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Who Diabetes Report 2017

New Cdc Report: More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

New Cdc Report: More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

More than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or prediabetes, according to a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report finds that as of 2015, 30.3 million Americans – 9.4 percent of the U.S. population –have diabetes. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if not treated often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years. The report confirms that the rate of new diabetes diagnoses remains steady. However, the disease continues to represent a growing health problem: Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2015. The report also includes county-level data for the first time, and shows that some areas of the country bear a heavier diabetes burden than others. “Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes,” said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, M.D. “More than a third of U.S. adults have prediabetes, and the majority don’t know it. Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease.” Diabetes is a serious disease that can often be managed through physical activity, diet, and the appropriate use of insulin and other medications to control blood sugar levels. People with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications including premature death, vision loss, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and amputation of toes, feet, or legs. The National Diabetes Statistics Report, released approximately every two years, provides information on diabetes prevalence and incidence, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, mortality, and costs in the U.S. Key findings from Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Statistic Report, 2017

National Diabetes Statistic Report, 2017

Diabetes cases are beginning to level off, but the number is still enormous: more than 100 million people in the United States have diabetes or prediabetes. Much work still needs to be done. In July, CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation (DDT) released the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017. The report presents the “state of the disease” in our nation, providing the most recent scientific data on: Diabetes incidence (new cases) Diabetes prevalence (existing cases) Short- and long-term complications Risk factors for complications Prediabetes Mortality (death rate) Costs Diabetes is a serious disease that can often be managed through physical activity, diet, and use of insulin and oral medications to lower blood sugar levels. People with diabetes are at increased risk of additional serious health complications including vision loss, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation of toes, feet or legs, and premature death. As many as 2 out of 5 Americans are expected to develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Prediabetes is a serious health condition in which a person’s blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough yet to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Without weight loss (for those who need it), healthy eating, and moderate physical activity, many people living with prediabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes. The National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017 analyzes health data through 2015, providing statistics across ages, races, ethnicities, education levels, and regions. This report reflects a point-in-time analysis, and its data provides vital perspective on the current status of diabetes and can help focus prevention and control efforts going forward. Key findings: 30.3 million Americans—nearly 1 in 10—have diabetes. Continue reading >>

Current Burden Of Diabetes In The U.s.

Current Burden Of Diabetes In The U.s.

Diabetes is one of the most common and costly chronic diseases. An estimated 23.1 million people in the United States are diagnosed with diabetes at a cost of more than $245 billion per year.1,2 The CDC estimates that another 7.2 million people have diabetes but remain undiagnosed, while another 84.1 million adults 18 years and older have prediabetes.1 The highest rates of diabetes are found among minority populations and older Americans; however, across the United States, the overall prevalence continues to increase as overweight and obesity rates rise.3 Individuals with diabetes are at greater risk than other similar adults for many common problems, including coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, depression, pain, polypharmacy, and functional disability.4 Diabetes remains the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults in the United States, and the leading cause of end-stage renal failure. Annual updates on the impact of diabetes on the health of the U.S. population are available from the CDC National Diabetes Statistics Report . Despite significant advances in therapy over the past several years, diabetes remains the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Intensive treatment of glucose, blood pressure, and lipid levels in individuals with diabetes substantially reduces the risk of developing diabetes-related complications. However, under current models of care, many individuals with diabetes are not achieving the targets for optimal care recommended by clinical experts. In the most recent reports from the National Committee for Quality Assurance on health maintenance organizations (HMOs), 31 percent of patients continue to have an A1C greater than 9 percent, while 35 percent have blood pressure of ≥140/90 mm Hg.5 This gap between curr Continue reading >>

Community Sustainability Series

Community Sustainability Series

Rates of type 2 diabetes among children aged 10 to 19 is higher than the incidence of type 1 diabetes in all minority groups studied including African Americans, Hispanics, Asian Americans, and American Indians. In American Indian children, the incidence of type 2 diabetes was almost nine times higher than the incidence of type 1 diabetes. This is astounding for a disease that did not exist in children in significant numbers until recent decades. The incidence of type 1 diabetes in Caucasian children was about eight times higher than the incidence of type 2 diabetes. These dramatic differences between different races and ethnic groups illustrate the importance of understanding genetic risk factors and discussing those risk factors with your doctor. Overall, during 2011–2012, the estimated annual number of newly diagnosed cases of diabetes in United States youth (all races and ethnic groups) included: Whenever the obvious isn’t being done at an individual or organizational level, something other than data is driving behaviors. There is wide and growing awareness that the vast majority of disease in America is diet and lifestyle driven. The current drivers of public health problems can be more effectively addressed with data that facilitate personalized healthcare planning such as the following: This data is not being gathered at the rate that the public health situation would dictate. Knowing the reversal timetables would be a great asset to planning an individual’s healthcare. Knowing specifics for the data above could be a powerful incentive for those who believe that their diabetes is irreversible. For example, some people who have had diabetes for over 20 years can still reverse it depending on the individual situation (1). If long-term diabetics know more spec Continue reading >>

Heart Disease, Stroke, And Diabetes Data And Publications

Heart Disease, Stroke, And Diabetes Data And Publications

The Washington State Diabetes Prevention and Control Program works with other chronic disease programs and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to define the burden of diabetes. This work informs and influences public health decision-making. We monitor several data sources to track diabetes in Washington. We also measure progress on state and national objectives to guide program development. These sources inform this work. Diabetes Epidemic and Action Report The 2017 Washington State Diabetes Epidemic and Action Report (PDF) is a legislative report written in response to Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 6052 (June 2015). It is the result of a collaborative effort from the Washington State Department of Health, the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, and the Washington State Health Care Authority. This report is intended to inform the State Legislature about the current state of diabetes in Washington and provide recommendations on how to reduce the impact of the epidemic. Everyone concerned about diabetes in Washington may find this report valuable to inform and guide their priorities and work. This report is an update to the 2014 Washington State Diabetes Epidemic and Action Report (PDF). Data Heart Disease and Stroke Publications Diabetes Publications For more information about program data and publications, contact us at [email protected] at 360-859-3677. Continue reading >>

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released the 2017 Diabetes Statistics Report with estimates for “prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs.” Where are we now? There are 30.3 million people with diabetes (9.4% of the US population) including 23.1 million people who are diagnosed and 7.2 million people (23.8%) undiagnosed. The numbers for prediabetes indicate that 84.1 million adults (33.9% of the adult U.S. population) have prediabetes, including 23.1 million adults aged 65 years or older (the age group with highest rate). The estimated percentage of individuals with type 1 diabetes remains at 5% among those with diabetes. The statistics are also provided by age, gender, ethnicity, and for each state/territory so you can search for these specifics. The CDC has produced wonderful infographics, “A Snapshot of Diabetes in the U.S.” and “Prediabes: Could it be You?” for everyone to use and reproduce. They illustrate estimates for diabetes, prediabetes, the cost of diabetes (dollars, risk of death, medical costs), specifics about type 1 and type 2 diabetes, risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and a “What You Can Do” section. If we compare the numbers with previous estimates, we see that there has been an increase in those with diabetes and a decrease in those with prediabetes. However, the numbers are all still extremely high, and the costs and health burdens are staggering! What can we do with these statistics? Use them to help focus efforts to prevent and control diabetes in the U.S. Share the positive messages regarding prevention strategies with those at risk of developing or with type 2 diabetes Distribute the information to local media and Continue reading >>

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Been Diagnosed With Diabetes Or Prediabetes, Latest Cdc Report Reveals

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Been Diagnosed With Diabetes Or Prediabetes, Latest Cdc Report Reveals

The new ‘National Diabetes Statistics Report’ released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on 18th July 2017, says that over 100 million adults in U.S. are presently living with prediabetes or diabetes. According to the report, as of 2015, 9.4 % of the U.S. population, i.e., 30.3 million people have diabetes and 84.1 million were diagnosed with prediabetes, which if left untreated causes type 2 diabetes in five years. Further Reading It is confirmed by the study that the rate of diagnoses of new diabetes remains stable, yet, the disease continues to be a growing health issue. And in 2015, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. Brenda Fitzgerald, M.D, the Director of CDC said: “Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes. More than a third of U.S. adults have prediabetes, and the majority don’t know it. Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease.” Diabetes, even though a serious condition that increases the risk of severe health complications such as, premature death, loss of vision, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and amputation of toes, feet, or legs, can usually be managed through physical activities, diet, as well as the suitable use of insulin and other medications to control levels of blood sugar. In order to provide information on diabetes prevalence and incidence, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, mortality, and costs in the U.S, CDC releases the National Diabetes Statistics Report approximately every two years. For the first time, the newly released report contains county-level data, which shows that a few Continue reading >>

Diabetes Data: Surveillance And Evaluation

Diabetes Data: Surveillance And Evaluation

Implementation and evaluation of diabetes prevention and control programs depends on reliable data. The following data sources tell us how many people in Texas are estimated to have diabetes and the groups most affected by the disease. They allow for development of culturally appropriate messages and assist in focusing prevention efforts on high-risk populations. The Diabetes Program at DSHS develops epidemiological reports on diabetes incidence, prevalence, morbidity, and mortality in Texas. The program contracts for annual statewide telephone surveys through the Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, participates in statewide and international collaborative data collection projects, and reviews information from the Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) and the TMF Health Quality Institute, which is the state’s Medicare Quality Improvement Organization. Data from these and other sources are collected and illustrated in the burden report below. The Diabetes Program updates this report periodically as data collection occurs and data is verified for publication. The Texas Diabetes Fact Sheet offers at-a-glance diabetes prevalence and mortality statistics for Texas by race/ethnicity, age, and gender. Requests for specific data will be addressed as time and availability of data permit. To ensure that data requests are fulfilled in a timely manner, please submit your requests at least two weeks before the data is needed. Texas Diabetes and Prediabetes Fact Sheet (Updated September 2017, 178kb, PDF viewing information) Diabetes and prediabetes prevalence, mortality, and cost data for Texas. Diabetes Trend Data, Texas and US, 2011-2015 (Updated March 2017, PDF 923kb, PDF viewing information) Current Diabetes Prevalence Among Adults by Demographic C Continue reading >>

Trends In Diabetes: Sounding The Alarm

Trends In Diabetes: Sounding The Alarm

Diabetes is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. In 2012 it caused as many deaths as HIV/AIDS (1·5 million).1 Disability resulting from diabetes has grown substantially since 1990, with particularly large increases among people aged 15–69 years.2 People with all types of diabetes are at risk of developing a range of complications that can endanger their health and survival, and the high costs of care increase the risk of catastrophic medical expenditure.3 Diabetes is the theme of this year's World Health Day on April 7, and WHO has published the Global Report on Diabetes to raise awareness and spark momentum for action at the necessary scale. In The Lancet, the NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (NCD-RisC)4 presents a robust and timely analysis of trends in diabetes prevalence. They provide updated, consistent, and comparable estimates of age-standardised prevalence of diabetes since 1980, derived from 751 population-based measurement studies involving nearly 4·4 million participants. These are the first global estimates and trend analyses published since adoption of the voluntary target to halt the rise in diabetes and obesity (against the 2010 baseline) by 2025. The news is not good. NCD-RisC estimates that the number of people with diabetes quadrupled between 1980 and 2014. Age-standardised prevalence among adult men doubled during that time (from 4·3% [95% credible interval 2·4–7·0] to 9·0% [7·2–11·1]), and age-standardised prevalence among adult women increased by 60% (5·0% [2·9–7·9] to 7·9% [6·4–9·7]). Diabetes prevalence either increased or remained the same in every country. Given these trends, the authors calculate that only a few countries, mostly in western Europe, have even a chance of meeting the target to halt the rise in dia Continue reading >>

Michigan Diabetes Statistics And Reports

Michigan Diabetes Statistics And Reports

A number of data sources are available to and through the Diabetes Prevention and Control Program about: Diabetes burden Diabetes-related indicators Complications Mortality These sources include: Michigan Diabetes Reports Diabetes Data Library Tables are presented in diabetes prevalence and incidence among Michigan adults and children, as well as prediabetes among adults. In addition, the Library provides data about diabetes-related risk factors, preventive care practices, diabetes-related complications, hospitalization data, mortality, and cost data. Hospitalization among Michigan Adults with Diabetes, 2013 Risk Factors in Adults with Diabetes and the General Population, 2011-2013 Diagnosed Diabetes Prevalence and Incidence (New Cases) in Adults, 2011-2013 Preventive Care Practices in Adults with Diabetes, 2011-2012 Diabetes in Pregnancy, 2010-2012 Diabetes Prevalence in Children, 2006 Diabetes Incidence (New Cases) in Children, 2002-2003 Prevalence of Complications in Adults with Diabetes, 2008-2010 Mortality for People with Diabetes, 2009 Prediabetes in Adults, 2005-2006, 2010 Cost of Diabetes in Michigan, 2005-2006 Michigan Diabetes Related Medicaid Data Michigan's Medicaid programs are funded by state and federal dollars and serve socio-economically vulnerable children and adults. Analysis of paid Medicaid claims, encounter, and prescription data provide a unique and powerful perspective on key components of health care. Previously, MDHHS has utilized analysis of Medicaid data to address health care utilization of children with asthma and the disabled population served by Michigan Medicaid programs. Diabetes burden and indicators are presented as briefs, presentations, and downloadable tables, charts, and maps. Briefs and Reports Diabetes-Health Care Utilization By Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a disease that causes high blood sugar. It occurs when there is a problem with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes sugar from foods and moves it to the body's cells. If the body does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin well, the sugar from food stays in the blood and causes high blood sugar. There are several different types of diabetes, but the most common is type 2. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Report, 2014, 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes in the United States have type 2. Just 5 percent of people have type 1. Contents of this article: Key facts about diabetes in the U.S. Diabetes is at an all-time high in the U.S. The CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation states that 1 percent of the population, which is about a half of a million people, had diagnosed diabetes in 1958. Today, nearly 10 percent of the population have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). That's 29.1 million Americans, and more than a quarter of these people do not know they have it. The ADA report that the number of people who have diabetes increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. The risk of developing diabetes increases with age. The CDC report that 4.1 percent of people age 20-44 have diabetes, but the number jumps to 25.9 percent for people over 65 years old. As obesity has become more prevalent over the past few decades, so too has the rate of type 2 diabetes. An article in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology states that 25.6 percent of Americans are obese, much higher than the 15.3 percent of obese people in 1995. In that same period, the incidence of diabetes increased by 90 percent. Although the link between obesity and diabetes is well Continue reading >>

Current Diabetes Reports

Current Diabetes Reports

Description Current Diabetes Reports provides in-depth review articles contributed by international experts on the most significant developments in the field. By presenting clear, insightful, balanced reviews that emphasize recently published papers of major importance, the journal elucidates current and emerging approaches to the diagnosis, treatment, management, and prevention of diabetes. Browse Volumes & Issues Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017: Women And Diabetes

World Diabetes Day 2017: Women And Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic, metabolic disease characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose (or blood sugar), which leads over time to serious damage to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. The most common is type 2 diabetes, usually in adults, which occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin or doesn't make enough insulin. In the past three decades the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has risen dramatically in countries of all income levels. Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin by itself. For people living with diabetes, access to affordable treatment, including insulin, is critical to their survival. There is a globally agreed target to halt the rise in diabetes and obesity by 2025. Continue reading >>

Cdc: More Than 100 Million U.s. Adults Have Diabetes

Cdc: More Than 100 Million U.s. Adults Have Diabetes

The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes greatly varies by region, race and age, according to a new report from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. While the rate of new diabetes cases is steady, a report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that a third of adults in the United States currently are living with diabetes or prediabetes. The National Diabetes Statistics Report found that as of 2015 30.3 million Americans are living with diagnosed diabetes and another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if left untreated leads to diabetes within five years. “Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes,” said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, M.D. in a statement. “More than a third of U.S. adults have prediabetes, and the majority don’t know it. Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease.” The report, which is released every two years, provides information on diabetes prevalence and incidence, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, mortality and costs in the U.S. According to the CDC, diabetes continues to represent a growing health problem. It was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2015, and the disease is more prevalent in some area of the country than others. The southern and Appalachian areas of the United States had the highest rates of diagnosed diabetes and of new diabetes cases. While it can often be managed through physical activity, diet and the appropriate use of insulin and other medications to control blood sugar levels, people with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevalence (per 1,000 inhabitants) of diabetes worldwide in 2000 - world average was 2.8%. no data ≤ 7.5 7.5–15 15–22.5 22.5–30 30–37.5 37.5–45 45–52.5 52.5–60 60–67.5 67.5–75 75–82.5 ≥ 82.5 Disability-adjusted life year for diabetes mellitus per 100,000 inhabitants in 2004 No data <100 100–200 200–300 300–400 400–500 500–600 600–700 700–800 800–900 900–1,000 1,000–1,500 >1,500 Globally, an estimated 422 million adults are living with diabetes mellitus, according to the latest 2016 data from the World Health Organization (WHO).[1] Diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly; previous 2013 estimates from the International Diabetes Federation put the number at 381 million people having diabetes.[2] The number is projected to almost double by 2030.[3] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 85-90% of all cases.[4][5] Increases in the overall diabetes prevalence rates largely reflect an increase in risk factors for type 2, notably greater longevity and being overweight or obese.[1] Diabetes mellitus occurs throughout the world, but is more common (especially type 2) in the more developed countries. The greatest increase in prevalence is, however, occurring in low- and middle-income countries[1] including in Asia and Africa, where most patients will probably be found by 2030.[3] The increase in incidence in developing countries follows the trend of urbanization and lifestyle changes, including increasingly sedentary lifestyles, less physically demanding work and the global nutrition transition, marked by increased intake of foods that are high energy-dense but nutrient-poor (often high in sugar and saturated fats, sometimes referred to as the Western pattern diet).[1][3] The risk of getting type 2 diabetes has been widely found to be associat Continue reading >>

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