol increases the lactic acid production. Since lactic acidosis icould be a possible side effect of metformin in some individuals, drinking a lot of alcohol with it might mean a "double whammy," if you were prone to the lactic acidosis. I have a drink or two and am on metformin, and have had no problems. I think most meds have the alcohol warning on the label. Same reason Grapefruit Juice is on that list. Rare complications. If you already have kidney problems, then Ketosis is a possibility with Met and alcohol. But ... if you have kidney problems, alcohol is likely already on the no-no list! If your pharmacist didn't know, they need to have their license taken away! But ... don't listen to some stranger like me. I only know what I read about it, and that may be un-true! Ask your doctor who prescribed it. My understanding was as you say... they both work on the Liver. Here is my question. I have enjoyed 1-2 g Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Metformin | Alcohol With Metformin Side Effects

Alcohol And Metformin | Alcohol With Metformin Side Effects

What are the possible interactions of alcohol and metformin? What should you know about alcohol with metformin side effects? These are common questions people about metformin, which is a diabetic drug. Below what should be known about alcohol and metformin will be covered, including the possible alcohol with metformin side effects. Metformin is a drug that’s used to treat type 2 diabetes, and it can be used alone or with other medicines, and in adults and children. For people who are at risk of developing diabetes it can also be used as a way to prevent that, and it can be used as a treatment option for polycystic ovaries and weight gain due to the use of certain medicines. Metformin helps control high blood sugar levels, and this can in turn help prevent serious complications like kidney damage, nerve problems, and blindness. When your diabetes is well-controlled, it can also help lower the risk of a stroke or heart attack. The way metformin works is by restoring the way your body responds to the insulin you produce, and it decreases the amount of sugar made by your liver, and thereby absorbed by your stomach and intestines. Side effects of metformin can include nausea, vomiting, general upset stomach, diarrhea, weakness or a metallic taste in your mouth. In some cases, if metformin is taken with other diabetic medications, it can cause low blood sugar, but this isn’t usually a symptom of this medicine on its own. Understanding drug interactions is important with any medicine you’re prescribed, which is why you should tell your doctor about all other medicines you’re taking, your medical history, and even supplements and vitamins you take. Some of the medicines that can interact with metformin include beta-blockers and any medicine that affects your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause lactic acidosis. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are severe and quick to appear. They usually occur when other health problems not related to the medicine are present and very severe, such as a heart attack or kidney failure. The symptoms of lactic acidosis include abdominal or stomach discomfort; decreased appetite; diarrhea; fast, shallow breathing; a general feeling of discomfort; muscle pain or cramping; and unusual sleepiness, tiredness, or weakness. If you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, get emergency medical help right away. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur because of lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise and diet. Furthermore, counseling on contraception and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in patients with diabetes during pregnancy. Travel—Keep your recent prescription and your medical history with yo Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Mix Metformin And Alcohol?

Is It Safe To Mix Metformin And Alcohol?

If you’re taking metformin to treat your diabetes, you may be wondering how this drug affects your ability to drink safely. Drinking alcohol can affect your diabetes symptoms directly, but there are additional risks if you drink alcohol with metformin. This article gives you information on how alcohol interacts with metformin and also how drinking alcohol can affect your diabetes. With any medicine you take, you should be aware of interactions that can happen if you use other substances. Metformin and alcohol can interact to increase your risk of harmful effects. You are at much greater risk of these effects if you frequently drink a lot of alcohol or you binge drink (drink a lot in short periods). These effects include an extremely low blood sugar level, called hypoglycemia, and a condition called lactic acidosis. Hypoglycemia Drinking alcohol while you’re taking metformin may cause extremely low blood sugar levels. Some symptoms of low blood sugar levels can be similar to symptoms of having too much alcohol. These include: drowsiness dizziness confusion Tell the people who are with you while you drink that you have diabetes. They can help you watch for these symptoms. If you or the people around you notice these symptoms, stop drinking and eat something right away to help increase your blood sugar level. If your symptoms of hypoglycemia are severe, such as losing consciousness, and you do not have a glucagon hypoglycemia rescue kit, someone with you should call 9-1-1. A glucagon hypoglycemia rescue kit includes human glucagon (a natural substance that helps balance your blood sugar level), a syringe to inject it, and instructions. You can use this kit for severe hypoglycemia when eating food will not help. If you are not familiar with this kit, talk to your doctor Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol: Do The Two Mix? (part 1)

Diabetes And Alcohol: Do The Two Mix? (part 1)

A nice glass of Chianti…a cold beer on a hot summer day…celebrating with a flute of champagne. There are so many ways that alcohol is integrated into both everyday life and special occasions. Granted, not everyone drinks alcohol, but many people do. And when it comes to the question, "Can I drink alcohol if I have diabetes?" the answer is about as clear as that for "Is a low-carb diet good for diabetes?" In other words, the answer really is, "It depends!" It’s important to mention right off the bat that there are certainly many reasons why people should not drink alcohol. Some may be related to diabetes and some may be related to other reasons. Therefore, it’s important to discuss this issue with your health-care provider if you have any doubts or concerns. And if you’re newly diagnosed with diabetes or starting on a new medicine, it’s worthwhile bringing up the topic if your provider doesn’t. While you’d be hard-pressed to find any health organization actually recommending that you drink alcohol, you might take some comfort in knowing that the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association, and even the American Cancer Society agree that drinking alcohol in moderation is certainly not off-limits to most people. But back to diabetes and alcohol. What’s the concern here? And why should some people with diabetes not drink alcohol? To answer these questions, it’s helpful to understand a little bit about how alcohol is processed in the body. The body treats alcohol as a drug, not as a food product. This means that, when you drink any type of alcoholic beverage, your liver kicks into high gear, preparing itself to “detoxify” the body of this “poison” (I’m using these words for dramatic effect). Essentially, the liver has to metabo Continue reading >>

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