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Who: Diabetes Rates Skyrocketing Worldwide

Who: Diabetes Rates Skyrocketing Worldwide

Diabetes rates nearly doubled in the past three decades, largely due to increases in obesity and sugary diets, according to a report released Wednesday by the World Health Organization. The percentage of adults living with diabetes worldwide grew from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014. Overall, there was a nearly four-fold increase in worldwide cases: An estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, up from 108 million in 1980. The WHO describes diabetes as a serious, chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. In 2012, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, had diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. About 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year, according to the organization. More than 8.1 million Americans with diabetes don't know it, putting them at greater risk of complications. The disease can develop slowly over time. In 2012, 86 million Americans age 20 and older had prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar is higher than normal but doesn't yet qualify as diabetes. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States, killing about 69,000 Americans a year. The disease contributes to an additional 234,000 deaths each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. Worldwide, diabetes killed 1.5 million people in 2012, according to the WHO report. High blood sugar caused an additional 2.2 million deaths by increasing the risks of heart disease and other chronic conditions. About 43% of these deaths occur before the age of 70. The percentage of deaths attributable to high blood glucose or diabetes that occur prior to age 70 is higher in l Continue reading >>

Why Don't Non-north American Cultures With Daily High-carb Diets Of Rice Or Pasta Have Higher Rates Of Diabetes?

Why Don't Non-north American Cultures With Daily High-carb Diets Of Rice Or Pasta Have Higher Rates Of Diabetes?

Well, it is not only about pasta and rice, but about eating habits and lifestyle. And there is now evidence that overweight and obese rates (directly linked to diabetes) among kids in the Mediterranean Countries (the diet I know better and with some of the healthiest and skinnier countries) are growing very fast, being now higher than among US kids. I personally think that this is a consequence of how the Mediterranean families are now eating in a much more similar way than the Americans than ever before. I grew up in Spain and I live now in the US where I have developed my 32 Mondays Weight Loss Management Method to teach a practical way to go back to the basic points of nutrition and weight loss management. The drive to develop that method was precisely the differences I encountered between the Mediterranean Diet I grew up with and the American diet I experienced when I arrived to the US 7 years ago. Mediterranean families are now busier than ever. With the economy so bad, both partners in the families are working very hard and they don't have time anymore to shop for healthy groceries, cook and have meals together. They have now access to many convenient manufactured meals and cheap restaurants which they are taking benefit of. If we add that kids have less opportunity to exercise we can see that they will gain weight as a consequence. That's why the percentage of overweight and obese kids is increasing so much, being even ahead of the US. We will see very soon an increase in diabetes rates, the same it has been experienced in the US. They haven't realized about the problem yet, and educational campaigns haven't been launched, but I am expecting that if things continue the same the overweight and obese adult rates are going to increase each year when those kids becom Continue reading >>

Countries With The Highest Rates Of Diabetes

Countries With The Highest Rates Of Diabetes

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) due to insufficient secretion of insulin or insensitivity to this hormone. High levels of blood sugar can lead to severe consequences, including organ failure, loss of sight, neuropathy, coma, and even death. Stress, inactivity, nutritionally-poor and energy-dense diets, and being obese are not only correlated one with another, but can also work either independently or interdependently to decrease the human body’s ability to secrete insulin and its sensitivity to its actions. 10. New Caledonia (20%) The nation of New Caledonia consists of a number of small islands in the South Pacific Ocean. In 1999, this country, located just east of the continent of Australia, was afforded the status of being a "special collectivity" of France. With roots dating back to the days of French colonialism, the current populace is made up of a mix of Kanak (the indigenous people of New Caledonia), Europeans, and Polynesians, as well as many of Southeast Asian descent. Perhaps one of the reasons behind the country's high rate of diabetes is its limited domestic agricultural industry, which has resulted in making it harder for local residents of this tropical locale to have adequate access to a varied, healthy diet. 9. Mauritius (21%) The small country of Mauritius, with a population of just over one million people, is located just off the coast of Africa in the Indian Ocean. Despite being described as a virtual tropical paradise by both locals and tourists alike, Mauritius isn’t immune to the worldwide epidemic of rising rates of diabetes. Key among the known risk factors for this chronic disease are smoking and being overweight. According to 2014 statistics from the World Health Organization, almost forty Continue reading >>

Poorest Countries Have Highest Prevalence Of Diabetes

Poorest Countries Have Highest Prevalence Of Diabetes

Healthday News reported on a study from Quebec City which discovered that more diabetes cases are found in poorer countries even after adjusting for common risk factors. Dr. Gilles R. Dagenais and fellow researchers set out to see if economic levels of different countries around the world made a difference in diabetes prevalence. They analyzed the number of diabetes cases in 119,666 adults from three high-income (HIC), seven upper-middle-income (UMIC), four low-middle-income (LMIC), and four low-income (LIC) countries. Do Poorer Countries Get More Diabetes than Richer Countries? After adjusting for age and gender, researchers found that the poorer countries had a higher prevalence of diabetes cases and the richest countries had the lowest prevalence. After adjusting for all risk factors and ethnicity, researchers still found the poorer countries having a higher prevalence of diabetes than the richest countries. Other Factors Make a Difference Researchers also found that overall, diabetes prevalence was higher for males, those living in urban areas, for those having a low education versus a high education level and for those with a low physical activity level versus a higher physical activity level. Diabetes prevalence was also higher in those with a family history of diabetes, a higher waist-to-hip ratio and a higher BMI. The study authors concluded that “Conventional risk factors do not fully account for the higher prevalence of diabetes in LIC countries. These findings suggest that other factors are responsible for the higher prevalence of diabetes in LIC countries.” According to Healthday, “One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry. Several pharmaceutical companies provided unrestricted grants to fund the study.” Money Matters in Diab Continue reading >>

Per Capita Sugar Consumption And Prevalence Of Diabetes Mellitus – Global And Regional Associations

Per Capita Sugar Consumption And Prevalence Of Diabetes Mellitus – Global And Regional Associations

Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a rampant epidemic worldwide. Causative factors and predisposition is postulated to be multi-factorial in origin and include changing life styles and diet. This paper examines the relationship between per capita sugar consumption and diabetes prevalence worldwide and with regard to territorial, economic and geographical regions. Data from 165 countries were extracted for analysis. Associations between the population prevalence of diabetes mellitus and per capita sugar consumption (PCSC) were examined using Pearson’s correlation coefficient (PCC) and multivariate linear regression analysis with, infant mortality rates (IMR, as an general index maternal and child care), low birth weight (LBW, as an index of biological programming) and obesity prevalence included in the model as confounders. Despite the estimates for PCSC being relatively crude, a strong positive correlation coefficient (0.599 with p < 0.001) was observed between prevalence of diabetes mellitus and per capita sugar consumption using data from all 165 countries. Asia had the highest correlation coefficient with a PCC of 0.660 (p < 0.001) with strongest correlation noted in Central (PCC = 0.968; p < 0.001), South (PCC = 0.684; p = 0.050) and South East Asia (PCC = 0.916; p < 0.001). Per capita sugar consumption (p < 0.001; Beta = 0.360) remained significant at the last stage as associations of DM prevalence (R2 = 0.458) in the multivariate backward linear regression model. The linear regression model was repeated with the data grouped according to the continent. Sugar was noted to be an independent association with DM only with regard to Asia (p < 0.001 Beta = 0.707) and South America (p = 0.010 Beta 0.550). When countries were categorized based on income PCS and DM demon Continue reading >>

America Has The Highest Rate Of Diabetes In The Developing World - While The Uk, Australia And Lithuania Are Among Those Nations With The Lowest Rates Of The Condition

America Has The Highest Rate Of Diabetes In The Developing World - While The Uk, Australia And Lithuania Are Among Those Nations With The Lowest Rates Of The Condition

The US has the highest prevalence of diabetes among all developed countries across the world, new data reveals. Almost 11 per cent of Americans between the ages of 20 and 79 suffers from the disease, according to data from the International Diabetes Federation. That’s an estimated 30 million adults across the country. Such is the scale of the issue in the US, the country had nearly two-thirds the total number of cases of all the other 37 developed nations combined, experts warned. In contrast, those nations have a total of 46 million cases between them. The International Diabetes Federation has revealed the US tops the league tables of developing countries with the highest prevalence of the disease, with 10.75 per cent of adults suffering type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Singapore and Malta come in second and third place PREVALENCE OF DIABETES IN ADULTS AGE 20-79 IN DEVELOPED COUNTRIES Top Ten - Highest prevalence % Bottom Ten - Lowest prevalence % 1. United States 10.75 1. Lithuania 3.97 2. Singapore 10.53 2. Estonia 4.37 3. Malta 9.92 3. Ireland 4.39 4. Portugal 9.86 4. Sweden 4.7 5. Cyprus 9.55 5. Luxembourg 4.73 6. Andorra 8.52 6. United Kingdom 4.73 7. Slovenia 7.77 7. Australia 5.06 8. Slovakia 7.76 8. Belgium 5.09 9. Spain 7.7 9. Italy 5.12 10. Israel 7.46 10. Greece 5.16 Experts said the high number of people in the US suffering diabetes, is in large part, due to the number living with type 2 diabetes. The condition is closely linked to obesity. Dr Petra Wilson, the CEO of IDF, called on governments to take actions, including introducing taxes on unhealthy food and drink to try and curb the obesity epidemic. He said: 'As rates of type 2 diabetes increase in many countries around the world, we urgently need preventative action. 'IDF asks governments to lead the way i Continue reading >>

Which Countries Have The Highest Rates Of Diabetes?

Which Countries Have The Highest Rates Of Diabetes?

The small island of Nauru in the South Pacific is believed to have the highest prevalence of diabetes in the world with a massive 31% of adults between 20 and 79 suffering from either type-1 or type-2 diabetes in 2010. Obesity is the primary reason for the high diabetes rates in Nauru with more than 95% of the population classified as either overweight or obese making Nauru the fattest nation on the planet. This is due mainly to a shift away from traditional foods such as fish and coconuts to diets high in refined carbohydrates and cheap, high fat beef and lamb offcuts which are typically exported to South Pacific nations from New Zealand and Australia because they are unfit for either local consumption or export to the more lucrative European markets. Prescription Weight Loss - Learn About Obesity Treatment Learn About an FDA-Approved Medication That May Help Chronic Weight Management. Prescription treatment website The incidence of diabetes in other countries varies dramatically from as high as 12-18% in the Middle East to as low as 2-3% in some African countries. A study, published in the journal Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice last year, estimated the prevalence of diabetes for adults aged 20-79 for every country in the world. The following table lists the 10 countries that were calculated to have the highest prevalence of diabetes in 2010. The prevalence estimates are age standardised to allow better cross-country comparisons. Country Diabetes Prevalence Nauru 30.9% Untied Arab Emirates 18.7% Saudi Arabia 16.8% Mauritius 16.2% Bahrain 15.4% Reunion 15.3% Kuwait 14.6% Oman 13.4% Tonga 13.4% Malaysia 11.6% The prevalence of diabetes in the United States is estimated to be 10.3% which is relatively high. By comparison, diabetes rates are 3.6% in the United Kin Continue reading >>

11 Countries With The Highest Diabetes Rates In The World

11 Countries With The Highest Diabetes Rates In The World

Diabetes is something most of us don’t consider a risk until it strikes, for which the probability is quite high in each of the 11 countries with the highest diabetes rates in the world. Just like in our previous list of the 11 countries with the highest cancer rates, the occurrence of this certain disease are far more in these countries than in the rest of the world for one reason or another. Diabetes has been recorded and observed since the early known civilizations. First characterized by excessive urinating, “diabetes” literally translates to “to pass through”. The term was first seen in usage in an ancient Greek doctor’s diary. In the early ages of civilization, diabetes was known under various names which were mainly associated with its symptoms, such as “honey urine” in India, where doctors observed that patients’ urine attracts ants. However, in the distant past, diabetes was considered a rarity. This is mainly attributed to the physically active lifestyle and balanced diet that people from ancient times had. With the combination of those two, developing diabetes, especially type two, is not easy. However, nowadays people tend to live quite unhealthy and in a quite unhealthy environment. Type two diabetes caused by excessive weight and lack of exercise, which in turn builds up insulin tolerance, has gained immense prevalence, especially in developed countries. Furthermore, type 1 diabetes cases have increased too. The cause behind type one diabetes remains unknown to this day but the disease mainly manifests itself through the destruction of beta cells and thus, insulin. The problem with both types of diabetes is mainly in the fact that people who are considered healthy or not otherwise prone to obesity or bad lifestyle related diseases can hav Continue reading >>

The Rate Of Diabetes Has More Than Doubled In Africa And No One Is Ready For It

The Rate Of Diabetes Has More Than Doubled In Africa And No One Is Ready For It

There are now four times as many people in the world living with diabetes today than in 1980 and poor diet and a lack of exercise are largely blamed, according to a report by the World Health Organization. In Africa, the prevalence of diabetes has more than doubled in that time, which may be due to better personal incomes versus poor public spending. While the rate of diabetes remains comparatively low in Africa, the number of people living with diabetes has jumped from 4 million in 1980, to 25 million in 2014. For one of the world’s youngest regions, that number is worrying for a number of reasons. The prevalence of diabetes in African adults has more than doubled AfricaThe AmericasEastern MediterraneanEuropeSouth-East AsiaWestern PacificTotal3.1%55.95.34.14.44.719807.1%8.313.77.38.68.48.52014AfricaThe AmericasEastern MediterraneanEuropeSouth-East AsiaWestern PacificTotal7.1%8.313.77.38.68.48.53.1%55.95.34.14.44.7 Data: World Health Organization (WHO) Since diabetes is a lifestyle disease, an increase in the disease could be a symptom of growing prosperity, as people are able to afford more processed foods. It’s also a sign of a more sedentary lifestyle as more people spend their working days sitting down. However, Africa’s relative prosperity has not yet translated to more sound public healthcare systems. In developing countries, diabetes is an added burden to states still dealing with historical sociopolitical inequalities and weak economies. Plus, developing countries have other illnesses—biological and social—whose immediate effects have seemed more pressing than diabetes. “Most of these countries are also burdened by communicable diseases such as HIV, tuberculosis, malaria and diarrheal diseases. Political unrest, poverty and poor leadership with subst Continue reading >>

Climates On Incidence Of Childhood Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus In 72 Countries

Climates On Incidence Of Childhood Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus In 72 Countries

We are aimed to systematically assess the worldwide trend in incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus (CT1DM) from 1965 to 2012 and to discuss whether climate affect incidence of CT1DM. We searched the relevant literatures in detail to judge the effect of different climates on incidence of CT1DM. The climates included Mediterranean, monsoon, oceanic, continental, savanna, and rainforest. According to different climates, we further researched relevant factor such as sunshine durations and latitudes. The overall incidence of CT1DM in 72 countries was 11.43 (95% CI 10.31–12.55) per 100,000 children/yr. The incidence of CT1DM in Oceanic climate [10.56 (8.69–12.42)] is highest compared with other climates; the incidence in 40°–66°34′N/S [14.71 (12.30–17.29)] is higher than other latitude groups; the incidence in sunshine durations with 3–4 hours per day [15.17 (11.14–19.20)] is highest compared with other two groups; the incidence of CT1DM from 2000 to 2012 [19.58 (14.55–24.60)] is higher than other periods; all p < 0.01. Incidence of CT1DM was increasing from 1965 to 2012, but incidence in Oceanic climate is higher than other climates. Furthermore, it is higher in centers with higher latitude and lower sunshine durations. The climates might play a key role in inducing CT1DM. The worldwide variation in the incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (TIDM) among children has been confirmed to be increased over the past 50 years1,2,3, especially among children of 10–14 years of age4. Childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus (CTIDM) is a syndrome caused by β-cell destruction that results in progressive or acute insulin deficiency5,6. While we know that children with diabetes aged less than 7 years are at high risk of cognitive dysfunction, and poor glycaemic co Continue reading >>

World Health Day: India Among Top 3 Countries With High Diabetic Population

World Health Day: India Among Top 3 Countries With High Diabetic Population

After tightening laws on tobacco and alcohol, experts now want a high tax on sugary drinks as they cause a sugar high that leads to insulin resistance. Ahead of World Health Day (April 7), the Lancet study (to be published online late tonight) said there is a fourfold rise in the number of diabetics – from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 and half of them live in India, China, USA, Brazil and Indonesia. According to the Lancet study, China, India and USA are among the top three countries with a high number of diabetic population. While the numbers climbed from 20.4 million in China in 1980 to 102.9 million in 2014, the rise has been equally dramatic in India from 11.9 million in 1980 to 64.5 million in India. Prevalence of diabetes has more than doubled for men in India and China (3.7 per cent to 9.1 per cent in India and 3.5 per cent to 9.9 per cent in China). It has also increased by 50 per cent among women in China (5.0 per cent to 7.6 per cent) and 80 per cent among women in India (4.6 per cent to 8.3 per cent). Dietary patterns must change, with more fibre and protein and less of sugar and starches in the diet. A high tax on sugary drinks is needed, as they cause a sugar high that leads to insulin resistance, Dr K Srinath Reddy, President of Public Health Foundation of India told The Indian Express. The government launched an adult screening programme for diabetes and hypertension in some districts, but it has had an inadequate response. Unless early detection and effective treatment become a part of routinely available primary health services, we will fail in protecting persons with diabetes from having serious complications. Urban planning must support safe and pleasurable physical activity, especially active commuting. Public education on the prevent Continue reading >>

How The Us Compares To The Nations With The Highest Diabetes Rates

How The Us Compares To The Nations With The Highest Diabetes Rates

Where diabetes is on the rise Diabetes is one of the largest health issues of the 21st century. According to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly 29 million people have diabetes in the U.S. — 9.1 percent of the population. How does the U.S. compare to other nations when it comes to levels of diabetes? Using data from the International Diabetes Federation to find the countries and territories with the highest rates of diabetes in 2015 (the most recent year available), the following is a ranking of countries with the highest diabetes rates in the world. The report from the IDF includes levels of diabetes prevalence for people aged 20 to 79, as well as the number of diabetes-related fatalities and total number of diabetes cases. The IDF prevalence figures are age-adjusted to account for different age structures in various countries. For context, also included is the average amount spent per person with diabetes for each country, as reported by the IDF. These amounts are measured in international dollars, a hypothetical currency with the same purchasing power parity of U.S. dollars in the U.S. at a given point in time. The data from the IDF includes the prevalence of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes (either diagnosed or undiagnosed). Type 1 occurs when the pancreas makes insufficient insulin; Type 2, the more common variety, occurs when the body has difficulty producing and using insulin. The ranking is dominated by small island nations, particularly in the Pacific Islands. Many countries in this region have dealt with malnutrition and inadequate food labeling, especially as they import more processed food. Countries in the Middle East also showed reported elevated levels of diabetes. Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Qatar all made the top 10. Not Continue reading >>

Diabetes Rates May Double Worldwide By 2030

Diabetes Rates May Double Worldwide By 2030

April 26, 2004 -- The number of people with diabetes will double worldwide by 2030, according to new estimates from researchers at the World Health Organization (WHO) and several European universities. Although the U.S. is expected to experience a far more rapid increase in diabetes rates, the study suggests the greatest relative increases will be in the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, and India. That's because researchers say deaths due to infectious diseases as well as maternal and infant deaths in developing countries are expected to continue to drop in the next 30 years. Meanwhile, as diabetes rates climb in these areas, deaths due to related diseases, such as heart disease, will increase and account for a larger proportion of deaths in developing countries. According to the study, published in the May issue of Diabetes Care, the top 10 countries with the highest number of estimated diabetes cases for 2000 and 2030 are as follows: 2000 2030 Rank Country People with diabetes (millions) Country People with diabetes (millions) 1 India 31.7 India 79.4 2 China 20.8 China 42.3 3 U.S. 17.7 U.S. 30.3 4 Indonesia 8.4 Indonesia 21.3 5 Japan 6.8 Pakistan 13.9 6 Pakistan 5.2 Brazil 11.3 7 Russian Federation 4.6 Bangladesh 11.1 8 Brazil 4.6 Japan 8.9 9 Italy 4.3 Philippines 7.8 10 Bangladesh 3.2 Egypt 6.7 *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety information. The study shows that the three countries with the most people with diabetes are expected to remain India, China, and the U.S. But researchers predict an even higher increase than the CDC predicted in 2001. The CDC study projected Continue reading >>

List Of Countries By Incidence Of Type 1 Diabetes Ages 0 To 14

List Of Countries By Incidence Of Type 1 Diabetes Ages 0 To 14

Save for later Position Country Incidence (per 100,000) 1 Finland 57.6 2 Sweden 43.1 3 Saudi Arabia 31.4 4 Norway 27.9 5 United Kingdom 24.5 6 USA 23.7 7 Australia 22.5 8 Kuwait 22.3 9 Denmark 22.2 10 Canada 21.7 11 Netherlands 18.6 12 Germany 18 12 New Zealand 18 14 Poland 17.3 15 Czech Republic 17.2 16 Estonia 17.1 17 Puerto Rico 16.8 18 Ireland 16.3 18 Montenegro 16.3 20 Malta 15.6 21 Luxembourg 15.5 22 Belgium 15.4 23 Cyprus 14.9 24 Iceland 14.7 25 Slovakia 13.6 26 Austria 13.3 27 Portugal 13.2 28 Spain 13 29 Serbia 12.9 30 United States Virgin Islands 12.8 31 France 12.2 32 Italy 12.1 32 Russian Federation 12.1 34 Qatar 11.4 35 Hungary 11.3 36 Slovenia 11.1 37 Israel 10.4 37 Greece 10.4 39 Bahamas 10.1 39 Sudan 10.1 41 Bulgaria 9.4 42 Switzerland 9.2 43 Croatia 9.1 44 Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 9 45 Algeria 8.6 46 Uruguay 8.3 47 Ukraine 8.1 48 Egypt 8 49 Lithuania 7.8 50 Brazil 7.7 51 Latvia 7.5 52 Tunisia 7.3 53 Argentina 6.8 54 Chile 6.6 55 Dominica 5.7 56 Belarus 5.6 57 Romania 5.4 58 Georgia 4.6 59 India 4.2 60 Macedonia 3.9 61 Taiwan 3.8 62 Iran 3.7 63 Antigua and Barbuda 3.5 63 Bosnia and Herzegovina 3.5 65 Jordan 3.2 66 Nigeria 2.9 67 Oman 2.5 67 Singapore 2.5 69 Japan 2.4 70 Cuba 2.3 71 Barbados 2 71 China, Hong Kong SAR 2 73 Mexico 1.5 74 Mauritius 1.4 75 Colombia 1.3 76 Uzbekistan 1.2 76 Tajikistan 1.2 78 Republic of Korea 1.1 79 United Republic of Tanzania 0.9 79 Paraguay 0.9 81 Zambia 0.8 82 China 0.6 83 Dominican Republic 0.5 83 Pakistan 0.5 83 Peru 0.5 86 Ethiopia 0.3 86 Thailand 0.3 88 Papua New Guinea 0.1 88 Venezuala 0.1 Source: The International Diabetes Federation. The data on estimates for incidence of Type 1 diabetes in children aged 0 to 14 comes from theInternational Diabetes Federation’s Diabetes Atlas, with the estimates being for 2011. The l Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Exploding In Developing And Middle-income Countries

Diabetes Is Exploding In Developing And Middle-income Countries

(Nam Y. Huh / Associated Press) A new global assessment of diabetes finds that the number of adult diabetics continues to rise dramatically, driven by aging populations, sedentary lifestyles and, in some areas, a heightened genetic vulnerability to the disease. The growth has been particularly notable in developing and middle-income countries. The assessment makes clear that world health leaders can now make a pretty safe prediction: Their goal for the year 2025 of holding worldwide diabetes prevalence to the level that prevailed in 2010 will not be met. In 2014 the number of adult diabetics stood at 422 million, up from 108 million in 1980. By 2025, the number of diabetic adults worldwide is expected to surpass 700 million. By then, 12.8% of men and 10.4% of women are expected to have diabetes, a metabolic disorder that increases two- to fourfold a sufferer's risk of having a heart attack or stroke. The new research was published in the journal Lancet. Data were compiled and analyzed by an international team of public health researchers under a grant from Britain's Wellcome Trust. Between 1980 and 2014, 120 countries saw the prevalence of diabetes across the age spectrum double for men, and 87 countries experienced a doubling of diabetes rates among women. Nowhere did diabetes rates significantly decline in that period. In the process, men by 2014 took on the greater burden of diabetes from women, who in 1980 were more likely than men to suffer from the disorder. Across the islands of Polynesia and Micronesia, roughly 1 in 4 adults has diabetes — up 15 percentage points since 1980. And the countries of the Middle East and North Africa, where roughly 15% of adults have diabetes, have seen increases in the disorder almost as great. In 1980, higher-income European count Continue reading >>

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