diabetestalk.net

Who Diabetes Diagnosis

New Thresholds For Diagnosis Of Diabetes In Pregnancy

New Thresholds For Diagnosis Of Diabetes In Pregnancy

Share Midwives should diagnose women with gestational diabetes if they either have a fasting plasma glucose level of 5.6 mmol/litre or above, or a 2-hour plasma glucose level of 7.8 mmol/litre or above, according to NICE. Midwives should diagnose women with gestational diabetes if they either have a fasting plasma glucose level of 5.6 mmol/litre or above, or a 2-hour plasma glucose level of 7.8 mmol/litre or above, according to NICE. Updated guidelines on diabetes in pregnancy lower the fasting plasma glucose thresholds for diagnosis, and include new recommendations on self-management for women with type 1 diabetes. Around 35,000 women have either pre-existing or gestational diabetes each year in England and Wales. Nearly 90 per cent of the women who have diabetes during pregnancy, have gestational diabetes, which may or may not resolve after pregnancy. Rates have increased in recent years to due rising obesity rates among the general population, and increasing number of pregnancies among older women. Of the women with diabetes in pregnancy who do not have gestational diabetes, 7.5 per cent of women have type 1 diabetes, and the remainder have type 2 diabetes, both of which have also increased recently. Following a number of developments, such as new technologies and research on diagnosis and treatment of gestational diabetes, NICE has updated its guidelines on diabetes in pregnancy. Diagnosis Among the new recommendations are that a woman should be diagnosed with gestational diabetes if she has either a fasting plasma glucose level of 5.6 mmol/litre or above, or a 2-hour plasma glucose level of 7.8 mmol/litre or above. NICE says this could help tackle current variation in the number in the glucose levels used for diagnosing gestational diabetes, and may lead to an incr Continue reading >>

Which Home Based Equipment Is Best For Diagnosis Of Diabetes For The Best Results?

Which Home Based Equipment Is Best For Diagnosis Of Diabetes For The Best Results?

Hello Shamshir, I am not a doctor nor am I a medical practitioner in any way. But if you really need to have these test. I suggest you look for a blood sugar meter online and compare them for price and reliability. Then bring the list to your doctor and have him pick one for you so that you would have a professional opinion on the matter. Now there is a guide online on how to check blood sugar that I found: Am I Diabetic? How to Test Your Own Blood Sugar To Find Out Home Blood Glucose Test If you have any questions ask your doctor. Continue reading >>

Misdiagnosis By Design - The Story Behind The Ada Diagnostic Criteria

Misdiagnosis By Design - The Story Behind The Ada Diagnostic Criteria

This is the little known story of how--and why--the American Diabetes Association keeps doctors from diagnosing Type 2 diabetes early. If you wait for your doctor to give you a diabetes diagnosis, the chances are good that by the time you are diagnosed you'll already have one or more serious diabetic complications. These include retinal damage, nerve damage, and early kidney damage. It is now known that these diabetic complications only develop after years of chronic exposure to high blood sugars. But, tragically, the way that today's doctors are forced to diagnose diabetes ensures that you will get no warning that you are experiencing those chronically high blood sugars until they have reached a level so high they have already done irreversible damage. This is not an accident. Years ago a committee of medical experts whose task was to decide how diabetes should be diagnosed decided it was better to avoid diagnosing patients with diabetes than to give them early warning that they were suffering from elevated blood sugars. As a result, these medical experts intentionally set the standards for diagnosing diabetes artificially high, so that most patients do not get diagnosed until their blood sugar has reached a level where they may soon develop the diabetic eye disease that leads to blindness. Their reasons for doing this this made sense in the late 1970s when these diagnostic criteria were originally crafted. At that time there was no treatment that could help people with early diabetes, while delivering a diabetes diagnosis could make it impossible for their patients to get health or life insurance. These circumstances led the experts to conclude that an early diagnosis of diabetes was more likely to harm than help their patients. So they defined diagnostic criteria tha Continue reading >>

Diagnosis And Classification Of Diabetes Mellitus

Diagnosis And Classification Of Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: DEFINITION AND DESCRIPTION OF DIABETES MELLITUS Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. The chronic hyperglycemia of diabetes is associated with long-term damage, dysfunction, and failure of differentorgans, especially the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart, and blood vessels. Several pathogenic processes are involved in the development of diabetes. These range from autoimmune destruction of the β-cells of the pancreas with consequent insulin deficiency to abnormalities that result in resistance to insulin action. The basis of the abnormalities in carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism in diabetes is deficient action of insulin on target tissues. Deficient insulin action results from inadequate insulin secretion and/or diminished tissue responses to insulin at one or more points in the complex pathways of hormone action. Impairment of insulin secretion and defects in insulin action frequently coexist in the same patient, and it is often unclear which abnormality, if either alone, is the primary cause of the hyperglycemia. Symptoms of marked hyperglycemia include polyuria, polydipsia, weight loss, sometimes with polyphagia, and blurred vision. Impairment of growth and susceptibility to certain infections may also accompany chronic hyperglycemia. Acute, life-threatening consequences of uncontrolled diabetes are hyperglycemia with ketoacidosis or the nonketotic hyperosmolar syndrome. Long-term complications of diabetes include retinopathy with potential loss of vision; nephropathy leading to renal failure; peripheral neuropathy with risk of foot ulcers, amputations, and Charcot joints; and autonomic neuropathy causing gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and cardiovascul Continue reading >>

Why Are The Diabetes Test Results Negative Despite Having The Symptoms?

Why Are The Diabetes Test Results Negative Despite Having The Symptoms?

There is no way that you have had diabetes since age 9. If the symptoms that you had were caused by diabetes, you would have had an elevated blood glucose. So the symptoms are resulting from something else. If you had had a ton of bacteria in your blood you would not have survived the week without very aggressive treatment. I guess that that was not the case. If anything, you are best off forgetting the diagnoses you have made for yourself, and try to find a real diagnosis. You HAVE TO accept that the diagnosis may involve psychological issues, and that psychiatric treatment that might include medication. I also think that looking for other physical problems is also in order Go back to your doctor: - Don't make any diagnosis, that is their job. Speaking of diabetes with a normal blood glucose level, and speaking of a massive prolonged bacteremia makes you sound just a little bit...well..."off." - Accept the possibility of needing psychological help. Maybe ask directly for a mental health referral. - Ask what other diseases might be going on medically. DON'T tell the doctor what it is without appropriate lab tests, X-rays or whatever. You want to get into the best medical and psychological condition as fast as possible. Those girls are waiting for you. Continue reading >>

Discordance In The Diagnosis Of Diabetes: Comparison Between Hba1c And Fasting Plasma Glucose

Discordance In The Diagnosis Of Diabetes: Comparison Between Hba1c And Fasting Plasma Glucose

Abstract HbA1c has been introduced as a complementary diagnostic test for diabetes, but its impact on disease prevalence is unknown. This study evaluated the concordance between HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in the diagnosis of diabetes in the general population. Materials and methods The study was designed as a population based investigation, with participants being sampled from the Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Blood samples were collected after overnight fasting and analyzed within 4 hours after collection. HbA1c was measured with high pressure liquid chromatography (Arkray Adams, Japan). FPG was measured by the hexokinase method (Advia Autoanalyzer; Bayer Diagnostics, Germany). Diabetes was defined as HbA1c ≥ 6.5% or FPG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L. Prediabetes was classified as HbA1c between 5.7% and 6.4%. The study included 3523 individuals (2356 women) aged 30 years and above. Based on the HbA1c test, the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes was 9.7% (95%CI, 8.7–10.7%; n = 342) and 34.6% (33.0–36.2; n = 1219), respectively. Based on the FPG test, the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes was 6.3% (95%CI, 5.5–7.2%; n = 223) and 12.1% (11.1–13.2; n = 427). Among the 427 individuals identified by FPG as "pre-diabetes", 28.6% were classified as diabetes by HbA1c test. The weighted kappa statistic of concordance between HbA1c and FPG was 0.55, with most of the discordance being in the prediabetes group. These data indicate that there is a significant discordance in the diagnosis of diabetes between FPG and HbA1c measurements, and the discordance could have significant impact on clinical practice. FPG appears to underestimate the burden of undiagnosed diabetes. Figures Citation: Ho-Pham LT, Nguyen UDT, Tran TX, Nguyen TV (2017) Discordance in the diagnosis of dia Continue reading >>

How To Deal With The Diagnosis Of Diabetes

How To Deal With The Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Common Emotional Reactions Ann Bloise was so ashamed to learn she had type 2 diabetes that she didn't tell her family for three weeks. "I thought I got diabetes because I'm so overweight," the Dallas resident says. "I really felt that it was my fault." On top of her shame, she was terrified about how diabetes would affect her vision, her feet, and her heart. She also became depressed. "I was staring mortality in the face," she says. "Here I was, 44 years old, and I hadn't done half of the things I wanted to do in life." Being diagnosed with diabetes is an emotional experience that can arouse difficult feelings. Some people deny their illness or feel outrage. Others become depressed, feel tremendous guilt and shame, or are stricken with fear about the future. "All of these are common emotional reactions," says John Zrebiec, M.S.W., CDE, associate director of mental health services at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and a member of the Diabetic Living editorial advisory board. "Diabetes can often bring with it a normal grief reaction. But the stages and intensity will differ from person to person, depending on life experiences," he says. Healthy Ways to Deal with a New Diagnosis Zrebiec says it may take as long as a year to come to terms with diabetes. If you're in the doldrums, try not to let negative feelings interfere with taking care of your health. Here are some strategies to keep them in check: Educate Yourself: "The more you learn, the more empowered you'll feel," says Paula Wilkerson of Albany, New York, who was initially terrified by her diagnosis. "Now I know the diagnosis doesn't mean life is over. You can begin an even better life that includes taking better care of yourself and understanding your body," she says. Open Up to Family and Friends: Rather tha Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

"Diabetes" redirects here. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.[7] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger.[2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.[3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.[2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced.[8] There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:[2] Type 1 DM results from the pancreas's failure to produce enough insulin.[2] This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes".[2] The cause is unknown.[2] Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[9] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2] Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels.[2] Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.[2] Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with t Continue reading >>

What Are The Nursing Diagnosis For Diabetes Type 2?

What Are The Nursing Diagnosis For Diabetes Type 2?

Diabetes mellitus occurs when there is a decrease in the production of insulin by the pancreas, or the cell does not respond to the insulin present in the body, also known as insulin resistance. Due to this, the body is unable to absorb glucose by the cells. The 3 main types of diabetes are: Type 1 diabetes or Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, where insulin is not produced in the body and the person is required to take insulin injections Type 2 diabetes occurs due to insulin resistance, where the insulin present in the body is not effectively utilized Gestational diabetes is when diabetes affects a pregnant woman, who did not have it earlier. Some other types of diabetes are cystic fibrosis related diabetes, congenital diabetes, diabetes induced due to high doses of glucocorticoids and monogenic diabetes. 1. Risk for Infection Symptoms: Infection can be caused due to high glucose levels, changes in circulation or decrease in functioning of leukocytes. Existing UTI or respiratory infection can also be a risk factor. Nursing interventions Observe for signs of infection or inflammation. Ensure good hygiene is maintained. Rotate IV sites and maintain asepsis. Provide skin care and keep skin dry. Administer antibiotics as required. 2. Risk for Imbalanced Nutrition The nutritional needs of the body are not met and are less than the requirements. Symptoms: Insulin deficiency Reduced intake of food or fluids, which can be caused due to anorexia, nausea, abdominal pain, gastric fullness or altered consciousness Stress hormones can also get released Weight loss, weakness, diarrhea, dilute urine, frequent urination, and fatigue, etc. Nursing interventions: Weigh the patient daily, get dietary recall and compare with current intake of food. Check bowel sounds and make reports of Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

It's important for diabetes to be diagnosed early so treatment can be started as soon as possible. If you experience the symptoms of diabetes, visit your GP as soon as possible. They'll ask about your symptoms and may request blood and urine tests. Your urine sample will be tested for glucose. Urine doesn't normally contain glucose, but glucose can overflow through the kidneys and into your urine if you have diabetes. If your urine contains glucose, a specialised blood test known as glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) can be used to determine whether you have diabetes. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) In people who have been diagnosed with diabetes, the glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) test is often used to show how well their diabetes is being controlled. The HbA1c test gives your average blood glucose levels over the previous two to three months. The results can indicate whether the measures you're taking to control your diabetes are working. If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, it's recommended you have your HbA1c measured at least twice a year. However, you may need to have your HbA1c measured more frequently if: you've recently been diagnosed with diabetes your blood glucose remains too high your treatment plan has been changed Unlike other tests, such as the glucose tolerance test (GTT), the HbA1c test can be carried out at any time of day and doesn't require any special preparation, such as fasting. However, the test can't be used in certain situations, such as during pregnancy. The advantages associated with the HbA1c test make it the preferred method of assessing how well blood glucose levels are being controlled in a person with diabetes. HbA1c can also be used as a diagnostic test for diabetes and as a screening test for people at high risk of diabetes. HbA1c as a diagno Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: Screening And Diagnosis

Diabetes Mellitus: Screening And Diagnosis

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common diagnoses made by family physicians. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to blindness, limb amputation, kidney failure, and vascular and heart disease. Screening patients before signs and symptoms develop leads to earlier diagnosis and treatment, but may not reduce rates of end-organ damage. Randomized trials show that screening for type 2 diabetes does not reduce mortality after 10 years, although some data suggest mortality benefits after 23 to 30 years. Lifestyle and pharmacologic interventions decrease progression to diabetes in patients with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance. Screening for type 1 diabetes is not recommended. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening for abnormal blood glucose and type 2 diabetes in adults 40 to 70 years of age who are overweight or obese, and repeating testing every three years if results are normal. Individuals at higher risk should be considered for earlier and more frequent screening. The American Diabetes Association recommends screening for type 2 diabetes annually in patients 45 years and older, or in patients younger than 45 years with major risk factors. The diagnosis can be made with a fasting plasma glucose level of 126 mg per dL or greater; an A1C level of 6.5% or greater; a random plasma glucose level of 200 mg per dL or greater; or a 75-g two-hour oral glucose tolerance test with a plasma glucose level of 200 mg per dL or greater. Results should be confirmed with repeat testing on a subsequent day; however, a single random plasma glucose level of 200 mg per dL or greater with typical signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia likely indicates diabetes. Additional testing to determine the etiology of diabetes is not routinely recommended. Clinical r Continue reading >>

Are Most People With Type 2 Diabetes In Denial About Their Condition And Eat As If Before Their Diagnosis?

Are Most People With Type 2 Diabetes In Denial About Their Condition And Eat As If Before Their Diagnosis?

Diabetes is a life long disease. I’ve had it since I was 27, I’m 60 now. Liang is not only terrible rude he is absolutely wrong about what diabetics do and don’t do. Individuals handle this diagnosis differently. However, every diabetic goes through bouts of believing that they don’t have to what they need to do. What you call, being in denial. For some this is at the beginning. They leave the doctor’s office and they are going to prove him/her wrong because they just know they are NOT diabetic. Most however, hit this period of denial after an initial acceptance of the disease and what it will require of them. Then the reality hits of how difficult it is to maintain a lifetime of good diet, exercise and control. So they give up. Usually they get back on the wagon eventually, but it can take a long time. Results may vary and they might only achieve partial control. Life can kick a diabetic right off their pins. Family and relationship problems tragedies can drive a diabetic to eat wrong, not monitor, not exercise or do the things they know they should not be doing because the rest of their life is so hard at the time. Speaking of hard, individuals that have little money and cannot afford to eat right, can’t pay for their medications so they cut back and take half doses, etc., etc. Others have insensitive and boorish physicians like Liang. No matter what they do, it isn’t enough or it isn’t right and so they just give up. If you are gong to be treated like a lazy failure, where do you find the strength to battle this life time sentence? A succinct answer to your question is that, yes, most diabetics deal with denial on and off throughout the course of their life. Some succumb to the delusion that they are not diabetic and they make no changes or make minim Continue reading >>

Just Diagnosed With Diabetes? 9 Questions You Have To Ask Your Doctor

Just Diagnosed With Diabetes? 9 Questions You Have To Ask Your Doctor

How often should I check my blood sugar? iStock/MarkHatfield The answer will depend on several factors. At each doctor visit, you'll want to review and discuss how you are using your monitoring results from blood sugar testing at home and whether you should increase or decrease your monitoring schedule. These surprising things can raise your blood sugar. How and when do I take my medications? iStock/londoneye This is critical to know after a diabetes diagnosis. The instructions for you might be different than for somebody else, so pay careful attention, and take notes. Make sure you know if you should take your medication or insulin before or after meals, at night or in the morning, with or without food, etc. Do you need to avoid alcohol? Are there potential interactions with other drugs? This information will be in the bag when you pick up your prescription, but the language can be hard to understand, so ask while you're in the office. Is there a generic version of my medication? iStock/stock_colors If money is a concern, ask about drug alternatives. Sometimes a doctor can switch you to an older drug that's equally effective and less costly or to a generic version of the drug. What side effects could I experience? iStock/KatarzynaBialasiewicz Any prescription you receive should come with a patient pamphlet that describes possible side effects and symptoms, but it's smart to discuss these issues when the doctor first prescribes your medications. Are some side effects more likely than others? Will the medication make you drowsy or unable to drive a car? What symptoms warrant a call to the doctor? Should you stop taking a drug if you experience certain unpleasant effects? If for any reason you do stop taking a medication, call you doctor and let him know right away. Don't Continue reading >>

Criteria For Diagnosing Diabetes - Topic Overview

Criteria For Diagnosing Diabetes - Topic Overview

To be diagnosed with diabetes, you must meet one of the following criteria:1 Have symptoms of diabetes (increased thirst, increased urination, and unexplained weight loss) and a blood sugar level equal to or greater than 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). The blood sugar test is done at any time, without regard for when you last ate (random plasma glucose test or random blood sugar test). Have a fasting blood sugar level that is equal to or greater than 126 mg/dL. A fasting blood sugar test (fasting plasma glucose) is done after not eating or drinking anything but water for 8 hours. Have a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) result that is equal to or greater than 200 mg/dL. An OGTT is most commonly done to check for diabetes that occurs with pregnancy (gestational diabetes). Have a hemoglobin A1c that is 6.5% or higher. Your doctor may repeat the test to confirm the diagnosis of diabetes. If the results of your fasting blood sugar test are between 100 mg/dL and 125 mg/dL, your OGTT result is between 140 to 199 mg/dL (2 hours after the beginning of the test), or your hemoglobin A1c is 5.7% to 6.4%, you have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is above normal but not high enough to be diabetes. Discuss with your doctor how often you need to be tested.1 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diagnosis

Diabetes Diagnosis

Tweet Diagnosis for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can occur in a number of different ways. Usually type 2 is diagnosed by diabetes symptoms, such as polyuria (excessive urination) and polydipsia (excessive thirst). Otherwise, diabetes is picked up through screening, hyperglycaemia when doctor investigates a complication, or signs and symptoms prompted by diabetes. What is a diabetes screening test? A screening test determines whether a person has diabetes, and how serious it is. Depending on where you are and what your circumstances are, the screening test will vary. Tests include: Random blood glucose tests - commonly used to test for type 1 diabetes Urine glucose test Fasting plasma glucose tests (FPG tests) Oral glucose tolerance tests Additional diagnostic tests, such as urine ketone tests, GAD autoantibodies tests or C-peptide tests may also be used, as part of the diagnosis, to distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. For adults aged between 40 and 50, screening should be considered. For people who have higher risk factors (ethnicity, family history, obesity) screening should be conducted beforehand. More on tests for diabetes If you have recently been diagnosed with diabetes by your healthcare team, please see our guide for newly diagnosed. Measuring hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) can help diagnose cases of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. According to diagnostic guidelines set out by the World Health Organisation (WHO), a HbA1c value of: 6% (below 42 mmol/mol) is considered non-diabetic 6-6.4% (42 to 47 mmol/mol) indicates impaired fasting glucose regulation and is considered prediabetes 6.5% or more (48 mmol/mol and above) indicates the presence of type 2 diabetes Diabetes screening is strongly recommended for adults aged between 40 and 50 years, or earlier fo Continue reading >>

More in diabetes