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Why Can T People With Diabetes Soak Their Feet?

Foot Care

Foot Care

Drugstore Do’s and Don’t’s Even with diabetes, your feet can last a lifetime, and they stand a better chance of doing so if you treat them with tender, loving care. That includes giving them a daily inspection for cuts and abrasions as well as asking your doctor to examine them periodically for any signs of nerve damage, such as loss of sensation, or reduced blood flow, such as coldness or hair loss on the feet and legs. The tools or products you use on your feet at home can have profound effects on their health, particularly if you have any degree of nerve damage or reduced blood flow in your feet. Using the right products can help to keep your skin – and feet – intact, while using the wrong ones can lead to breaks in the skin, which can allow bacteria to enter and, in the worst-case scenario, lead to foot ulcers. Here, then, is your guide to over-the-counter foot products, including some that are safe to use and some to avoid. Soap Washing your feet with warm or tepid water and soap every day keeps them clean and gives you a good chance to do that daily inspection. (If it’s hard to see your feet, run your fingers over them to feel for calluses or sore spots. The backs of your hands are sensitive to heat and can be run over your feet to find hot spots, which can indicate infection.) There must be at least 50 varieties of soap on the shelves of most drugstores – liquid soaps, solid bar soaps, scented soaps, unscented soaps, etc. Which to choose? In general, bar soaps are a better choice than liquid soaps, and soaps that have moisturizing lotion in them are the best choice of all. The compound in soap that gives it its lather is a fatty acid called lanolin, and the more lather, the softer the soap. In most cases, bar soaps have more lather than liquid. The Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Use A Foot Spa?

Can A Diabetic Use A Foot Spa?

For normal folks, foot spas are an awesome way to relax, melt away stress and get some therapeutic benefits too. But what if you have diabetes? Can a diabetic use a foot spa? The short and general answer is, sadly, No. If you have diabetes, soaking your foot for an extended period of time in warm or hot water is NOT recommended as diabetics have loss of feeling and sensation in their nerves and muscles. The problem with diabetic feet In the UK alone, 135 people a week undergo amputations due to diabetes. This can range from losing a toe or part of a foot in a minor amputation or having a foot or part of the leg totally cut off. The root cause is diabetics suffering from neuropathy or nerve damage. The symptoms are: loss of feeling or numbness pain or tingling wasting of the muscles Out of all the parts of the body, the feet are most affected by neuropathy because their nerves are the longest in the body. Loss of sensation is a huge problem. Pain is a signal for us when we hurt our body. If you can’t feel pain, you won’t know if your feet are already injured or hurt. Dr. Bresta Miranda-Palma of the Diabetes Research Institute recounts, “I’ve seen people walk on a nail for weeks until infection has developed.” When you have diabetic neuropathy, you are at risk for conditions ranging from sores, injuries, infections, and even gangrene. About 60 to 70% of those with diabetes are affected by neuropathy. You are at a higher risk for nerve disorders due to diabetes if you are older, have had it for longer, if you have problems controlling your blood sugar, or if you’re overweight. Why a diabetic should avoid foot soaks There are a handful of complications that can arise if a diabetic suffering from nerve damage, especially one who lives alone, soaks their feet for Continue reading >>

47 Podiatrists Share Tips On Good Foot Care For Those With Diabetes

47 Podiatrists Share Tips On Good Foot Care For Those With Diabetes

Here is exactly what we asked our panel of experts: What tips would you give to someone who is newly diagnosed? Why do you think a lot of people ignore their foot care when it comes to diabetes? Featured Answer Dr. Ira H. Kraus, President, American Podiatric Medical Association A1: The most important tip I would give to anyone newly diagnosed with diabetes is to include a podiatrist in your care team. That may seem like a self-serving tip! But independent studies show that when a podiatrist is involved in caring for a person with diabetes, that person’s risk of hospitalization and diabetes-related amputations goes down dramatically. Seeing a podiatrist once a year can help you prevent diabetic ulcers, and if you do develop an ulcer, seeing a podiatrist can help reduce the risk of amputation by up to 80 percent. I would also suggest that people newly diagnosed with diabetes simply pay close attention to their feet. Prevention can be the key. Watch your feet daily for any changes, and if you see something that concerns you, get in to see your podiatrist as soon as possible! A2: A diabetes diagnosis can be overwhelming. It comes with a lot of lifestyle changes and a lot of concerns. Our feet are literally the furthest things from our minds, so it’s not surprising that many people overlook them as they’re growing accustomed to living with diabetes. Also, many people don’t understand the serious complications diabetes can cause in the feet, and by the time they realize there’s a problem, it is a significant problem. People do not realize that simple things that they have been living with for years like: dry skin, athletes foot, skin fissures or calluses can lead to serious complications. The good news is that those small steps of examining your feet once a day and Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Tips For Daily Foot Care

Diabetes: Tips For Daily Foot Care

If you have diabetes, it's essential to make foot care part of your daily self-care routine. That's because "people can develop complications before they realize they even have a problem," says Bresta Miranda-Palma, MD, a professor with the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Medical School. "I've seen people walk on a nail for weeks until infection has developed." When feet and legs have nerve damage, a small cut or wound can go unnoticed. That's why it's critical to check for problems before they get infected and lead to serious complications -- like gangrene or amputation. "Daily foot care is the most important thing," says Miranda-Palma. "About 85% of amputations can be prevented if the patient gets a wound treated in time." That means checking your feet daily and seeing a foot doctor (podiatrist) every two or three months in order to catch problems early. Daily Care you might like Wash and dry your feet with mild soap and warm water. Dry your feet thoroughly, especially between the toes, an area more prone to fungal infections. Use lotion on your feet to prevent cracking, but don't put the lotion between your toes. Do not soak feet, or you'll risk infection if the skin begins to break down. And if you have nerve damage, take care with water temperature. You risk burning your skin if you can't feel that the water is too hot. Weekly Care Trim toenails straight across with a nail clipper. You can prevent ingrown toenails if you don't round the corners of the nails or cut down the sides. Smooth the nails with an emery board. Check the tops and bottoms of your feet, using a mirror if you need it; you can also ask someone else to check your feet for you. Also, be sure to get your feet examined at every doctor's visit. When examining your feet, look for Continue reading >>

If I Have Diabetes, Can I Take Epsom Salt Baths?

If I Have Diabetes, Can I Take Epsom Salt Baths?

While Epsom salt baths can be relaxing, they are not recommended for people with diabetes. Epsom salt is made up of magnesium sulfate. Why does that matter? When Epsom salts are added to a warm bath, some magnesium can be absorbed through the skin, causing an increased release of insulin, leading to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). What about just soaking your feet? This is still not recommended. People with diabetes tend to have poor circulation to their feet and toes, making it hard for sores and wounds to heal. Soaks can cause dryness and irritation to the feet and can lead to cracking and infection. These are perfect sources for bacteria to invade, causing infection. Always try to avoid products that may dry out your skin or cause irritation, and always talk to your doctor before trying new products. Continue reading >>

Can You Use Epsom Salts If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Use Epsom Salts If You Have Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, you should be aware of foot damage as a potential complication. Foot damage is often caused by poor circulation and nerve damage. Both of these conditions can be caused by high blood sugar levels over time. Taking good care of your feet can help lower your risk of foot damage. Although some people soak their feet in Epsom salt baths, this home remedy isn’t recommended for people with diabetes. Soaking your feet may raise your risk of foot problems. Talk to your doctor before soaking your feet in Epsom salts. Epsom salt is also called magnesium sulphate. It’s a mineral compound that’s sometimes used as a home remedy for sore muscles, bruises, and splinters. In some cases, people add Epsom salt to baths or tubs to soak in. If you have diabetes, talk to your doctor before soaking your feet in an Epsom salt bath. Soaking your feet may actually increase your risk of foot problems. It’s recommended that you wash your feet every day, but you shouldn’t soak them. Soaking can dry out your skin. This can cause cracks to form and lead to infections. Some people may recommend Epsom salts as a magnesium supplement. Instead, you should look for magnesium supplements designed for oral use. Check the vitamin and supplement aisle at your local pharmacy. People with diabetes often have low levels of magnesium, a mineral that plays an important role in your body. Research suggests that oral magnesium supplements may help improve blood sugar and blood cholesterol levels in some people with diabetes. Unless your doctor advises otherwise, avoid using Epsom salt footbaths. If you’re interested in oral magnesium supplements, ask your doctor for more information. They can help you assess the potential benefits and risks of taking them. They can also recommend a Continue reading >>

Vinegar For Feet Diabetes

Vinegar For Feet Diabetes

Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com It is very common to have some of feet problems when you are diabetic patient. You may suffer from sore and swelled feet, stinky feet, have warts, corns and calluses on feet, burning feet and other painful things happens with your feet. Intense feet care is very important in case of suffering from diabetes. You need to be very careful for your feet care on daily basis to avoid all these painful problems and discomforts of feet. You may rely on medicated products and ingredients to use for feet care. However, vinegar is such an excellent ingredient that is very effective in healing all feet problems faced by diabetic patients. Diabetic patients need to have this amazing ingredient every time at their homes to use for feet care and treatment. It is easily available, cheap and most convenient to use for multiple feet related problems and discomforts. Vinegar foot bath and foot soak treatment is one of the best home remedy to protect your feet from fungi and bacteria and other painful problems of feet like sore and swelled feet, stinky feet, calluses and corns on feet. Vinegar can stop growing bacteria and fungi in toenails and feet and can make you have clean, relaxed and smooth skin of feet. Vinegar foot soak or foot bath recipes are prepared in different ways i.e. using/adding different other ingredients with vinegar like essential oils, herbs, salts and some of medicated products. You can make any of good vinegar foot soak recipe using vinegar and any of other ingredients. Adding other ingredients would by your own choice as vinegar itself is sufficient to provide your feet with intense care and treatment for feet discomfor Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Amputations If You Have Diabetes

How To Avoid Amputations If You Have Diabetes

In people with diabetes, a trifecta of trouble can set the stage for amputations: Numbness in the feet due to diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage) can make people less aware of injuries and foot ulcers. These ulcers may fail to heal, which can in turn lead to serious infections. "Normally a person with an injury on the bottom of their foot, such as a blister, will change the way they walk. Your gait will alter because you are going to protect that blistered spot until it heals up," says Joseph LeMaster, MD, an assistant professor at the University of Missouri–Columbia School of Medicine. "People with a loss of sensation don't do that. They will just walk right on top of that blister as though it wasn't there. It can burst, become infected, and turn into what we call a foot ulcer," he says. "That ulceration can go right down to the bone and become an avenue for infection into the whole foot. That's what leads to amputations." Foot injuries are the most common cause of hospitalizations About 15% of all diabetics will develop a foot ulcer at some point and up to 24% of people with a foot ulcer need an amputation. You're at extra-high risk if you're black, Hispanic, or Native American. These minority populations are two to three times more likely to have diabetes than non-Hispanic whites, and their rates of amputations are higher. "It's the most common reason that someone's going to be hospitalized with diabetesnot for high blood sugar or a heart attack or a stroke," says David G. Armstrong, DPM, a specialist in diabetic foot disease at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science in North Chicago. "It's for a hole in the foot, a wound." About a year ago, Dr. Armstrong treated a 59-year-old man with type 2 diabetes who had been working out at a local health club; 12 Continue reading >>

Should People With Diabetes Soak Their Feet?

Should People With Diabetes Soak Their Feet?

Soaking your feet can help sooth the pain and relax the feet. Furthermore, a warm salty bath may be ideal for improving the blood circulation. But, what about preventing diabetic foot infections? Unfortunately, soaking diabetic feet might cause inflammation and increase the pain. Unlike tired feet, diabetic feet problems are chronic and cant be treated with a simple soak. Soaking can only help provide short-term pain relief. But, it cant be used for treating chronic pain. Furthermore, diabetic feet often have infections that require medical treatment. Therefore, it is best to consult with a doctor if you have persistent and reoccurring feet pain. Can a Person with Diabetes Use a Foot Spa? Sadly, if you have diabetes, soaking the feet for a long time is not effective for soothing the chronic pain. Furthermore, it might even damage the nerves and muscles. In fact, even if the feet become softer in the water, they became dry and cracked once you stop soaking them. In addition, when the water evaporates, the skin becomes drier than ever before. Plus, if you use herbs or salt balls in the water, the feet might even become drier. Why? Well, people with diabetes have drier feet than the people without it. Therefore, excessive drying from soaking can cause even more pain and skin cracks. Furthermore, there is a chance that warm water might even increase the inflammation. So, unless you are experiencing short-term feet pain, you shouldnt use a foot spa. Instead of a foot spa, you can use better treatment. Many doctors recommend moisturizing the feet with an ointment or a lotion. This will keep the feet moisturized and soft. The reason why foot spa may not be good for your health is that it can damage the nerves, which in turn can cause neuropathy . The symptoms of neuropathy ar Continue reading >>

A Tipton And Noblesville Foot Doctor Talks About When It Makes Sense For Diabetics To Soak Their Feet And When They Should Not.

A Tipton And Noblesville Foot Doctor Talks About When It Makes Sense For Diabetics To Soak Their Feet And When They Should Not.

Diabetics are often instructed or advised not to soak their feet. This advise does not necessarily apply to all diabetics, and foot soaking for relaxation is a luxury that many diabetics can enjoy from time to time. However, some caution is advised to protect a diabetic's skin from unnecessary harm. Diabetes already causes skin to become dry due to the way excess blood sugar harms the functioning of the nerves that control sweat glands. The act of soaking the foot in water makes this dryness even worse by drawing out the skins natural lubricating oils. This is specially true of Epsom salts. While many assume soaking is moisturizing the foot, it is in actuality drying it even further. Therefore, soaking the feet can cause harm to a diabetic's skin if done frequently enough by making the skin drier and more likely to crack, develop wounds, and allow bacteria to enter the body. An occasional soak will not cause these things, but regularly soaking will. Diabetics with open wounds should not soak their feet unless directed to do so by the physician treating the wound. Our doctors occasionally use special types of soaking as a treatment for certain wounds or infections. However, the routine use of unsterile water in a bathtub, foot soaker, hot tub, or whirlpool may worsen some wounds and wound infections, and soaking in these instances should not be performed unless directed to by the physician treating the wound. Hot water soaking is discouraged in diabetics due to a potential for a diabetic to scald their own skin. Diabetes can limit one's ability to properly feel temperature with their feet and legs, and even if one feels the water temperature with their arms (the hands can have the same feeling loss) the foot skin can become damaged by the water since the discomfort of st Continue reading >>

Foot Care For People With Diabetes

Foot Care For People With Diabetes

Please note: This information was current at the time of publication. But medical information is always changing, and some information given here may be out of date. For regularly updated information on a variety of health topics, please visit familydoctor.org, the AAFP patient education website. How does diabetes affect my body? Diabetes makes your blood sugar level higher than normal. A high blood sugar level can damage your blood vessels and nerves. Damage to the blood vessels in your feet may mean that your feet get less blood. Damage to the nerves may cause you to lose some of the feeling (sensation) in your feet. Why should I worry about my feet? People with diabetes often have foot problems. Part of the problem is that if you have any loss of feeling in your feet, it's hard to tell if you have a blister or sore. Sores may take a long time to heal. If foot sores aren't taken care of, you might get a foot ulcer (a very serious, deep sore). If the ulcer then gets infected, you may need to go to the hospital for treatment or even have part of your foot amputated (removed). The good news is that with proper care you can help prevent foot problems. How should I care for my feet to avoid serious problems? Careful control of your blood sugar is the key to avoiding foot problems. It may help to monitor (check) your blood sugar level every day at home (this is called blood glucose self-monitoring). Be sure to follow your doctor's advice on diet, exercise and medicine. Here are some other things you can do to take care of your feet if you have diabetes: Check your feet daily. Call your doctor if you have redness, swelling, infection, prolonged pain, numbness or tingling in any part of a foot. Wash your feet every day with lukewarm (not hot) water and mild soap. Dry your fee Continue reading >>

Should Diabetics Soak Their Feet?

Should Diabetics Soak Their Feet?

Diabetes can cause damage to nerves and blood vessels, which can lead to foot sores and infections. Nerve damage can cause a loss of feeling in the feet, and cuts and blisters may become unnoticed until they spread. There is some discussion of the benefits of soaking your feet to prevent infections, but it is not an effective preventative measure and can actually worsen symptoms. Tired, Aching Feet vs Diabetic Feet Foot-soaking is traditionally used to soothe tired and aching feet. Putting your feet in a warm, salty bath can relieve pain and improve blood circulation, but does it help prevent diabetic foot infections? Unfortunately, soaking diabetic feet can increase pain and exacerbate inflammation. Unlike tired and aching feet, diabetic foot problems are chronic and cannot be cured by a soak. Soaking is only appropriate for short-term pain relief, not as a treatment for chronic illness. Diabetic feet often have infections or inflammation that needs proper medical treatment. In addition, soaking dries out feet. While they soften in the water, feet become dry and cracked once removed. Once the water evaporates, the skin is left drier than before. This is especially true if the water has bath salts or herbs in it. Diabetics tend to have drier feet than non-diabetics in the first place, so excessive drying from a soak can increase cracks and pain. Also, warm water can increase inflammation. Unless you are experiencing short-term pain from excessive exercise or an injury, soaking will only make problems worse. A much better treatment for painful feet is moisturizing with a lotion or ointment. The information provided on battlediabetes.com is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between a patient/site visitor and his/her health professional. This i Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Epsom Salt – To Soak Or Not To Soak?

Diabetes & Epsom Salt – To Soak Or Not To Soak?

Epsom salt foot soaks are often encouraged for people with achy, tired feet. It is frequently used as a method to soothe aching muscles as well and may be added to a bath for pain relief. Some men and women even use Epsom salt as a source of magnesium supplementation. All of these uses are wonderful in their application, so why is Epsom salt not recommended for diabetes patients? This is due, in large part, to neuropathy and a lack of substantive proof that Epsom provides enough magnesium. What is Epsom salt? Epsom salt is a mineral compound whose scientific name is magnesium sulfate. Although it would seem that this alone is enough to warrant using it as a magnesium supplement, this particular format of magnesium is not easily absorbed. The “salt” is not actually salt, but a mineral with a texture similar to that of table salt. Epsom and Diabetes Epsom salt itself, while not an effective supplementation protocol, is not the greatest concern; instead, regular foot soaks are the real problem. For individuals without diabetes, a foot soak is a simple treat at the end of a long day. When diabetes is involved, however, a foot bath could lead to severe infection. A foot soak poses several problems, including the risk of drying feet out, compounding circulatory issues, and causing burns. Because diabetes increases the risk of developing neuropathy, the nerves in your feet and legs may not be functioning well enough to register dangerous temperatures which can cause burns. Neuropathy can also lead to an increased risk of dry, cracked feet and heels. Although this may seem to be a simple comfort or aesthetic problem, cracked feet can lead to serious infection. Because diabetes is often accompanied by poor circulation, your body cannot fight infection as effectively as those Continue reading >>

For Healthy Feet: Skip The Soak

For Healthy Feet: Skip The Soak

Soaking your feet may feel soothing and seem smart, but it isn't necessary — and it can be dangerous. In fact, if you have dry skin on your feet, they should never be soaked. Prolonged soaking opens small cracks in your skin where germs can get in. That's how infections get started. Soaking also removes your natural skin oils. Repeatedly wetting and drying your feet can worsen dry skin problems, especially if you don't replenish lost moisture afterwards. For these reasons, soaking is not recommended. From a health point of view, the risks of soaking your feet outweigh the benefits. If you're a diehard fan of foot baths and can't give them up, save them for when you don't have any wounds on your feet. Make sure the water isn't too hot, and don't let your feet stay submerged for too long (they shouldn't shrivel). Use a moisturizing lotion afterwards. Continue reading >>

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