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Whole Grains For Diabetes

Enjoying The Best Grains For Diabetes – Your Healthy Kitchen

Enjoying The Best Grains For Diabetes – Your Healthy Kitchen

If you have diabetes, should you stop eating bread, rice and pasta? While everyone with diabetes (and pre-diabetes) benefits from eliminating processed grains from their diet (foods like white rice, cold cereals, white bread and snack foods), some individuals benefit from avoiding whole grain products as well. Others can lose weight and normalize blood sugar levels while still enjoying grains. However, if you eat grains, it’s important to be picky about the type and portion size of the grains you choose. Individuals who have difficulty losing weight and controlling blood sugar levels sometimes benefit from eliminating all grains, including whole grains, from their diets for a while. Whole and processed grains contain an easily digested type of starch that can trigger spikes in blood sugar levels after meals, leading to weight gain and many of the complications of diabetes. Some people find that they can add whole grains back into their diets after they reach their weight and blood sugar goals. Others with diabetes can maintain good health while still enjoying grains, but find that it is important to eat only whole grains, and in moderate quantities. Serving grains as a side dish, or about ¼ of a meal, is a helpful strategy that lends itself to healthy weight management and blood sugar control. So what are whole grains and why are they nutritionally superior to processed grains? All true grains, including rice, wheat, barley and corn, are seeds that come from different types of grasses. A whole grain consists of three basic components: an outer layer called the bran, a starchy center called the endosperm, and a tiny, oil-packed germ, which is the part of the seed which sprouts and grows into a new plant. There is also an area just under the Bran, where many important Continue reading >>

Five Common Grain Myths

Five Common Grain Myths

There’s a good chance that, at one point or another, you’ve wondered about eating certain foods. If you have diabetes, foods that contain carbohydrate (also known as carb) come to mind. And one type of carb food that never fails to spark debate is grains. There’s the camp that disparages most grains, in general, proclaiming that they’re bad for diabetes because they’ll send your blood sugars sky-high. On the more moderate side of things, the argument is that refined grains are to be avoided, but whole grains are OK (in limited amounts). And then there’s the rest of the folks who feel thoroughly confused. Is it OK to eat pasta? What the heck is farro, anyway? Read on to learn more. Whole grains defined According to the Oldways Whole Grains Council, a whole grain has “all three parts of the original grain — the starchy endosperm, the fiber-rich bran, and the germ.” The bran is the outer layer of the grain; the germ is the “embryo,” which contains B vitamins, vitamin E, phytonutrients, antioxidants, and fat, and the endosperm is the germ’s food source that contains carbohydrate, protein, and some vitamins and minerals. Once a food manufacturer starts stripping away any part of a whole grain, it’s no longer, well, whole. Now it’s refined. And that’s when the grain starts to lose many of its healthy attributes. Whole-grain myths People who have diabetes should avoid all grains and grain foods. This particular fallacy stems from the fact that grains contain carbohydrate. Carbohydrate (in many people’s minds) is bad. They raise your blood sugar, right? So, stay away from them. But, it’s not that simple, at least when it comes to grains. As we just learned, whole grains are packed with nutrition — carb, yes, but also some protein, fat, vitami Continue reading >>

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes is a serious medical condition that puts you at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is also very treatable, and if you have it, there is a good chance you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by making changes in your diet and increasing your level of physical activity. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body does not produce or use enough insulin to be able to turn glucose into energy. Glucose is the sugar and starch that comes from the food you eat, which fuels your body. Insulin is a hormone that carries glucose from your blood into your cells. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in your blood and can cause serious health problems. Pre-Diabetes Pre-diabetes is when your fasting blood glucose (blood sugar) level is above normal. To test for pre-diabetes, your doctor will take a sample of your blood after you have fasted overnight: Normal fasting glucose: 60 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) Pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose): 100 to 125 mg/dl Diabetes: 126 mg/dl or higher on 2 occasions Healthy Tips for Preventing Type 2 Diabetes If you have pre-diabetes, you should talk to your doctor about developing a lifestyle plan to reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends increased physical activity and, if you are overweight, losing 5-10 percent of your body weight. Your doctor may also want you to take medication if you have a family history of diabetes, you are obese, or have other cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, or a history of heart disease). Below are tips to help you keep pre-diabetes from progressing to Type 2 diabetes: Exercise Every Day Since muscles use glucose for energy, activities like walking, bicycling, and gardening Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

Is bread an option for people with diabetes? Food may be one of life’s simple pleasures, but for people with diabetes, deciding what to eat can get complicated. Foods that contain a lot of carbohydrates can spike blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates are found in many different kinds of food, including desserts, grains, and bread. Giving up carbs completely isn’t realistic, healthy, or even necessary. What matters is that you’re aware of your carb intake and make nutritious food choices. Breads can often be high in carbs. Some are overly processed, high in sugar, and filled with empty calories. Healthier options can be part of a satisfying meal plan for people with diabetes. If you’re trying to figure out which breads work best for diabetes management, this information may help. When a person has diabetes, their body doesn’t make or use enough insulin to process food efficiently. Without enough insulin, blood sugar levels can spike. People with diabetes may also have high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. This means that it’s important to keep an eye on fat and sugar intake. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin injections daily and follow a specific type of eating plan. This eating plan is geared towards keeping blood sugar levels low. People with type 2 diabetes often follow an eating and exercise regimen geared towards reducing blood sugar. If diet and exercise aren’t enough to control blood sugar, insulin injections or oral medication may be a part of a daily regimen. Creating a food plan, making smart nutritional choices, and watching carbohydrate intake is recommended for people with both types of diabetes. Creating a meal plan can help people with diabetes control blood sugar and provide satisfying nutrition. There isn’t a one-size-fits-a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Whole Grains

Diabetes And Whole Grains

Whole grains are found in wheat, oats, barley, maize and brown rice People with diabetes are often advised to eat a good selection of whole grain food. However, people are often confused as to what counts as whole grain. Much of the produce which many of us have grown up with consists of refined wheat products lacking very much of the nutrition within better whole grain equivalents. If you have wheat or grain based foods, try to find whole grain varieties. They will be better for your sugar levels as well as your health in general. Whole grain foods are found in cereals such as wheat, oats, barley, maize, rye and brown rice, amongst others. The grain is made up of three constituent parts: Germ: the germ is the reproductive part of the grain and is packed with nutrients Endosperm: accounts for about 80% of the grain, this is the starchy part Bran: the fibre rich outside (shell) of the grain Much food sold these days is made from highly refined flour and wheat products. The more refined the food is, the less nutrition it carries. White bread for example is made from highly refined flour which has very little nutritional value as the refining process strips out much of the vitamins. Furthermore, products that are highly refined, such as white bread, are very quickly turned into glucose by the body and therefore they are best avoided by those with diabetes . For food to count as whole grain, it should include each of the three parts (germ, endosperm and bran). However, shop produce can make it very difficult to tell what is actually whole grain. Be wary of terms like wholemeal, granary and multigrain as these offer no guarantee that the bread is made from whole grains. Look instead for use of the term whole grain or wholegrain. As a general guide, look for items such as th Continue reading >>

Whole Grains And Diabetes

Whole Grains And Diabetes

Be on The Lookout For Rubbish Information rubbish articles like this, which are everywhere written by a dietitian, someone that should have their facts straight. The beginning of the articles says: YES, type 1 and type 2 diabetics should eat whole grains. But it then goes on to give research based on reducing risk and how carbs are the thing that has the biggest impact on blood sugar so IT DOESN'T MAKE SENSE! That's just bad information in my opinion. Are people actually thinking about this when they write things? I just feel like people are insulting your intelligence. Seriously, if you had the right information would you work to change your diet? I bet you would because you want to feel better. Just because people do commonly consume grains doesn't mean they have to. And it also doesn't mean we should keep recommending it just because that's what people commonly eat! Diabetics want, and more importantly need to know what to eat to improve their health, period! Sure, it's tough to get to the bottom of it. But, can these dietitians and health organizations just stop regurgitating the status quo and present a properly constructed evidence based argument? Anyway, now that I've said my bit, let's get back on point. Evidence Behind Whole Grains for Diabetes TREATMENT There is VERY limited evidence that whole grains are actually good for diabetic treatment. study took 11 obese subjects (note these are not diabetic and 11 is a very small study). The people had hyperinsulinemia meaning they had insulin resistance and were prediabetic. They did find that insulin was 10% lower in the whole grain diet compared to the refined grain diet (well it doesn't take science to reach that conclusion). common argument is that grains are low glycemic index (GI) and low GI helps diabetes. Ag Continue reading >>

Whole-grain Intake And The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Study In Men

Whole-grain Intake And The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Study In Men

Whole-grain intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective study in men From the Programs in Nutrition, Simmons College, Boston (TTF); the Departments of Nutrition (TTF, FBH, MJS, and WCW) and Epidemiology (FBH, MJS, GAC, and WCW), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston; the Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, and the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (MAP); and the Division of Preventive Medicine (SL) and the Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine (FBH, MJS, GAC, and WCW), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. Address reprint requests to TT Fung, Programs in Nutrition, Simmons College, 300 The Fenway, Boston, MA 02115. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: From the Programs in Nutrition, Simmons College, Boston (TTF); the Departments of Nutrition (TTF, FBH, MJS, and WCW) and Epidemiology (FBH, MJS, GAC, and WCW), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston; the Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, and the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (MAP); and the Division of Preventive Medicine (SL) and the Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine (FBH, MJS, GAC, and WCW), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. Search for other works by this author on: From the Programs in Nutrition, Simmons College, Boston (TTF); the Departments of Nutrition (TTF, FBH, MJS, and WCW) and Epidemiology (FBH, MJS, GAC, and WCW), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston; the Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, and the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (MAP); and the Division of Preventive Medicine (SL) and the Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine (FBH, MJS, GAC, and WCW), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard M Continue reading >>

To Eat Or Not To Eat: Whole Grains

To Eat Or Not To Eat: Whole Grains

Not all health foods are necessary for good health, especially if they raise blood sugar. These days, even in mainstream markets, you can find spelt, millet, barley, and the like. And the marketing messages leaping off of every loaf of bread and cereal box shout, whole grains! Additionally, every healthy-eating article has authors singing the praises of whole grains, citing all kinds of studies showing that eating these wonder foods will reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer, and more. However, the research supporting the benefits of these popular foods isnt as strong as you might think. And theres another side to whole grains thats important to keep in mind if you have diabetes: They can significantly raise blood sugar. A 2013 study of people with type 2 diabetes found that most whole-grain breads raised blood sugar and insulin levels just as much as bread made from refined white flour. The exception was pumpernickel, which increased blood sugar less than other types, but caused it to remain above the healthy 140 mg/dL range. Many observational studies have shown a decreased risk of diabetes, heart disease, and other serious health conditions in people who eat whole grains regularly. However, this only demonstrates a link between whole grain consumption and disease risk reduction . People who eat a lot of whole grains tend to have healthier eating and lifestyle habits overall. They typically consume very little junk food, and engage in regular exercise more often than those who never eat whole grains. Though its true that whole grains can be a good source of fiber, there are many other fiber-rich foods that have less of an impact on blood sugar. In fact, whole grains arent even that high in fiber when compared with other, lower-carb foods . For instance, a cup of Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention With Whole Grains

Diabetes Prevention With Whole Grains

A year ago, I shared with you my fathers diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in a blog post . I told you how genetic predisposition was the culprit, passed down from one generation to the next, along with boxes of old photographs and quilts. Surprising to think that a man who is careful about what he eats and gets plenty of exercise might still have to take medication to regulate his blood glucose levels. I am pleased to report that within just a few months of his diagnosis, hed impressed his doctor and nutritionist with his ability to nip the disease in the proverbial bud, returning him to pre-diabetic status. We are all so proud! (Thats my dad and my brother, in the photo.) But to what does he owe this success? Outside of the obvious support of family and doctors, he contributes it to whole grains. One of the very rst (and as he recalls, the easiest) change to make was the switch to whole grains. Taking hints rst from me, then from his nutritionist, he and my mother quickly replaced foods like white rice, marshmallowy white bread and white pasta, with brown rice, whole grain breads and pastas. Before long my parents even headed into more adventurous territory, with grains like quinoa and freekeh. I know youll agree that his story is heartening, but was it too good to be true? Was his health improvement really tied to the whole grains? Can this work for others too? The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published a study just last month that made my whole family sigh in relief. We now have evidence showing that the addition of more whole grains into a healthy diet can slow the progression from normal glucose tolerance to pre-diabetes . As my brothers, my children and I all face the uncertainty of our own path toward this diagnosis, I nally have the ammunition I need to r Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Whole Grain Foods On Diabetes And Obesity

The Effect Of Whole Grain Foods On Diabetes And Obesity

Home / Conditions / Obesity / The Effect of Whole Grain Foods on Diabetes and Obesity The Effect of Whole Grain Foods on Diabetes and Obesity Researchers assessed the impact of whole grains on the risk of type 2 diabetes, obesity and body weight measures, and cardiovascular disease in human studies as the basis for establishing an American Society for Nutrition (ASN) position. The study included a comprehensive PubMed search of human studies published from 1965 to December 2010. All study data involved patients with various comorbidities that studied the benefits of whole grain, fiber and whole bran diets as they related to improvements in each patents disease state. Results from the study review showed that most whole-grain studies included mixtures of whole grains and foods with 25% bran. Prospective studies consistently showed a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes with high intakes of cereal fiber or mixtures of whole grains and bran. For body weight, a limited number of prospective studies on cereal fiber and whole grains reported small but significant reductions in weight gain. For cardiovascular disease, studies found reduced risk with high intakes of cereal fiber or mixtures of whole grains and bran. In conclusion, the researchers suggested that the ASN position, based on the current state of the science, is that consumption of foods rich in cereal fiber or mixtures of whole grains and bran is modestly associated with a reduced risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Researchers also noted that consuming fiber may allow a diabetic patient to eat relatively more carbohydrates without running the risk of hyperglycemia. Cho, Susan S. "Consumption of cereal fiber, mixtures of whole grains and bran, and whole grains and risk reduction in type 2 diab Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Diabetes is a metabolic disease, meaning there is a glitch in the way the body converts food energy into usable energy. A healthy reaction to eating carbohydrate is a rise in blood sugar (glucose) followed by insulin being released as a response. The insulin acts as a key to open up cells within the brain and organs to let glucose in to be used as an immediate source of energy. Any unused energy is then stored in the liver, muscle, and fat tissues. Someone with diabetes has a rise in blood glucose but insulin is either not released or cells are resistant to the insulin. This is why diabetics have difficulty returning their high blood sugar levels back down to normal and thus need to control how much carbohydrate (glucose source) they put into their body throughout the day. Control carbohydrates. With a little effort and control diabetes can easily be managed. Diabetics should not condemn, but rather control carbohydrates. They should focus on allowing their body only the amount of carbohydrates it can handle at one time (this can be determined by a doctor or registered dietitian). Despite being diabetic, the body still needs and uses carbohydrates as its preferred source of energy. In fact, it is the only source of fuel for the brain! So it should never be eliminated, just merely controlled so your body can handle the glucose load. Stick to an eating plan. There is no single ideal eating plan for those with diabetes; the recommended plan is specific to a person’s weight, medication, blood sugars, cholesterol, and other medical conditions or concerns. Despite the varying eating plans, all diabetics should be consistent with their eating habits. Also, they need to eat about every 4-5 hours to prevent blood sugars from getting too low. Additionally, breakfast is an impor Continue reading >>

Whole-grain Intake And The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Study In Men.

Whole-grain Intake And The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Study In Men.

Whole-grain intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective study in men. Programs in Nutrition, Simmons College, Boston, MA 02115, USA. [email protected] Certain dietary components may play a role in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. We examined prospectively the associations between whole- and refined-grain intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes in a large cohort of men. Men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study without a history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease in 1986 (n = 42898) were followed for Continue reading >>

Ways To Get More Whole Grains In Your Meal Plan

Ways To Get More Whole Grains In Your Meal Plan

Diabetic Living / Food to Eat / Nutrition Ways to Get More Whole Grains in Your Meal Plan Revamp your pantry to fit your diabetes meal plan by adding healthful whole grains to your cupboards -- we show you how with our easy-to-follow pantry guide. Stock your pantry with whole grains to make healthful versions of items you can enjoy along with everyone else -- including brownies and cakes for occasional treats. Our guide shows you how to stock your pantry with grain-base products like bread, flour, and baking mixes. Replacing refined grains with whole grains may help improve blood glucose control and weight management. Plus, whole grains may reduce your risk of health issues that can accompany diabetes, such as heart disease and high blood pressure. Check out our whole grain guide to give your pantry a healthful makeover -- without skimping on flavor. Diabetes Meal Plan , Best Foods for Diabetes , Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutrition Whole grain product pick: Barilla whole grain pasta, barilla.com, 800/922-7455. Also try Dreamfields pasta or Hodgson Mill organic whole wheat pasta with flaxseed. Make the switch: A serving of the Barilla pasta has triple the fiber of traditional refined-flour pasta (6 grams versus 2 grams of fiber per serving). Diabetes Meal Plan , Best Foods for Diabetes , Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutrition Whole grain product pick: Texmati brown rice, riceselect.com, 800/232-7423. Also try Uncle Ben's natural whole grain brown rice. Make the switch: Switching to brown (whole grain) rice is an easy yet effective way to complement your diabetes meal plan -- just don't forget to measure portions. Diabetes Meal Plan , Best Foods for Diabetes , Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutritio Continue reading >>

Whole Grain Bread Vs. Whole Wheat Bread For Diabetes

Whole Grain Bread Vs. Whole Wheat Bread For Diabetes

Just walk down the bread aisle of your local supermarket and you will be bombarded with health claims -- some of which are true and some are misleading. It can be difficult to muddle through all of the jargon on food labels, especially if you are a diabetic. One of the most confusing topics may be the difference between whole grain and whole wheat, especially when it comes to bread. But, with a little knowledge, you can identify the best bread choices for you. Video of the Day The Food and Drug Administration describes a whole grain food as one that contains grain that is whole, ground or flaked, but still contains the main anatomy of the endosperm, germ and bran. By this definition, whole wheat bread can also be considered a whole grain food. However, for it to qualify, whole wheat bread must be made with a whole wheat flour that is made from whole grains. A Carbohydrate is a Carbohydrate? To understand how carbohydrates affect your body, look at how your body digests them. Any carbohydrate you eat is broken down into its smallest possible molecules by your body. Most of this is glucose, which is why carbohydrates directly affect your blood glucose. However, the makeup of a carbohydrate, including how it is processed and what it is eaten with, can also affect your blood glucose. While both whole wheat and whole grain breads are less processed than their white bread counterparts, a whole grain bread may be the best for you. This is where the glycemic index comes into play. The Glycemic Index and Diabetes The glycemic index rates the effect a food -- more specifically, a carbohydrate within a food -- has on your blood glucose. This system takes into consideration the processing of the food as well as the other nutrients that accompany it. For example, a less-processed gr Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

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