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Which Juice Is Good For Diabetes

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

Having diabetes means that you have to be aware of everything you eat or drink. Knowing the amount of carbohydrates you ingest and how they may affect your blood sugar is crucial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends zero-calorie or low-calorie drinks. The main reason is to prevent a spike in blood sugar. Choosing the right drinks can help you avoid unpleasant side effects, manage your symptoms, and maintain a healthy weight. Water Unsweetened tea Unsweetened coffee Sugar-free fruit juice Low-fat milk Zero- or low-calorie drinks are typically your best bet when choosing a drink. Squeeze some fresh lemon or lime juice into your drink for a refreshing, low-calorie kick. Whether you’re at home or at a restaurant, here are the most diabetes-friendly beverage options. 1. Water When it comes to hydration, water is the best option for people with diabetes. That’s because it won’t raise your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can cause dehydration. Drinking enough water can help your body eliminate excess glucose through urine. Women should drink approximately 8 glasses of water each day, while men should drink about 10 glasses. If plain water doesn’t appeal to you, create some variety by: adding slices of lemon, lime, or orange adding sprigs of flavourful herbs, such as mint, basil, or lemon balm crushing a couple of fresh or frozen raspberries into your drink 2. Tea Research has shown that green tea has a positive effect on your general health. It can also help reduce your blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests that drinking up to six cups a day may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed. Whether you choose green, black, or herbal tea, you should avoid sweeteners. For a refreshi Continue reading >>

Rebooting And Juicing With Diabetes

Rebooting And Juicing With Diabetes

The World Health Organization recently shared a shocking statistic: 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. In the UK almost 5% of the population has diabetes and in the US almost 10% of the population has diabetes. These figures do not include the percent of the population that are prediabetic or don’t realize they have diabetes. Diabetes can have serious health complications including nerve, eye and kidney damage. The good news is that 93 percent of diabetes is caused by lifestyle choices – what we eat and how much we move. Which means that most diabetics can manage and even prevent diabetic damage through diet and exercise. People with prediabetes can stop it dead in it’s tracks and never develop the disease at all. Nothing about type 2 diabetes is inevitable if you can make positive changes. For over 10 years, I’ve been working with diabetes patients in the UK. I’ve seen first-hand what happens when diabetics lose weight and adopt a healthy diet. Many of my patients reduce their medications or are able to stop taking it all together. A healthy diet, to me, means get plenty of fruits and veggies. I’m a big fan of juice! And of Rebooting! It’s a great “circuit breaker” that helps people make the leap from an unhealthy to a healthy diet. If you are diabetic and wondering if you can Reboot, the answer is yes, but you may need to make a few modifications. Before You Start: It’s important to always consult with your doctor before starting a Reboot. For anyone with type 1 diabetes or those taking insulin it very important to have your doctor’s approval and supervision. (If you are taking any medication it is important to discuss your Reboot with your doctor.) Find out how to talk to your doctor about a Reboot and print this document with helpful t Continue reading >>

Juicing For Diabetics – Just A Myth Or Can It Really Help You?

Juicing For Diabetics – Just A Myth Or Can It Really Help You?

Juicing works amazingly well for all sorts of conditions. It can help add nutrients, increase overall caloric intake, and helps stomach problems. But, can juicing really help diabetes? This is a question that we’re going to answer. For most people, they don’t have to worry too much about the finer details of juicing. They don’t have to worry about how many carbohydrates they take in, and can juice whatever they want to. Diabetics, on the other hand, have to be very concerned with a number of sugars they take in. And unfortunately, juicing tends to concentrate sugars. So, diabetics really need to pay attention to the type of juices they use and the quantity. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that causes the person to lose their pancreas function because of the autoimmune system attacks and destroys the islet cells that produce insulin. Type 1 diabetes most often occurs between the ages of 4 and 10, but anyone can be affected by type 1 diabetes. This type of diabetes cannot be cured. Because type 1 diabetics do not have pancreas function or have very minimal pancreas function that’s declining, they have to rely on an external source of insulin. For every sugar molecule they take in, they have to inject a corresponding amount of insulin. We won’t go into how much insulin it takes because every person is different. So, when juicing, type 1 diabetics have to know how many sugars they will be taking in. That way, they can take an appropriate amount of insulin to metabolize the sugars. Type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle condition that is caused by a person consuming too many sugars for too long. The pancreas has worked so hard for so long, that it is worn out. The over-consumption of sugars has also caused the body to become resistant to its own insulin and this Continue reading >>

Juicing For Diabetes: Is It A Good Idea?

Juicing For Diabetes: Is It A Good Idea?

Juicing can be a good way to get in some extra fruits and vegetables. But youll miss out on important nutrients, and for people with diabetes, the health trend may have other drawbacks. Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Not all juices are created equal, and using vegetables, like celery, kale, broccoli, and cucumber, can help reduce the spike in your blood sugar. When Lori Chong bought a juicer, she hoped she would be able to create low-carb concoctions that wouldn't spike her blood sugar too much. As a person with diabetes herself, Chong understands the importance of tracking carb intake. But within weeks, Chong, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, had set aside her juicer and returned to eating full fruits and vegetables instead. Now, she hardly uses the device at all. Juicing for People With Diabetes: Is It Safe? I dont think juicing is the best idea for people with diabetes, says Chong, who has type 1 diabetes. She explains that people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes need to control their blood sugar not only throughout the day, but at any individual point in the day as well. While juicing can be safe if you focus on nonstarchy, or low-carbohydrate, vegetables and limit diabetes-friendly fruits , the overall carbs in juices can add up quickly, Chong says. Consuming too many carbs can be dangerous for people with diabetes, as theyre broken down into glucose in the blood, thereby spiking blood sugar. Blood sugar control is imperative for effective diabetes management. Anna Simos, CDE, MPH, manager of the diabetes education and prevention program at Continue reading >>

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

Along with a diabetes-healthy diet, diabetics may consume certain fruit juices, but in moderation. Whole fruits, however, are a better and healthier choice than juices. Juice and Diabetes Juices, such as grapefruit juice, pineapple juice and orange juice, if taken in moderation, are considered appropriate for diabetics. All types of citrus fruit juices are superfood for diabetics as they are nutrient-rich, says American Diabetes Association (ADA). Apart from citrus juices, diabetics may also drink apple juice for it is rich in fibre, lemon juice as it is low on carbs, tomato juice as it is low on sugar content and carrot juice as it is juiced raw. All fruit juices, however, also contain significant amount of sugar, which can cause blood sugar levels to spike. Therefore, moderate consumption of fruit juices is advised. Carbs from juices also adds to your total intake of carbohydrates for the day. Having juice along with the meal can surely reduce the effects of sugar content of the juice. While citrus juices are low on Glycemic Index table, pineapple and orange juice is rated 46 and grapefruit juice is rated 48. Factors Diabetics should Consider Consumption of carbs present in the juices results in increased blood sugar levels, though the impact varies from individual to individual. Here are a few points that diabetics should consider if they wish to consume juices or other beverages. The recommended amount of a fruit or any other drink is 4 oz. per day. Drinking juices separately can lead to quicker spike in blood glucose level. Added sugar in the juices is a major concern for the diabetic’s well-being. Fruit and vegetable juice prepared with the original pulp is a good choice for diabetics. Two of the best juices for diabetics include apple and carrot juice. Recommen Continue reading >>

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn't have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it's as close as a tap. If you're after something tastier, though, you've got options. Some tempting or seemingly healthy drinks aren't great for you, but you can make swaps or easy homemade versions of many of them. These tasty treats can fit into your diabetes diet and still satisfy your cravings. 1. Chocolate Milk This treat may remind you of the school lunchroom, but it’s a good calcium-rich choice for grown-ups as well. Low-fat chocolate milk can be a good post-workout recovery drink. The bad news: Ready-made brands come packed with sugar. Try this at home: Mix 1% milk, 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder, and 2 tablespoons of the zero-calorie sweetener of your choice. It saves you 70 calories, 16 grams of carbs, and 2 grams of fat compared to 1 cup of store-bought, reduced-fat chocolate milk. 2. Sweet Tea A 16-ounce fast-food version might have up to 36 grams of carbs. That’s a lot of sugar, especially when there are carb-free choices, like sugar-free iced tea or iced tea crystals, that are just as satisfying. But you can also easily make your own: Steep tea with your favorite crushed fruit (raspberries are a good choice). Strain, chill, and then sweeten with your choice of no-calorie sugar substitute. That’s a tall glass of refreshment. 6. Hot Chocolate It’s the ultimate in decadent drinks. Coffeehouse-style versions of this classic are packed with carbs. A typical medium hot chocolate made with low-fat milk has 60 grams. Good news: You can make your own satisfying mug for less than half that. Mix 1 cup of low-fat milk with 2 squares of 70% dark chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, and a little cinnamon. Melt in a saucepan, and enjoy it for only 23 grams of carbs. It seems like a he Continue reading >>

3 Juicing Recipes For Diabetics That Will Actually Lower Your Blood Glucose Level

3 Juicing Recipes For Diabetics That Will Actually Lower Your Blood Glucose Level

It seems like everybody knows someone who has diabetes. It could be a friend, relative or even an acquaintance. That isn’t surprising because diabetes is an epidemic. In this article, I’ll briefly talk about diabetes, the causes and how you can potentially reverse this through juicing and the right diet. If my father who is in his early seventies was able to do it you can too. Disclaimer: These recipes (particularly the first one) are so potent (when combined with medication) that it can excessively lower down blood sugar level to dangerously low levels. Please do your due diligence and have a regular blood test to monitor blood glucose level. These recipes will work best with type-2 diabetes. If you check out the statistics in Diabetes.org close to 30 million Americans have diabetes and that number is rising with around 1.7 million new cases per year. As of 2014, over 347 million people worldwide have diabetes, if that number doesn’t scream epidemic I don’t know what will. This is close to my heart because my father, brother and uncle have diabetes and if I’m not careful I might get it too. If you want jump straight to the recipes, click here. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where our bodies have elevated blood sugar levels because of two things – (1) the body does not produce insulin or (2) it does not respond well to insulin. The first form of diabetes I described is type-1 diabetes, the 2nd which I’ll be talking about here is type-2 diabetes which accounts for 90 to 95% of diabetes cases. We have to take this condition seriously because once you have it your whole life changes. Depending on the type of diabetes you have, you may either have to have oral medication, insulin shots or both. Diabetes left undiagnosed is a silent killer because th Continue reading >>

Juices That Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics

Juices That Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics

Living with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) involves limiting foods that could raise blood sugar to high levels. Juice can be a part of an overall healthy diet in limited amounts. Keeping serving sizes to 4 ounces or less -- about 1/2 cup -- limits the carbohydrate load. Fruit juice is sometimes helpful to treat low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, due to the fast absorption of the sugar. The nutrient quality of juices varies, so it's helpful to know which juices are healthier choices. There are also alternatives to drinking plain juice that can help limit your carbohydrate intake. Video of the Day Vegetable juice is a lower-carbohydrate alternative to fruit juice. For example, a 4-ounce glass of a tomato-based vegetable juice contains 5.5 g of carbohydrate. However, a 4-ounce serving of a similar vegetable-fruit juice blend typically has 13.7 g of carbohydrate. Low-level inflammation is a contributing factor to insulin resistance and T2DM, particularly in people who are overweight. The authors of a June 2013 "British Journal of Nutrition" study report found that overweight and obese women experienced reduced inflammation after drinking about 1.5 cups of tomato juice daily for 3 weeks. These findings suggest that tomato-based vegetable juice and tomato juice can be good, low-carbohydrate juice options -- and might assist in reducing inflammation. When choosing a fruit juice, the American Diabetes Association recommends 100 percent fruit juice with no added sugar. Pomegranate, cranberry and grape juice all contain a high concentration of antioxidants, according to research published in January 2010 in "Nutrition Journal." Foods rich in antioxidants might help prevent or limit damage caused by an overabundance of free radicals, chemicals that can injure cells. Excess accumulation of Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Fruit Juice While whole fruits are a healthy, fiber-rich carbohydrate option for diabetics, the same can’t be said for fruit juice. They may offer more nutritional benefit than soda and other sugary drinks, but fruit juices — even 100 percent fruit juices — are chock full of fruit sugar, and therefore cause a sharp spike in blood sugar. Skipping the glass of juice and opting for the fiber-packed whole fruit counterpart will help you maintain healthy blood sugar levels and fill you up on fewer calories, aiding in weight loss. For a refreshing and healthy drink alternative, choose zero-calorie plain or naturally-flavored seltzer and jazz it up with a wedge of lemon or lime. Continue reading >>

How Juicing These 20 Foods Can Prevent Or Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How Juicing These 20 Foods Can Prevent Or Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes type 2 is caused by years of faulty eating. Begin to include plenty fresh plant foods in your dietary and bring it under control, maybe even reverse it. Understanding Diabetes Mellitus Doctors often use the full term “Diabetes Mellitus” rather than “diabetes” alone, to distinguish this disorder from “Diabetes Insipidus” which is another rare disease that does not affect blood sugar levels. There are two types of diabetes mellitus: Type I: Known as juvenile diabetes, occurs when the pancreas fails to produce adequate insulin. Insulin is the hormone used by the body to make blood sugar (glucose) available to cells. Recent evidence reported by John Hopkins University suggests that consumption of dairy products by sensitive children causes the immune cells to respond with excessive aggressiveness to antigens in cow’s milk. These antigens may attach themselves to cells in the pancreas. Once attached, the antigens are attacked by immune cells that, in the process, destroy both the antigens and the pancreatic cells that produce insulin. Most people who have type I diabetes develop this disorder before age 30. Type II: The most common form of diabetes, usually occurs in adulthood in people older than forty; but these days, the age number is getting smaller and smaller. For most adult-onset diabetics, the pancreas actually produces more insulin than is necessary, at least in the early stages of the illness. Dietary fat and cholesterol infiltrate the blood and block insulin from making glucose available to cells. As the disorder continues, the pancreas weakens, and production of insulin diminishes until insulin injections may be prescribed. Constantly overeating the wrong kinds of foods over the years is the main risk factor for developing type II diabetes. Continue reading >>

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

Tweet Fruit juice has, until recently, been considered a great way to get your five a day. people with diabetes need to moderate their fruit juice intake as larger glasses of juice can substantially raise blood sugar levels. The key is to In addition, more recently, regular consumption of fruit juice has been linked with an increase in type 2 diabetes risk. What's in fruit juice? Aside from vitamin C and calcium, fruit juice contains: Calories - 250ml glass of unsweetened orange juice typically contains around 100 calories, compared to the 60 calories in an actual orange Fructose (a form of sugar) - half a pint of fruit juice contains more sugar than the World Health Organisation recommends ideally having in a day (30g of sugar for men, 24g for women) A lack of fibre - juice always contains less fibre than whole fruit and highly processed juices may not contain any fibre How does this affect my diabetes? Badly, is the short answer. Sugar levels in fruit juice can cause a significant spike in blood sugar levels, increasing the risk of hyperglycemia. The glycemic index, which is used to reflect the impact on blood sugar levels of individual foods, places orange juice between 66 and 76 on a scale of 100. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice doesn't offer much fibre. (it's stripped away in the juicing process). Fibre is a kind of carbohydrate that, because the body doesn't break it down, is calorie-free, so it doesn't affect your blood sugar, making it important for people with diabetes. Soluble fibre can help lower your cholesterol levels and improve blood glucose control if eaten in large amounts. Apples, oranges, and pears all contain soluble fibre, but not when juiced. Is fruit juice all bad for people with diabetes? Fruit juice has some benefits for people wi Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Orange Juice?

Can Diabetics Drink Orange Juice?

If you’re living with diabetes, caution around what you eat and drink is natural. Certain foods like sugary sodas are clearly off the cards. But when fresh produce and fiber are recommended, or your sugar levels are dipping, is it okay to reach for a glass of orange juice? What’s In Your Orange Juice? A fresh squeezed glass of orange juice contains 112 kcal, 20.83 gm of sugars, and 25.79 gm of carbohydrates. This 248 gm serving also delivers lots of calcium and vitamin C, as well as nutrients like potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin A and folate. These minerals and vitamins are important for a range of normal body functions and also have antioxidant properties that make them good for health.1 Yet, there is concern around whether or not diabetics should even be considering having the juice due to the sugar and carb content in a glass of OJ(orange juice). Should Diabetics Be Worried? The American Diabetes Association recommends drinking low calorie(or even zero calorie drinks) like plain water or unsweetened tea and coffee. When you need a cool drink, they suggest water with a squeeze of lime. Flavored water with orange slices could work just as well. But what about orange juice?2 The Association advises against consuming sugary drinks of any kind, and that could well mean your favorite packaged orange juice doesn’t pass muster. In fact, some fruit juices can be as high in natural sugars as sodas, even if they don’t have any added sugar in them.3 If you’re watching your diet and taking care not to have high glycemic index(GI) foods which increase blood glucose levels quickly (causing a potentially dangerous spike in sugar levels), then aim for foods with a glycemic load of 10 and under. These are low GI foods. Once the GI goes over 20, they’re considered Continue reading >>

Pomegranate Helps Diabetic Hearts

Pomegranate Helps Diabetic Hearts

Aug. 29, 2006 -- Drinking pomegranate juice may help people with diabetesdiabetes reduce their risk of heart diseaseheart disease. A preliminary new study shows that people with diabetes who drank pomegranate juice for three months had a lower risk of atherosclerosis -- or hardening of the arteries. In addition, the pomegranate juice appeared to slow the absorption of unhealthy LDL cholesterolLDL cholesterol by immune cells. People with diabetes have increased risk for atherosclerosis, which contributes to coronary heart disease, heart attacks, strokes, and other circulation problems. These results suggest that the antioxidants found in pomegranate juice may be especially beneficial in reducing these heart-related risks associated with diabetes. "In most juices, sugars are present in free -- and harmful -- forms," says researcher Michael Aviram, of the Technion Faculty of Medicine in Haifa, Israel, in a news release. "In pomegranate juice, however, the sugars are attached to unique antioxidants, which actually make these sugars protective against atherosclerosis." People with diabetes aren't able to process sugars normally and are advised to monitor their intake of food and beverages high in natural or processed sugars, including fruit juice. Pomegranate Juice Reduces Diabetes RisksIn the small study, published in the journal Atherosclerosis, researchers examined the effects of drinking a specially prepared concentrated pomegranate juice that is the equivalent to about a 6-ounce glass of "single strength pomegranate juice, just as it is when you squeeze the pomegranate and get the juice," Aviram tells WebMD by email, every day for three months in 10 healthy adults and 10 adults with type 2 diabetes (who were not dependent on insulin therapy). Drinking pomegranate juice Continue reading >>

Juicing For Diabetics Juice That Works!

Juicing For Diabetics Juice That Works!

Juicing for diabetics can be very helpful in controlling blood sugar. Fresh vegetable juice is loaded with antioxidants, phytochemicals and hopefully trace minerals. Vegetable juice is beneficial for normalizing blood sugar, plus fresh vegetable juice can be a key ingredient in a weight loss program. However, there are certain juicing ingredients that are especially helpful to diabetics. GREEN APPLE may help to slow carbohydrate digestion, slow glucose absorption, and stimulate the pancreas. Green apples are lower in sugar than red apples, but should still be used sparingly when juicing for diabetes. ASPARAGUS may help to regulate blood sugar levels. GREEN BEANS may help to stabilize blood sugar. BITTER MELON contains Charantin, Polypeptide P, and Oleanolic Acid Glycosides which may help to lower blood sugar. BLUEBERRIES are wonderful for juicing for diabetics. They are high in phyto-chemicals, and may help prevent type 2 diabetes and improve insulin sensitivity. BROCCOLI has more vitamin C than an orange, contains beta-carotene, promotes healthy vision, is anti-inflammatory, and has nutrients that support detox. It is a wonderful addition when juicing for diabetics. CARROTS may help to stimulate and improve overall liver function, and may help reduce insulin resistance. Yes, carrots have quite a bit of sugar, so go easy on these. CELERY may help to cleanse the digestive system of uric acid. CRANBERRIES help to fight inflammation, and may be beneficial for those battling with diabetes. FRENCH GREEN BEANS. Juice or eat at least 4 a day. French green beans are said to help prevent macular degeneration and reduce pressure in the eyes. If you have a garden, why not plant a 3 or 4 foot row, providing a trellis for them to climb on, from which you may gather a few fresh Frenc Continue reading >>

Should I Drink Fruit Juice?

Should I Drink Fruit Juice?

If my blood glucose goes low, drinking orange juice can help raise it. But how about drinking orange juice when my blood sugar level is normal? I’m concerned that it will raise my sugar too much. So I’ve been staying away from fruit juices and just eat the fruit itself. Continue reading >>

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