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Who Diabetes Rates By Country

The 50 Countries With The Lowest Diabetes Rates

The 50 Countries With The Lowest Diabetes Rates

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 29 million Americans, or 9.3 percent, have either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Whether it's genetic or a result of a poor diet with little exercise, the prevalence of diabetes in America seems high, especially when you consider the $245 billion price tag Americans are paying for diabetes treatment annually. If the U.S. is in trouble with a diabetes epidemic, what does a country with low diabetes rates look like? Using data from the International Diabetes Federation's 2015 Diabetes Atlas, the following list looks at the countries with the lowest prevalence of diabetes. The data includes the prevalence of Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes (either diagnosed or undiagnosed), as well as the number of diabetes-related fatalities and the annual health care costs of a person who has diabetes. The countries are ranked by age-adjusted prevalence (percent of people who have diabetes adjusted to account for how occurrences of diabetes differ through age and different age structures in various countries). If countries had the same diabetes prevalence, the country with fewer diabetes-related deaths appears higher on the list. The average amount spent per person with diabetes for each country, as reported by the IDF, is also included. These amounts are measured in international dollars, a hypothetical currency with the same purchasing power parity of U.S. dollars in the U.S. at a given point in time. According to the IDF, the global prevalence rate of diabetes in 2015 was 8.8 percent. Each of these countries falls at least 12 percent below the global average, with some countries reporting over 150 percent below the global average rate of diabetes. This data shows that while there are many countries with long life expectancies and Continue reading >>

U.s. Leads Developed Nations In Diabetes Prevalence

U.s. Leads Developed Nations In Diabetes Prevalence

New and detailed data from the new International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Diabetes Atlas, released at this week’s World Diabetes Congress in Vancouver, Canada (Nov 30-Dec 4) reveals that, unsurprisingly, the United States has the highest prevalence (11% of the population aged 20-79 years) of diabetes among developed nations. This league table includes countries of the European Union plus Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Israel, Andorra, Norway, Switzerland, and the U.S. itself. And in terms of estimates of absolute numbers of people with diabetes in these nations, the U.S., with almost 30 million people with diabetes, has around two thirds the number of cases of all the other 37 nations in the developed nation league combined (46 million). In terms of prevalence, Singapore finished a close second to the U.S. (10.5%), followed by Malta (10%), Portugal (10%), and Cyprus (9.5%) in 3rd, 4th, and 5th place respectively. The countries with the lowest estimated prevalence in the 38 nation league were (lowest first), Lithuania, Estonia, and Ireland (all around 4%), followed by Sweden, Luxembourg, the U.K., and Australia (all around 5%). Canada, the host nation for the World Diabetes Congress, has the 12th highest prevalence, at 7%. “The prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide,” says Professor Nam Cho, chair of the IDF Diabetes Atlas committee. “While the exact cause of type 1 diabetes is currently unknown, trends such as urbanisation, unhealthy diets and reduced physical activity are all contributing lifestyle factors that increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.” The individual country data follows the release of the Diabetes Atlas summary, revealing that an estimated 415 million people globally have diabetes in 2015, wit Continue reading >>

Diabetes Rates May Double Worldwide By 2030

Diabetes Rates May Double Worldwide By 2030

April 26, 2004 -- The number of people with diabetes will double worldwide by 2030, according to new estimates from researchers at the World Health Organization (WHO) and several European universities. Although the U.S. is expected to experience a far more rapid increase in diabetes rates, the study suggests the greatest relative increases will be in the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, and India. That's because researchers say deaths due to infectious diseases as well as maternal and infant deaths in developing countries are expected to continue to drop in the next 30 years. Meanwhile, as diabetes rates climb in these areas, deaths due to related diseases, such as heart disease, will increase and account for a larger proportion of deaths in developing countries. According to the study, published in the May issue of Diabetes Care, the top 10 countries with the highest number of estimated diabetes cases for 2000 and 2030 are as follows: 2000 2030 Rank Country People with diabetes (millions) Country People with diabetes (millions) 1 India 31.7 India 79.4 2 China 20.8 China 42.3 3 U.S. 17.7 U.S. 30.3 4 Indonesia 8.4 Indonesia 21.3 5 Japan 6.8 Pakistan 13.9 6 Pakistan 5.2 Brazil 11.3 7 Russian Federation 4.6 Bangladesh 11.1 8 Brazil 4.6 Japan 8.9 9 Italy 4.3 Philippines 7.8 10 Bangladesh 3.2 Egypt 6.7 *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety information. The study shows that the three countries with the most people with diabetes are expected to remain India, China, and the U.S. But researchers predict an even higher increase than the CDC predicted in 2001. The CDC study projected Continue reading >>

Per Capita Sugar Consumption And Prevalence Of Diabetes Mellitus – Global And Regional Associations

Per Capita Sugar Consumption And Prevalence Of Diabetes Mellitus – Global And Regional Associations

Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a rampant epidemic worldwide. Causative factors and predisposition is postulated to be multi-factorial in origin and include changing life styles and diet. This paper examines the relationship between per capita sugar consumption and diabetes prevalence worldwide and with regard to territorial, economic and geographical regions. Data from 165 countries were extracted for analysis. Associations between the population prevalence of diabetes mellitus and per capita sugar consumption (PCSC) were examined using Pearson’s correlation coefficient (PCC) and multivariate linear regression analysis with, infant mortality rates (IMR, as an general index maternal and child care), low birth weight (LBW, as an index of biological programming) and obesity prevalence included in the model as confounders. Despite the estimates for PCSC being relatively crude, a strong positive correlation coefficient (0.599 with p < 0.001) was observed between prevalence of diabetes mellitus and per capita sugar consumption using data from all 165 countries. Asia had the highest correlation coefficient with a PCC of 0.660 (p < 0.001) with strongest correlation noted in Central (PCC = 0.968; p < 0.001), South (PCC = 0.684; p = 0.050) and South East Asia (PCC = 0.916; p < 0.001). Per capita sugar consumption (p < 0.001; Beta = 0.360) remained significant at the last stage as associations of DM prevalence (R2 = 0.458) in the multivariate backward linear regression model. The linear regression model was repeated with the data grouped according to the continent. Sugar was noted to be an independent association with DM only with regard to Asia (p < 0.001 Beta = 0.707) and South America (p = 0.010 Beta 0.550). When countries were categorized based on income PCS and DM demon Continue reading >>

Did Henry Viii Have Diabetes? How And By Who Was This Diagnosed? How Was He Treated For Diabetes?

Did Henry Viii Have Diabetes? How And By Who Was This Diagnosed? How Was He Treated For Diabetes?

Chances are he did not. Without the modern development of injectable insulin life expectancy would be pretty low. Simple low blood sugar could quickly drop a diabetic into hypoglycaemia. Even if you somehow managed to survive those things, kidney failure would mostly likely kill you without dialysis to treat it. Henry certainly had gout and was obese but diabetes was known as a condition which made urine and blood sweet, I personally don't know of any record of Henry showing these symptoms or of him having the ‘pissing evil’. If he had had it, it is likely his doctors could have identified it, even if there was very little they could do to treat it. Some treatments included being on horseback to prevent excess urination, drinking wine, over eating or a starvation diet. It wasn't until much later (1889) the role of the pancreas was discovered, then insulin and the differentiation into types 1 and 2. Perhaps the best evidence for Henry not having diabetes is his relatively long life span for the Early Modern period. Although he was certainly unhealthy and unwell, diabetes would have killed him far faster than how he actually died. Continue reading >>

How The Us Compares To The Nations With The Highest Diabetes Rates

How The Us Compares To The Nations With The Highest Diabetes Rates

Where diabetes is on the rise Diabetes is one of the largest health issues of the 21st century. According to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly 29 million people have diabetes in the U.S. — 9.1 percent of the population. How does the U.S. compare to other nations when it comes to levels of diabetes? Using data from the International Diabetes Federation to find the countries and territories with the highest rates of diabetes in 2015 (the most recent year available), the following is a ranking of countries with the highest diabetes rates in the world. The report from the IDF includes levels of diabetes prevalence for people aged 20 to 79, as well as the number of diabetes-related fatalities and total number of diabetes cases. The IDF prevalence figures are age-adjusted to account for different age structures in various countries. For context, also included is the average amount spent per person with diabetes for each country, as reported by the IDF. These amounts are measured in international dollars, a hypothetical currency with the same purchasing power parity of U.S. dollars in the U.S. at a given point in time. The data from the IDF includes the prevalence of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes (either diagnosed or undiagnosed). Type 1 occurs when the pancreas makes insufficient insulin; Type 2, the more common variety, occurs when the body has difficulty producing and using insulin. The ranking is dominated by small island nations, particularly in the Pacific Islands. Many countries in this region have dealt with malnutrition and inadequate food labeling, especially as they import more processed food. Countries in the Middle East also showed reported elevated levels of diabetes. Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Qatar all made the top 10. Not Continue reading >>

Countries With The Highest Prevalence Of Diabetes Worldwide In 2017*

Countries With The Highest Prevalence Of Diabetes Worldwide In 2017*

Premium This statistic depicts the countries with the highest prevalence of diabetes worldwide in 2017. The Marshall Islands was the country with the highest prevalence of diabetes, with some 33 percent of its population aged between 20 and 79 suffering from the disease. In that same year, approximately 13 percent of adults in the United States had diabetes, while only 7.7 percent of those in Japan had the disease. If left untreated diabetes can cause heart disease and stroke and can damage a persons eyes, kidneys and nerves. Statistics on "Diabetes" Everything On "Diabetes" in One Document: Edited and Divided into Handy Chapters. Including Detailed References. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Rates Are Rising In The Middle East

Diabetes Rates Are Rising In The Middle East

In recent years, parts of the Middle East have been experiencing a food-related public health crisis: an extreme rise in type-2 diabetes in the Arabian Peninsula region. The rate of diabetes in parts of the Arabian Peninsula is over twice the global average rate, and much higher than some other areas of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). And cases of type-2 diabetes outnumber cases of type-1 diabetes by a ratio of 10:1. According to the International Diabetes Federation Atlas, 19.3 percent of adults aged 20 to 79 in the United Arab Emirates are diabetic. In Bahrain, the percentage rises to 19.6—and the statistic jumps to 20 percent for Kuwait, Qatar, and Saudi Arabia. These five nations all rank within the top 15 nations in the world for highest rate of diabetes per capita. Also ranking within the top 40 are the MENA countries of Egypt, Oman, and Lebanon, though diabetes rates there are much closer to the global average. In contrast, diabetes prevalence for this age range is only five percent in the Gulf nation of Yemen. Qatar, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, and Saudi Arabia also rank in the top 15 countries for obesity; Qatar ranks highest, at number six. Additionally, high rates of smoking have led to increased rates of heart disease and high blood pressure. Last year, in Bahrain, nearly 50 percent of men over age 15 used tobacco products—and the percentage is expected to rise to 86.1 by 2025. Experts, concerned about the rapid increase in lifestyle diseases in this region, have looked to history and environmental factors to identify the cause. According to The Wall Street Journal, “the cause of the high prevalence of diabetes in the region is clear. Unhealthy lifestyles and urbanization are to blame—particularly in the Persian Gulf where the Continue reading >>

List Of Countries By Incidence Of Type 1 Diabetes Ages 0 To 14

List Of Countries By Incidence Of Type 1 Diabetes Ages 0 To 14

Save for later Position Country Incidence (per 100,000) 1 Finland 57.6 2 Sweden 43.1 3 Saudi Arabia 31.4 4 Norway 27.9 5 United Kingdom 24.5 6 USA 23.7 7 Australia 22.5 8 Kuwait 22.3 9 Denmark 22.2 10 Canada 21.7 11 Netherlands 18.6 12 Germany 18 12 New Zealand 18 14 Poland 17.3 15 Czech Republic 17.2 16 Estonia 17.1 17 Puerto Rico 16.8 18 Ireland 16.3 18 Montenegro 16.3 20 Malta 15.6 21 Luxembourg 15.5 22 Belgium 15.4 23 Cyprus 14.9 24 Iceland 14.7 25 Slovakia 13.6 26 Austria 13.3 27 Portugal 13.2 28 Spain 13 29 Serbia 12.9 30 United States Virgin Islands 12.8 31 France 12.2 32 Italy 12.1 32 Russian Federation 12.1 34 Qatar 11.4 35 Hungary 11.3 36 Slovenia 11.1 37 Israel 10.4 37 Greece 10.4 39 Bahamas 10.1 39 Sudan 10.1 41 Bulgaria 9.4 42 Switzerland 9.2 43 Croatia 9.1 44 Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 9 45 Algeria 8.6 46 Uruguay 8.3 47 Ukraine 8.1 48 Egypt 8 49 Lithuania 7.8 50 Brazil 7.7 51 Latvia 7.5 52 Tunisia 7.3 53 Argentina 6.8 54 Chile 6.6 55 Dominica 5.7 56 Belarus 5.6 57 Romania 5.4 58 Georgia 4.6 59 India 4.2 60 Macedonia 3.9 61 Taiwan 3.8 62 Iran 3.7 63 Antigua and Barbuda 3.5 63 Bosnia and Herzegovina 3.5 65 Jordan 3.2 66 Nigeria 2.9 67 Oman 2.5 67 Singapore 2.5 69 Japan 2.4 70 Cuba 2.3 71 Barbados 2 71 China, Hong Kong SAR 2 73 Mexico 1.5 74 Mauritius 1.4 75 Colombia 1.3 76 Uzbekistan 1.2 76 Tajikistan 1.2 78 Republic of Korea 1.1 79 United Republic of Tanzania 0.9 79 Paraguay 0.9 81 Zambia 0.8 82 China 0.6 83 Dominican Republic 0.5 83 Pakistan 0.5 83 Peru 0.5 86 Ethiopia 0.3 86 Thailand 0.3 88 Papua New Guinea 0.1 88 Venezuala 0.1 Source: The International Diabetes Federation. The data on estimates for incidence of Type 1 diabetes in children aged 0 to 14 comes from theInternational Diabetes Federation’s Diabetes Atlas, with the estimates being for 2011. The l Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevalence (per 1,000 inhabitants) of diabetes worldwide in 2000 - world average was 2.8%. no data ≤ 7.5 7.5–15 15–22.5 22.5–30 30–37.5 37.5–45 45–52.5 52.5–60 60–67.5 67.5–75 75–82.5 ≥ 82.5 Disability-adjusted life year for diabetes mellitus per 100,000 inhabitants in 2004 No data <100 100–200 200–300 300–400 400–500 500–600 600–700 700–800 800–900 900–1,000 1,000–1,500 >1,500 Globally, an estimated 422 million adults are living with diabetes mellitus, according to the latest 2016 data from the World Health Organization (WHO).[1] Diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly; previous 2013 estimates from the International Diabetes Federation put the number at 381 million people having diabetes.[2] The number is projected to almost double by 2030.[3] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 85-90% of all cases.[4][5] Increases in the overall diabetes prevalence rates largely reflect an increase in risk factors for type 2, notably greater longevity and being overweight or obese.[1] Diabetes mellitus occurs throughout the world, but is more common (especially type 2) in the more developed countries. The greatest increase in prevalence is, however, occurring in low- and middle-income countries[1] including in Asia and Africa, where most patients will probably be found by 2030.[3] The increase in incidence in developing countries follows the trend of urbanization and lifestyle changes, including increasingly sedentary lifestyles, less physically demanding work and the global nutrition transition, marked by increased intake of foods that are high energy-dense but nutrient-poor (often high in sugar and saturated fats, sometimes referred to as the Western pattern diet).[1][3] The risk of getting type 2 diabetes has been widely found to be associat Continue reading >>

Top 10 Countries With Highest Diabetes Rates In The World

Top 10 Countries With Highest Diabetes Rates In The World

Diabetes is a hormonal disorder whereby a person loses the ability to produce a substance called insulin which manages blood sugar levels. High levels of blood sugar can lead to organ failure, loss of sight, amputation, and many other complications that can even lead to death in certain situations. Millions of people are now dying every year from diabetes. The stigma from the disease may have subsided in the recent years due to people learning to manage and also live with the disease. But people have to know that the lives of people with diabetes are extremely different from those that live without it. You constantly have to watch what you eat, when you eat and how much of it you have to eat. If you are worrying whether you might have high blood sugar after having breakfast, you might have a completely different worry about a dramatic dip in blood sugar level that very day in the evening. U.S diabetes association is providing best help for the suffering patients to control it. Types of Diabetes There are two types of diabetes in the world. One is the type-I diabetes and the other is aptly named type-II diabetes. Yes I know; whoever came up with the names for these certainly didn’t give them much thought. On a more serious note, the Type-I diabetes is actually the more serious one. It is an autoimmune disease whereby the afflicted body starts destroying its own insulin cells. People with Type-I diabetes have to be really careful and they need insulin shots every day to survive. It is a good thing at least that only around 10% of diabetes cases are type-I. Type-II diabetes is a condition where a person cannot manage the insulin their body produces effectively. In most cases the condition can be managed with proper exercise, diet and daily medication. Only small percenta Continue reading >>

As An Indian Hindu, What Do You Wish Muslims Knew?

As An Indian Hindu, What Do You Wish Muslims Knew?

I do not mind you praying in my locality. Do not stop me praying in yours Don’t use the term ‘Intolerant’. we are way more tolerant than most of you Stop demanding separate favourable laws as per your religion. As a secular nation, we need a uniform civil code - one nation, one law. If you want one of the Sharia laws, make sure all sharia laws are applicable to you. Start admitting that your ancestors were Hindu. Majority of you are converted Muslims. Your great great-great-grandparents did not come from Arabic lands on camels. Condemn the wrongs of terrorist attacks openly. Don’t use the double standards of bad terrorism and good terrorism. Focus on educating your women and kids. Though this point is not applicable to Indian Muslims here - because they are already educated and hence on Quora. But they can pass the message to wider community and start working for their welfare rather than blaming the perceived corrupt ‘anti-Muslim’ government! Update: Many peaceful people disagreed ‘peacefully’ on the first point that they do wish non-Muslims on their festivals. They might be, because they are educated, but what about the majority? “As for offering congratulations for rituals of unbelief specific to another religion, then it is forbidden by agreement, such as congratulating them for their holidays and their fasting… But if a man is tried by that and he anticipates the need to repel some evil from them, then let him walk to them and say nothing but good and supplicate for them to receive guidance and direction. There is no harm in that.” - Source: Aḥkām Ahl al-Dhimmah 1/441 “It is narrated from Ahmad that it is forbidden to visit non-Muslims, congratulate them, or offer condolences for them in the same way it is an obligation to boycott a here Continue reading >>

Health: The High Cost Of Diabetes

Health: The High Cost Of Diabetes

24/04/2012 - Across OECD countries some 83 million people suffer from diabetes. On current trends, that will rise to almost 100 million by 2030. Speaking at the European Diabetes Leadership Forum in Copenhagen, OECD Deputy Director General Yves Leterme said, “Preventing and treating diabetes and its complications costs about €90 billion annually in Europe alone. With health budgets already under great pressure and national budgets severely strained, for the sake of our health and the health of our economies we must find ways to prevent and manage diabetes in a cost-effective manner.” Like other chronic diseases, diabetes reduces employment opportunities and earnings. In addition, diabetics are prone to depression, making it difficult to follow treatment guidelines. In the coming 10 years, more than two out of three people will be overweight or obese in some OECD countries. This has an impact on both their salaries and their health - across OECD countries, obese people earn up to 18% less than non-obese people. And they are 8 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. This jumps to 60 times more likely for the severely obese. Prevalence of diabetes in 2010, adults 20-79 years Source: IDF (2009), OECD Health at a Glance 2011 As with many diseases, prevention strategies to tackle obesity – promoting healthy nutrition and exercise - are more cost-effective than the treatment routinely provided by health services. Governments must work with the food and beverage industry, medical practices, schools and community groups to promote healthy life-styles. Denmark, Finland, France, Hungary have already passed legislation taxing foods rich in fat and sugar. OECD research shows that chronic diseases such as diabetes can be managed more efficiently through: Programmes to e Continue reading >>

America Has The Highest Rate Of Diabetes In The Developing World - While The Uk, Australia And Lithuania Are Among Those Nations With The Lowest Rates Of The Condition

America Has The Highest Rate Of Diabetes In The Developing World - While The Uk, Australia And Lithuania Are Among Those Nations With The Lowest Rates Of The Condition

The US has the highest prevalence of diabetes among all developed countries across the world, new data reveals. Almost 11 per cent of Americans between the ages of 20 and 79 suffers from the disease, according to data from the International Diabetes Federation. That’s an estimated 30 million adults across the country. Such is the scale of the issue in the US, the country had nearly two-thirds the total number of cases of all the other 37 developed nations combined, experts warned. In contrast, those nations have a total of 46 million cases between them. The International Diabetes Federation has revealed the US tops the league tables of developing countries with the highest prevalence of the disease, with 10.75 per cent of adults suffering type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Singapore and Malta come in second and third place PREVALENCE OF DIABETES IN ADULTS AGE 20-79 IN DEVELOPED COUNTRIES Top Ten - Highest prevalence % Bottom Ten - Lowest prevalence % 1. United States 10.75 1. Lithuania 3.97 2. Singapore 10.53 2. Estonia 4.37 3. Malta 9.92 3. Ireland 4.39 4. Portugal 9.86 4. Sweden 4.7 5. Cyprus 9.55 5. Luxembourg 4.73 6. Andorra 8.52 6. United Kingdom 4.73 7. Slovenia 7.77 7. Australia 5.06 8. Slovakia 7.76 8. Belgium 5.09 9. Spain 7.7 9. Italy 5.12 10. Israel 7.46 10. Greece 5.16 Experts said the high number of people in the US suffering diabetes, is in large part, due to the number living with type 2 diabetes. The condition is closely linked to obesity. Dr Petra Wilson, the CEO of IDF, called on governments to take actions, including introducing taxes on unhealthy food and drink to try and curb the obesity epidemic. He said: 'As rates of type 2 diabetes increase in many countries around the world, we urgently need preventative action. 'IDF asks governments to lead the way i Continue reading >>

Geography Of Type 1 Diabetes

Geography Of Type 1 Diabetes

The incidence of type 1 diabetes varies widely in both time and space. There is striking variation in the incidence of type 1 diabetes between one population and the next, and it is still unclear to what extent this is due to differences in genes or environment. Europe has the highest incidence, with peak rates in Finland and Sardinia. Other populations of European descent have high rates of type 1 diabetes, and it has been suggested that higher latitudes (both north and south) carry a higher risk, possibly related to lack of vitamin D from sunlight. There are many exceptions to this rule, however, and the incidence of type 1 diabetes has risen rapidly in populations previously considered immune. These include parts of India, the Middle East, and Sub-Saharan Africa. Asian populations have a low but rising incidence, and will make a major future contribution to the global burden of disease. Migrant studies have been of limited quality, but suggest that children adopt the risk of their host country. There are however important differences between the risk and phenotype of early onset diabetes in different ethnic populations within the same country, for example the USA. Continue reading >>

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