diabetestalk.net

Who Diabetes Report

Diabetes In Iran: Prospective Analysis From First Nationwide Diabetes Report Of National Program For Prevention And Control Of Diabetes (nppcd-2016)

Diabetes In Iran: Prospective Analysis From First Nationwide Diabetes Report Of National Program For Prevention And Control Of Diabetes (nppcd-2016)

We estimated proportions of different types of diabetes, comorbidities, treatment (the use of oral glucose-lowering agents and insulin), control (hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension) and chronic microvascular and macrovascular complications among people with diabetes presenting to the tertiary-care academic diabetes outpatient clinics in Iran. This study is the prospective analysis of data (n = 30,202) from the registry of university-affiliated adult outpatient diabetes clinics in the country during 2015–2016. The proportions of type 1 diabetes, types 2 diabetes, and other types of diabetes were 11.4%, 85.5%, and 1.3%, respectively. The frequencies of drug-naivety, use of oral agents, insulin monotherapy and insulin combination therapy were 2.9%, 60.5%, 11.5%, and 25.1%, respectively. Around 13.2%, 11.9% and 43.3% of patients with diabetes had controlled hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and hypertension, respectively. The proportions of retinopathy, nephropathy, peripheral neuropathy, diabetic foot, and ischemic heart disease were 21.9%, 17.6%, 28.0%, 6.2%, and 23.9%, respectively. Despite the wide availability of medications and insulin coverage in Iran, the estimated national control of hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and hypertension (especially for young men and old women) remains subpar. The present study further suggests that the frequencies of chronic vascular complications among patients with diabetes are relatively high in Iran. In 2013, at least 382 million adults had diabetes (all types) worldwide1, and this number rose to 422 million by 20142. The United States (US) witnessed a 4.5% annual growth rate of patients with diabetes during 1998–2008, before the prevalence of diabetes leveled off with no significant change from 2008 to 20123. The 2013 Inter Continue reading >>

National Pregnancy In Diabetes Annual Report 2016

National Pregnancy In Diabetes Annual Report 2016

Summary The National Pregnancy in Diabetes (NPID) audit is part of the National Diabetes Audit (NDA) programme and is commissioned by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) as part of the National Clinical Audit and Patient Outcomes Programme (NCAPOP). The NDA is managed by the NHS Digital in partnership with Diabetes UK and is supported by Public Health England (PHE). The audit is a measurement system to support improvement in the quality of care for women with diabetes who are pregnant or planning pregnancy and seeks to address the three key questions: - Were women with diabetes adequately prepared for pregnancy? - Were adverse maternal outcomes during pregnancy minimised? - Were adverse fetal/infant outcomes minimised? This report includes data on women with diabetes with completed pregnancies between 1 January 2016 and 31 December 2016 and where the data was submitted to the audit by 10 February 2017. In 2016, 3,304 pregnancies in 3,297 women with diabetes were recorded in 172 antenatal diabetes services. Key Facts Antenatal Care NICE Guideline: Offer immediate contact with a joint diabetes and antenatal clinic 24 per cent of women with Type 1 diabetes and 42 per cent of women with Type 2 diabetes did not present to the joint diabetes antenatal team before 10+0 weeks gestation. Delivery Type NICE Guideline: Advise elective birth by induction of labour or elective C-section Delivery by caesarean section was common (65 per cent of Type 1 and 57 per cent of Type 2). Maternal hypoglycaemia and ketoacidosis: Almost one in 10 women with Type 1 diabetes had at least one hospital admission for severe hypoglycaemia. Ketoacidosis, a high risk for mother and fetus, occurred in 2.7 per cent of women with Type 1 diabetes. The documents published along side this re Continue reading >>

What May Be The Cause Of Low Blood Sugar Levels If My Ultrasonograph Report Was Normal (no Tumour Or Anything Like That In Pancreas; Liver, Kidney Ok)and Not Suffering From Diabetes (not Taking Insulin)?

What May Be The Cause Of Low Blood Sugar Levels If My Ultrasonograph Report Was Normal (no Tumour Or Anything Like That In Pancreas; Liver, Kidney Ok)and Not Suffering From Diabetes (not Taking Insulin)?

Some medications - if somebody who does not have diabetes swallows diabetes medication they may develop low blood sugar levels. Quinine, a drug used for patients with malaria, can also cause hypoglycemia. Salicylates, which are used for treating rheumatic disease, and propronanolol for hypertension (high blood pressure may also trigger a serious drop in blood sugar levels. Alcohol abuse - the liver can stop releasing stored glucose into the bloodstream if somebody has been drinking a lot. Some liver diseases - drug-induced hepatitis can cause hypoglycemia. Kidney disorders - people with kidney disorders may have problems excreting medications, which can result in abnormally low blood-sugar levels. Not eating enough - people with eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa, may find that their blood sugar levels drop dramatically. Endocrine problems - some disorders of the adrenal and pituitary glands can lead to hypoglycemia. Children with these disorders are more likely to develop abnormally low blood sugar levels than adults. Reactive hypoglycemia (postprandial hypoglycemia) - this is when the pancreas produces too much insulin after a meal. Tumors - tumors in other parts of the body (not the pancreas) can cause hypoglycemia. This is very rare. Continue reading >>

Care & Prevention

Care & Prevention

Diabetes and cardiovascular disease In North America, Western Europe, Australia and Japan, most people with diabetes are aged over 50 years of age and are at a very high risk of heart disease. In these countries, studies have estimated that between 15% and 41% of middle-aged people with diabetes already have cardiovascular disease (mean age of study populations: 50 to 69 years). People living in Africa and Central Asia have the world’s highest rates of age-standardised cardiovascular disease mortality, and rising economic growth will be associated with higher rates of diabetes, obesity and high cholesterol. However, it is difficult to estimate the global burden of heart disease in people with diabetes, due to lack of data and standardisation. Only 41 countries worldwide have high-quality data on heart disease in people with diabetes, and even in these countries there are diverse definitions and classifications of heart and vascular disease. IDF believes that in the absence of standardized methodology it is difficult for policy makers to determine specific health targets that ensure adequate resources are allocated to diabetes care and prevention. The International Diabetes Federation calls on governments to instigate the following four policies: Use international standards for conducting epidemiological studies Implement policies and lifestyle interventions to increase healthy eating and physical activity Prioritise access to essential medicines to control blood pressure and diabetes Implement non-communicable disease monitoring systems By presenting a clear summary of the problem of measuring heart disease in people with diabetes, as well as real-world solutions, the IDF Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Report facilitates evidenced-based decision making and encour Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Idph

Diabetes | Idph

Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. Most of the food eaten is turned into glucose (sugar) for the body to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the bodys cells. When you have diabetes, the body either does not make enough insulin or cannot use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes sugar to build up in the blood. Type 1 This type of diabetes can occur at any age, although it most often appears in childhood or during the teen years. With this form of diabetes, the body no longer makes insulin. Treatment for type 1 diabetes includes taking insulin and possibly another injectable medicine; making wise food choices; being physically active; taking aspirin daily, for some; and controlling blood pressure and cholesterol. Type 2 Formerly called adult-onset or non-insulin dependent diabetes, this type is the most common form of diabetes and can develop at any age, even in childhood. Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which fat, muscle, and liver cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the body keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin, but, in time, the body is unable to produce enough insulin. Being overweight and inactive increases the chance of developing this form of diabetes. Treatment includes using diabetes medicines; making wise food choices; being physically active; taking aspirin daily, for some; and controlling blood pressure and cholesterol. It is estimated that 79 million adults aged 20 and older have pre-diabetes. Pre-diabetes is a condition where blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Studies have shown that by losing weight and inc Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017: Women And Diabetes

World Diabetes Day 2017: Women And Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic, metabolic disease characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose (or blood sugar), which leads over time to serious damage to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. The most common is type 2 diabetes, usually in adults, which occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin or doesn't make enough insulin. In the past three decades the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has risen dramatically in countries of all income levels. Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin by itself. For people living with diabetes, access to affordable treatment, including insulin, is critical to their survival. There is a globally agreed target to halt the rise in diabetes and obesity by 2025. Continue reading >>

Global Statistics On Diabetes

Global Statistics On Diabetes

Comment by Eberhard Standl, Forschergruppe Diabetes eV at Munich Helmholtz Centre, GermanyFor the EAPC Diabetes and CVD Educational Programme Diabetes is on the rise across the globe as reported in the most recent 8th edition of the IDF Diabetes Atlas 2017.(1) According to the IDF statistics, presently every seven seconds someone is estimated to die from diabetes or its complications, with 50% of those deaths (4 million in total per year) occurring under the age of 60 years. (1) This is against the background of a global diabetes prevalence of 8.8% (95% confidence interval 7.2-11.3%) of the world population in 2017, standardized for the age group 20-79 years. The prevalence is expected to further increase to 9.9% (95% CI 7.5-12.7%) by the year 2045. In total numbers, this reflects a population of 424.9 million (95% CI 346.4-545.4 million) people with diabetes worldwide in 2017 with an estimate of a 48% increase to 628.6 million people (95% CI 477.0-808.7 million) for the year 2045. Global umbers of diabetes prevalence have continuously risen from 151 million in 2000, when the IDF Diabetes Atlas first was launched, to 285 million in 2009 and to 382 million in 2013.Disturbingly in this context, some 50% of all individuals with diabetes are undiagnosed, especially in developing countries.(1) The figures given in the IDF Atlas fit well with the estimates of an international consortium reporting worldwide trends in diabetes since 1980 based on a pooled analysis of 751 population-based studies with 44 million participants. (2) According to this group global age-standardised diabetes prevalence increased from 4.3% (95% CI 2.4-7.0) in 1980 to 9.0% (7.2-11.1) in 2014 in men, and from 5.0% (2.9-7.9) to 7.9% (6.4-9.7) in women. Moreover, it was estimated that the number of adults Continue reading >>

Global Report On Diabetes - World Health Organization

Global Report On Diabetes - World Health Organization

Authored by WHO Not yet rated URL (7 MB) Download » In honor of World Health Day, the World Health Organization issued its first global report on diabetes. The report includes the scope of diabetes and its prevalence in the developing world, along with the serious health risks that increase among carriers. Steps and initiatives are mapped out to stop diabetes's spread and give better care to those already affected. To download the report click here: For more information, visit the World Health Day website: Continue reading >>

Paho Who | Diabetes | Reports

Paho Who | Diabetes | Reports

Hyperglycemia and Pregnancy in the Americas. Final report of the Pan American Conference on Diabetes and Pregnancy (Lima Peru: 8-10 September 2015) Preexisting diabetes and hyperglycemia first detected in pregnancy can have serious consequences for the health both of the baby and the mother; in particular, these conditions increase the risk of miscarriage and perinatal morbidity and mortality. It is estimated that one out of seven pregnant women worldwide suffers from hyperglycemia, corresponding to gestational diabetes (GDM) in 85% of cases. Up to 30% of pregnant women may be affected, but many cases of gestational diabetes are not diagnosed, with potentially fatal consequences for mother and baby. Data on the frequency of GDM is scarce: since there is no global, standardized approach to its screening and diagnosis, GDM often goes undiagnosed. Most developing countries of Latin America are in a stage of epidemiologic, demographic, and nutritional transition. Changes in lifestyle are associated with mass migration from the rural areas to the urban areas... Most developing countries of Latin America are in a stage of epidemiologic transition, which is the transition from infectious to chronic diseases as major sources of morbidity and mortality. The goal of the U.S.-Mexico Border Diabetes Prevention and Control Project is to reduce the impact of diabetes among residents along the U.S.-Mexico border, through a model of participation and shared leadership throughout the U.S.-Mexico border region. Over the past decade it has been obvious that the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly. Unless appropriate action is taken, it is predicted that there will be at least 350 million people in the world with type 2 diabetes by the year 2030. Continue reading >>

How Has Diabetes Care In The U.s. Changed Over Time?

How Has Diabetes Care In The U.s. Changed Over Time?

This collection of charts and a related brief explore trends in health outcomes, quality of care, and treatment costs for people with diabetes and related endocrine disorders. Endocrine diseases occur when any of the eight major glands in the endocrine system produce too little or too much of a particular hormone. In the U.S., diabetes is the most common endocrine disease. Diabetes is caused when the body is unable to create enough insulin to break down blood sugar. It is among the 10 leading causes of death in the U.S. and can cause serious health complications such as early mortality, blindness, kidney failure, lower-extremity amputations, and heart disease. There has been a reduction in complications due to diabetes and improvement in disease management, but diagnosis rates and spending continue to grow. Diabetes is among the 10 leading causes of death in the United States Diabetes is an endocrine system disease caused when the body is unable to create enough insulin to break down blood sugar. It is among the 10 leading causes of death in the U.S. and can cause serious health complications such as early mortality, blindness, kidney failure, lower-extremity amputations, and heart disease. There are three types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually diagnosed in children and young adults when the body does not produce insulin. There is no way to prevent type 1 diabetes, and proper management includes daily injections of insulin and monitoring blood glucose levels. Gestational diabetes occurs when there is not enough insulin created to support the pregnancy and happens in about 9.2% of pregnancies according to an analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A diagnosis of gesta Continue reading >>

Is This Diabetes Patient's Report Bad (or Critical In Any Way That It May Cause Death)?

Is This Diabetes Patient's Report Bad (or Critical In Any Way That It May Cause Death)?

No, he is not dying, but is dire need for well managed active treatment of his very much neglected diabetes and the threat of further dehydration which will make his body a lot less sensitive to internal and externally administered insulin, of which he will need a lot in the first days, along with a liberal mount of intravenous infusion to rehydrate him. In this situation only being on oral anti-diabetics won't do him any good, so has to be on lots of insulin now and most probably also later on, later on after he has been rehydrated and his blood sugar stabilized oral metformin should be added if he as is most probable has type 2 diabetes. Between the first and the last blood glucose determination the blood glucose levels has quadrupled, so the patient most likely wouldn't have been taking his anti-diabetic meds, concomitantly one sees a high triglyceride level. This resulted in peeing far too much, since high blood glucose will cause glucose leaking into the urine and taking water with it, you don't pee sugar cubes, it has to be dissolved in water, so losing body water; that's why serum creatinine is rising not due to more severe diabetic kidney damage, but dehydration. The urinary protein loss of 5 grams daily fits a diabetic kidney damage = Diabetic nephropathy, the initially high creatinine clearance of 129 ml/minute fits that diagnosis, so no stage IV kidney disease. but in May has developed raised serum creatinine because of dehydration due to high blood sugar levels as explained previously. The possibility of him already having severe diabetic eye complications = Diabetic retinopathy which if neglected will lead to blindness is very high, he should see an ophthalmologist within about a month. Personally I would have him admitted to a hospital for initial intensiv Continue reading >>

Report: Adherence To Diabetes Rx

Report: Adherence To Diabetes Rx

Diabetes is one of the most costly and concerning conditions for employers and plan sponsors. The CDC estimates that more than 30 million Americans have diabetes, with another 84 million having elevated blood sugar, putting them on the cusp of type 2 diabetes. All told, roughly one out of every three people in the U.S. has the potential to need treatment for diabetes. In Diabetes Dilemma: U.S. Trends in Diabetes Medication Use, we examined diabetes medication use among 1.4 million commercially insured members to identify what’s working, and where there might be room for improvement in outcomes and in reducing costs. Good News for Patients and Plan Sponsors Our most significant observation concerns adherence: people who were adherent to their oral diabetes medications experienced 235 fewer ER visits and 50 fewer inpatient hospitalizations per 1000 patients, and they spent nearly $500 less on total healthcare costs compared to nonadherent patients, potentially avoiding more than $210 million in healthcare spending in 2016. People with diabetes who were nonadherent to their oral diabetes drugs had 1.3 times higher medical costs and 4% higher total healthcare costs compared to those who were adherent, spending an average of $11,176 vs. $10,683 in 2016. While not all diabetes-related complications are avoidable, among people with diabetes who had diabetes-related complications, such as blindness, diabetic foot pain or chronic kidney disease, healthcare costs for adherent patients with diabetes-related complications were 9.4% lower than for those who were not adherent to their oral diabetes drugs in 2016. Nonadherence Amplifies Costs Employers spent more than $9,000 in total medical expenses per person with diabetes, nearly three times more than for individuals without diab Continue reading >>

International Diabetes Federation - Home

International Diabetes Federation - Home

Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes, accounting for around 90% of all diabetes cases. It is generally characterized by insulin resistance, where the body does not fully respond to insulin. Because insulin cannot work properly, blood glucose levels keep rising, releasing more insulin. For some people with type 2 diabetes this can eventually exhaust the pancreas, resulting in the body producing less and less insulin, causing even higher blood sugar levels (hyperglycaemia). Type 2 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed in older adults, but is increasingly seen in children, adolescents and younger adults due to rising levels of obesity, physical inactivity and poor diet. The cornerstone of type 2 diabetes management is a healthy diet, increased physical activity and maintaining a healthy body weight. Oral medication and insulin are also frequently prescribed to help control blood glucose levels. Several risk factors have been associated with type 2 diabetes and include: *Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a category of higher than normal blood glucose, but below the threshold for diagnosing diabetes. Changes in diet and physical activity related to rapid development and urbanisation have led to sharp increases in the numbers of people living with type 2 diabetes. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes are similar to those of type 1 diabetes and include: These symptoms can be mild or absent and so people with type 2 diabetes may live several years with the condition before being diagnosed. The cornerstone of managing type 2 diabetes is a healthy lifestyle, which includes a healthy diet, regular physical activity, not smoking, and maintaining a healthy body weight. Over time, a healthy lifestyle may not be enough to keep blood glucose levels under control and people w Continue reading >>

Who Global Report On Diabetes: A Summary

Who Global Report On Diabetes: A Summary

In this nationwide analysis we evaluated the early survival benefit of an early invasive strategy compared with an initial conservative strategy in diabetic patients presenting with non-ST-elevatio…" [more] Discover more Continue reading >>

Who Global Report On Diabetes: A Summary

Who Global Report On Diabetes: A Summary

Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organization, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland Correspondence Address: Gojka Roglic Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organization, Avenue Appia 20, 1211 Geneva Switzerland Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None The first WHO Global Report on Diabetes was launched on World Health Day 7 th April 2016 which was dedicated to Diabetes (1). Diabetes has been described in ancient scripts and recognized as a serious illness, but it does not appear to have been frequently encountered by physicians or healers. It is in the past few decades that human health and development is increasingly affected by the rising numbers of people with this condition. Diabetes, together with cardiovascular disease, cancer and chronic respiratory disease has been targeted in the Political Declaration on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs) at the Un High-level Political Meeting in 2011. In 2013 WHO member states endorsed a global monitoring framework for noncommunicable diseases, with 9 targets to be reached by 2025. Diabetes and its key risk factors are strongly reflected in the targets and indicators - reduction of exposure to unhealthy diet and physical inactivity, zero rise in the prevalence of diabetes, improved access to treatment and reduction of premature mortality. As part of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Member States have set an ambitious target to reduce premature mortality from NCDs - including diabetes - by one third; achieve universal health coverage; and provide access to affordable essential medicines - all by 2030( Keywords: Diabetes, global report, Continue reading >>

More in diabetes