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Whole Wheat Waffles For Diabetics

Fluffy Whole Wheat Waffles

Fluffy Whole Wheat Waffles

Ok, speak up. Whens the last time you had a truly phenomenal, omg-Im-going-to-cry-these-are-so-good waffle? But seriously. Name your last great waffle. I dont even think I can remember it. Maybe last year when I made my recipe for buttermilk waffles again? But I honestly dont think Ive used my waffle maker in our new house. In fact, I had to search boxes in the basement for it to test this recipe. WAFFLES ARE UNDERRATED! Why dont we make them more often?? Face it theyre better than pancakes. Waffles have nooks and crannies for maximum melted butter and maple syrup storage. You dont have to stand there and flip each individual one; the waffle maker does all the work for ya. When done right, waffles are a texture freaks dream; theyre crisp on the edges, but soft in the centers. I dont even want to dream about a crispy pancake. I think that just means burnt. A burnt pancake. So yeah, waffles vs pancakes. Theres really no contest. I suppose the reason I dont make waffles often is because they arent the healthiest way to begin the day. And arent those the rules? Always start healthy? ish? And if Im going to splurge before 12pm, its going to be a plate of big giant cinnamon rolls or frosted donuts with enough rainbow sprinkles to make a unicorn jealous. But that all changed last month. I had a hankering for waffles one weekend. Didnt feel like starting my day with a plate of empty calories, so I worked on a whole wheat version. Turns out, its pretty difficult to produce a whole wheat waffle thats not only crisp on the edges, but soft and airy in the centers. Not too dense, not too heavy. Light and fluffy like the white flour version. Its a tall order, but the secret lies within the ratio of ingredients. You see, whole wheat flour is much heartier than all-purpose; it weighs Continue reading >>

Solution For The Diabetic’s Breakfast Dilemma: 7 Low-carb Breakfast Ideas For The Weekend!

Solution For The Diabetic’s Breakfast Dilemma: 7 Low-carb Breakfast Ideas For The Weekend!

We always hear that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. But in so many ways, it is also the hardest meal of the day if you have diabetes. Most people can grab a muffin, juice and coffee and call it good. For many a quick bowl of cereal makes a sturdy meal to start the day. Some find a power bar the answer to a quick breakfast. Others can’t start their morning without a donut or Danish. For those of with diabetes, these choices may be too high in carbohydrates and while starting our morning off with a bang, may shoot our reading into the sky. Truth is that on workdays, I have a slice of low carbohydrate bread, (Sara Lee “delightful” or Arnold Double Fiber) a 4 ounce glass of Trop 50 juice and some really good coffee. But that is what I have time for in the morning. Some mornings, I do switch it up and have some “Cinnamon Sugarless” (I make it in batches, four parts sugar substitute to one part ground cinnamon) toast. While it makes a nice “sweet” change, I find I am hungrier by 10 a.m. than when I have the protein from the cheese. Two other “weekday” choices are maybe a better choice. You can make a crustless breakfast quiche, cut it into four good sized portions and have it for the week. All you have to do it pop it into the toaster oven or microwave and you are good to go. You can take that same mixture and bake it in muffin tins and that wonderful egg (and vegetable?) goodness is ready to go to work with you. Then there is the weekend. Time to splurge and have much more fun. Here are 7 deliciously low-carb breakfasts for the weekend: Greek Yogurt and Berries: Most of the Greek Style yogurts are fairly low in (carbohydrates 11-15 grams for Yoplait, Dannon, and Oikos), especially the vanilla and plain varieties. I like to top these with fr Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Mom is still right: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, especially when you have type 2 diabetes. Your diabetes diet needs to give you a healthy supply of energy to jumpstart your body in the morning. "Remember that first thing in the morning, you’ve gone many hours without eating and your body needs fuel," says Kelly O'Connor, RD, director of diabetes education at the endocrinology center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "If you’re not giving it any, it will create its own in the form of stored blood sugar that gets released into your bloodstream — which often results in blood sugar that’s too high." Healthy breakfast food is also a must when it comes to diabetes control and weight management. “Remember that when your body is fasting, you’re not giving it any energy, so it slows down to conserve what it has left, which is counterproductive," O'Connor says. The trick is to keep your metabolism going all day long at a steady rate. "The simple solution to both of these issues is to eat a good breakfast," she says. Avoiding Breakfast Mistakes Breakfast blunders can happen during the week when you wake up late and try eating breakfast while running out the door, or on the weekend when you go out for a big breakfast. However, the biggest mistake to avoid is skipping breakfast altogether. When you go too long without eating, your body goes into starvation mode. And when you finally give in to hunger later in the day (and probably overeat), your body will grab all the fat from your meal and store it. That's bad for anyone, especially for someone with type 2 diabetes. Here are some other breakfast mistakes to avoid: Don’t fly on a sugar high. If you don't have a lot of time in the morning for healthy breakfast foods, you may be tempted to wolf do Continue reading >>

How To Add Whole Grains To Your Diet

How To Add Whole Grains To Your Diet

Having diabetes doesn't mean you need to give up every piece of bread or dish of pasta. You can still enjoy foods made with grains, as long as you make them whole grains. Whole grains are packed with fiber, which can help lower your cholesterol and reduce your heart disease risk . Fiber slows digestion and the absorption of carbohydrates and may not raise your blood sugar as quickly as refined grains. And because whole grains help you feel fuller for longer, they can help you manage your weight . Although its best to get fiber from food sources such as whole grains, fiber supplements can also help you increase your fiber intake. Examples include psyllium and methylcellulose. Be sure to increase your fiber intake slowly to help prevent gas and cramping. Its also important to also increase the amount of liquids that you drink. The easiest way to eat more whole grains is to make a few switches in your diet, such as swapping out white bread and rice for whole wheat bread and brown rice. Also, try these tips: Add grains like barley and bulgur wheat to soups, stews, salads, and casseroles to add texture. When you bake breads or muffins, instead of white flour use half whole wheat flour and half oat, amaranth, or buckwheat flour. You can also use these whole-grain flours in pancakes and waffles. Instead of having crackers for a snack, eat popcorn, which is a whole grain. Just skip the butter and salt. Unsweetened whole-grain cereal makes another good snack option. Make quinoa your side dish instead of rice. You can also use quinoa as a coating for shrimp and chicken instead of flour or breadcrumbs. Finding whole-grain foods in your supermarket can be tricky. Some foods that appear to contain whole grains really dont. You need to look carefully at food labels. Don't be fooled Continue reading >>

Diabetic Waffle Recipes

Diabetic Waffle Recipes

Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Christmas Pretzel Calories Each waffle is approx six grams of carbs. They taste very close to a regular waffle. Top with low calorie syrup or fruit.Submitted by: FLUFFY22801 CALORIES: 186.6 | FAT: 10.4g | PROTEIN: 17.4g | CARBS: 6g | FIBER: 2.2g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the High-Protein, Low-Carb Waffles Calories Recipe revised 1/5/09Submitted by: ANTIOCHIA CALORIES: 343 | FAT: 20.5g | PROTEIN: 6.4g | CARBS: 38.3g | FIBER: 5.5g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Pecan-Oat Waffles Calories These seasonal waffles are easy to make and are packed with protein and fiber. The perfect fall or winter breakfast!Submitted by: COACH_NICOLE CALORIES: 251.4 | FAT: 4g | PROTEIN: 9.6g | CARBS: 48.5g | FIBER: 7.5g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Coach Nicole's Pumpkin & Apple Waffles Calories I adopted this from a recipe in Joy of Cooking. I made several changes and the family was so happy I don't think I'd do a thing different! I subbed skim milk for buttermilk, applesauce for oil, and flaxseed for wheat bran.Submitted by: OAKBORN CALORIES: 126.8 | FAT: 2.5g | PROTEIN: 4.9g | CARBS: 22.9g | FIBER: 2.6g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Honey Flaxseed Whole Wheat Applesauce Waffles Calories Turn any morning into a special occasion in just 30 minutes. Pair with fresh fruit and a cup of milk for a complete meal. Submitted by: CHEF_MEG CALORIES: 291.8 | FAT: 14.5g | PROTEIN: 9.6g | CARBS: 30.7g | FIBER: 4.6g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Whole-Wheat Pecan Waffles or Pancakes Calories This recipe baisically follows that on the box of Bisquick Heart Smart mix but replaces vegetable oil with apple sauceSubmitted by: SCORBITT CALORIES: 135.2 | FAT: 2.6g | PROTEIN: 4.5g | Continue reading >>

Free Diabetic Recipe: Chicken And Whole Grain Waffles

Free Diabetic Recipe: Chicken And Whole Grain Waffles

FREE DIABETIC RECIPE: Chicken and Whole Grain Waffles Chicken and waffles may look unusual, but its truly one of the most flavorful dishes around. This recipe allows you to explore the wide range of sweet, spicy, and savory flavor notes this unique combination has to offer. Whether you have it for breakfast or for dinner, your palate is going to be pleased. Calories: 400Fat: 10 g,Cholesterol: 90 mg,Sodium: 455 mg,Carbohydrate: 44 g,Sugar: 5 g, Fiber: 5 g, Protein: 35 g 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts Preheat your oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Coat a baking sheet with cooking spray and set aside. Add the whole wheat flour in a small bowl. Whisk together the hot sauce and egg whites in a second small bowl. Mix together the corn meal, salt, and pepper in a third small bowl. Slice the chicken breasts lengthwise into 1-inch thick strips, which should make around 15 strips. Dredge each strip in the flour and shake off the excess. Dip in the egg white, and then coat in the corn meal, and lay on the prepped baking sheet. Once the strips are coated, spray each strip with cooking spray on both sides. Bake for 20 minutes. While the chicken is cooking, preheat a waffle iron according to its directions and set it to high. Whisk together the milk, yogurt, egg, and oil in a small bowl. Sift together the baking soda, baking powder, and whole wheat flour in a large bowl. Whip the egg whites in another bowl until stiff peaks form. Mix the wet and dry ingredients together until theyre combined. Gently fold in the whipped egg whites until theyre combined. Cook the waffles according the waffle irons instructions. ( cup of batter will produce 4-inch square waffles.) Cook the waffles until theyre dark golden brown. You can top the dish with kicked up syrup. To do so, mix 5 table Continue reading >>

Whole Grain Chicken And Waffles

Whole Grain Chicken And Waffles

Heres a lighter version of a usually deep-fried, high carbohydrate, high-calorie meal. Note that youll need a waffle iron to make this dish. 2 waffles (4-inch square) + 3 chicken strips Choices/Exchanges: 3 Starch, 4 Lean protein Breakfast Foodie Lunch Main Dish High in Fiber Comfort Food Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Coat a baking sheet with cooking spray. Set aside. In a small bowl, add the whole wheat flour. In a second small bowl, whisk together the egg whites and hot sauce. In a third small bowl, mix together the corn meal, salt (optional), and pepper. Slice chicken breasts lengthwise into 1-inch thick strips (this should make 15 strips). Dredge each strip in the flour (and shake off the excess), then dip in the egg white, then coat in the corn meal, and lay on the prepared baking sheet. Once all of the chicken strips are coated, spray each strip with cooking spray on both sides. Bake for 20 minutes. While the chicken is cooking, preheat a waffle iron according to manufacturer directions (set it to high). In a small bowl, whisk together the egg, milk, yogurt, and oil. In a large bowl, sift together the baking soda, whole wheat flour and baking powder. In another bowl, whip the egg whites to stiff peaks. Mix the wet ingredients into dry ingredients until combined. Gently fold in the whipped egg whites until combined. Cook the waffles according to your waffle iron instructions. For 4-inch square waffles, each waffle uses 1/2 cup batter. Cook the waffles until they are dark golden brown. Serve two waffles with 3 strips of chicken. Continue reading >>

Oat Waffles - Recipes For Diabetics

Oat Waffles - Recipes For Diabetics

Oat flour, or ground old-fashioned oatmeal, is a good source of soluble fiber. Many people use oat flour for their baking because it is gluten-free. Gluten is a protein that makes dough elastic and baked goods chewy. Oat flour alone can leave your baked goods crumbly and heavy. This recipe combines oat flour with white whole wheat flour*. The addition of white whole wheat flour helps make these waffles more substantial and fluffy and the apple cider vinegar replaces the rise you would get from buttermilk. This recipe can easily be doubled. 2 Tbs coconut oil, melted and cooled (or 1 oz by weight) 1 cup almond milk, unsweetened and at room temperature Heat a waffle iron according to manufacturer's directions. Whisk together the oat flour, whole wheat white flour, stevia, baking powder, salt, baking soda and cinnamon in a medium bowl. Whisk in the unsweetened almond milk and the melted coconut oil. Add the wet ingredients to the dry and stir just until all the dry ingredients are combined. The mixture will be a little lumpy. Rest the batter for 5 minutes. The batter will thicken and bubble as it sits. Ladle 1/2 cup of waffle batter into the hot iron, using the highest setting. Close the iron top and cook until the waffle is golden on both sides, approximately 1 minute 45 seconds. Serve immediately or keep warm in a preheated 200 degree F oven until ready to serve. Serve with 1/2 cup fresh blueberries or fruit of your choice, and maple syrup, if desired. *The bran of white whole wheat is not only lighter in color but it's also milder in flavor. It is a whole wheat flour, containing the bran, germ and endosperm made from white wheat. Many grocery stores carry the King Arthur brand. It can also be ordered from the company's website . Per serving (1 waffle): Calories: 146; Pr Continue reading >>

Eggo Waffles Other Carbs | Diabetic Connect

Eggo Waffles Other Carbs | Diabetic Connect

I surfed google for an answer and www.askdrsears.com had this explanation: Other carbohydrates: This line reveals the number of grams of complex carbohydrates, not including fiber, but including non-digestible additives, such as stabilizers and thickening agents. Theoretically, this number should reflect the amount of the more nutritious sugars, that is the ones naturally present in the food. Reading between the lines. As a general guide, the greater the discrepancy between "total carbohydrates" and "sugar," on the label, the more nutritious carbohydrates the food contains. This means that the package contains more of the food's natural sugars than added sugars. The closer the number of grams of "sugar" is to the "total carbohydrates" in each serving, the closer the food gets to the junk quality (sort of like junk bonds they are a risky investment). The "total carbs" minus the "sugar" value is particularly helpful in comparing the nutritional value of cereals. For example, a serving of regular All-Bran contains 24 grams of total carbohydrates and 6 grams of sugars, resulting in 18 grams of potentially healthy carbohydrates. A serving of Fruit Loops, on the other hand, contains 28 grams of total carbohydrates, 15 grams of which are sugars - over 50 percent of the total carbohydrates in Fruit Loops are added sweeteners, versus 25 percent in All-Bran. When comparing juice labels, you will notice that even in "100 percent juice" the total carb and the sugar values are the same, since juice is nearly all natural sugar. When you're buying cereal, bread, or crackers, you are looking for complex carbohydrates without a lot of added sugar. There is no line in the "Nutrition Facts" listing for complex carbohydrates, but you can get a rough idea of the amount of healthy carbs in Continue reading >>

Healthy Frozen Waffles - Cooking Light

Healthy Frozen Waffles - Cooking Light

Compared to just a handful of years ago, many more frozen waffles today are made with whole grains. That means they're good sources of fiber, as well as other nutrients. and a much healthier grab-and-go breakfast pick than sugar-sweetened cereal and milk. Plus, there's plenty of other options to top them with besides maple syrup. Span both sweet and savory waffle toppers with nut butters, a melted cheese slice and lightly dressed salad greens, rotisserie chicken, and fresh fruit among many other ideas. To pick the best frozen waffles, we taste tested dozens of brands. Our nutrition editor set strict guidelines for eliminating less-healthy options (see below for Things to Look for on Labels). Any waffles that did not meet these requirements were eliminated. Each waffle was cooked according to individual package directions. Waffles were tasted hot and fresh by panel of Cooking Light editors and staff. Initial favorites were selected, and then the tasting panel ranked each favorite to create this final list of winners. Struggling to cook healthy? We'll help you prep. Sign up for our new weekly newsletter, ThePrep, for inspiration and support for all your meal plan struggles. These sweet waffles are toasty on the outside with a fluffy, pillowy texture on the inside making them good all the way around and our unanimous favorite. Another plus: we think their mild flavor willplease those who like whole grains, as well as those who think they don't. $2.99 for a box of 6, vegan Calories 160; Fat 4.5g (sat 1g); Protein 4g; Carb 28g; Fiber 6g; Sugars 3g; Chol 0mg; Iron 1mg; Sodium 280mg; Calc 20mg Earth's Best Organic Mini Blueberry Waffles Though they were designed as an option for kids and feature Cookie Monster on the packaging, we found that adults like these organic waffles' Continue reading >>

Weekday Waffles (low Carb, Grain-free, Diabetic-friendly)

Weekday Waffles (low Carb, Grain-free, Diabetic-friendly)

Weekday Waffles (Low Carb, Grain-Free, Diabetic-Friendly) These fluffy, gluten-free, nutrient-packedwaffles will get you excited about breakfast again. Biting into the lightlysweet, bread-like interiors, youd think these golden brown Eggo knock offs were made from white flour. Not true! Coconut flour, cashews, and a little bit of arrowroot starch (thepowdered form ofa root vegetable) blend up to createa batter that makes these wafflesequals partdelicious and nourishing. Although they look fancy and time-consuming to make, these homemade waffles are as simple as tossing the ingredients in a blender and whirling them into a smooth batter. It takes me all of 10 minutes to prep the batter, and another five for the cooking. We use and love a waffle iron similar to thisone . It not only cooks up a crispy waffle, but it makes a mean cauli-hash brown but thats a recipe for another post! The name Weekday Waffles comes from the superb freeze-ability of these toothsome treats.You can make up a big batch on Sundayfora quickbreakfastduring bleary-eyed weekday mornings. Its comforting, nutritious fast food. This nourishingwaffle batter is made from cashews, coconut flour, and arrowroot. The cashews give it a more bread-like texture than coconut flour, and the arrowroot gives it some lift. Im finding that sugar-free breads are best with a little bit of starch to improve the texture. Tapioca also works well here. Arrowroot and tapioca are largely interchangeablewhen used in small amounts in baked goods. In spite of the fact that the starch adds carbs, the overall carb count is low per waffle,makingthese waffles a super tasty diabetic-friendly breakfast option. Cashews are a bit of luxury item. I buy them in bulk for cost savings. Food To Live ismy preferred brand of cashews on Amazon Continue reading >>

Whole Wheat Waffles Recipe | King Arthur Flour

Whole Wheat Waffles Recipe | King Arthur Flour

Great base whole wheat waffle recipe. I prefer the nutty flavor of whole wheat to boring white flour waffles. As someone else mentioned, this recipe is great to adapt. Use buttermilk if you have it or add fresh chopped pears (2) , walnuts (1/3 c) and cinnamon (1 teas). The recipe makes a great batter and fluffy waffles. Unfortunately, I have a problem with waffles, pancakes and biscuits. They are just bland. It doesn't matter what type of flour I use. In the end, they all taste like flour. More butter seems to help a little, but it's still not that great. These is my favorite waffle recipe and have been making for several years. When I have buttermilk that needs to be used I substitute some for the milk. They freeze well when wrapped individually and toast up perfectly. Fresh is best but we know how busy things can be. They are delicious with jam or maple syrup (only pure) and fresh berries. Thank you KAF We love these waffles exactly as they are, but my husband has requested blueberries be added next time. Any suggestions on how to do that without ruining a wonderful waffle recipe? Steph, sometimes it helps to add blueberries that are semi-frozen to help them keep their shape and prevent them from breaking in the batter. The one catch to this method is that it can stain your batter and leave purple streaks, if this is something you care about. Another tactic is to prepare the batter as directed, spoon it into your waffle maker, add a few berries and then top off with more batter. Last approach? Make your waffles as you usually would and then garnish with a simple blueberry sauce: cook down your berries over medium heat with a bit of sugar and lemon juice to taste. Happy baking! [email protected] This recipe is amazing! I added 1/4 cup of peanut butter. It made it delicously nut Continue reading >>

5 Reasons To Switch To Whole Wheat Waffles

5 Reasons To Switch To Whole Wheat Waffles

5 Reasons to Switch to Whole Wheat Waffles 5 Reasons to Switch to Whole Wheat Waffles Waffles are quite possibly one of the pillars of human achievement. Nothing says, Good morning and Get ready for the best day ever like a fluffy, golden waffle. Waffles are a convenient, delicious and fast morning breakfast solution. Now, with Food For Lifes whole wheat waffles, they can also be a smart, healthy source of life changing nutrition. Here are five reasons to switch to Food For Lifes whole wheat waffles today. 1. Our Whole Wheat Waffles Have Sprouted Whole Grains and Legumes You can find organic waffles but none with the quality of ingredients we use. Food For Lifes healthy waffles also contain sprouted whole grains and legumes, which are a much healthier alternative to white flour or whole grain flour waffles. The best part about sprouted whole grain waffles over any other waffle is that they are easier to digest, minerals and antioxidants are increased in absorption, and the vitamin C and vitamin B ingredient ratio is much higher. 2. Our Whole Wheat Waffles Are Nutritional When you buy frozen waffles from the store, typical ingredients include, white flour, salt, baking powder, sugar, eggs, milk, vegetable oils and many other flavorings, gums, and preservatives. One of these preservatives might be Tertiary butylhydroquinone, or TBHQ, which has a controversial reputation. TBHQ is evaluated by both the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and it is found that the concentration of TBHQ allowed in foods, an upper limit of 0.02% of the fat or oil content in foods, is safe to consume. In concentrations higher than this, TBHQ can cause adverse effect on the health. Various symptoms which can occur due to consuming high d Continue reading >>

Whole-wheat Peanut Butter Waffles

Whole-wheat Peanut Butter Waffles

I changed the recipe to one half whole wheat and rest white flour. Very filling...They were light I texture but short on flavor...I ended up thinking I would rather have had buttermilk pancakes...I give my varied recipe a B- grade I was looking for a quick and healthful waffle recipe this morning that would make use of ingredients I had on hand. I'm glad I tried these - I thought they turned out great. My husband and 3-year-old really liked them as well. I followed the recipe exactly, and just used a "heaping" 1/2 cup of PB since other reviewers said they liked it with more. I also used agave instead of sugar. Waffles baked up perfectly in a Belgian Waffle iron, no sticking, and tasted great. They are not overly sweet which was fine with me. Put the rest in the freezer to save for busy mornings when I can just pop them in the toaster! I recommend this recipe for a healthful and still delicious and indulgent breakfast. Very dry and way too much wheat flavor. The peanut butter did not come through. With all of the other great waffle recipes out there, no reason to try to fix this one. The concept isgreat, but there issomething lackinghere. The flavor isa little flat; Ithink it lackssweetness. I'm nottalkingsugary-sweet, justthat little bit ofresidual sweetnessthat any good wafflehas. IF I make thisagain, we would topit with ice cream asa dessert waffle.But as a Sundaymorning breakfastwaffle, we've hadmuch better. No flavor,strange texture. First epicurious recipe that I've been thoroughly disappointed with. I made "breakfast for dinner"tonight with these and put them inthe Belgian waffle maker andeveryone loved them! I substitutedsunbutter (sunflower seed butter)for the peanut butter and agavenectar for the sugar and it workedout great. We topped them withraspberries, st Continue reading >>

Diabetic Friendly Belgium Waffles Recipes

Diabetic Friendly Belgium Waffles Recipes

Diabetic Friendly Belgium Waffles Recipes Member Recipes for Diabetic Friendly Belgium Waffles This recipe is Diabetic friendlySubmitted by: ALICEG1018 CALORIES: 306.1 | FAT: 5.5g | PROTEIN: 34.9g | CARBS: 27.5g | FIBER: 3.8g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Tuna Melt Calories Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Christmas Pretzel Calories Each waffle is approx six grams of carbs. They taste very close to a regular waffle. Top with low calorie syrup or fruit.Submitted by: FLUFFY22801 CALORIES: 186.6 | FAT: 10.4g | PROTEIN: 17.4g | CARBS: 6g | FIBER: 2.2g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the High-Protein, Low-Carb Waffles Calories These are the richest brownies I've ever made/tasted- no need for chocolate chips! This is a pantry raid goodie :)Submitted by: FETZEJ25 CALORIES: 87 | FAT: 2.9g | PROTEIN: 1.3g | CARBS: 15g | FIBER: 1.1g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Cocoa Brownies Calories Recipe revised 1/5/09Submitted by: ANTIOCHIA CALORIES: 343 | FAT: 20.5g | PROTEIN: 6.4g | CARBS: 38.3g | FIBER: 5.5g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Pecan-Oat Waffles Calories These seasonal waffles are easy to make and are packed with protein and fiber. The perfect fall or winter breakfast!Submitted by: COACH_NICOLE CALORIES: 251.4 | FAT: 4g | PROTEIN: 9.6g | CARBS: 48.5g | FIBER: 7.5g Full ingredient & nutrition information of the Coach Nicole's Pumpkin & Apple Waffles Calories I adopted this from a recipe in Joy of Cooking. I made several changes and the family was so happy I don't think I'd do a thing different! I subbed skim milk for buttermilk, applesauce for oil, and flaxseed for wheat bran.Submitted by: OAKBORN CALORIES: 126.8 | FAT: 2.5g | PROTEIN: 4.9g | CARBS: 22.9g | FIBER: 2.6g Full ingredient & nutrition inform Continue reading >>

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