diabetestalk.net

Whiskey And Diabetes

Diabetics & Whiskey

Diabetics & Whiskey

Having diabetes means you must be vigilant about closely monitoring your diet, but if you find yourself at a bar with friends, don't throw caution to the wind. Although diabetics can safely consume spirits because they're low in calories, be careful about enjoying whiskey in a mixed drink. Many types of mixers are high in calories, but by switching your mixer for a diet version -- using diet ginger ale instead of regular ginger ale, for example -- you can safely avoid consuming too many calories. Video of the Day Diabetics should practice moderation when planning to consume an alcohol such as whiskey, according to the American Diabetes Association. Although whiskey doesn't contain any carbohydrates and the ADA reports that alcohol leads to minimal change in your blood glucose, the organization still recommends that diabetic women should consume only one alcoholic beverage per day. Men can consume two. One serving of whiskey is 1.5 ounces, which is a standard serving size. The ADA recommends only drinking alcohol when you're effectively managing your blood glucose and drinking a calorie-free beverage such as water at the same time. Avoid mixed drinks, as they often contain high-sugar, high-calorie mixers. Continue reading >>

Whisky Made From Diabetics' Urine

Whisky Made From Diabetics' Urine

James Gilpin is a designer and researcher who works on the implementation of new biomedical technologies. He's also got type 1 diabetes, where his body doesn't produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. So he's started a project which turns the sugar-rich urine of elderly diabetics into a high-end single malt whisky, suitable for export. The source material is acquired from elderly volunteers, including Gilpin's own grandmother. The urine is purified in the same way as mains water is purified, with the sugar molecules removed and added to the mash stock to accelerate the whisky's fermentation process. Traditionally, that sugar would be made from the starches in the mash. Once fermented into a clear alcohol spirit, whisky blends are added to give colour, taste and viscosity, and the product is bottled with the name and age of the contributor. The original idea came from an (unverified) story he heard about a pharmaceutical company that supposedly set up a factory next to an old people's home and would swap cushions and soft toys for the residents' urine. They'd then process the urine to remove the chemicals that had passed straight through the dilapidated endochrine systems of the patients, which could then be put straight back into new medicine. The whisky, as you might have guessed, won't be widely marketed conventionally. In fact, it's more of an art piece, asking, Gilpin says, whether it's "plausible to suggest that we start utilising our water purification systems in order to harvest the biological resources that our elderly already process in abundance". It'll be exhibited, with tasting sessions, at 100% Materials, a design and architecture event in London in September, and the Abandon Normal Devices festival in Manchester in October. If you're not keen Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol

Diabetes And Alcohol

Tweet There is no need for people with diabetes to give up alcohol simply because of their diabetes. Although alcohol does have an effect on blood sugar levels, with a few precautions and careful management, people with diabetes can also enjoy a drink. There are also alcohol substitutes for those who abstain. In fact, diabetes alcohol guidelines are the same as for the general population. Read about alcohol's effect on blood sugar What are the recommended alcohol guidelines for people with diabetes? The guidelines are two units for women and three units for men. However, it is worth being aware how many units a drink contains. In some cases, a glass of wine will constitute two units, and a pint of beer can even reach three units. How much alcohol do drinks usually contain? If you have diabetes and are wondering how much alcohol you should drink, it is worth reading the following list to see how much alcohol is contained in each type of drink. One unit (approximate measure): 1/2 pint of standard strength beer, lager or cider 1 pub shot/optic/measure (50ml) of sherry or vermouth 1 pub shot/optic/measure of spirit (25 ml), eg gin, vodka or whisky. So if I have diabetes I can drink as usual? Not quite. People with diabetes need to be extra careful with alcohol. Alcohol intake significantly increases the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels). If your diabetes is already well under control, a moderate amount of alcohol may be fine either before, during or soon after a meal. Even if you have a drink, this may not influence short-term blood glucose levels. However, there are some precautions to be taken care of. What do I need to be careful of when it comes to diabetes and alcohol? Avoid drinking on an empty stomach, as this will quickly increase the amount of alcohol i Continue reading >>

Whiskey?

Whiskey?

Alright now.... I gotta ask here.... Although many articles say one ounce a day of whiskey is very healthy for people with or without diabetes, is this true? here's all the benefits that whiskey brings you: Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy You may get 20 or more different answers . Only way to know is to test. Take your drink, test at one hour and two hours. Your meter will be the expert to listen to. Last edited by Nan OH; 1/04/16 at 09:15 AM. I like many of the distilled spirits, they don't cause havoc with my type 2, but I moderate my intake more than I did when I was 40 Moderator T2 dx'd 2009, low carb diet, Metformin, Januvia. Yes, go by your meter readings. For me, I find I'm no longer able to drink any alcohol at all including wine, because it now drops my blood glucose too much. I do miss an occasional wine at dinner. your results might be different than mine so test to be sure you can personally handle it. Also, some meds state to not drink alcohol so check your meds too for that warning. There are 44 pages to this thread where Sir Shottlebop occasionally enjoys, cinnamon vodka, rum, fireball whiskey and other delights. Besides, it is a terrific look into wonderful eating My go-to alcohol is in fact whisky with water (blush!). I have found that it will, in fact, tend to lower my bgs. However, wine - especially white which tends to be sweet, and red, except for a high quality red, will invariably tend to raise my bgs. - Beer is totally out of the question. But we are all individuals so other things may work or not work for you. As Triv says, your meter is your best friend here. No meds yet. Until now, control by diet only and rather moderate exercise. Diagnosed at 7.3 %. Latest HbA1c at 5.99 % (like to be in the 5's!) (upward trend from Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol

Diabetes And Alcohol

If you have diabetes, everything you eat and drink takes on extra importance. You have to ask yourself whether that bowl of pasta will boost your blood sugar, and naturally you wonder if you can get away with having a little dessert. You may also wonder if it's OK to drink alcohol. You probably won't find beer or wine on any official "diabetic menu," but if your diabetes is well-controlled, a drink with dinner is not likely to do you harm. As reported in the Annals of Internal Medicine, light drinking might actually help you control your blood sugar -- at least in the short term -- while possibly lowering your risk for heart disease. The key word is "moderate." While light drinking usually isn't dangerous, too much alcohol can make your disease harder to control and put your health at risk. If you don't drink now, it's best not to start. If you're already a drinker, knowing when to say "when" can be a crucial step toward managing your diabetes and staying well. The American Diabetes Association recommends a limit of two drinks per day for men, and one drink per day for women. But even if you stick to these modest levels, you'll need to use a little caution and common sense to make sure alcohol won't turn against you. If you have diabetes, drinking is certainly a good topic to discuss with your doctor. Immediate impact If you do drink socially, you're already aware of alcohol's impact. Within minutes of your first sip, alcohol can start making its presence felt all over the body. The heart beats a little faster, the skin feels a little warmer, and the brain gets a small buzz. People with diabetes should know about other, lesser-known effects of alcohol. For one thing, alcohol keeps the liver from releasing sugar (glucose) to the bloodstream. As reported in the Annals of Continue reading >>

Effects Of Alcohol Use On Diabetics

Effects Of Alcohol Use On Diabetics

Needless to say, alcohol is never healthy and more so if you have diabetes. The effect of alcohol is seldom positive but diabetics who want to enjoy a drink should not be very disappointed. Whiskey has only alcohol content and does not contain sugar; its intake needs to be moderated if not avoided altogether. If you cannot do without alcohol indulgence, you should learn about relation between complications of diabetes and whiskey. Effect of whiskey on diabetes Diabetics can suffer from hypoglycaemia as well as hyperglycaemia. If alcohol is consumed without sugar, it can lead to severe low blood sugar. When the blood sugar level goes below normal, the usual reaction of your liver is production of glucose in order to prevent its deficiency. But, alcohol disrupts this very process. The load on liver in digesting alcohol is so great that it is unable to produce glucose. When alcohol is detoxified in liver, it produces a by product chemical known as NADH which gets stored in there. This NADH restricts the normal production of glucose and increases the chances of hypoglycaemia. It is important to note for diabetics looking to drink that even with moderate alcohol consumption, a hypoglycaemic condition becomes likely. As there is no sugar in most varieties of whiskey, it increases the chances of hypoglycaemia. Who needs to avoid whiskey? The American Diabetes Association warns diabetics against consuming alcohol if they suffer from these conditions: Damage of nerves in arms and legs. High blood pressure. Diabetic eye. Abnormally high level of triglycerides. The important thing to not in this is that even having a light drink can damage the nerves. In diabetics suffering from nerve damage, having alcohol can cause numbness, tingling sensation, burning sensation and pain. Those Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Alcohol

Diabetes & Alcohol

Drinking alcohol can lead to serious low blood sugar reactions. Alcohol can also affect diabetic nerve damage, eye disease, and high blood triglycerides. You may wonder if drinking alcohol is safe for people with diabetes. If you drink alcohol, there are some things you need to know first about alcohol safety. Is it Safe to Drink Alcohol? Check with your doctor to make sure alcohol doesn’t interfere with your medications or complicate any of your medical conditions. Drinking alcohol can lead to serious low blood sugar reactions, especially if you take insulin or types of diabetes pills that stimulate the release of insulin from the pancreas. Alcohol can also affect other medical conditions you may have, like diabetic nerve damage, diabetic eye disease, and high blood triglycerides. Get guidelines for alcohol use from your medical provider. How Much Alcohol Can I Drink? If you choose to drink alcohol, drink in moderation. Limit your intake of alcohol to no more than one serving per day for women, and no more than two servings per day for men. One serving size of alcohol equals: 12 ounces of beer 5 ounces of wine 1½ ounces of distilled spirits (such as rum, whiskey, gin, etc.) Alcohol and Risk of Low Blood Sugar If you are managing your diabetes with diet and exercise alone, drinking alcohol can stil increase your risk of low blood sugars. And if you take insulin or types of diabetes pills that stimulate insulin production, drinking alcohol can lead to even more serious low blood sugar reactions. Normally, the liver releases glucose to maintain blood sugar levels. But when you drink alcohol, the liver is busy breaking the alcohol down, so it does a poor job of releasing glucose into the bloodstream. This can lead to a drop in blood sugar levels if you are drinking alco Continue reading >>

Is It Okay For Diabetics To Consume Alcohol?

Is It Okay For Diabetics To Consume Alcohol?

Most believe that alcohol is not safe for diabetics. Seen as a high-sugar indulgence, alcohol is believed to spike blood sugar levels, leading to a subsequent crash. But how true is this belief that alcohol is entirely bad for diabetics? Dr. Shalini Jaggi, Senior Consultant with Action Diabetic Centre of Sri Balaji Action Medical Institute, New Delhi, gives us the answers. Dr. Shalini is frank about alcohol consumption: “People with diabetes can consume alcohol in moderation if they are aware of how it might affect their blood sugars. As one of the important lifestyle factors, alcohol consumption has shown a U-shaped association with the risk of diabetes, with the least risk being observed in people consuming moderate amounts of alcohol compared to non-drinkers as well as heavy drinkers. However, different findings have been seen in different studies which may not essentially conform to this fact.” How does alcohol spike blood sugar level? “What we need to understand is that alcohol also contains carbohydrates, which raise your blood sugar levels. So you may observe a slight peaking in your blood glucose levels initially depending on the amount of alcohol consumed.” She also explains how alcohol can drop your blood sugar level: “Another very important fact that we need to know is that in diabetics alcohol can also lower your blood sugars and precipitate hypoglycaemia as well. This occurs because alcohol is metabolized in the liver which is also the main organ responsible for storing your blood glucose and releasing it when needed. Alcohol interferes with liver’s release of glucose because once liver detects alcohol, it gives preference to first clearing the alcohol, putting glucose production and release on hold. Hence this lack of glucose release from liver Continue reading >>

5 Reasons Drinking Whisky Is Healthy For You

5 Reasons Drinking Whisky Is Healthy For You

The historian Raphael Hollinshed wrote about the healthy properties of whisky in his 1577 book Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland. "Being moderately taken, it slows the age, cuts phlegm, helps digestion, cures the dropsy, it heals the strangulation, keeps and preserves the head from whirling, the tongue from lisping, the stomach from womblying, the guts from rumbling, the hands from shivering, the bones from aching…and truly it is a sovereign liquor if it be orderly taken." And who am I to argue, especially when it comes to womblying (whatever that is)? It should also be added that during Hollinshed's time, whisky was also used as an antiseptic on battlefields, especially because effective medicine was hard to come by in those days. During America's Prohibition in the 1920s, whisky could be legally imported into the United States because it was considered as a medicine, not a liquor. Back then, it was sold in pharmacies for use as a tonic. It can even lead to a long life. Grace Jones, one of Britain's oldest women, attributes her ripe age of 110 to drinking whisky every night for the last 60 years. Her whisky of choice, by the way, is the Famous Grouse blend. Obviously, if you drink too much whisky every night you probably will suffer more than benefit. But at lower, more moderate quantities, science says that it might be good for you. Here’s what the uisga beatha (Gaelic for "Water of Life") can do for you and your body: Whisky Fights Cancer Whisky has as many anti-oxidants as wine. It contains more ellagic acid (the same antioxidant found in wine) as wine, which helps absorb rogue cells in the body, according to Jim Swan, the celebrated whisky industry consultant dubbed the "Einstein of whisky." at a medical conference in 2005. However, it should be noted Continue reading >>

Is Alcohol Safe For Diabetes Patients In India ?

Is Alcohol Safe For Diabetes Patients In India ?

Public Health , Wellness alcohol , Diabetes Mellitus , Sugar , Type 2 Diabetes admin We often hear that diabetics need to control their diet and avoid sugar. But can they consume alcohol ? In this article we seek to cover the great alcohol debate and shed some light on safe alcohol consumption for people living with type 2 diabetes. The most important rule, and this goes without saying, is to keep alcohol consumption moderate. Studies have shown that moderate alcohol consumption may have positive health effects like raising HDL (good) cholesterol and lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease. Other studies suggest that moderate alcohol consumption may even reduce risk of type 2 diabetes. The American Heart Association defines moderate alcohol consumption as 1 drink a day for women and 2 drinks a day for men. For reference, a single drink is measured as a 12 oz. beer, a 5 oz. glass of wine, or 1 oz. of distilled spirits i.e. vodka, whisky, gin etc. However, excessive alcohol consumption or binge drinking in which a person consumes more than 5 drinks in a two hour span of time for men and 4 for women, can increase the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Alcohol in excess can further increase your weight which can lead to insulin resistance making glucose control more challenging. A person living with type 2 diabetes is free to consume alcohol if desired, however, additional safety measures should be taken. Some alcoholic beverages are better than others for type 2 diabetics and other tips should be followed in order to stay safe. The American Diabetes Association recommends that individuals living with diabetes be able to recognize and manage delayed hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) when drinking alcohol especially if these individuals use ins Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Rye Whiskey’s Health Benefits

5 Surprising Rye Whiskey’s Health Benefits

<<< Back to the Blog Rye is a crop that shows up in so many of our products today. It is an essential ingredient for cereals, breads and of course, whiskey. It has been around since ancient times, and still today helps to feed the world. Rye grain suppliers in the U.S. want to provide quality grain services in order to keep the production of food and beverage moving forward. Whiskey is made primarily from rye grains and as a whiskey connoisseur, most would want to be aware of the health benefits that come from consuming rye. Promotes Weight Loss Rye is known as the number one grain for helping in weight loss efforts. The type of fiber that is found in rye makes a person feel full sooner than other grains. This removes the issue many people have with diets… hunger. By minimizing your appetite, the urge to eat more food is also reduced, leading to less caloric intake and causing greater potential weight loss. Plus, whiskey is a low-calorie alcohol, giving you an option to drink even when on a diet. Helps Digestion Just as the fibers mentioned above help with weight loss, they also assist with the digestion process. The fiber loosens up blockage, and removes gas and discomfort caused by digestion issues. Freeing you up to do what you need to get done. Diabetic Approved Since rye and whiskey contain no carbohydrates; they won’t impact your blood sugar levels like wheat products can. This makes whiskey the top alcoholic choice for people with diabetes. Though you should consult your doctor before drinking, regardless. Reduce Cancer Risks Whiskey contains antioxidants called ellagic acid from the rye grains. This is an acid that prevents DNA from making contact with cancer-causing cells. Rye grain suppliers have been very encouraged by the continued research done on the g Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Type 2 Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Alcohol And Type 2 Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Many people with type 2 diabetes think they need to eliminate alcohol completely from their diet. But, in moderation, alcohol may actually have some health benefits. For instance, moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of developing diabetes in people who don’t have the condition, particularly women, according to a data analysis published in the September 2015 issue of Diabetes Care. And in people who have type 2 diabetes that is well-controlled, a glass of red wine a day as part of a healthy diet may help improve heart disease risk factors, according to results of a two-year study published in Annals of Internal Medicine in October 2015. However, you need to be thoughtful about including any type of alcohol, even red wine, in your type 2 diabetes management plan. “The most important thing is to make sure you aren’t drinking alcohol on an empty stomach,” says Liz Brouillard, RD, LDN, CDE, nutrition manager at the Boston Medical Center’s Center for Endocrinology, Nutrition, and Weight Management in Massachusetts. She recommends only drinking alcohol with a meal or snack that contains both carbohydrates and protein. That's because alcohol can lower your blood sugar, creating a risky situation for people with type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of low blood sugar — sleepiness, dizziness, and disorientation — can look like being intoxicated, she says, adding that people who use insulin or other medications that lower blood sugar are at greater risk for hypoglycemia. If signs of hypoglycemia are mistaken for drunkenness, you may not get the help and treatment you need. For added safety and security, tell someone you're with about your condition. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends wearing a medical ID that lets people know you have diabetes. Be C Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol: Do The Two Mix? (part 1)

Diabetes And Alcohol: Do The Two Mix? (part 1)

A nice glass of Chianti…a cold beer on a hot summer day…celebrating with a flute of champagne. There are so many ways that alcohol is integrated into both everyday life and special occasions. Granted, not everyone drinks alcohol, but many people do. And when it comes to the question, "Can I drink alcohol if I have diabetes?" the answer is about as clear as that for "Is a low-carb diet good for diabetes?" In other words, the answer really is, "It depends!" It’s important to mention right off the bat that there are certainly many reasons why people should not drink alcohol. Some may be related to diabetes and some may be related to other reasons. Therefore, it’s important to discuss this issue with your health-care provider if you have any doubts or concerns. And if you’re newly diagnosed with diabetes or starting on a new medicine, it’s worthwhile bringing up the topic if your provider doesn’t. While you’d be hard-pressed to find any health organization actually recommending that you drink alcohol, you might take some comfort in knowing that the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association, and even the American Cancer Society agree that drinking alcohol in moderation is certainly not off-limits to most people. But back to diabetes and alcohol. What’s the concern here? And why should some people with diabetes not drink alcohol? To answer these questions, it’s helpful to understand a little bit about how alcohol is processed in the body. The body treats alcohol as a drug, not as a food product. This means that, when you drink any type of alcoholic beverage, your liver kicks into high gear, preparing itself to “detoxify” the body of this “poison” (I’m using these words for dramatic effect). Essentially, the liver has to metabo Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes

Alcohol And Diabetes

Consult your physician to determine what alcohol consumption limits you, personally, should not exceed. Alcohol is everywhere: at family reunions, picnics, even around sports fields. But people with diabetes need to take precautions when it comes to alcohol consumption. Here are some tips to help you make informed choices. Your body and alcohol The Canadian Diabetes Association 2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Diabetes in Canada recommends that people with diabetes limit their consumption of alcohol based on the same recommendation for the general public: Women: A maximum of 2 alcoholic drinks per day A maximum of 10 alcoholic drinks per week Men: A maximum of 3 drinks per day A maximum of 15 alcoholic drinks per week One alcoholic drink is the equivalent of: 340 mL (12 oz.) of beer (5% alcohol) 140 mL (5 oz.) of wine vin (red or white) at 12% alcohol 85 mL (3 oz.) of fortified wine (ex.: port) at 20% alcohol 45 mL (1.5 oz.) of spirits at 40% alcohol If you suffer from high blood pressure, have a high triglyceride level in your blood, have liver or neurological problems, it would be better to limit your consumption of alcohol. When in doubt, consult your physician to determine what alcohol consumption limits you, personally, should not exceed. Never drink alcohol on an empty stomach! Alcohol has a hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) effect because it prevents the liver from producing sugar when foods don’t supply enough of it. This phenomenon can happen when drinking alcohol on its own, as an aperitif, for example. Drinking alcohol when taking insulin or insulin secretagogue medication* puts you at extra risk of hypoglycemia. A hypoglycemic episode under such conditions can be very serious because your body, while it is metabolizing the Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol

Diabetes And Alcohol

With your doctor's permission, you may enjoy alcohol in moderation. Moderation is defined as no more than one drink per day for women; no more than two drinks per day for men. Here are some guidelines for drinking alcohol for people with diabetes: Check with your doctor before drinking any alcoholic beverages. Discuss the safety and possible side effects of mixing alcohol and your medicines. Never drink on an empty stomach. Drink alcohol with food to avoid low blood sugar reactions. Do not drink alcohol before, during, or after exercise. Wear diabetes identification if drinking away from home in case of a low blood sugar reaction or any other emergency. Limit your alcohol consumption if you are overweight to help control calories. Avoid alcohol if you are pregnant or if you have any of the following: One drink equals 4 ounces of wine, 12 ounces of beer, or 1 ounce of distilled spirits. Pure Distilled Liquors (1 ounce) (Bourbon, Brandy, Gin, Rum, Scotch, Tequila, Vodka, Whiskey, etc.) 80 proof Calories: 65 Carbs: 0 90 proof Calories: 74 Carbs: 0 100 proof Calories: 83 Carbs: 0 Other drinks (4 ounces) Daiquiri Calories: 224 Carbs: 8 Manhattan Calories: 256 Carbs: 4 Martini Calories: 250 Carbs: 0 Red Wine Calories: 80 Carbs: 2 Tequila Sunrise Calories: 125 Carbs: 13 White Wine Calories: 80 Carbs: 1 Beer (12 ounces) Amstel® Light Calories: 95 Carbs: 5 Bud Light® Calories: 110 Carbs: 6.6 Coors Light® Calories: 102 Carbs: 5 Corona® Light Calories: 105 Carbs: 5 Guinness® Stout Calories: 125 Carbs: 9.9 Michelob® Ultra Calories: 95 Carbs: 2.6 Miller Lite® Calories: 96 Carbs: 3.2 Sam Adams Light® Calories: 124 Carbs: 9.7 Liqueurs (1 ounce) Amaretto Calories: 80 Carbs: 17 Baileys® Calories: 75 Carbs: 5.5 Kahlua® Calories: 120 Carbs: 17 Triple Sec Calories: 80 Carbs: 12.5 Continue reading >>

More in diabetes