diabetestalk.net

Which Type Of Medicine Is Given To The Patients Suffering From Diabetes?

Medicines For Diabetes

Medicines For Diabetes

If you have diabetes, taking medicines is a major part of staying healthy because they help keep your blood sugar levels under control. Having blood sugar that's out of control can make you feel awful and can damage your body over the years. Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it's important to know what medicine to take, when to take it, and how much to take. Insulin is a hormone that lets sugar, or glucose, get into the body's cells where it can be used for energy. All people with type 1 diabetes and many people with type 2 diabetes need to take insulin every day. The overall goal of treatment with insulin (and other diabetes medicines) is to match the amount of insulin given with the amount of insulin a person needs throughout the day and night. Doing this means that blood sugar levels can be kept as close to normal as possible, which helps a person avoid both short- and long-term problems from diabetes. The types of insulin you use and how much you need to take each day depends on your diabetes management plan. Some people with diabetes need to take two injections each day. Others may need several injections or an insulin pump to keep blood sugar levels under control. Your doctor will help you decide what's best for you. There are a few different kinds of insulin. They differ from one another based on: when they work their hardest to lower blood sugar The table below outlines the types of insulin and how they work. The time it takes for insulin to work, when it peaks, and how long it lasts is different from person to person, and even from day to day as the way a person's body reacts to insulin may change. After a while, you'll get to know how insulin works in your body. Works to control glucose between meals and during the night. Looks cloudy or clear and c Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetic Kidney Disease: 10 Answers To Questions

Preventing Diabetic Kidney Disease: 10 Answers To Questions

Diabetic kidney disease is a decrease in kidney function that occurs in some people who have diabetes. It means that your kidneys are not doing their job as well as they once did to remove waste products and excess fluid from your body. These wastes can build up in your body and cause damage to other organs. What causes it? The causes of diabetic kidney disease are complex and most likely related to many factors. Some experts feel that changes in the circulation of blood within the filtering apparatus of the kidney (the glomerulus) may play an important role. Are some people more likely to get diabetic kidney disease? Yes. The following risk factors have been linked to increased risk of developing this disease: high blood pressure, poor glucose (sugar) control, inherited tendency and diet. I have diabetes. How do I know if my kidneys are affected? In the early stages, there may not be any symptoms. As kidney function decreases further, toxic wastes build up, and patients often feel sick to their stomachs and throw up, lose their appetites, have hiccups and gain weight due to fluid retention. If left untreated, patients can develop heart failure and fluid in their lungs. Are there tests that can be done to tell if I have kidney disease? Yes. The diagnosis is based on the presence of abnormal amounts of protein in the urine. A wide variety of tests can be done to tell if a person has kidney disease. The most widely used are serum creatinine and BUN (blood urea nitrogen). These are not very sensitive tests because they do not begin to change until the patient develops more severe disease. Other more sensitive tests are: creatinine clearance, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine albumin. In patients with Type I (juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent) diabetes, a diagnos Continue reading >>

Blood Pressure Medicine Shows Potential As Type 1 Diabetes Cure

Blood Pressure Medicine Shows Potential As Type 1 Diabetes Cure

Please install the latest Adobe Flash Player Plugin to watch this content. A medication called Verapamil is a common treatment for controlling blood pressure, but researchers have stumbled onto another possible use for it: curing type 1 diabetes. A first-of-its-kind trial is now underway, and it could be the cure for what is currently the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. Joy Myers didn't always count carbs and she didn't always have an insulin pump strapped to her hip. "It calculates how much insulin I get and it's beeping," said Joy Myers. Myers has been doing all of this for just over a year, ever since at 41 years old, a near-death experience put her in a coma for nine days. "As I woke up in the hospital I was informed that I was a type 1 diabetic," said Myers. Even though it's typically thought of as juvenile diabetes, type 1 can show itself at any age. And Myers was diagnosed just as a ground-breaking new study was getting underway. "Diabetes treatment has come a long way. We have different insulins and we have different oral medications, but what we don't have is any approach that would promote the patient's own beta cell mass and function," said Anath Shalev, MD, Professor of Medicine and Director of UAB Comprehensive Diabetes Center. Doctor Anath Shalev discovered that the blood pressure medication Verapamil protects the body's beta cells, the only cells capable of producing insulin. Verapamil not only prevented type 1 diabetes in mice, but reversed it. "This could potentially be a cure," said Joy. As a trial participant, Myers doesn't know if these blue pills are Verapamil or a placebo. But that's not what matters to her. "This data is going to hopefully have an effect on the future for someone else," said Myers. Since Verapamil is already FDA approve Continue reading >>

Table Of Medications

Table Of Medications

Medications used to treat type 2 diabetes include: Use this table to look up the different medications that can be used to treat type 2 diabetes. Use the links below to find medications within the table quickly, or click the name of the drug to link to expanded information about the drug. Table of oral medications, incretion-based therapy and amylin analog therapy: Medicine FDA Approval Formulations (color indicated if available by Brand only) Dosing Comments (SE = possible side effects) STIMULATORS OF INSULIN RELEASE (Insulin Secretagogues) – increase insulin secretion from the pancreas1 SULFONYLUREAS (SFUs) Tolbutamide Orinase® various generics 1957 500 mg tablets Initial: 1000-2000 mg daily Range: 250-3000 mg (seldom need >2000 mg/day) Dose: Taken two or three times daily SE: hypoglycemia, weight gain Preferred SFU for elderly Must be taken 2-3 times daily Glimepiride Amaryl® various generics 11/95 1 mg, 2 mg, 4 mg tablets Initial: 1-2 mg daily Range: 1-8 mg Dose: Taken once daily SE: hypoglycemia, weight gain Need to take only once daily Glipizide Glucotrol® Glucotrol XL® various generics 5/84 4/94 5 mg, 10 mg tablets ER: 2.5 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg tablets Initial: 5 mg daily Range: 2.5-40 mg2 (20 mg for XL) Dose: Taken once or twice (if >15 mg) daily SE: hypoglycemia, weight gain Preferred SFU for elderly ER = extended release/take once a day Glyburide Micronase®, DiaBeta® various generics 5/84 1.25 mg, 2.5 mg, 5 mg tablets Initial: 2.5-5 mg daily Range: 1.25-20 mg2 Dose: Taken once or twice daily SE: hypoglycemia, weight gain Glyburide, micronized Glynase PresTab® various generics 3/92 1.5 mg, 3 mg, 4.5 mg, 6 mg micronized tablets Initial: 1.5-3 mg daily Range: 0.75-12 mg Dose: Taken once or twice (if >6 mg) daily SE: hypoglycemia, weight gain GLINIDES Repaglini Continue reading >>

After Diabetes Diagnosis

After Diabetes Diagnosis

Diabetes is a disease where blood sugar levels are too high because the body can no longer make or use insulin properly. The condition could lead to serious complications and even death. An estimated 29.1 million Americans have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes in the U.S. There are several types of diabetes, including Type 1, Type 2 and gestational — a type that occurs in pregnant women. Type 2 is the most common, and about 95 percent of all people with diabetes in the U.S. have this type. An additional 86 million adults in the United States have prediabetes, a condition where your blood sugar is high but not elevated enough for a diabetes diagnosis. Cases of diabetes increase each year, and every 19 seconds doctors diagnose someone in the U.S. with the disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1 in 3 adults may be diagnosed with diabetes by 2050. It’s important to keep blood sugar levels controlled because it can cause serious health problems — including kidney disease, heart problems, skin problems and limb amputations. Even if Type 2 diabetes has no cure, it can be prevented and managed. People with the disease can control blood sugar with lifestyle changes and medication. What is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which your body loses its ability to produce and use insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas that the body uses to convert glucose into energy. Without the right amount of insulin, excess sugar builds up in the body and causes a number of health problems. Where Type 1 typically occurs in younger people and is an immune disorder, Type 2 most often occurs later in life. In fact, the medical community used to call Type 2 diabetes “adult-onset” diabetes. M Continue reading >>

New Erectile Dysfunction Drug Approved

New Erectile Dysfunction Drug Approved

On April 27, pharmaceutical manufacturer Vivus announced the approval of its erectile dysfunction (ED) drug, Stendra (generic name avanafil) by the US Food and Drug Administration. It is the first ED medicine to be approved in over a decade, joining Viagra (sildenafil), Cialis (tadalafil), and Levitra (vardenafil) in the drug class known as phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, or PDE5 inhibitors. Roughly 30 million men in the United States are affected by erectile dysfunction, and according to at least one estimate, over 50% of men will develop ED within 10 years of developing diabetes. The body produces a chemical called cGMP during sexual stimulation, which causes the blood vessels in the penis to dilate, resulting in an erection. cGMP is broken down by an enzyme known as phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5). PDE5 inhibitors work by blocking the action of this enzyme, causing levels of cGMP to increase and leading to a better erection. The safety and effectiveness of Stendra was established through three double-blind, placebo-controlled trials that involved a total of 1,267 people assigned to take Stendra for as long as 12 weeks. The medicine — which may be an option for men who do not respond to Viagra, Cialis, or Levitra — will be available in 50-milligram, 100-milligram, and 200-milligram doses and should be taken 30 minutes before sexual activity at the lowest dose necessary to be effective. According to the drug maker, Stendra may work faster for some men than other medicines in its class, potentially becoming effective in as little as 15 minutes. The medicine should not be taken more than once per day. “This approval expands the available treatment options to men experiencing erectile dysfunction, and enables patients, in consultation with their doctor, to choose th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Treatment

Diabetes Mellitus Treatment

In patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM), the therapeutic focus is on preventing complications caused by hyperglycemia. In the United States, 57.9% of patients with diabetes have one or more diabetes-related complications and 14.3% have three or more.[1] Strict control of glycemia within the established recommended values is the primary method for reducing the development and progression of many complications associated with microvascular effects of diabetes (eg, retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy), while aggressive treatment of dyslipidemia and hypertension further decreases the cardiovascular complications associated macrovascular effects.[2-4] See the chapter on diabetes: Macro- and microvascular effects. Glycemic Control Two primary techniques are available to assess a patient's glycemic control: Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and interval measurement of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose Use of SMBG is an effective method to evaluate short-term glycemic control. It helps patients and physicians assess the effects of food, medications, stress, and activity on blood glucose levels. For patients with type 1 DM or insulin-dependent type 2 DM, clinical trials have demonstrated that SMBG plays a role in effective glycemic control because it helps to refine and adjust insulin doses by monitoring for and preventing asymptomatic hypoglycemia as well as preprandial and postprandial hyperglycemia.[2,5-7] The frequency of SMBG depends on the type of medical therapy, risk for hypoglycemia, and need for short-term adjustment of therapy. The current American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines recommend that patients with diabetes self-monitor their glucose at least three times per day.[8] Those who use basal-bolus regimens should s Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Diabetes Medicines

Common Questions About Diabetes Medicines

How do I know if my diabetes pill is working? The best way to find out how well your diabetes pill is working is to test your blood sugar. Ask a member of your health care team what time of day is best for testing. You'll want to test when your diabetes medicine is expected to be most active in your body. Keep a record of your blood sugar levels (PDF) during that time to see if they're at or near your goal. If your levels are at or near your goal and you're not having any problems with the medicine, then it's probably working well. If you're still not sure, talk to your doctor or other member of your care team. Can I stop taking my diabetes medicine after my blood sugar is under control? It's reasonable to think that after a person gets good blood sugar control, it means the end of managing diabetes. But that's not the case. People with type 1 diabetes aren't able to make their own insulin, so they will always need to take insulin shots every day. For people with type 2 diabetes who are on medicine, the answer isn't as clear. Sometimes when people are first diagnosed, they start on pills or insulin right away. If the person also works hard to control diabetes with diet and exercise, he or she can lower the need for medicine and might be able to stop taking it altogether. As long as the person is able to keep blood sugar levels normal with diet and exercise, there isn't a need for medicine. However, type 2 diabetes changes over time. The change can be fast or slow, but it does change. This means that even if a person was able to stop taking medicine for a while, he or she might need to start taking it again in the future. If a person is taking medicine to keep blood sugar normal, then it's important to keep taking it to lower the chances for heart disease and other healt Continue reading >>

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

Diabetes is a condition that leads to high levels of blood glucose (or sugar) in the body. This happens when your body can’t make or use insulin like it’s supposed to. Insulin is a substance that helps your body use the sugar from the food you eat. There are two different types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. People with both types of diabetes need medications to help keep their blood sugar levels normal. The types of drugs that can treat you depend on the type of diabetes you have. This article gives you information about drugs that treat both types of diabetes to help give you an idea of the treatment options available to you. Insulin Insulin is the most common type of medication used in type 1 diabetes treatment. It’s also used in type 2 diabetes treatment. It’s given by injection and comes in different types. The type of insulin you need depends on how severe your insulin depletion is. Options include: Short-acting insulin regular insulin (Humulin and Novolin) Rapid-acting insulins Intermediate-acting insulin Long-acting insulins Combination insulins NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine-insulin aspart) Humalog Mix 75/25 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humalog Mix 50/50 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humulin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Novolin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Ryzodeg (insulin degludec-insulin aspart) Amylinomimetic drug Pramlintide (SymlinPen 120, SymlinPen 60) is an amylinomimetic drug. It’s an injectable drug used before meals. It works by delaying the time your stomach takes to empty itself. It reduces glucagon secretion after meals. This lowers your blood sugar. It also reduces appetite through a central mechanism. Most medications for type 2 diabetes are o Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Medication

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Medication

Medication Summary Insulin injected subcutaneously is the first-line treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). The different types of insulin vary with respect to onset and duration of action. Short-, intermediate-, and long-acting insulins are available. Short-acting and rapid-acting insulins are the only types that can be administered intravenously (IV). Human insulin currently is the only species of insulin available in the United States; it is less antigenic than the previously used animal-derived varieties. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medicines

Diabetes Medicines

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends on your type of diabetes, your schedule, and your other health conditions. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. If you have type 1 diabetes, you will need to take insulin. Type 2 diabetes, the most common type, can start when the body doesn't use insulin as it should. If your body can't keep up with the need for insulin, you may need to take pills. Along with meal planning and physical activity, diabetes pills help people with type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes keep their blood glucose levels on target. Several kinds of pills are available. Each works in a different way. Many people take two or three kinds of pills. Some people take combination pills. Combination pills contain two kinds of diabetes medicine in one tablet. Some people take pills and insulin. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

List Of Medications Available For Diabetes

List Of Medications Available For Diabetes

Diabetes is a disorder of blood sugar levels. There are two main types of diabetes, plus rarer forms such as diabetes that can happen during pregnancy, known as gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes results in high blood sugar levels because the body stops producing insulin, the hormone that regulates sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes leads to high blood sugars because the insulin in the body does not work effectively. The broad differences in treatment between the two types are: Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin injection. Careful diet and activity planning is needed to avoid complications of treatment. Type 2 diabetes is treated with lifestyle measures, drugs taken by mouth, and sometimes also insulin if the other treatments fail. Medications for type 1 diabetes Treatment for type 1 diabetes is always with insulin, to replace the body's absent insulin and keep blood sugar levels under control. Insulin treatments Insulin is usually given by injection - by patients themselves, injecting it under the skin, or if hospitalized, sometimes directly into the blood. It is also available as a powder that patients can breathe in. Insulin injections vary by how quickly they act, their peak action, and how long they last. The aim is to mimic how the body would produce insulin throughout the day and in relation to energy intake. 1. Rapid-acting injections take effect within 5 to 15 minutes but last for a shorter time of 3 to 5 hours: Insulin lispro (Humalog) Insulin aspart (NovoLog) Insulin glulisine (Apidra) 2. Short-acting injections take effect from between 30 minutes and 1 hour, and last for 6 to 8 hours: Regular insulin (Humulin R and Novolin R) 3. Intermediate-acting injections take effect after about 2 hours, and last for 18 to 26 hours: Insulin isophane, also called NPH i Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment

Diabetes Treatment

Treatment of diabetes depends on which type of diabetes a patient has, either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce insulin, so replacement insulin must be delivered by injection, pump, or inhalation. People who have type 1 diabetes need to carefully plan and follow meals, timing of meals, and activity to keep their blood glucose (sugar) in check. It's important to measure blood sugar levels as low blood sugar can be dangerous, too. Type 2 diabetes occurs when either the body makes too little insulin or the cells do not respond to insulin that is produced ("insulin resistance"). Patients with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes may be able to control their blood sugar levels by following a diet, exercise program and losing excess weight. If this first-line treatment does not control blood sugar levels effectively, an oral medication, often metformin first with other medications if needed, can be added to the treatment plan. Patients with type 2 diabetes may also need injected insulin, and in some circumstances it may be used as the first medication. Patients and/or family members must learn to inject insulin if it is prescribed. In addition, patients with diabetes must learn to check and follow their blood sugar levels. In addition to medications to control glucose, many patients with diabetes also need to take medicines to lower their blood pressure and cholesterol levels. When diet and exercise aren't satisfactory, weight loss medications such as Belviq, Contrave, Xenical, or Qsymia can also be used to help with the management of obesity. Statins, such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), rosuvastatin (Crestor), or pravastatin (Pravachol) are typically first-line prescription treatment for high cholesterol, also along with diet and Continue reading >>

What Are My Options?

What Are My Options?

If your deductible reset on January 1, there are new programs to help you afford your insulin prescription| Learn more There are different types, or classes, of drugs that work in different ways to lowerblood sugar(also known as bloodsugar) levels: Acarbose (Precose) and miglitol (Glyset) are alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. These drugs help the body to lower blood sugar levels by blocking the breakdown of starches, such as bread, potatoes, and pasta in the intestine. They also slow the breakdown of some sugars, such as table sugar. Their action slows the rise in blood sugar levels after a meal. They should be taken with the first bite of a meal. These drugs may have side effects, including gas and diarrhea. Metformin (Glucophage) is abiguanide. Biguanides lower blood sugar levels primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose produced by theliver. Metformin also helps to lower blood sugar levels by making muscle tissue more sensitive toinsulinsoglucosecan be absorbed. It is usually taken two times a day. A side effect ofmetforminmay be diarrhea, but this is improved when the drug is taken with food. The BAS colesevelam (Welchol) is a cholesterol-lowering medication that also reduces blood sugar levels in patients with diabetes. BASs help remove cholesterol from the body, particularly LDL cholesterol, which is often elevated in people with diabetes. The medications reduceLDL cholesterolby binding with bile acids in the digestive system; the body in turn uses cholesterol to replace the bile acids, which lowerscholesterollevels. The mechanism by which colesevelam lowers glucose levels is not well understood. Because BASs are not absorbed into the bloodstream, they are usually safe for use by patients who may not be able to use other medications because of liver problems. Bec Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication - Guides And Information

Diabetes Medication - Guides And Information

Tweet Diabetes medications are a common form of treatment for people with diabetes. There are many different types of diabetes medicines, or anti-diabetic drugs, and this includes insulin, which has its own area within the site. Whilst each drug is unique in the way it works to help patients with diabetes keep their condition under control, some act similarly to one other and are grouped in the same class of drugs. The way in which they are administered can also differ, with some medicines taken orally and others injected directly into the blood. Are diabetes drugs suitable for all diabetics? Most diabetes drugs are designed for people with type 2 diabetes who are unable to control their blood sugar levels through strict diet and exercise alone. But some, such as metformin, are sometimes taken alongside insulin treatment for people with type 1 diabetes. Medication guides Explore the 18 most common medications for diabetes: Assists insulin in controlling post-meal glucose levels. Can more than one drug be taken at the same time? Depending on individual circumstances, a GP may prescribe more than one anti-diabetic drug to help treat a patient’s diabetes. Watch the video below for more information on the types of diabetes medication available. What are the side effects of anti-diabetic medicines? As with any type of medication, blood glucose-lowering drugs can have a number of side effects. These potentially harmful effects are listed in the patient information leaflet that accompanies the medication, so make sure you check this before starting your drug treatment. You may not experience any of the adverse effects listed, but if you do, consult your doctor and/or diabetes care team as they may be able to suggest another suitable medication for your condition. They will a Continue reading >>

More in diabetes